U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                        Mission

               The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to
               protect human health and the environment.
Introduction and Overview

The Agency's  FY  2013  budget  request
supports the Administration's commitment
to ensure that all Americans are protected
from significant risks to human health and
protect  the  environment where they live,
learn and work. The EPA's work touches on
the lives  of every single American, every
single day as we protect the environment for
our children,  but  also for our children's
children. The mission, day in and day out, is
to protect the health of the American people
by keeping pollution  out  of  the  air  we
breathe, toxins out of the water we drink and
swim in, and harmful  chemicals out of the
food we eat and the lands  where we build
our homes  and  our communities.  We  are
committed  to  advancing  environmental
justice and achieving transparency in agency
decision-making  as  an integral   part   of
achieving our mission.

Environmental challenges and health threats
have the capacity to limit  opportunity and
hold   back  the   progress    of   entire
communities.  Recent  events such  as  the
radiation  released  after  the earthquake  in
Japan  and  the  environmental  impact  of
large-scale disasters, both natural and man-
made, reinforce the  critical importance  of
fulfilling the EPA's  mission and providing
the safeguards that  the American people
look to the Agency to deliver. We will meet
these challenges by using the best available
scientific  information,  ensuring fair  and
effective enforcement of environmental
laws,  and providing all parts of society—
communities,  individuals,  businesses,  and
federal,    state,    local,    and   tribal
governments—access      to      accurate
information  so that they  may  participate
effectively in  managing human  health and
environmental risks.  The  EPA's  work  is
guided  by  the  best  possible   data  and
research and a commitment to transparency
and the accountability that comes with it.

To  learn  more  about how  the Agency
accomplishes   this    mission,   including
information on the  organizational  structure
and       regional      offices,       visit:
http ://www. epa.gov/aboutepa/.

FY 2013  Annual Performance Plan  and
President's Budget
(including FY 2011 Annual Performance
Report)

The EPA's FY 2013  Annual Performance
Plan and President's Budget requests $8.344
billion,  approximately  $105 million  below
FY 2012. The  Agency  recognizes  the
difficult fiscal situation that the nation  is
facing, and is  making strategic adjustments
to sustain  necessary and fundamental human
health  and environmental protection within
core resources and  programs. In preparing
the  FY  2013   President's  Budget,  we
reassessed our priorities and focused on the
most critical work of the EPA and our state
and  tribal   partners   to  maximize  the
effectiveness    of  our    resources   and
collaboration.  This  budget   reflects  our
commitment to finding ways to do our work

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
more  effectively   and  efficiently   while
achieving the  same  or potentially  better
results, and realizing cost savings.

To  support  continued  progress  toward the
most critical goals and  outcomes,  the FY
2013  request   reprioritizes   and  adjusts
funding levels.  Where possible, the Agency
is leveraging its resources by  expanding or
building new partnerships with other federal
agencies. In addition, the Agency is focusing
resources on the problems of the future and
is eliminating certain mature programs that
have accomplished their goals,  and where
there is the  possibility  of maintaining some
of  the  human  health  and environmental
benefits  through implementation  at  other
federal agencies or the state or local level
because they are well-established and well-
understood.

The EPA strives to connect the results we
have achieved to our planning and budgeting
decisions and to support our overall strategic
direction and the FY 2012 -  2013  Priority
Goals. Toward  this end, the  Agency  has
worked to integrate the FY  2011  Annual
Performance   Report    and   FY   2013
Congressional  budget  justification.   The
EPA's FY 2011 performance information is
highlighted  throughout  the budget  request,
notably  in  the  sections  titled  Program
Performance and Assessment and Overview
of FY 2011 Performance  sections, which
describe    key   accomplishments    and
challenges for the EPA's five strategic goals
and    five    cross-cutting    fundamental
strategies.

FY 2013 Funding Priorities

Improving  Air  Quality  and  Climate
Change
The EPA  is dedicated  to  protecting  and
improving the quality of the Nation's  air to
promote  public  health and   protect  the
environment.  Among  the  most  common
sources of air pollution are highway motor
vehicles  and  their fuels.  EPA's  work  to
establish   the   new   fuel   and  national
emissions standards to reduce emissions of
air pollution and educate consumers on the
ways their actions affect the environment
have led to a real success story. The national
program of fuel economy and greenhouse
gas standards  for  light-duty vehicles alone
will save approximately 12 billion barrels of
oil and prevent 6 billion metric tons of GHG
emissions over the lifetimes of the vehicles
sold through model year 2025. In FY 2013,
$102 million is provided for Federal Vehicle
and  Fuel  Standards and  Certifications.  In
addition,   Federal    Stationary    Source
Regulations work  is funded at $34 million
which includes a nearly $7 million increase
to support the development of New  Source
Performance   Standards   and   to   more
efficiently   coordinate  actions  to  meet
multiple CAA  objectives  for  controlling
both criteria and toxic air pollutants while
considering cost effectiveness, the technical
feasibility of controls, and providing greater
certainty for regulated industry.

We will continue to address the impacts of
climate change in  FY 2013. An increase of
approximately $32.8 million over the  FY
2012 Enacted  budget for climate  protection
will  allow the Agency to support the full
range of approaches to reducing GHGs and
the risks its effects  pose to human health and
the  environment  and  to  property.  This
increase    includes  $26.5  million   for
categorical grants  for states and tribes. The
economic  costs  of not addressing climate
change  could  include reduced productivity
through  missed work  and school  days,
increased  hospital visits,  respiratory  and
cardiovascular diseases, and even  premature
death - especially  for certain  vulnerable
populations like the elderly, the  poor, and
children.

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Protecting America's Waters

The  EPA's ecosystem protection programs
encompass a wide range of approaches that
address specific at-risk regional areas and
larger categories of threatened systems, such
as urban  waters,  estuaries,  and wetlands.
Locally generated  pollution, combined with
pollution carried by  rivers and streams and
through air deposition, can  accumulate in
these ecosystems  and  degrade them  over
time. The EPA and its federal partners along
with  states,  tribes,  municipalities,   and
private  parties,  will  continue efforts to
restore the integrity of the imperiled waters
of the United States. In FY 2013, EPA will
fund the Great Lakes Restoration  Initiative
at $300  million,  maintaining FY   2012
enacted  funding  levels,   and  fund  the
Chesapeake Bay program at $72.6 million, a
$15 million increase over FY 2012 levels.

Sustainable Water Infrastructure

The  Clean Water and Drinking Water  State
Revolving  Funds are provided  $2 billion in
FY 2013.  As part of  the  Administration's
long-term strategy, the EPA is implementing
a  Sustainable Water Infrastructure Policy
that  focuses on  working  with states  and
communities   to    enhance    technical,
managerial and financial capacity. Important
to the  enhanced technical  capacity will be
alternatives  analyses   to  expand  "green
infrastructure" options  and  their  multiple
benefits. Federal dollars  provided  through
the  State Revolving Funds  will  act  as  a
catalyst for efficient system-wide planning
and  ongoing management of sustainable
water infrastructure. More fully utilizing the
revolving   fund    capitalization   grants
provided to our partners will enable  States to
build,   revive,  and  "green"   our  aging
infrastructure.
To  help  ensure that water is  safe to drink
and to address the nation's aging drinking
water infrastructure  that can  impact water
quality, $850 million for the Drinking Water
State  Revolving  Fund will  support  new
infrastructure  improvement   projects  for
public drinking water systems in FY 2013.
In concert with  the  states, the  EPA will
focus  this  affordable,  flexible  financial
assistance to support utility compliance with
safe drinking water standards.  The EPA also
will work with utilities to promote technical,
financial, and managerial  capacity  as  a
critical means to meet  infrastructure needs
and to enhance program  performance and
efficiency.

The EPA will continue to provide annual
capitalization  to   the  Clean  Water  State
Revolving Fund to enable  EPA partners to
improve   wastewater   treatment,  address
nonpoint sources  of pollution, and promote
estuary  revitalization.   Recognizing   the
expected  long-term  benefits of  healthy
aquatic systems as  economic cornerstones
vital   to    property   values,   tourism,
recreational  and  commercial  fishing,  and
hunting,  the  EPA  is  requesting  $1.175
billion in FY 2013.

Protecting Our Land

The   Superfund   program   protects   the
American  public  and  its   resources by
cleaning  up sites which pose an imminent or
long  term risk of exposure  and harm to
human health and the environment. In FY
2013, the Agency will maintain the funding
level  necessary  to respond to  emergency
releases of hazardous substances  as well as
maintain the  goal of sites achieving human
exposure and  groundwater migration under
control. In addition, as one  of the  Superfund
program's primary goals, the Agency will
continue  its  "enforcement first" policy and
identify  and  pursue  potentially responsible

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
parties  (PRPs)  to  pay  for and conduct
cleanups  at  Superfund  sites to  preserve
critical federal dollars for sites where there
are no viable contributing parties.  This will
include  negotiating  and settling with  PRPs
and  utilizing  the  special  account   funds
which the Agency  obtains  from PRPs  to
finance   site-specific   CERCLA  response
actions  in accordance with the settlement
agreement. PRP resources, state resources,
and appropriated resources are critical  to the
Superfund program.  As of the end of FY
2011, the EPA is carefully managing more
than  $1.8  billion   in   special  account
resources  and  has  developed  multi-year
plans to use these funds as expeditiously as
possible    consistent   with   applicable
requirements. The EPA will maximize all of
our available tools and resources to continue
our  Superfund  work, while  attempting  to
minimize programmatic impacts.

Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals

Ensuring  the  safety  of new  or existing
chemicals  in   commerce  to protect  the
American  people   remains  a  key  EPA
priority.  Chemicals are ubiquitous in  our
everyday lives and products.  They are used
in the production  of everything  from  our
homes and cars to the cell phones we carry
and  the food we eat. Chemicals often are
released into the environment as a result of
their  manufacture,   processing,   use,  and
disposal. FY 2013  funding will be directed
toward chemical safety, increasing support
for actions to reduce and  assess chemical
risks, and obtaining  and maximizing  the
availability  to  the   public  of  needed
information  on   potentially   hazardous
chemicals. The current  program activity
levels  continue to  leave  a backlog  of
chemicals to be tested. The FY 2013 overall
increase  of $36.4  million  to  the EPA's
chemical programs is essential to support a
crucial  stage  of the EPA's strengthened
approach to address existing chemicals that
have not been tested  for adverse health  or
environmental effects.

21st Century Enforcement

This FY 2013 budget builds upon current
efforts  to   transition  toward  using  21st
Century  technology  in  enforcement  and
compliance, resulting in  long-term  savings
to the federal government,  states, and the
regulated community  as the overall cost  of
compliance  is reduced. Investments in new
technology,  including e-reporting and more
advanced monitoring  tools,  will  allow the
EPA and our state partners  to  more easily
identify, investigate, and address the worst
violations that affect  our communities. By
embracing  new approaches to  harness 21st
century technology tools, the Agency will
meet   our   goals   more  effectively  and
efficiently.

In FY 2013, the  Agency will redirect  or
refocus approximately $36  million  within
the enforcement and  compliance programs
in order to transform and  modernize our
approach    to   enforcing   the   nation's
environmental laws. This  effort will enhance
the EPA's  ability  to  detect violations that
impact  public  health,  reduce transaction
costs  for the regulated  community,  and
better engage the public to drive behavioral
changes  in  compliance. The  EPA  will
promote  e-reporting by implementing new
technologies,  develop   and   disseminate
advanced monitoring tools, upgrade agency
IT infrastructure to exploit  more fully the
wealth  of   new  monitoring   data,  and
modernize    the   EPA's   approach    to
enforcement by ensuring new and existing
rules incorporate electronic reporting. In FY
2013, as a key element of this approach, we
will  assist   states  in  modifying their data
systems to implement e-reporting with their

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
regulated  facilities,  leading  to  improved
compliance and transparency.

Supporting State and Tribal Partners

Supporting our state and tribal partners, the
primary  implementers   of  environmental
programs  on  the  ground,  is a  long-held
priority of the EPA. Funding to states and
tribes  in the  State  and Tribal  Assistance
Grants (STAG) account continues to be the
largest  percentage  of  the EPA's budget
request, at 40% in FY 2013. For Categorical
Grants, $1.2 billion is provided, reaffirming
the  EPA's   commitment   to  states  that
implement rules and rely on Federal funding
to maintain core environmental programs in
light of state funding uncertainties. At $114
million over FY 2012 Enacted levels, this
budget  request  for  Categorical  Grants
provides increases of $66 million  for State
and  Local Air Quality  Management, $27
million for Pollution  Control,  and  $29
million for Tribal GAP.

As part of the Agency's  commitment  to
tribes,  we  are  proposing  a $29  million
increase over the FY 2012  enacted levels to
enhance the  Tribal  General  Assistance
Program (GAP)  resources.  This  funding
level  for GAP grants  will  build Tribal
capacity and  assists tribes in  leveraging
other EPA and federal funding to contribute
towards   a   higher   overall  level   of
environmental and human health protection.

Expanding    Partnership   with   Other
Federal Agencies

The EPA continues to work with its partners
across  the  federal  government to leverage
resources  and avoid duplication  of efforts
and maximize  the effect of federal resources
in environmental protection. For example, to
support sustainability efforts,  the EPA has
joined   forces  with  the  Department   of
Transportation  (DOT) and the Department
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
to   align   housing,   transportation   and
environmental   investments   through   a
Partnership  for Sustainable  Communities.
Adding  to  that  effort,  the  Brownfields
program  has  become  a  laboratory  for
innovation  in   sustainable   development
where efforts to remediate polluted sites and
make  them  available  for  reuse  by  the
community     often     includes     green
infrastructure,  Smart  Growth  principles,
efficient building techniques, or other steps
towards building a sustainable city.

Building  on   the  existing   collaboration
efforts  to protect or  restore the nation's
waters,  the  EPA  and US  Department  of
Agriculture  (USDA) will enhance existing
coordination efforts  in  reducing non-point
source pollution.  The Agency also recently
joined  ten  other  federal   agencies   in
launching   the   Urban   Waters   Federal
Partnership, aimed at transforming urban
waters into  neighborhood centerpieces and
foundations   for   sustainable   economic
growth. The EPA will continue to work with
the Department of Energy (DOE) and the
US   Geological  Survey  (USGS)  on   a
Hydraulic  Fracturing  Study of  potential
impacts on drinking water.

Priority Science and Research

Science  and research continue to be  the
foundation of all our work at the EPA. The
Office  of  Research  and  Development's
integrated      and       cross-disciplinary
organization  of  the   scientific  research
programs provides a systems  perspective.
This   perspective   is   critical  to   the
performance of the EPA and increases the
benefits from high quality science. Superior
science leads to shared solutions; everyone
benefits  from  clean  air and clean  water.
Rigorous  science   leads   to  innovative

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
solutions   to    complex    environmental
challenges.  In  FY  2013,  the  EPA  is
refocusing resources to support  a  Southern
New  England  Program  for  Innovative
Estuarine Approaches, and advancing efforts
in  both  lifecycle  chemical  safety  and
sustainable molecular design.

The Southern New England Program  for
Innovative  Estuarine   Approaches   will
develop innovative scientific and  technical
solutions to inform policies,  environmental
management   structures,   and   business
approaches to ensure  the  sustainability  of
our  coastal   watersheds  and   estuaries.
Additional  funding   is   for   sustainable
molecular design  of chemicals  to develop
inherently  safer  process and products that
minimize or eliminate the associated adverse
impacts   on  human   health   and   the
environment.  This effort will provide new
principles for alternative chemical  design
and reduce the likelihood of unwanted toxic
effects   of   nanomaterials   and   other
chemicals.

The EPA  also will continue to  build  on
current  research  to   study  the  potential
impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking
water.  Building  on  ongoing research,  the
$14  million total  request in FY 2013  for
hydraulic  fracturing research will  begin  an
effort   to  assess  additional   questions
regarding  the safety of hydraulic fracturing.
The research will be coordinated with DOE
and    USGS    under    a    developing
Memorandum   of Understanding  which
emphasizes the  expertise of each Federal
partner, and will include an  assessment of
potential air,  ecosystem, and water quality
impacts of hydraulic fracturing. The EPA
also will release  an Interim  Report  on the
Impacts   of  Hydraulic   Fracturing   on
Drinking Water Resources in 2012.
Eliminations and Efficiencies

Recognizing the tight limits on discretionary
spending across government, the EPA has
evaluated  and  reprioritized  its work and
made necessary adjustments to focus FY
2013 resources toward the Agency's highest
priorities  and most critical  needs.  These
reductions   and   eliminations   and  the
projected  impacts are described in  fuller
detail in appropriate sections of the FY 2013
Annual Plan and Congressional Justification
and in the 2013 Cuts, Consolidations, and
Savings (CCS) Volume  of the President's
Budget   which   identifies   lower-priority
program  activities in accordance with the
GPRA  Modernization   Act,  31  U.S.C.
1115(b)(10).  The  public  can access the
volume                                at:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget.

The EPA continues to examine its programs
to find those that have served their purpose
and  accomplished their  mission.  The FY
2013  President's  Budget  eliminates   a
number  of programs totaling  $50  million
including:    the    Clean     Automotive
Technology Program;  Beaches Protection
categorical     grants;      Environmental
Education; State Indoor Radon Grants; the
Support to Other Federal Agencies program
within Superfund; and the Fibers program.

Building on  the  work  undertaken in FY
2011 and planned for FY 2012, the Agency
is examining  how  it  can  do  its  work
differently,   both   programmatically   and
administratively, to achieve efficiencies and
results.  To  complement these  near-term
efforts, the EPA also is undertaking a series
of important steps to lay the groundwork for
longer-term  efficiencies,  to move toward  a
21st  century  EPA.  Major projects include
enhancing   collaboration  tools   and  IT
systems,  evaluating  and  consolidating or
reconfiguring our space, and  establishing

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Regional or national Centers of Expertise,
all of which will help ensure the best use of
human and financial resources. The EPA is
continuing  the effort  to  analyze  staffing
levels  and  deploy  human  resources  to
achieve  the   Agency's   mission   more
effectively and efficiently.

The  Agency's  funding  request reflects  its
commitment   to   reducing  discretionary
spending across government. In response to
government-wide    calls  for   promoting
efficient spending, such as the Campaign to
Cut   Waste   and  Executive  Order  on
Promoting Efficient Spending, the Agency
will reduce spending by an aggregate of 20
percent on  advisory  contracts,  printing,
travel, and IT devices by the end of FY 2013
compared to FY 2010. The EPA will do this
by:  providing  as  many documents  and
reports  electronically rather  than printing
thousands  of pages  of paper,  saving money
and  reducing the Agency's  environmental
footprint;  reducing overall   agency  travel
ceiling   by    27   percent    by   using
videoconferences, reducing the number of
overall meetings  and combining  meetings;
and  managing   spending   on   EPA-held
conferences by using  government-owned
space and technology to achieve savings.

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                          Environmental Protection Agency

              FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification

                           APPROPRIATION SUMMARY
                                  Budget Authority
                                (Dollars in Thousands)


Science & Technology

Environmental Program & Management

Inspector General

Building and Facilities

Oil Spill Response

Superfund Program
IG Transfer
S&T Transfer
Hazardous Substance Superfund

Leaking Underground Storage Tanks

State and Tribal Assistance Grants

SUB-TOTAL, EPA

Rescission of Prior Year Funds
SUB-TOTAL, EPA (INCLUDING
RESCISSIONS)
Recovery Act - EPM
Recovery Act - IG
Recovery Act Resources
TOTAL, EPA
FY2011
Actuals

$877,269.5

$2,883,566.0

$46,627.9

$38,523.8

$19,680.7

$1,413,818.5
$8,943.7
$27,506.1
$1,450,268.3

$118,851.3

$4,555,997.5

$9,990,785.0

$0.0
$9,990,785.0
$31,546.9
$3,664.8
$35,211.7
$10,025,996.7





























FY 2012
Enacted

$793,728.0

$2,678,222.0

$41,933.0

$36,370.0

$18,245.0

$1,180,890.0
$9,939.0
$22,979.0
$1,213,808.0

$104,142.0

$3,612,937.0

$8,499,385.0

($50,000.0)
$8,449,385.0


$0.0
$8,449,385.0





























FY 2013
Pres Budget

$807,257.0

$2,817,179.0

$48,273.0

$41,969.0

$23,531.0

$1,142,342.0
$10,864.0
$23,225.0
$1,176,431.0

$104,117.0

$3,355,723.0

$8,374,480.0

($30,000.0)
$8,344,480.0


$0.0
$8,344,480.0
*For ease of comparison, Superfund transfer resources for the audit and research functions are
shown in the Superfund account.

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                          Environmental Protection Agency
           FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification

                           APPROPRIATION SUMMARY
                              Full-time Equivalents (FTE)


Science & Technology

Science and Tech. - Reim

Environmental Program & Management

Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim

Inspector General

Oil Spill Response

Super fund Program
IG Transfer
S&T Transfer
Hazardous Substance Superfund

Superfund Reimbursables

Leaking Underground Storage Tanks

WCF-Reimbursable

FIFRA

Pesticide Registration Fund

UIC Injection Well Permit BLM

TOTAL, EPA

FY 2011
Actuals

2,452.9

1.1

10,802.1

38.1

264.9

110.4

2,927.5
49.9
106.4
3,083.8

97.2

67.0

126.8

136.3

54.3

3.0

17,237.9


































FY 2012
Enacted

2,432.7

1.5

10,735.1

0.0

293.0

101.0

2,945.3
65.1
105.3
3,115.7

43.7

69.7

141.6

150.0

0.0

0.0

17,084.0


































FY 2013
Pres Budget

2,471.4

1.5

10,758.6

0.0

300.0

118.5

2,883.4
65.8
106.4
3,055.6

48.7

68.1

141.6

145.0

0.0

0.0

17,109.0

*For ease of comparison, Superfund transfer resources for the audit and research functions are
shown in the Superfund account.

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification
GOAL, APPROPRIATION SUMMARY
Budget Authority
(Dollars in Thousands)

Taking Action on Climate Change and
Improving Air Quality
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Inspector General
Building and Facilities
Hazardous Substance Superfund
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Protecting America's Waters
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Inspector General
Building and Facilities
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing
Sustainable Development
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Inspector General
Building and Facilities
Oil Spill Response
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and
Preventing Pollution
Science & Technology

FY 2011
Actuals
$1,175,293.2
$300,827.8
$508,524.5
$4,732.7
$9,136.6
$4,067.2
$348,004.4
$5,085,863.7
$156,935.6
$1,086,528.0
$37,534.1
$6,154.3
$3,798,711.8
$2,246,381.2
$211,339.8
$361,566.4
$4,546.6
$7,538.9
$17,282.2
$1,183,400.3
$118,117.4
$342,589.8
$697,917.4
$189,347.3
10
FY 2012
Enacted
$1,026,168.9
$259,586.9
$459,629.4
$5,546.6
$8,625.3
$4,089.9
$288,690.7
$4,094,452.5
$148,848.5
$968,153.2
$25,490.1
$5,975.0
$2,945,985.7
$1,931,053.3
$187,061.8
$333,896.6
$5,408.2
$7,218.9
$15,729.3
$960,699.1
$103,291.6
$317,748.0
$662,826.3
$180,156.6

FY 2013
Pres Budget
$1,124,580.5
$270,745.7
$499,317.5
$7,170.6
$10,178.8
$4,428.8
$332,739.1
$3,782,228.0
$150,595.4
$982,243.2
$27,573.0
$6,891.6
$2,614,924.7
$1,937,998.6
$182,851.0
$346,461.8
$6,578.8
$8,199.5
$20,342.8
$926,024.8
$103,265.7
$344,274.2
$699,261.0
$184,540.7


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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan


Environmental Program & Management
Inspector General
Building and Facilities
Hazardous Substance Superfund
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Enforcing Environmental Laws
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Inspector General
Building and Facilities
Oil Spill Response
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Sub-Total
Rescission of Prior Year Funds
Total
FY 2011
Actuals
$452,722.3
$2,008.4
$10,898.5
$6,158.2
$36,782.8
$820,541.2
$18,819.0
$505,771.7
$1,471.0
$4,795.6
$2,398.5
$256,642.7
$733.9
$29,908.7
$10,025,996.7
$0.0
$10,025,996.7
FY 2012
Enacted
$428,138.4
$3,021.3
$9,991.2
$7,293.0
$34,225.8
$784,884.0
$18,074.2
$488,404.4
$2,466.9
$4,559.6
$2,515.7
$241,726.1
$850.4
$26,286.8
$8,499,385.0
($50,000.0)
$8,449,385.0
FY 2013
Pres Budget
$456,289.1
$3,759.0
$11,455.5
$7,638.1
$35,578.6
$830,411.9
$18,524.2
$532,867.4
$3,191.6
$5,243.6
$3,188.2
$238,339.3
$851.3
$28,206.4
$8,374,480.0
($30,000.0)
$8,344,480.0
                                             11

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification
GOAL, APPROPRIATION SUMMARY
Authorized Full-time Equivalents


Taking Action on Climate Change and
Improving Air Quality
Science & Technology
Science and Tech. - Reim
Environmental Program & Management
Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim
Inspector General
Hazardous Substance Superfund
WCF-REIMB
Protecting America's Waters
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim
Inspector General
WCF-REIMB
UIC Injection Well Permit BLM
Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing
Sustainable Development
Science & Technology
Science and Tech. - Reim
Environmental Program & Management
Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim
Inspector General
Oil Spill Response
Oil Spill Response - Reim
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Superfund Reimbursables
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
WCF-REIMB
FY 2011
Actuals

2,773.5
767.4
0.0
1,928.6
2.6
27.6
17.7
29.7
3,510.3
480.7
2,775.9
9.2
218.5
23.0
3.0

4,452.5
539.0
0.9
1,699.9
10.5
26.5
74.9
20.3
1,906.6
86.2
63.5
24.3
(FTE)
FY 2012
Enacted

2,719.0
759.3
1.5
1,868.0
0.0
38.8
18.6
32.8
3,423.6
490.2
2,728.3
0.0
178.1
27.1
0.0

4,328.2
525.0
0.0
1,647.6
0.0
37.8
83.7
0.0
1,898.2
43.7
65.0
27.2

FY 2013
Pres Budget

2,783.1
777.3
1.5
1,907.2
0.0
44.6
18.9
33.6
3,418.9
497.1
2,723.6
0.0
171.4
26.8
0.0

4,342.1
532.3
0.0
1,628.2
0.0
40.9
100.4
0.0
1,901.6
48.7
63.3
26.7
                                             12

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan


Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and
Preventing Pollution
Science & Technology
Science and Tech. - Reim
Environmental Program & Management
Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim
Inspector General
Hazardous Substance Superfund
WCF-REIMB
Pesticide Registration Fund
Rereg. & Exped. Proc. Rev Fund
Enforcing Environmental Laws
Science & Technology
Environmental Program & Management
Envir. Program & Mgmt - Reim
Inspector General
Oil Spill Response
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Superfund Reimbursables
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
WCF-REIMB
FY 2011
Actuals
2,734.4
579.5
0.2
1,886.8
14.0
11.7
17.7
34.0
54.3
136.3
3,888.4
86.4
2,604.2
1.9
8.6
15.2
1,141.8
11.0
3.5
15.9
FY 2012
Enacted
2,680.0
568.0
0.0
1,882.6
0.0
21.1
22.0
36.3
0.0
150.0
3,933.2
90.2
2,608.6
0.0
17.2
17.3
1,176.9
0.0
4.7
18.2
FY 2013
Pres Budget
2,679.9
573.5
0.0
1,879.4
0.0
23.4
22.5
36.1
0.0
145.0
3,885.0
91.1
2,620.2
0.0
19.8
18.1
1,112.6
0.0
4.8
18.3
Total                                          17,359.2          17,084.0          17,109.0
                                                 13

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
               FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013  Annual Performance Plan  and
Congressional Justification

Taking Action  on Climate Change  and
Improving Air Quality

Reduce  greenhouse  gas  emissions  and
develop  adaptation  strategies  to  address
climate change, and protect and improve air
quality

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES:
   •   Reduce the threats posed by climate
       change by reducing greenhouse gas
emissions and taking actions that
help communities  and ecosystems
become more  resilient to the effects
of climate change
Achieve  and  maintain health-based
air  pollution  standards  and  reduce
risk  from toxic air pollutants and
indoor air contaminants.
Restore  the  earth's  stratospheric
ozone  layer and protect the public
from  the harmful  effects  of UV
radiation.
Minimize unnecessary  releases  of
radiation  and  be  prepared   to
minimize  impacts  should  unwanted
releases occur.
                           GOAL, OBJECTIVE SUMMARY
                                    Budget Authority
                                  Full-time Equivalents
                                 (Dollars in Thousands)
                                                                   FY 2013 Pres Budget
Taking Action on Climate Change
and Improving Air Quality
Address Climate Change
Improve Air Quality
Restore the Ozone Layer
Reduce Unnecessary Exposure to
Radiation
   Total Authorized Workyears
FY 2011
Actuals
$1,175,293.2
$200,978.6
$913,282.5
$18,007.6
$43,024.5
2,773.5
FY 2012
Enacted
$1,026,168.9
$200,463.4
$768,929.3
$17,998.3
$38,778.0
2,719.0
FY 2013
Pres Budget
$1,124,580.5
$240,278.6
$825,362.2
$18,528.3
$40,411.4
2,783.1
V.
FY 2012 1
$98,411.6
$39,815.2
$56,432.9
$530.0
$1,633.4
64.1
                                           14

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Introduction

The EPA has dedicated itself to protecting
and improving the quality of the Nation's air
to promote public  health  and  protect the
environment.  Air pollution concerns  are
diverse   and   significant,   and   include:
greenhouse  gases  (GHGs)  and  climate
change,  outdoor and indoor  air  quality,
stratospheric ozone depletion, and radiation
protection.

Since  passage  of  the  Clean Air  Act
Amendments in 1990, nationwide air quality
has  improved  significantly.  Despite  this
progress,   in  2010  about   124  million
Americans  (about   40%   of  the   US
population)  lived in counties with air  that
did not meet health-based standards  for at
least one  pollutant. Long-term exposure to
elevated levels of certain  air pollutants has
been  associated  with  increased  risk  of
cancer, premature mortality, and damage to
the  immune,   neurological,  reproductive,
cardiovascular,  and  respiratory  systems.
Short-term exposure  to elevated levels of
certain air pollutants can exacerbate asthma
and lead to other adverse health effects and
economic  costs  including;  the  impacts
associated with increased air pollution levels
affect productivity and the economy through
missed work and school days. Degradation
of views  in  national and state  parks is
difficult to quantify but is likely to impact
tourism and quality of life.

The issues of highest importance facing the
air program over the next few years will
continue to be  ozone  and particulate  air
pollution,  including  interstate transport of
these   air  pollutants;   emissions  from
transportation  sources; toxic air pollutants;
indoor air pollutants;  and GHGs. The EPA
uses  a  variety  of  approaches  to  reduce
pollutants  in  indoor  and   outdoor  air.
Strategies  include   traditional   regulatory
tools; innovative market-based techniques;
public-   and  private-sector  partnerships;
community-based   approaches;   voluntary
programs  that   promote   environmental
stewardship;  and programs that  encourage
cost-effective technologies and practices.

Among the most  common sources of  air
pollution are highway motor vehicles and
their  fuels.  The EPA establishes  national
emissions  standards  for  each  of  these
sources to reduce emissions of air pollution.
The  Agency also  provides emissions and
fuel economy information for new cars, and
educates   consumers  on  the  ways  their
actions affect the environment. The EPA's
Renewable  Fuel  Standard  program  and
motor vehicle  greenhouse gas  standards
have  already begun  changing  the  cars
Americans drive and the  fuels they use. The
supply and diversity of biofuels in America
is growing every year, and  a new  generation
of   automobile   technologies,   including
several new plug-in hybrids and  all-electric
vehicles,  continues to "hit the road."

The EPA is responsible for establishing test
procedures  needed  to   estimate  the  fuel
economy of new vehicles,  and for verifying
car manufacturers'  data  on  fuel economy
and  pollutant emissions.  The Agency  is
completing efforts to increase its testing and
certification capacity to ensure  that  new
vehicles,    engines,   and   fuels   are   in
compliance  with  new  vehicle  and  fuel
standards.   In   particular,   compared   to
conventional vehicles, advanced technology
vehicles   like   Plug-in   Hybrid  Electric
Vehicles   (PHEV)   and   Battery  Electric
Vehicles   (EV)  require   new,   additional
testing capabilities.  Ensuring  compliance
with the Administration's new fuel economy
and  greenhouse gas  standards is  vital  to
reducing   dependence  on  oil  and  saving
consumers'  money  at the  pump.  The EPA
will   continue  to  implement  a  national
                                           15

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
program to reduce GHGs from light-duty
and heavy-duty mobile sources. The national
program of fuel  economy and greenhouse
gas standards for light-duty  vehicles alone
will save approximately 12 billion barrels of
oil and prevent 6 billion metric tons of GHG
emissions over the lifetimes of the vehicles
sold through model year 2025.

The EPA's air toxic control  programs are
critical to the Agency's continued  progress
in  reducing   public   health   risks,   and
improving the quality of the environment. In
FY 2013, the EPA will continue to focus on
communities with greater levels of industrial
and mobile source activity (e.g., near ports
or distribution areas), which according to the
2005 National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment
often  have greater cumulative exposure to
air toxics than non-industrial areas. Between
2012  and 2013, there are approximately 70
stationary source  (e.g., air toxics) rules due
for  review and promulgation, 35 of which
are already on court-ordered deadlines or in
litigation. These rules are all in some stage
of development now. Working with litigants
and stakeholders, and informed by  analyses
of air quality health risk data,  the EPA is
working to prioritize a more limited set of
air toxics regulations that can be completed
expeditiously and that will address the most
significant risks to public health.

In FY  2013,  the EPA  will  continue to
address the  impacts  of climate  change
through careful,  cost-effective  rulemaking
and  voluntary  programs that  encourage
businesses    and   consumers   to   limit
unnecessary greenhouse gas emissions.  The
climate  is   warming,  as  evidenced   by
observations  in the scientific  literature  that
show  increasing   temperatures, rising  sea
levels, and widespread melting of snow and
ice. Heat-trapping greenhouse gases are now
at record-high levels  in the  atmosphere
compared to the  recent and  distant past, a
clear  result  of  human  activity.  As  the
number  of   days  with   extremely  hot
temperatures increase, severe heat waves are
projected  to   intensify  and  lead  to heat-
related mortality and sickness.  Also, with
time,  more Americans  are  likely  to  be
affected by certain diseases that  thrive in
areas  with  higher temperatures  and greater
precipitation, including  pest-borne diseases
and food  and water-borne  pathogens. The
costs  of these impacts of  climate  change
include increased hospital visits, respiratory
and   cardiovascular  diseases,  and  even
premature  death -  especially  for  certain
vulnerable  populations like  the  elderly, the
poor,  and children.

Because people spend much  of their lives
indoors, the quality of indoor air also is a
major concern. Indoor allergens and irritants
play  a significant role in  making  asthma
worse and  triggering asthma  attacks. Over
25 million  American currently have asthma
and  asthma   annually  accounts  for  over
500,000 hospitalizations, 13 million missed
school  days,   and  over  $50  billion  in
economic costs.

Major FY  2013 Changes

In FY 2013,  resources under Goal 1 are
focused on the Agency's core statutory work
in reducing  public health  risks  through
standards    setting,   market-driven   and
partnership  innovations,  and  support for
state  and  tribal partners. Recognizing the
tight limits on discretionary  spending across
the government, the EPA has  evaluated and
reprioritized its  work and made necessary
adjustments to focus FY 2013 resources on
the Agency's  highest priorities.  This effort
involved    strategic    reductions    and
redirections within and across programs. In
addition,  the  Agency  is   proposing  to
eliminate certain mature programs that have
succeeded in establishing the expertise at the
                                           16

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
state and local level  to  implement  similar
programs, and where there is the possibility
of maintaining some  of the human health
benefits through implementation at the local
level. Reductions in some critical areas in
FY 2012 make the FY 2013 resources even
more  important to  advancing   or even
maintaining  progress  toward  longer-term
goals.  Across the Agency, resources have
been   targeted  to:   1)   moving   toward
environmental   protection  for  the   21st
Century by increasing transparency and the
use  of  technology,  2)   supporting  core
mission  functions,  and  3)  implementing
efficiencies that enhance the effective use of
limited resources in the long-term.

Given  the  nation's  current  tight  fiscal
climate,   the   EPA  is   making   several
significant changes in the air program to
focus on its highest priorities. The Agency is
eliminating    the    Clean    Automotive
Technology (CAT) program and reassigning
the program's  expert  staff to address  the
high priority  and increasing workload in
vehicle and  fuels  testing  related  to  the
historic  new  GHG   and  fuel   economy
standards.  The  Agency  also  is  reducing
radon   activities  by  $8.0   million   by
eliminating categorical grants to  states for
radon and reducing the federal staff in the
radon  program.  These   programs  have
resulted    in    significant    institutional
improvements over time.

For  work under the  strategic   objective
Improve Air  Quality, a  funding level of
$825.4 million,  $56.4 million over the FY
2012  Enacted  budget,   will  enable  the
Agency  and   state  and  tribal partners to
conduct  statutorily  mandated work  on the
National  Ambient  Air  Quality  Standards
(NAAQS) for criteria pollutants, including
ozone.  Included  in this  amount is $289
million in state and tribal grant funding, an
increase of $39 million over FY 2012. These
funds  support  an  expanding  core  state
workload  for  implementing  revised and
more stringent NAAQS, and for overseeing
compliance with air toxics regulations. Also
included is an increase for  additional state
air monitors required by revised NAAQS.

The  FY 2013  resources are  also critical for
the  EPA  to  review  criteria   pollutant
standards  in  accordance with  the  CAA
statutory schedule and for the EPA  and  its
state and tribal partners to  monitor  the  air
that  we all breathe  in communities across
America. The requested FY 2013  funding
will  allow the EPA to continue to coordinate
actions to meet multiple CAA objectives for
controlling  both  criteria   and   toxic   air
pollutants  while  considering  their  cost
effectiveness and the technical feasibility of
controls,  as   well  as providing   greater
certainty for regulated industry. The EPA is
working to streamline the implementation of
rules at the federal,  state, tribal, and local
government level, as  well as  in industry. For
example, the  EPA  has made progress  in
combining  multiple  standards  where they
pertain  to  the same area with  a "sector"
approach to maximize the synergies  among
standards  and  reduces  costs  to  the EPA,
states, tribes, local government and industry.

An increase of approximately $32.8 million
over  the  FY  2012 Enacted  budget  for
climate  protection will allow the Agency to
support  the full  range  of  approaches  to
reducing GHGs and the risks its effects pose
to human health and  the environment and to
property.   This  increase   includes  $26.5
million for categorical grants to assist states
and   tribes   in   permitting  sources   of
greenhouse gas emissions  and  implement
the  Greenhouse  Gas Reporting  Rule  In
addition, the  Energy  Star  program,  the
Global Methane Initiative, the Greenhouse
Gas  (GHG) Reporting Rule, and state and
local technical  assistance and partnership
                                           17

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
programs, such as SmartWay, will all  help
reduce GHGs before it is too late. This level
of resources for these programs in FY 2013
is critical for the Agency's efforts to address
the impacts  of  climate  change.  Without
these  funds, the impacts of climate change
are likely to be even worse, in the form of
increased  hospital  visits,  respiratory  and
cardiovascular diseases,  and even premature
death.

The  Diesel   Emissions   Reduction  Act
(DERA) grant program is funded at  $15
million; a $15 million  reduction from  FY
2012   enacted  levels.   DERA  provides
immediate  emission   reductions   from
existing  diesel   engines   through   engine
retrofits, rebuilds and replacements of older,
dirtier engines, switching to  cleaner fuels,
idling reduction strategies, and other clean
diesel  strategies.  While the  DERA  grants
accelerate the  pace at which dirty engines
are retired or retrofitted,  pollution emissions
from the legacy fleet will be reduced over
time as portions of the  fleet  turn over and
are replaced  with new engines that meet
modern  emissions  standards.  As  such,
DERA funding is being  phased  out and will
be  allocated to a new rebate program and
national  low-cost  revolving  loan  or other
financing  program that  targets  the dirtiest,
most  polluting  engines. Both  approaches
would be available to private fleets for the
first  time and   enable  a more  targeted
approach to high emissions areas.

The  Agency  is  eliminating   the  Clean
Automotive  Technology (CAT) program in
FY 2013 resulting in  a  net savings of over
$8  million.  The  34 technical  experts  that
supported the  CAT program  work will be
redeployed   to    support   the   growing
implementation  and  compliance activities
associated   with  NHTSA   CAFE  fuel
economy and EPA GHG emission standards
for light-duty  and heavy-duty vehicles and
engines.  In  FY 2013, resources also will
support  GHG  standard  setting  actions
regarding advanced  vehicle  and  engine
technologies,   including   light-duty   and
heavy-duty trucks.

The  Agency  also is eliminating Radon
Categorical Grants ($8 million in STAG) in
FY  2013 and  cutting  approximately  $2
million from the non-STAG Radon program.
Exposure to  radon gas  continues to  be a
significant risk to  human health, and over
the 23 years  of its existence, EPA's radon
program  has provided important guidance
and  significant funding  to  help   states
successfully establish their own  programs.
At the federal level, the EPA will implement
the Federal Radon Action Plan, a multi-year,
multi-agency strategy for reducing the risk
from radon exposure by leveraging existing
federal   housing   programs   and   more
efficiently    implementing   radon-related
activities to have a greater impact on public
health.

For the  Air, Climate, and  Energy (ACE)
research  program, the increase will support
an  effort to address  additional  questions
regarding the safety of hydraulic fracturing
(FTP). Resources will  support ambient air
monitoring and associated health effects
assessments to address the potential impacts
of FTP on air  quality, water  quality, and
ecosystems.

Priority  Goals

The EPA has established an FY 2012-2013
Priority  Goal  to  improve the  country's
ability to measure and control  Greenhouse
Gas (GHG) emissions. The Priority Goal is:

•  Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from
   cars and trucks. Through September 30,
   2013, the  EPA in  coordination  with
   DOT's fuel  economy  standards program
                                           18

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
   will be implementing vehicle and truck
   greenhouse  gas  standards  that   are
   projected to  reduce  GHG emissions by
   1.2  billion metric tons and reduce oil
   consumption by about 98 billion gallons
   over the lifetime of the affected vehicles
   and trucks.

Additional   information   on the  Agency's
Priority   Goals    can    be   found    at
www.performance.gov.

FY 2013 Activities

Reducing GHG  Emissions and Developing
Adaptation  Strategies to Address Climate
Change

Responding to the threat of climate change
is one of the Agency's top priorities.  The
EPA's  strategy  to  address climate change
supports the  President's  greenhouse   gas
reduction goals.  Climate change poses risks
to public health, the environment, cultural
resources, the economy, and quality of life.
Many impacts of climate change are already
evident and  some will persist into the future.
Climate  change  impacts include increased
temperatures and more  stagnant air masses
that make it more challenging to achieve air
quality  standards for smog  in many regions
of the country. This adversely affects public
health  if areas  cannot  attain  or  maintain
clean air and increases the costs to local
communities.

The  Agency will  work with  partners and
stakeholders  to   provide    tools   and
information   related  to  greenhouse   gas
emissions  and  impacts and   will reduce
emissions domestically  and internationally
through  cost-effective, voluntary programs
while pursuing additional regulatory actions
as needed.  In FY  2013,  the  Agency  will
focus on core program activities,  expand
some existing  strategies,  and  discontinue
others, including:

•  Beginning to  implement  the important
   new  vehicle  fuel  economy  labelling
   requirements. For the first time, the new
   label    provides    consumers    with
   greenhouse gas, as well as fuel economy,
   information.
•  Continuing to implement the harmonized
   DOT  and  EPA  fuel   economy  and
   greenhouse    gas   (GHG)   emission
   standards  for light-duty  vehicles (model
   years   2012-2016)   and   heavy-duty
   vehicles (model years 2014-2018). The
   EPA  will  begin developing a  second
   phase  of  heavy-duty  GHG regulations
   that will incorporate a complete vehicle
   approach  and bring a  wider  range of
   advanced  technologies, including hybrid
   vehicle drive trains. The EPA also must
   consider  nine  petitions   asking  the
   Agency  to  develop  GHG  emission
   standards  for a wide range  of non-road
   equipment,    including    locomotives,
   marine craft, and aircraft.
•  Continuing  to  promote  cost-effective
   corporate  GHG management  practices
   and  provide  recognition  for  superior
   efforts through a joint  award program
   with non-government organizations. As
   of 2010,  the  EPA's  voluntary, public
   private partnerships  helped businesses,
   industry and  transportation avoid 533
   million metric tons of carbon equivalent
   emissions.
•  Focusing   on   GHG   supply    chain
   management,  which will primarily  be
   implemented   through    the   ongoing
   cooperative  pilot  with  the  General
   Services Administration to  assist  small
   federal suppliers  in  developing  their
   GHG inventories.
•  Continuing     to    implement    the
   Greenhouse   Gas   Reporting    Rule.
   Activities  in FY 2013 will  include
                                           19

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
expanding   the   database   management
systems for new sectors, verifying reported
data,  providing  guidance  and training to
reporters, and  sharing data with the public,
within the  federal government, with state
and local governments, and with reporting
entities.
An increase of around $3 million for the
Greenhouse Gas  Reporting  Program  will
support  reporting   and   verification  of
emissions across the 31 industry sectors and
emission sources (10 sectors were  added in
FY   2010)  and   approximately   13,000
reporters as well as work with states across
the spectrum  of the common by-product
gases. Work in FY 2013 includes support for
uses on how to comply  with the  rule and
how to report emissions using the electronic
reporting tool as well as how to address any
potential reporting  errors  prior  to data
publication. These  resources  will provide
assistance to reporting entities, ensure data
accuracy, and provide transparency into the
major sources of GHG emissions across the
nation.  An increase  of  approximately  $4
million  for ENERGY STAR will  support
oversight   of   the   improved  third-party
certification system  for  ENERGY  STAR
products and  the implementation of the
EPA's verification process for residential,
commercial and   industrial  buildings  to
safeguard the economic and health benefits
brought to the market by this program. This
increase  will  also  support the Agency's
effort to develop an  ENERGY STAR fee
program.   Another priority  is to  support
public and private organizations  as they
implement  the  full  range of least cost
compliance   and    mitigation    options
associated with the EPA's power sector air
standards.

Funding    for   the    Clean    Automotive
Technologies    (CAT)    program    was
eliminated  in FY  2013. The CAT program,
with its advanced series  hybrids and ultra-
clean engines, has matured and provided a
deep  understanding  of  the  technology
pathways  that  are  necessary in order to
achieve maximum reductions  of criteria and
GHG emissions cost-effectively  from both
cars and trucks. FY 2012 will  be a transition
year  in which  the  CAT   program  will
complete  work  on  the  highest  priority
projects,    and    continue    technology
deployment   through   various    actions
including license agreements.  In 2013, other
Federal  research programs, such as DOE's
Vehicles Technology  program will  support
the   development  and  deployment  of
advanced  automotive technologies. In FY
2013, the Agency will refocus the workforce
in this program to  support implementation
and   compliance   with  GHG   emission
standards  for  light-duty  and  heavy-duty
vehicles   developed  under  the   Federal
Vehicle   and    Fuels    Standards   and
Certification  program project. In addition,
resources will be used to support compliance
activities for implementing NHTSA's CAFE
standards. Under authorities contained in the
Clean Air Act  and  the  Energy Policy Act,
the  EPA  is   responsible  for   issuing
certificates and ensuring  compliance with
both the GHG and CAFE standards.

Improving Air Quality

Clean Air

Particulate Matter (PM) is linked to tens of
thousands of premature  deaths per year and
repeated exposure to ozone can cause acute
respiratory problems and lead to permanent
lung damage. Short term exposure to sulfur
dioxide  (862)   can   result  in   adverse
respiratory effects,  including narrowing of
the  airways  which  can  cause  difficulty
breathing  and increased asthma symptoms,
particularly in at  risk  populations including
children,  the  elderly,  and  people  with
asthma.
                                           20

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Implementing the  existing  PM  National
Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS),
as well as the potential revised 2012 PM
NAAQS,  are among the Agency's highest
priorities  for FY  2013.  The  EPA  will
provide technical and  policy  assistance  to
states  developing  or  revising  attainment
State  Implementation Plans (SIPs) and will
designate    areas   as    attainment    or
nonattainment.  The  budget  includes   an
additional $39 million in grants to support
core  state   workload  for  implementing
NAAQS, reducing exposure to air toxics to
ensure improved air quality in communities,
and for additional air monitors required by
revised NAAQS.  In FY 2013, the EPA will
also  continue  its  work  with  states  and
communities to  implement  the  existing
ozone standard.  The  EPA   will  provide
technical  and policy  assistance to states
developing or revising  attainment SIPs, and
provide ongoing  assistance in meeting  the
goals  of those plans.  The EPA will  also
provide technical and  policy  assistance  to
states     developing    regional    haze
implementation plans and will continue to
review  and  act  on SIP  submissions  in
accordance with the Clean Air  Act. These
objectives are supported by an investment of
$7.0 million to provide technical assistance
to state, tribal and local agencies through the
Federal   Support    for   Air    Quality
Management program. This support includes
source characterization analyses,  emission
inventories,   quality  assurance  protocols,
improved testing and monitoring techniques,
and air quality modeling.

The EPA will  continue to implement  the
new  Renewable  Fuel   Standards  (RFS2)
program and carry out  several other actions
required by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct)
of 2005 and the  Energy Independence and
Security Act (EISA) of 2007. The EPA is
responsible for establishing test procedures
needed to estimate the fuel economy of new
vehicles    and    for    verifying     car
manufacturers'  data on fuel economy. In FY
2013, the EPA will continue implementing
its plan to upgrade its vehicle, engine, and
fuel  testing  capabilities  at  the  National
Vehicle  and  Fuel Emissions  Laboratory
(NVFEL), addressing the need to increase
testing and certification capacity to  ensure
that new vehicles, engines, and fuels are in
compliance  with  new   vehicle  and  fuel
standards.  In  2011,  the  EPA  provided
certifications  for over 4,000 different types
of engines - a workload that has quadrupled
over the past decade.  The EPA's workload
will continue to grow, as the Agency begins
to implement new and more stringent GHG
emission standards promulgated in 2012 and
2013 for additional classes of vehicles and
engines.

The  requested  FY  2013  resources  are
required to operate the new testing facilities
and run new test procedures associated with
the increased breadth  and  complexity  of
standards. Resources will support  activities
such  as  oversight  of certification  and
compliance requirements for the expanding
number of vehicles and engines the EPA
regulates. These include hybrid and biofuel
vehicles,  advanced  technology  vehicles,
engines entering the market in response to
the EPA's new GHG  emission standards,
and  foreign  imports.  Resources will  also
support oversight of credit trading under
both fuels and engine regulations and will be
used to develop and manage  data systems
designed to make it easier for  the regulated
community to comply with EPA standards
by reducing reporting burdens.

Air Toxics

The Agency will continue to work with state
and local air  pollution control  agencies and
community groups to assess and address air
                                           21

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
toxics   emissions  in  areas   of  greatest
concern,  including   in  disproportionately
impacted communities and where the most
vulnerable members of our population live,
work, and go to school.

One of the  top priorities for the air toxics
program is to  eliminate unacceptable health
risks and cumulative exposures to air toxics
from    multiple    sources   in    affected
communities and to enable the Agency to
fulfill its Clean Air Act (CAA)  and court-
ordered obligations. The  CAA requires that
the technological basis for  all technology-
based standards be reviewed and updated as
necessary every eight years. In FY 2013, the
EPA   will   continue   to   conduct  risk
assessments  to  determine  whether  the
technology-based rules appropriately protect
public health.

In addition  to meeting CAA requirements,
the EPA will  continue development  of its
multi-pollutant and sector based  efforts  by
constructing and organizing analyses around
industrial  sectors. By addressing  individual
sectors'  emissions  comprehensively   and
prioritizing   regulatory  efforts   on   the
pollutants of greatest  concern, the EPA will
develop consolidated, more effective, lower-
cost technological   improvements  in  the
sectors. The EPA will continue to look at all
pollutants in an industrial sector and identify
ways to take advantage of the co-benefits of
pollution control. In developing  sector  and
multi-pollutant  approaches,   the  Agency
seeks innovative  solutions  that address the
differing nature  of the various sectors  and
minimizes costs to the EPA,  states, tribes,
local   governments   and   the  regulated
community.  In FY 2013,  an increase of $2.7
million will be used to coordinate  actions for
controlling  both  criteria   and  toxic   air
pollutants to achieve objectives of the Clean
Air Act, maximize cost effectiveness,  and
provide greater certainty to industry.
The EPA  will  continue  to  improve  the
dissemination of information to state, local
and  tribal  governments,  and  the  public,
using analytical  tools such as the National
Air  Pollution   Assessment  (NAPA)   and
National Air  Toxic Assessment  (NATA),
enhancing  quantitative benefits  assessment
tools such as BenMAP, improving emission
inventory estimates for toxic air pollutants,
and  managing  information for  regulated
entities  electronically in a single location by
modernizing the Air Facility System (AFS)
database.  The EPA anticipates that these
improvements will increase the Agency's
ability  to  meet aggressive court-ordered
schedules to complete rulemaking activities,
especially in the Risk Technology Review
program.

Indoor  Air

Twenty percent of the population,  including
students, teachers  and administrative staff,
spend   the   day  inside   elementary   and
secondary  schools. If these schools have
problems with leaky roofs and poor heating,
ventilation, or air conditioning systems, the
result can  be  the increased presence  of
molds   and  other  environmental  allergens
which can trigger a host of health problems,
including asthma  and allergies.  Over  the
past four years,  at least  16,000  health care
professionals have been trained by the EPA
and   its   partners   on   environmental
management     of    asthma      triggers.
Additionally,  approximately  1/3  of  our
nation's schools now have effective indoor
air quality management programs in place. It
is  estimated  that  2.7  million homes  with
high radon levels have, with the help of the
EPA  and  its partners,  been  returned  to
acceptable  levels or have been built  with
new radon-reducing features.
                                           22

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
In  the  Reduce  Risks  from  Indoor Air
program  ($17.8  million), the  EPA  will
continue  to promote comprehensive asthma
care  that   integrates   management   of
environmental asthma triggers and  health
care  services   by  building  community
capacity   for  delivering  comprehensive
asthma   care   programs   through  the
Communities in Action for Asthma-Friendly
Environments Campaign.  The  EPA  will
place a particular emphasis  on protecting
vulnerable  populations, including  children,
and low-income and minority populations.
The EPA will continue to update its existing
program  guidance  to  provide  clear and
verifiable protocols  and  specifications  for
ensuring  good indoor  air quality  across  a
range of building  types during  multiple
phases of the building life cycle.  The EPA
will collaborate  with  public and private
sector  organizations  to  integrate   these
protocols and specifications more efficiently
into  existing   energy-efficiency,   green-
building  and health-related programs and
initiatives. FY 2013 activities will  focus on
equipping the affordable housing sector with
training  and  guidance   to  promote the
adoption  of these best practices with the aim
of creating healthy, energy-efficient  homes
for low income families.

In FY 2013,  with the elimination of Radon
Categorical  Grants  and  reduction to the
radon program of approximately $2 million,
this  program will  focus  on  efficiently
promoting  radon risk  reduction in  homes
and     schools.     Using     information
dissemination, social marketing techniques,
and partnerships with  federal agencies and
public     health    and     environmental
organizations, the EPA will drive action by
implementing the Federal  Radon Action
Plan, published in June 2011. These actions
will promote testing for indoor radon, fixing
homes and schools when radon levels are
high,  and building new homes and schools
with radon-resistant features.

Stratospheric Ozone

The   stratospheric ozone program  ($15.3
million)  implements the provisions  of the
Clean Air Act Amendments  of  1990 (the
Act)  and  the  Montreal   Protocol  on
Substances that Deplete the  Ozone Layer
(Montreal Protocol).  Under the Act and the
Protocol, the EPA is authorized  to control
and   reduce  ozone   depleting  substances
(ODS) in the US, and to contribute to the
Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund. As of
January  1, 2010,   ODS production  and
imports  were   capped  at   3,810  ODP-
weighted metric tons, which is 25  percent of
the U.S.  baseline  under   the  Montreal
Protocol.  In 2015,  U.S. production  and
import will be reduced further, to  10 percent
of the  U.S.  baseline,  and  in  2020, all
production and import will  be phased out
except for  exempted amounts. As ODS and
many of their substitutes are potent GHGs,
appropriate control and reduction of these
substances also provides significant benefits
for climate protection. The Act provides for
a phase out of production and consumption
of ODS and requires controls on their use,
including banning  certain  emissive  uses,
requiring   labeling  to   inform  consumer
choices   and  requiring   sound  servicing
practices for the use  of ODS in various
products   (e.g.,   air   conditioning   and
refrigeration).   As   a  signatory  to   the
Montreal  Protocol,  the  United  States  is
committed to ensuring that our domestic
program  is   at   least  as   stringent  as
international  obligations  and  to  regulating
and enforcing its  terms domestically. In FY
2013, the EPA will focus its work to ensure
that ODS production and import caps under
the Montreal Protocol and  Clean Air Act
continue to be met.
                                           23

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Radiation

In FY 2013, the EPA Radiation program
($21.8 million), in cooperation with other
federal   agencies,    states,   tribes,   and
international      radiation      protection
organizations,  will   develop   and  use
voluntary and regulatory  programs, public
information,  and  training  to  protect  the
public  from  unnecessary  exposures  to
radiation.  In  response   to  advances  in
uranium  production processes  and mining
operations,  the  Agency   is  updating  its
radiation   protection  standards   for   the
uranium  fuel cycle,  which were  developed
over 30 years ago.  In FY 2013, the EPA's
Radiological  Emergency  Response Team
(RERT) will maintain and improve the level
of readiness to support federal radiological
emergency response and recovery operations
under  the  National Response Framework
(NRF) and the National Oil and Hazardous
Substances  Pollution  Contingency   Plan
(NCP).   The  National  RadNet   ambient
radiation  air  monitoring   system,  which
includes  the  country's 100 most populous
cities,  will  provide  data  to  assist  in
protective action determinations.

Research

Environmental   challenges  in  the  21st
Century continue to be complex as the links
between  stressors  such as climate  change,
urbanization, and air quality become better
understood.  These   complex  challenges
require different thinking and solutions than
those used  in the past. Reducing risk can  no
longer   be   the    only    approach    to
environmental  protection.   Industry  and
government are turning to  solutions  that
enhance  economic growth  and social well-
being, as well as protect public health and
the environment.  These  solutions require
research  that transcends disciplinary lines
and includes all stakeholders in the  process.
The process includes the EPA's regional and
program   offices   as   well   as   other
stakeholders    including    states    and
communities who rely on the research. With
the partners and  stakeholders,  the EPA
researchers  define the research  needs and
how the solutions will be integrated. These
new,      integrated,      transdisciplinary
approaches require innovation at all steps of
the process. Ultimately, the EPA is seeking
technological   innovations  that   support
environmentally responsible  solutions and
foster new economic development.

In FY 2013, the EPA is  strengthening  its
planning  and   delivery   of  science   by
continuing   the  more  integrated  research
approach  begun  in FY  2012.  Integrated
research   looks    at   problems   more
systematically   and   holistically.    This
approach will yield benefits beyond those
possible from  more  narrowly  targeted
approaches that focus on single chemicals or
problem areas.

A robust air monitoring network is vital to
the nation's air quality. Air monitoring tools
measure  and  track  pollutants,   identify
pollutant  sources,  and  inform  how  and
where  Americans   are   exposed  to   air
pollutants. Many  of the existing  monitoring
technologies used in the national  networks
are decades  old  and  are  costly.  The
complexity of environmental issues at local,
national, and  international levels requires
more    advanced   and    comprehensive
monitoring.  In  FY 2013, the EPA plans to
develop efficient, high-performing,  and cost-
effective monitors for ambient air pollutants.
Such   monitors  will   replace   outdated
techniques,    produce     more     detailed
information,   and   reduce the   cost   of
monitoring  for the  EPA,  states,  and local
agencies.
                                           24

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
The   Air,  Climate   and  Energy  (ACE)
program     conducts     research     on
environmental and human  health impacts
related to air pollution, climate change, and
biofuels. Protecting human  health and  the
environment from the  effects of air pollution
and  climate  change,  while  simultaneously
meeting   the  demands  of   a  growing
population and economy  is critical to  the
well-being of the nation  and  the world.
Exposure to  an  evolving  array  of  air
pollutants is a considerable challenge  on
human  health and the environment.  This
multifaceted   environment   reflects    the
interplay  of  air  quality,  the  changing
climate,  and  emerging energy  options.  By
integrating air, climate and energy research,
the EPA can better understand, define and
address the complexity of these interactions.
The  Agency  will  provide models and tools
necessary for communities and for decision
makers at all levels of government to  make
the best decisions.

For  example, the ACE research program
will  improve the widely  used  Community
Multiscale Air  Quality (CMAQ) modeling
system.  State and local agencies and  the
EPA rely on this tool  to  implement  the
National  Ambient Air Quality  Standards
(NAAQS). Specifically, nations, states, and
communities  use CMAQ to model how air
pollution  levels   change  when  different
emission  reduction alternatives  are  used.
With this tool, decision-makers can test a
range  of strategies   and determine  what
approach   best   fits   their   situation.
Improvements  to  CMAQ  will  increase
users'   capability   to  accurately  model
changes  in  ozone,  paniculate  matter, and
hazardous air pollutant concentrations. The
CMAQ model has over  1,500  users in  the
U.S. and 1,000 more in over 50 countries.
The ACE research program will continue to
address  critical  science  questions  under
three major research themes.

Theme 1: Assess Impacts - Assess human
and   ecosystem   exposures   and  effects
associated with air pollutants and  climate
change. Evaluate the effects of air pollution
and   climate   change   on   individuals,
ecosystems,   communities,   and   regions
(including  the   effects   on  those  most
susceptible or vulnerable).

Theme 2: Prevent and Reduce Emissions -
Provide the  science needed to develop and
evaluate  approaches   to preventing  and
reducing harmful  air  emissions.  The EPA
decision makers and other stakeholders need
such data and methods to analyze the full
life-cycle impacts  of  new  and existing
energy  technologies.   With  ACE's  data,
decision   makers  can  determine   which
energy  choices  are   most   economically,
socially, and environmentally appropriate.

Theme 3: Respond to  Changes in Climate
and Air  Quality - Provide modeling and
monitoring tools, metrics, and information
on  air  pollution  exposure.   Individuals,
communities,  and  governmental agencies
will use these tools and information to make
public health decisions related to air quality
and climate change.

ACE  research  incorporates  economic and
social factors that may influence anticipated
environmental results.
                                           25

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Figure 1:  Integration  of Air,
Climate, and Energy1
Figure  1,   "Integration  of Air,
Climate, and Energy" illustrates
the   relationships   among   air,
climate,  and energy.  The  figure
identifies  the  major  earth  and
human  systems impacted by  air
pollution  and climate change.  It
portrays the  responses and social
factors       influencing      the
relationships among each.
                                    Earth Systems
    Exposurestoand Effects on:
In  FY  2013,  research  will   study  the
generation,  fate,  transport,  and chemical
transformation of air emissions  to identify
individual and population  health risks. The
ACE  research  program   considers   the
environmental impacts of energy production
and  use  across  the  full  life   cycle. For
example,   increased  use   of  wood   in
residences  can  reduce   greenhouse   gas
emissions  but  cause  local  air pollution
problems. The program will incorporate air,
climate, and energy research to ensure the
development  of  sustainable solutions and
attainment of statutory goals in  a complex
multi-pollutant  environment.   The   ACE
program  will  conduct research  to  better
understand and assess the  effects of global
change on air quality, water quality, aquatic
ecosystems,  land  use, human  health and
social wellbeing.

In  addition,  the  program  will  conduct
systems-based  sustainability  analyses that
include environmental, social and economic
dimensions. The EPA's FY 2013 hydraulic
fracturing research request will enable
assessment of potential air,  ecosystem and
water   quality    impacts   of   hydraulic
fracturing. The EPA, with the Department of
Energy and the  Department  of the Interior,
will  study the impacts  of developing our
nation's  unconventional   oil   and  gas
resources. This effort will promote a better
understanding   of  potential  impacts   of
hydraulic fracturing and complement current
hydraulic fracturing research  efforts. This
research will help our nation to safely and
prudently develop oil and gas resources.
 Adapted from IPCC, 2007: Climate Change 2007:
Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II,
and III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
                                            26

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                        FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual  Performance Plan and
Congressional Justification

Protecting America's Waters
Protect and restore our waters to ensure that
drinking water is  safe, and that aquatic
ecosystems sustain fish, plants and wildlife,
and economic, recreational, and  subsistence
activities.
                 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES:
                    •   Reduce    human    exposure    to
                        contaminants in drinking water,  fish
                        and   shellfish,   and   recreational
                        waters,  including protecting source
                        waters.
                    •   Protect  the quality of rivers, lakes,
                        streams,   and   wetlands   on   a
                        watershed  basis, and  protect urban,
                        coastal, and ocean waters.
                            GOAL, OBJECTIVE SUMMARY
                                     Budget Authority
                                    Full-time Equivalents
                                   (Dollars in Thousands)
Protecting America's Waters
Protect Human Health
Protect and Restore  Watersheds and
Aquatic Ecosystems
   Total Authorized Workyears
                                      FY 2013 Pres Budget
FY2011      FY2012     FY 2013      v.
Actuals       Enacted     Pres Budget   FY 2012 Enacted

$5,085,863.7   $4,094,452.5  $3,782,228.0   ($312,224.5)

$1,532,401.0   $1,295,538.9  $1,216,766.0   ($78,772.9)


$3,553,462.7   $2,798,913.5  $2,565,462.0   ($233,451.5)

3,510.3       3,423.6       3,418.9       -4.7
                                             27

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Introduction

While  much  progress  has  been  made,
America's   waters    remain   imperiled.
Increased  demands,  land  use  practices,
population growth, aging infrastructure, and
climate   variability   continue   to  pose
challenges to our nation's water resources.
The latest national surveys   confirm that
America's waters are  stressed by  nutrient
pollution,    excess    sedimentation,   and
degradation of shoreline vegetation, which
affect more than 50 percent of our lakes and
streams. The rate at which new waters  are
listed for water quality impairments  exceeds
the  pace  at which  restored  waters  are
removed  from the  list.  For  many years,
nonpoint   source   pollution,   principally
nitrogen,  phosphorus,  and  sediments, has
been  recognized  as the  largest remaining
impediment  to  improving  water  quality.
However,    pollution    discharged   from
industrial,   municipal,   agricultural,   and
stormwater point sources continue to cause a
decline in the quality  of our waters. Other
significant contributors  to degraded water
quality  include  loss   of  habitat,  habitat
fragmentation, and changes in the way water
is infiltrated into  soils, runs off the land, and
flows down streams (hydrologic alteration).

From  nutrient  loadings  and  stormwater
runoff  to  invasive species  and  drinking
water contaminants, water quality programs
face  complex   challenges  that  can   be
addressed   effectively  only   through   a
combination  of  traditional and innovative
strategies. The EPA will work hand-in-hand
with  states  and tribes   to  develop  and
2 U.S. EPA, 2006. Wadeable Streams Assessment: A
Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Streams. EPA 841-B-
06-002. Available at
http://www.epa. gov/owow/streamsurvey. See also EPA,
2010. National Lakes Assessment: A Collaborative Survey
of the Nation 'slakes. EPA 841-R-09-001. Available at
http://www.epa.gov/lakessurvev/pdf/nla chapter0.pdf.
implement nutrient limits and intensify our
work to restore and protect the quality of the
nation's streams, rivers, lakes, bays, oceans,
and aquifers. We will continue the increased
focus  on  communities, particularly  those
disadvantaged      communities      facing
disproportionate  impacts  or  having been
historically underserved. We also will  use
our  authority   to   protect   and   restore
threatened  natural treasures  such  as  the
Great Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay, and the
Gulf of Mexico;  to  address  our neglected
urban rivers; to ensure safe drinking water;
and  to reduce pollution from nonpoint  and
industrial    dischargers.   The  EPA  will
continue to address post-construction runoff,
water-quality   impairments   from  surface
mining, and drinking water contamination.

As  part of the  Administration's  long-term
strategy,  the  EPA   is   implementing  a
Sustainable Water Infrastructure Policy that
focuses   on  working  with  states   and
communities    to    enhance    technical,
managerial and financial capacity. Important
to the  enhanced technical  capacity will be
alternatives  analyses  to   expand  "green
infrastructure"  options and their multiple
benefits. Federal  dollars provided  through
the  State Revolving Funds  will  act as  a
catalyst for efficient  system-wide planning
and  ongoing management  of sustainable
water infrastructure.

The EPA  continues to work with its partners
across  the Federal government to leverage
resources  and avoid  duplication of efforts.
The EPA and USDA will  enhance existing
coordination efforts  in  reducing  nonpoint
source pollution and the  EPA will move
beyond its  ongoing  study  and expand its
work  with  DOE   and  the  USGS  on
understanding and the potential impacts of
hydraulic  fracturing.
                                            28

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Major FY 2013 Changes

To  address resource constraints in the FY
2013  budget  and  the  FY 2012 Enacted
Budget, the EPA carefully evaluated water
program activities to assess where the pace
of progress could be slowed, where other
governmental entities could provide needed
support,   or  where  programs   could be
eliminated   to   allow   for   necessary
redirections to  fund critical Administration
priorities.  The  EPA  will direct limited
resources to  where they  can best protect
public health,  especially  in  disadvantaged
communities; provide increased support to
state and tribal partners;  and  focus  on the
largest   pollution   problems,   including
nutrient pollution. In light of reductions in
some  critical  areas  in   FY  2012,  the
requested FY 2013  resources are pivotal to
enabling the Agency to advance, or  even
maintain, progress toward longer-term goals.

In FY 2013, funding of $265 million,  $27
million above  FY  2012,   for Section  106
Water Pollution  Control   Grants  supports
prevention and  control measures to improve
water quality and address nutrient run-off
The increase,  in  addition to  addressing
nutrient  loads, will  strengthen  the  state,
interstate and tribal base programs, provide
additional  resources  to  address  TMDL,
monitoring, and wet weather issues and help
states improve their water quality programs
relating to the management of nutrients. An
addition  of $4.4 million  to Public Water
System  Supervision  Grants  will  support
state   data   management,  improve   data
quality,  and allow the  public  to  access
compliance monitoring  data not previously
available.

In  FY  2013,   the  Budget  includes  a
significant new effort under which the EPA
and  the USDA  are working   with  key
Federal  partners,  along  with agricultural
producer    organizations,    conservation
districts, states, tribes, NGOs and other local
leaders to identify areas where a focused and
coordinated approach can achieve decreases
in water pollution.  The President's Budget
builds   upon   the   collaborative   process
already underway among Federal partners to
demonstrate  substantial  improvements  in
water   quality  by   coordinating   efforts
between U.S.  Department  of Agriculture
(USDA) and  EPA programs  such  as  the
EPA's Nonpoint  Source Grants and Water
Pollution Control Grants and USDA's Farm
Bill     conservation     programs.     This
coordination will allow for more effective,
targeted investments at the Federal and State
level during a time of constrained budgets,
and will ensure continued improvements in
water quality.
Further, the EPA will provide $15 million of
Section   106  funds  to  states,  interstate
agencies   and  tribes   that   commit   to
strengthening  their  nutrient  management
efforts consistent with the EPA's Office of
Water guidance issued in March 2011.

Increased   funding  of  approximately $15
million  above FY 2012 for the Chesapeake
Bay  will   help states  meet  the   nutrient
reduction goals in the Total Maximum Daily
Load through State Implementation  Grants
(SIGs) and implement Phase II Watershed
Implementation Plans. An increase of $5
million  for Mexico  Border Infrastructure
Assistance  will help advance the  EPA's
work  with the Border  States and local
communities   in  improving  the  region's
water quality and public health.

Also in FY 2013,  $5.9 million over FY 2012
is requested for the Drinking Water program
to strengthen efforts to protect the nation's
drinking   water   supply   by  providing
technical assistance to states and  systems.
The funds also will support upgrading of the
Safe Drinking Water  Information  System
                                           29

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
(SDWIS) to improve compliance monitoring
and data flow and quality.
In FY 2013, $4.3 million above FY 2012 is
provided for the Safe and Sustainable Water
Resources  research program as part of a
wider   $14  million  effort  to   address
additional  questions regarding the safety of
hydraulic fracturing (FTP).  The research will
be in collaboration with  DOE and USGS
under   a   developing  Memorandum  of
Understanding   which    emphasizes   the
expertise of each Federal  partner,  and will
include  an assessment  of  potential  air,
ecosystem, and water quality  impacts of
hydraulic fracturing.  Consistent with advice
from the Science Advisory Board  on areas
to  study,   this  work  will  ensure  an
understanding of the full  suite  of  potential
impacts   of   hydraulic    fracturing   and
complement  current  hydraulic  fracturing
research efforts.

In FY 2013, the EPA reduced or eliminated
funding to  a  number  of programs.  The
Agency is requesting $2 billion, a reduction
of $359 million, for the Clean Water and
Drinking Water State Revolving Funds. The
Administration   requests   a  combined  $2
billion for federal capitalization of the SRFs.
This will allow the SRFs to finance over $6
billion  in wastewater  and drinking  water
infrastructure   projects    annually.   The
Administration  has strongly  supported  the
SRFs,   having  received   and/or requested
funding for them totaling over $18 billion
since 2009; since their inception, over $52
billion has been provided for the SRFs. The
reduced  level   will  mean  fewer  water
infrastructure projects.  The EPA will work
to target assistance to small and underserved
communities  with limited  ability to  repay
loans,   while   maintaining  state  program
integrity. A number  of systems could have
access     to    capital    through    the
Administration's   proposed  Infrastructure
Bank.
In  this  difficult  financial   climate,  the
Agency will eliminate  the Beaches  Grant
Program with a reduction of $9.9 million in
FY 2013. While beach monitoring continues
to be important, well-understood guidelines
are in place, and state and local government
programs have the technical  expertise and
procedures to  continue  beach  monitoring
without federal support.

Priority Goals

The EPA has established two FY 2012-2013
Priority Goals to improve water quality. The
Priority Goals are:

•   Improve,  restore,  or  maintain  water
    quality  by  enhancing nonpoint  source
    program accountability, incentives, and
    effectiveness.  By September  30,  2013,
    50% of  the   states  will   revise their
    nonpoint  source program  according  to
    new Section  319 grant guidelines that
    the EPA will release in November 2012.

•   Improve  public health  protection  for
    persons served by small drinking water
    systems  by strengthening the technical,
    managerial, and financial  capacity  of
    those systems. By September 30,  2013,
    the EPA will  engage with  twenty states
    to improve small drinking  water system
    capability through two EPA  programs,
    the  Optimization Program  and/or  the
    Capacity Development Program.

Additional  information  on the  Agency's
Priority   Goals    can    be   found   at
www.performance.gov.
                                           30

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
FY 2013 Activities

Through    Environmental    Management
Systems,   the  EPA   will   continue   to
emphasize     watershed      stewardship,
watershed-based     approaches,     water
efficiencies,  and best practices. The EPA
will   focus    specifically    on    green
infrastructure, nutrients, and  trading among
point sources and nonpoint sources for water
quality improvements  and urban waters.  In
FY 2013, the Agency will advance the water
quality monitoring initiative under the Clean
Water Act, and develop important rules and
implementation  activities  under  the Safe
Drinking  Water Act.  Related  efforts   to
improve monitoring  and surveillance will
help advance water security nationwide.

Drinking Water

To  help achieve the Administrator's priority
to protect America's waters, in FY 2013, the
EPA will continue to implement its Drinking
Water  Strategy,  an  approach  to  expand
public health protection for drinking water.
The vision of the strategy is to streamline
decision-making  and  expand  protection
under  existing  laws  and   promote  cost-
effective new technologies to meet the needs
of  rural,  urban  and  other  water-stressed
communities.  The  Agency  will  focus  on
regulating   groups   of  drinking  water
contaminants, improving water  treatment
technology  and expanding  communication
with states, tribes and communities.

In  FY  2013, a funding level  of $120.8
million  in categorical grants for  drinking
water programs will enable the EPA, the
states,  and  community  water  systems  to
build on  past  successes while  working
toward the FY 2013  goal of assuring that 92
percent   of  the  populations   served  by
community water systems receive  drinking
water that meets all  applicable health-based
standards. The Agency met its safe drinking
water goals from FY 2008 through FY 2011.
In FY 2011,  93.2 percent of the population
was  served by  community  water systems
that  met applicable  health-based standards,
surpassing the FY 2011 target of 91 percent.
States carry out  a  variety  of  activities,
including on-site sanitary  surveys  of water
systems and  assistance to  small  systems to
improve their capabilities. The EPA  will
support state and  local  implementation of
drinking  water  standards  by   providing
guidance, training, and technical assistance
and  ensuring proper certification of water
system   operators.   The   EPA  also  will
maintain the rate of system sanitary surveys
and  onsite reviews to promote compliance
with drinking water standards.

To help ensure  that water is safe to drink
and  to address the nation's  aging drinking
water infrastructure  that can impact water
quality, $850 million for the Drinking Water
State Revolving Fund  will  support  new
infrastructure  improvement  projects  for
public drinking water systems in FY 2013
and beyond. In FY 2011, the fund utilization
rate3 for the Drinking Water State Revolving
Fund was 90 percent, surpassing the target
of 89 percent. In concert with the states, the
EPA will  focus  this  affordable, flexible
financial  assistance  to  support  utility
compliance   with   safe   drinking  water
standards. The EPA also will work with
utilities to promote technical, financial, and
managerial capacity  as a critical means to
meet infrastructure  needs  and  to enhance
program performance and efficiency.
3 Utilization rate is the cumulative dollar amount of loan
agreements divided by cumulative funds available for
projects. Cumulative funds available include the federal
capitalization grant portion and everything that is in the
SRF (state match, interest payments, etc).
                                            31

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Clean Water

In FY  2013, the  EPA will  continue  to
collaborate with states and  tribes to  make
progress toward  the EPA's  clean  water
goals.  Programs  for controlling  nonpoint
sources of pollution are key  to reducing the
number of impaired waters. The programs
provide  a  multi-faceted approach to  the
problem,   with   a   mix   of  innovative
development  strategies   to  help  leverage
traditional tools. Maximizing the partnership
with  USDA and more  fully  utilizing  the
revolving   fund    capitalization   grants
provided to our partners will  enable the EPA
to build, revive,  and "green"  our  aging
infrastructure.  In FY 2013,  a funding level
of $445.2 million  in  categorical  grants for
clean water programs will enable the  EPA,
states and  tribes  to implement core  clean
water programs and promising innovations
on a watershed basis to accelerate  water
quality improvements.

In FY 2013, the EPA and the USDA will
work together to effectively target both the
Natural  Resource   Conservation  Service's
(NRCS) conservation assistance  programs
and  EPA's  Section  319  grant  funds  to
critical watersheds to improve water quality.
The  EPA and NRCS will collaborate with
stakeholders  to  identify  watersheds  for
focusing   conservation   and  monitoring
projects.  Priority  will  be   placed  on
partnering  in  watersheds that  have  high
nonpoint source nutrient sediments loadings,
including those listed by states  as having
impaired  waters   for  nutrients,   and  the
opportunity to make significant progress on
reducing those loads. Further, the EPA will
provide $15.0 million of Section  106  funds
to support  states, interstate agencies and
tribes that  commit  to  strengthening their
nutrient management efforts consistent with
EPA  Office of Water  guidance  issued  in
March 2011.

Building  on  30  years  of  clean   water
successes,  the  EPA, in  conjunction with
states   and   tribes,   will   address   the
requirements of the Clean  Water Act by
focusing  on  two   primary  tools:   Total
Maximum   Daily  Loads  and   National
Pollutant  Discharge  Elimination  System
(NPDES)   permits   that  are  built  upon
scientifically sound water quality standards
and  technology-based   pollutant  discharge
limits. For the  past six  years, the EPA has
consistently  surpassed   its  targets   for
establishing or  approving  TMDLs. There is
much  remaining  to   do,  an  additional
estimated 49,000 TMDL are needed. In FY
2011, the Agency completed 2,846 TMDLs
bringing the  cumulative total  to 49,663
TMDLs. The EPA also surpassed its target
of issuing  high priority EPA and state
NPDES permits  (including  tribal) by  32
percent.

The  EPA will  continue to  provide annual
capitalization  to the  Clean  Water  State
Revolving Fund to  enable EPA partners to
improve wastewater treatment,  nonpoint
sources    of   pollution,   and    estuary
revitalization. Realizing the expected long-
term  benefits,  the EPA is  continuing our
Clean  Water    State   Revolving   Fund
commitment by requesting $1.175 billion in
FY 2013.  The  fund  utilization rate for  the
Clean Water State Revolving Fund  in FY
2011  was 98 percent, surpassing the target
of              94.5              percent
                                           32

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                    FY 2013 Annual Plan
    60,000
    55,000
    50,000
    45,000
    40,000
    35,000
    30,000
    25,000
    20,000
    15,000
    10,000
     5,000
         0
                      TMDLs  Established or Approved by
                              EPA - Cumulative (bps)
 Budget Target
I EOY Result
              2006    2007
               2008    2009     2010
                          Fiscal Year
2011     2012
2013
In FY  2013, the EPA will continue to
strengthen   the   nationwide  monitoring
network  and  complete  statistically-valid
surveys of the nation's waters. In FY 2011,
the EPA used valid surveys of a statistically
representative sample  of  U.S.  waters to
assess the nation's water quality. The results
of these efforts are scientifically-defensible
water quality data and information essential
for cleaning up and protecting the nation's
waters. Work will continue on the National
Wetland  Condition  Assessment  report,
which will be issued in FY 2014, providing
regional and national  estimates of wetland
ecological integrity and ranking the stressors
most   commonly  associated  with  poor
conditions.

The Agency will continue in FY  2013 to
assist communities, particularly underserved
communities, in their local efforts to restore
and protect the quality of their urban waters.
By integrating  water  quality improvement
activities and partnering with federal, state,
                              local,  and non-governmental organizations,
                              the  EPA  will   help  to  sustain  local
                              commitment over the longer time frame that
                              is required for water quality improvement in
                              urban   watersheds.   In  support  of  the
                              President's   America's  Great   Outdoors
                              (AGO)  initiative,  the EPA  will  provide
                              grants and  technical assistance to support
                              community urban  water  stewardship and
                              local  restoration  efforts.  As  part  of  the
                              Urban Waters Federal Partnership, the EPA
                              also will coordinate with member agencies
                              to  deliver  technical   assistance  to pilot
                              communities. Focus  areas  may  include:
                              promoting  green infrastructure  to  reduce
                              contaminated stormwater runoff;  promoting
                              volunteer  monitoring;  and  tailoring risk
                              communication     and    outreach     to
                              communities.  The  Urban  Waters  grant
                              program will provide $4.4 million to fund
                              innovative  approaches  for  water  quality
                              improvement enhancements in urban areas
                              that will help  communities revitalize their
                                          33

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
waterfronts and accelerate measurable water
quality improvements.

As part of the Agency's core missions under
the Clean  Water  Act  and Safe  Drinking
Water Act, the EPA will continue to address
climate change  impacts to water resource
programs  and to  mitigate greenhouse  gas
emissions resulting  from  water activities.
Climate  change  will  exacerbate   water
quality  stressors such  as  stormwater  and
nutrient pollution, will overload treatment
systems,  and could add new stressors such
as those  related  to  expanding renewable
energy development. WaterSense, Climate
Ready Estuaries,  Climate Ready  Water
Utilities   and   Green  Infrastructure  are
examples   of  programs   that  will  help
stakeholders adapt to climate change in FY
2013, and  programs targeted  at vulnerable
populations will be  increasingly important.
Efforts  to   incorporate   climate   change
considerations into key programs will help
protect  water   quality and  the  nation's
investment in drinking water and wastewater
treatment infrastructure.

In FY 2013, the EPA,  in cooperation with
federal, state  and tribal governments  and
other  stakeholders,   will  make  progress
toward achieving the national goal  of no net
loss of wetlands under the Clean Water  Act
Section 404 regulatory program.  In  FY
2011, the  EPA and its partners  met  this
national goal. In addition, since 2002, over
1,000,000  acres  of  habitat  have been
protected   or  restored  within  National
Estuary Program study areas. The Agency's
FY 2013 budget request of $27.3 million for
National  Estuaries Programs  and Coastal
Waterways  will  enable the protection  or
restoration of an  additional  100,000 acres
within these areas.
Geographic Water Programs

The Administration has launched numerous
cross-agency    efforts     to    promote
collaboration   and   coordination   among
agencies,  which include  a suite  of large
aquatic ecosystem  restoration efforts. Three
prominent examples for the EPA  of cross-
agency  restoration efforts  are  the Great
Lakes, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Gulf of
Mexico.  Working  with  its  partners  and
stakeholders,  the   EPA   has  established
special programs to protect and restore each
of these unique natural resources.
The EPA's  ecosystem protection programs
encompass a wide  range of approaches that
address  specific at-risk regional  areas and
larger categories of threatened  systems, such
as urban  waters,  estuaries, and wetlands.
Locally generated pollution, combined with
pollution carried by rivers and streams and
through air deposition, can accumulate  in
these  ecosystems  and degrade  them over
time. The EPA and its federal partners along
with  states,  tribes,   municipalities,  and
private  parties, will  continue  efforts  to
restore the integrity of imperiled waters  of
the United States.

Great Lakes:
In FY 2013, $300 million  in funding for the
EPA-led  Great Lakes Restoration  Initiative
will  address priority  environmental issues
(e.g.,  toxic  substances,  nonpoint  source
pollution,  habitat degradation  and  loss, and
invasive  species)  in the largest freshwater
system  in   the   world.   This   carefully
coordinated interagency effort involves  the
White House  Council on Environmental
Quality, U.S.  Department of Agriculture,
U.S. Department of Commerce, Department
of Health and Human Services, Department
of  Homeland Security,   Department   of
Housing     and    Urban    Development,
Department   of   State,   Department   of
                                           34

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Defense,  Department  of   Interior,  and
Department of Transportation.

The  EPA expects to  continue to  achieve
substantial  results  through  both  federal
projects and  projects  done  in  conjunction
with    states,    tribes,    municipalities,
universities,    and   other   organizations.
Progress will continue in each of the Great
Lakes  Restoration  Initiative's  five  focus
areas (see below) through implementation of
both on-the-ground and in-the-water actions.
The  EPA will place  a priority on restoring
beneficial   uses  in   Areas  of  Concern,
deli sting Areas  of Concern, and reducing
phosphorus pollution in targeted watersheds.

Five Focus Areas:
•  Toxic Substances and Areas of Concern
•  Invasive Species
•  Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source
•  Habitat  and  Wildlife  Protection and
   Restoration
•  Accountability, Education,  Monitoring,
   Evaluation,     Communication,     and
   Partnerships

Chesapeake Bay:
The  Chesapeake  Bay  Program's  FY 2013
budget request of $72.6 million, an increase
of approximately $15.3 million, will  allow
the    EPA-led    inter-agency    Federal
Leadership   Committee   to  continue   to
implement the President's Executive  Order
on   Chesapeake  Bay   Protection   and
Restoration.   The key  initiatives  include:
implementing the TMDL;  assisting states in
implementing their   Phase   II  watershed
implementation plans, maintaining oversight
of state permitting and compliance actions
for  the  various sectors;  expanding and
improving  a  publicly accessible  TMDL
tracking    and   accountability    system;
deploying technology  to integrate  discrete
Bay  data systems and to present the data in
an  accessible accountability system called
Chesapeake<5Y
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
building off of the tremendous early efforts
of the Working Group, the Gulf of Mexico
Alliance, and others, while working to assist
the Deepwater  Horizon  Natural  Resource
Damage  Trustee  Council.   The  Trustee
Council focuses on restoring,  rehabilitating,
or replacing the natural resources damaged
by the oil spill, while the Task Force and its
federal   agency   partners   focus   their
individual  efforts on  the broader  suite of
impacts afflicting the Gulf Coast region. The
Gulf of Mexico program's FY 2013 budget
request of $4.4 million will allow the EPA
to continue its support for Gulf restoration
work,  such  as  habitat  conservation  and
replenishment and protection of coastal and
marine  resources. In  FY 2011,  the  EPA
exceeded its targets for 1) restoring water
and habitat quality  to meet  water quality
standards  in   impaired  segments  in  13
priority  coastal  areas,  and  2)  restoring,
enhancing   or   protecting   over   30,000
cumulative acres of important  coastal  and
marine habitats.

The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task
Force  has developed  a  Gulf  of Mexico
Regional  Ecosystem  Restoration  Strategy
that  identifies major policy areas where
coordinated federal-state action is necessary
and   also  considers  existing   restoration
planning efforts  in  the region to identify
planning gaps and  restoration needs.  This
strategy will inform federal investments in
ecosystem  restoration in the  Gulf region
over the next decade.  The Administration
also supports dedicating a significant portion
of the eventual  Clean  Water Act  civil
penalties  resulting  from the  Deepwater
Horizon oil   spill  for Gulf recovery, in
addition   to  current   funding  for  Gulf
programs.

Homeland Security

In FY 2013,  in  its role in protecting the
nation's  critical  water infrastructure  from
terrorist and other threats, the  EPA and its
stakeholder group will evaluate  data  from
the final Water Security Initiative pilots in
four   major    metropolitan    areas    on
effectiveness,  sustainability (including  costs
and  benefits),  and implementation  ability.
The  EPA also will develop tools to enable
national adoption of contamination warning
systems by the water sector.

Research

Environmental challenges in the 21st century
are more complex than before.  Causes of
environmental  and  health risks,  such as
climate  change,   urbanization,   nonpoint
source water pollution, and increased water
demand,  have become universal and require
different thinking and solutions than in the
past.  Reducing risk can  no longer be the
only approach to environmental  protection.
Industry and government are looking toward
solutions  that  enhance  economic  growth,
social   well-being,   public  health,   and
environmental quality.

Increased  demands,   land use  practices,
population growth, aging infrastructure, and
climate  change    and  variability,   pose
significant  threats to  our nation's  water
resources. (See Figure 1)
                                            36

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                          FY 2013 Annual Plan
.create-
                           affect -
                                          -produce.
Drivers
Agriculture,
Forestry,
Fishing

Energy/Mineral
Extraction
and Injection
( Manufacturing
[Recreation,
[Tourism

1 Public works,
Construction J
[ Transportation

IS
•4
                    Pressures
                    'N
                    Emissions
                          State
                          Flow timing
                          and quantity
Impact

Ecosystem
services
                                                                 m
                                                   alter-
Responses
                                                                     Land use planning
                                                                     &BMPs
                                                                     Water quality
                                                                     management
                                                                     Water quantity
                                                                     management
                                                                    f Dam operations j

                                                                    [Wetlands restoration]
                                                                    ( Climate adaptation
                                                         Species and
                                                         habitat protection
       Figure  1:  Conceptual  model  for watersheds,  where  socioeconomic forces
       influence the ecosystem; human activities place stress on the ecosystem; the state
       is the condition of the ecosystem; the impact relates to benefits that ecosystems
       provide,  and  their  value  to  human  well-being;  and  responses   are  the
       environmental management actions and decisions by society.
Such  competing  interests  require  the
development of innovative new solutions for
water resource managers and other decision-
makers.  To address  these  challenges, the
EPA's   Safe   and   Sustainable   Water
Resources   (SSWR)   research   program
provides the information and  tools that the
EPA needs  to meet its  legal,  statutory, and
policy challenges. Research will integrate
social,   economic,   and    environmental
sciences to  support the nation's range of
growing    water-use   and     ecological
requirements.

SSWR  is   conducting  research   that will
enable decision-makers to  identify what is
needed to protect water resources, including
information  about complex  tradeoffs, water
contaminants and nutrient  management on
watershed,   regional,  and  national  scales.
This research  is  informing  the EPA's first
National Wetlands Condition Report.

Researchers are  also developing tools to
better   detect    and    assess  waterborne
                                    chemicals and  microbial  contaminants.  In
                                    FY 2013, the SSWR program will report on
                                    the   presence   of  Nitrosodimethylamine
                                    (NDMA) in drinking water, a compound  of
                                    concern  because  of   its   carcinogenic
                                    potential. In addition,  in  support of the
                                    Agency's  Recommended Elements  of   a
                                    State Nutrients Framework, the EPA will
                                    conduct research to improve, demonstrate
                                    and   apply   numeric   nutrient   criteria
                                    approaches   across  different   scales  and
                                    waterbody types.

                                    Research also addresses and adapts to future
                                    water  resources   management  needs   to
                                    ensure  that  natural and engineered  water
                                    systems have the capacity and resiliency  to
                                    meet current and future water needs. The
                                    SSWR program will  continue  developing,
                                    implementing, and  providing  guidance on
                                    green  infrastructure  projects   as  a  cost-
                                    effective    approach    to    stormwater
                                    management.  Additionally,   the  SSWR
                                    research program will  continue to ensure the
                                    safety of America's water resources through
                                           37

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
new approaches  to  monitor  and mitigate
aging distribution and collection systems.

The SSWR  research  program  also  will
continue research to  address potential water
supply   endangerment   associated   with
subsurface land  use  practices  including
energy  and  mineral extraction. Research
conducted includes studying the impacts of
hydraulic fracturing  on the Nation's water
resources. The EPA  seeks to investigate the
public  and environmental  health questions
while maximizing the benefits of hydraulic
fracturing practices.  The EPA will continue
conducting research  to determine whether
hydraulic fracturing  has adverse  effects  on
drinking water resources.  In  addition, the
EPA will  begin  studying the impacts  of
hydraulic fracturing  on air, water  quality,
and   ecosystems.   This   research   will
complement  the  EPA's  current study  on
potential impacts  of  hydraulic fracturing  on
drinking water, and  will expand upon and
compliment ongoing  coordination with DOE
and USGS under a developing MOU.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                           FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan  and
Congressional Justification

Cleaning    Up    Communities     and
Advancing Sustainable Development
Clean up communities, advance sustainable
development, and protect disproportionately
impacted low-income, minority, and tribal
communities.  Prevent releases  of harmful
substances  and   clean   up  and  restore
contaminated areas

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES:
    •   Support  sustainable,  resilient,  and
       livable communities by working with
       local,   state,   tribal,   and  federal
       partners to  promote  smart growth,
       emergency     preparedness     and
           recovery    planning,    brownfield
           redevelopment,  and  the  equitable
           distribution     of    environmental
           benefits.
           Conserve resources and prevent land
           contamination  by  reducing  waste
           generation, increasing recycling, and
           ensuring  proper   management  of
           waste and petroleum products.
           Prepare for and respond to accidental
           or    intentional     releases    of
           contaminants  and   clean   up  and
           restore polluted sites.
           Support  federally-recognized tribes
           to build environmental  management
           capacity,    assess    environmental
           conditions and measure results, and
           implement  environmental  programs
           in Indian country.
                            GOAL, OBJECTIVE SUMMARY
                                     Budget Authority
                                   Full-time Equivalents
                                  (Dollars in Thousands)
Cleaning  Up  Communities   and
Advancing           Sustainable
Development
Promote   Sustainable  and  Livable
Communities
Preserve Land
Restore Land
Strengthen  Human  Health   and
Environmental  Protection  in Indian
Country
   Total Authorized Workyears
                                                                     FY 2013 Pres Budget
                                FY2011      FY2012     FY 2013      v.
                                Actuals      Enacted     Pres Budget   FY 2012 Enacted
                                $2,246,381.2  $1,931,053.3  $1,937,998.6   $6,945.3


                                $531,616.1    $483,770.0    $478,699.8    ($5,070.2)

                                $276,971.3    $254,818.4    $242,950.8    ($11,867.6)

                                $1,347,503.6  $1,104,154.4  $1,097,100.4   ($7,054.0)
                                $90,290.2

                                4,452.5
   ,310.5

4,328.2
$119,247.5

4,342.1
$30,937.0

13.9
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Introduction

The EPA strives to protect and restore land,
one of America's  most valuable  resources,
by cleaning up communities to create a safer
environment for all  Americans.  Hazardous
and  non-hazardous  wastes  on  land   can
migrate to the air, groundwater and surface
water,    contaminating   drinking   water
supplies, causing acute illnesses and chronic
diseases,    and     threatening     healthy
ecosystems.  The EPA will continue efforts
to prevent  and reduce the risks  posed by
releases of harmful substances to land, clean
up communities, strengthen state  and tribal
partnerships,  expand the conversation on
environmentalism,     and    work    for
environmental justice. The Agency also will
advance   sustainable   development   and
maximize      efforts     to      protect
disproportionately   impacted  low-income,
minority, and tribal  communities  through
outreach   and   protection   efforts   for
communities  historically  underrepresented
in the EPA's decision-making.

In FY 2013, the EPA will continue to work
collaboratively with state and tribal  partners
to  prevent   and   reduce   exposure   to
contaminants. Improved compliance at high-
risk  oil  and  chemical  facilities  through
inspections will help prevent exposure  and
lower the risk of accidents. The EPA and its
key  state,  tribal,   and   local   partners,
including   affected    communities,  have
matured in our collaborative  approaches to
identifying  and  cleaning  up contaminated
sites and  putting  these  sites  back  into
productive use for communities. To address
exposures to  releases that  have  already
occurred and/or will  occur in  the future, the
EPA will continue the multi-year  Integrated
Cleanup  Initiative  (ICI)  program  for  the
fourth year.  The Initiative will identify  and
implement  opportunities  to  integrate   and
leverage the full range of the  Agency's land
cleanup authorities to accelerate the pace of
cleanups,  address  a  greater  number  of
contaminated sites, and put these  sites back
into productive use while protecting human
health and the environment.

As a result of the ICI effort, the Agency will
implement improvements to its land cleanup
programs  (e.g.,  Superfund,  Brownfields,
RCRA  Corrective  Action,  and  Leaking
Underground Storage Tanks) to address the
cleanup needs   at individual sites. These
efforts will be supported by sound scientific
data, research, and cost-effective  tools that
alert the EPA to emerging issues and inform
Agency decisions on managing  materials
and addressing contaminated properties. The
EPA  also will  continue to  implement  its
Community  Engagement  Initiative.   The
goals  of  this  initiative  are to  ensure
transparent and  accessible decision-making
processes,    deliver    information   that
communities   can    use  to   participate
meaningfully, and help  the  EPA  produce
outcomes that are responsive to community
perspectives and that  ensure timely  cleanup
decisions.

Improving  a community's  ability to make
decisions that affect its environment is at the
heart  of  the EPA's  community-centered
work.     Challenging    and     complex
environmental    problems     such     as
contaminated    soil,    sediment,    and
groundwater that can  cause  human health
concerns,  persist  at  many  contaminated
properties. The burden of a single blighted
and contaminated site, or multiple blighted
and contaminated sites concentrated within
an   area,    can  result   in    long-term
environmental and economic distress to a
community.   As  multiple  sites  often  are
connected   through   infrastructure   and
geographic   location,   approaching    the
assessment and cleanup needs of the entire
area can be more effective than focusing  on
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
individual  sites.  During  FY  2013,  the
Brownfields  program  will  continue  to
support the Agency's ongoing brownfields
area-wide planning efforts. The cooperative
agreements awarded and technical assistance
provided for brownfields area-wide planning
helps communities identify viable reuses of
brownfields properties, as well  as  the  full
range    of    associated    infrastructure
investments       and       environmental
improvements, which will help site cleanup
and   area  revitalization.  This  approach
maximizes the benefits that clean up  and
restoration can bring to a community.

In FY 2013, the EPA will continue its work
to   cleanup,  redevelop,   and  revitalize
contaminated   sites.  Many  communities
across the country regularly face risks posed
by  intentional  and  accidental releases  of
hazardous substances into the environment.
The EPA and its state partners issue, update,
or  maintain  RCRA  permits  for  2,466
hazardous waste facilities. In FY 2011, the
EPA  approved new or updated controls for
100  hazardous waste facilities. In addition,
there are  1,652 sites  on  the Superfund
National Priorities List (NPL), only 347 of
which have been deleted.  Sites are placed on
the   NPL   when  the   presence    of
contamination,    often    from    complex
chemical mixtures of hazardous substances,
has  impacted  groundwater, surface water,
and/or soil. The precise  impact of many
contaminant  mixtures  on  human  health
remains  uncertain;   however,  substances
commonly found  at  Superfund sites have
been  linked to a variety  of human health
problems, such as birth defects,  infertility,
cancer,   and  changes in  neurobehavioral
functions. Through FY 2011,  the EPA  had
controlled     human     exposures     to
contamination at 1,348 NPL sites.

In FY  2013,  the  EPA   is directing  $5.7
million  to  compliance monitoring and  on-
site inspections  at Risk  Management Plan
(RMP) and oil facilities.  There is a critical
need for the  Agency to continue efforts to
prevent and respond to accidental releases of
harmful substances, including oil spills, by
developing   clear   authorities,   training
personnel, and providing proper equipment.
Recent  spills  and  releases   at  oil  and
chemical facilities resulted in human injuries
and deaths,  severe  environmental  damage,
and great financial  loss. For  example,  the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster resulted
in 11 deaths, over  200 million gallons  of
spilled  oil,  and  severe  economic  and
environmental damage throughout the Gulf.
Likewise, accidents  reported  to  the EPA
since 2005 by the current universe of RMP
facilities have resulted in  approximately 60
deaths, over  1,300 injuries, nearly 200,000
people sheltered in place, and more than
$1.6 billion in on-site and off-site damages.

Major FY 2013 Changes

The  EPA  has  carefully  evaluated  all
program  activities associated with cleaning
up communities and taking  care of one  of
America's  most valuable resources,  land.
The  FY 2013  request reflects the EPA's
continuous analysis  of program  priorities
and needs in light of fiscal constraints which
informed  the   decisions  to  reduce   or
eliminate programs and redirect resources to
higher   priorities.   This  budget   reflects
difficult choices such as  a reduction to  the
Superfund  cleanup  programs of   $40.6
million   and  the   elimination   of   the
Environmental Education program and  the
Superfund:   Support  for  Other   Federal
Agencies program (which transfers funds to
other agencies automatically).  The EPA has
targeted resources to areas of critical need
including  Tribal General Assistance (GAP)
and Oil Spill Prevention.

The FY 2013  request strongly supports tribal
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
programs. As the largest single source of the
EPA's funding to tribes,  the Tribal General
Assistance Program (GAP) provides grants
to    build    capacity   to    administer
environmental   programs  that  may   be
authorized by the  EPA in Indian  Country.
The   capacity  to  develop   environmental
education and  outreach programs,  develop
and   implement   integrated   solid  waste
management plans, and to identify serious
conditions that pose immediate public health
and ecological  threats, is important for the
health of the  tribal   communities.  These
grants  provide technical  assistance  for
developing     programs     to     address
environmental issues on Indian lands. In FY
2013, $96.4 million, a $28.7 million increase
over FY  2012,  for GAP grants will  help
build  tribal  capacity  and assist  tribes  in
leveraging other EPA  and federal funding to
contribute towards a higher overall level of
environmental and human health protection
for this underserved population.

The discharge  of  oil  into U.S.  waters can
threaten   human  health,  cause   severe
environmental  damage,  and induce  great
financial  loss to businesses, all levels  of
government and the public. The EPA's Oil
Spill program protects U.S.  waters and the
communities  that  depend   on  them   by
preventing, preparing  for,  and responding to
oil  spills. In FY  2013,  $19.3   million,  an
increase of $4.6 million, is requested for the
Oil  Spill:  Prevention,   Preparation  and
Response  program.   Additional  resources
will allow the Agency to better protect local
communities   by   supporting   increased
inspections  of  high-risk  Facility Response
Plan (FRP) facilities,  establishing a national
oil   database,   helping   facilities   with
compliance    issues,    better   equipping
inspectors for  more efficient  inspection
processes,    and     informing    program
management and  measurement activities.
There   are  approximately   4,500   FRP
facilities. In FY 2013, the EPA's goal is to
bring into  compliance 40 percent of those
facilities found to be non-compliant during
the FY 2010  through FY  2012  inspection
cycle.

In FY 2013,  the EPA is  requesting $2.0
million for planning and  implementing  a
Regional Center of Expertise for Chemical
Warfare  Agent  (CWA)   Laboratories  to
consolidate  functions  and  gain  cost  and
human capital efficiencies.  Maintaining this
national  capability is  essential  to  support
emergency responses and NPL site  cleanup
decisions.  The  Agency will  conduct  an
analysis to determine how  to maintain this
CWA   capability   most   effectively  at
Regional laboratories.  This analysis would
include  potential   consolidation  of  the
facilities  and  equipment  that   requires
support,  while  maintaining the  strategic
vision for the wider federal  effort developed
by the Department  of Homeland Security.
Other   priority   considerations   include
maintaining national expertise in this area,
processes to  mobilize  this expertise,  and
policy  for dual  use of the capability to
promote more efficient operations and other
factors.

In FY 2013,  the Agency  is  reducing the
Superfund  Remedial  program   by  $33.2
million.  To withstand  this reduction, the
Agency  will  give priority to completing
projects  at various  stages  in  the response
process. The EPA will not plan to start new
project  phases,  including  new remedial
construction starts. Instead,  the Agency will
focus on completing ongoing project phases,
such as  investigation, remedy  design,  and
remedy  construction.  This approach will
create  a  backlog  of new  construction
projects estimated to range between 25 and
35 by the end of FY 2013. The EPA will not
reduce its  statutorily mandated  actions to
operate  ground  water  remedies,   or  to
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
monitor and assess the protectiveness of the
constructed  remedies. The  program  will
continue to place emphasis  on promoting
site reuse in affected  communities, but this
shift  may  impact the EPA's  longer-term
commitment to complete 93,400 Superfund
remedial site assessments by 2015. Through
FY 2011, 89,916 sites had been assessed.
The  pace of ongoing construction projects
will  be slowed, extending the timeline to
achieve site cleanup and the return of sites to
productive use. In order to protect the public
from imminent threats to human health and
the environment, the EPA is  maintaining
funding levels for the  Superfund Emergency
Response  and  Removal   program.   The
program that  provides  automatic transfer
funding   to   other   federal    agencies
(Superfund:   Support  to  Other  Federal
Agencies) is  being  eliminated as outdated.
Funding for  Superfund  support by  the
National   Oceanic   and    Atmospheric
Administration,  U.S.  Coast  Guard,  and
Department of the Interior will  be provided
on an as-needed basis through inter-agency
agreements.

The EPA conducts environmental education
activities and  outreach through its national
program offices (e.g., the Office of Water,
etc.),  as  well as through its Environmental
Education program.  The Agency proposes to
eliminate  its  Environmental   Education
program, a reduction of nearly $10 million,
in order to  focus its limited resources on
further integrating environmental education
activities   into  existing   environmental
programs. In FY 2012, the EPA established
the Intra-Agency Environmental Education
Workgroup  to incorporate  environmental
literacy and stewardship activities across all
EPA programs. By aligning  environmental
education and  outreach activities with  the
appropriate national  programs,  the EPA is
improving the accountability and outcomes
of  these  activities.  Elimination of  the
Environmental   Education  program   will
allow  the  EPA  to  better  leverage  its
resources    for   environmental   outreach
activities which will be carried out under a
streamlined  and  coordinated approach,  thus
better serving the public while promoting
environmental literacy.  The Agency  also
will  enhance efforts to  develop additional
public-private partnership to help  support
environmental education stakeholders.

Priority Goal

The EPA  has established an FY 2012-2013
Priority Goal to highlight  progress made
through cleaning up contaminated sites. The
Priority Goal is:

• Clean up  contaminated sites  and make
  them  ready for  use.  By  September  30,
  2013,  an additional 22,100 sites will be
  ready for anticipated use.

Additional  information  on  the  Agency's
Priority   Goals    can   be   found    at
www.performance.gov.
FY 2013 Activities

Work under Goal 3 supports four objectives:
1)   Promote   Sustainable   and  Livable
Communities,  2) Preserve Land; 3) Restore
Land; and 4) Strengthen Human Health and
Environmental Protection in Indian Country.
All of these efforts  are guided  by science
and research.

Promote    Sustainable   and   Livable
Communities

In FY 2013, the EPA will continue  to use
several  approaches to  promote sustainable,
healthier    communities    and   protect
vulnerable         populations        and
disproportionately  impacted  low-income,
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
minority,   and  tribal  communities.  The
Agency  especially   is  concerned   about
threats  to  sensitive  populations,  such  as
children, the elderly, and  individuals with
chronic diseases.

Brownfields:

The EPA's Brownfields program is  funded
at $167 million.  This  program  supports
states,  local communities, and tribes in their
efforts to assess and  clean  up potentially
contaminated and lightly contaminated sites
within their jurisdiction. In FY 2013, this
support  includes   participation  in  the
Partnership  for  Sustainable  Communities,
particularly   for  brownfields   area-wide
planning projects and support for sustainable
redevelopment  approaches to brownfields.
The EPA will continue to provide technical
assistance for brownfields redevelopment in
cities   in transition  (areas struggling with
high unemployment  as a result of structural
changes to their economies). In addition, the
Brownfields program, in collaboration with
the   EPA's   Sustainable   Communities
program,  will  address critical  issues for
brownfields redevelopment, including land
assembly,  development  permitting  issues,
financing, accountability to uniform systems
of information for land use controls, and
other  factors that influence  the economic
viability of brownfields redevelopment. The
best  practices,  tools,  and lessons learned
from the Sustainable Communities program
will directly inform and  assist the  EPA's
efforts to increase area-wide planning for
assessment,  cleanup, and redevelopment of
brownfields  sites.   In   FY   2013,  the
Brownfields program will continue to foster
federal,  state,   local,  and  public-private
partnerships   to   return   properties   to
productive economic use in communities.

The EPA  supports  a modification  to the
current statutory language which calls for a
firm  25-percent  set-aside  for  petroleum
brownfields properties.  The  new language
will provide for "no more than 25 percent"
of Brownfields funds directed to petroleum
sites.  This  change will allow  brownfield
funding to be directed  to projects  selected
based  on  potential  risk   and  benefits.
Petroleum  sites  will  remain  eligible  for
funding.

Smart Growth:

The    Agency's    Smart    Growth    and
Sustainable Design program works across
the EPA and with other federal  agencies to
help    communities    strengthen   their
economies, protecting the environment  and
preserving their  heritage.  This  program
focuses on streamlining, concentrating,  and
leveraging state  and federal  assistance in
places  with the greatest need in order to
create an inviting atmosphere for economic
development upon which urban, suburban,
and rural communities can capitalize. In FY
2013,   the  EPA   will   develop   new
mechanisms to address the growing demand
from communities for more direct technical
assistance, including in  rural  areas, in areas
that are disadvantaged, or in areas that have
been  adversely affected by  contamination
and environmental degradation.

The Agency also will continue its support
for the U.S. Department of Transportation,
Housing and Urban Development,  and the
EPA's    Partnership    for     Sustainable
Communities  by  coordinating  planning
efforts     associated    with     housing,
transportation, air quality, and protection of
water resources. The EPA will  continue to
provide technical assistance to tribal, state,
regional, and local governments as they seek
to grow their  economies  and  create jobs
while   reducing    polluting    emissions,
controlling       storm-water      runoff,
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
incorporating  sustainable  design  practices,
and promoting equitable development.

Environmental Justice:

The  EPA  is  committed to environmental
justice regardless  of race,  color, national
origin, or income. Recognizing that minority
and/or low-income communities frequently
may  be   exposed  disproportionately  to
environmental harm and risks, the Agency
works to protect these communities and to
ensure they  are given  the  opportunity to
participate  meaningfully in environmental
decisions, including clean-ups. In  FY 2013,
the  EPA  requests  $7.8  million for the
Environmental  Justice  (EJ)  program  to
continue   its   efforts   to   incorporate
environmental justice considerations into the
rulemaking process, as well  as maintain the
successful    ongoing   grants   program.
Implementation of Plan EJ 2014 by Agency
Programs  and Regional Offices  is a key
component  of  this  effort.   An  ongoing
challenge for the EPA has been developing
rules  that  implement  existing   statutory
authority   while   working   to   reduce
disproportionate exposure and  impacts from
multiple  sources.   In  FY  2013, the  EJ
program   will  apply   effective   methods
suitable  for  decision-making   involving
disproportionate     environmental   health
impacts on minority, low-income,  and  tribal
populations.  The EPA  also is developing
technical guidance to support the integration
of EJ considerations in analyses that support
the EPA's actions.

Community   Action   for   a   Renewed
Environment (CARE):

The   Agency  places a  high  priority  on
expanding     the     conversation     on
environmentalism    and    working   for
environmental   justice.    Through   the
Community   Action   for   a   Renewed
Environment (CARE)  Program,  the  EPA
will  provide funding, tools,  and technical
support    that     enable    underserved
communities   to    create   collaborative
partnerships to address local environmental
problems. The  on-the-ground support and
funding will help to reduce toxic pollution
from  all  sources,  revitalize  underserved
areas,   and   improve   the   health   of
communities across the nation in sustainable
ways. In dealing with multi-media, multi-
layered  issues,  communities  want  "One
EPA" and  "one  government". For each of
the CARE communities, the EPA will  work
with the community to  see their problems
holistically, the way they see them.

In FY 2013, the  EPA  is  requesting new
grant authority to implement this successful
program  beyond the demonstration phase.
The  CARE program is designed to assist
distressed  communities  with   addressing
critical  human  health and environmental
risks using  a multi-media approach, with 90
percent of CARE projects in Environmental
Justice communities  of concern.  With FY
2013 funding of $2.1 million, the EPA will
address  pollution problems in communities
using collaborative processes to  select and
implement  local  actions.  The  EPA will
award federal funding for projects to reduce
exposure  to toxic  pollutants   and   local
environmental   problems,   create    and
strengthen local  partnerships  and capacity,
provide technical support and training, and
conduct outreach to share lessons learned by
CARE  communities.  In   FY  2013,  the
Agency also will continue to support CARE
through the  Brownfields  and  Sustainable
Communities  Programs  to  enhance  the
building  of local  partnerships, to  help
underserved communities, and to leverage
resources and sustain environmental health
efforts over time.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
U.S.-Mexico Border:

The EPA  is requesting $14.5  million  for
U.S.-Mexico Border programs in FY 2013,
including  $10  million for  infrastructure
assistance  grants. The 2,000 mile border
between the United  States and Mexico is
one  of  the  most  complex  and  dynamic
regions  in  the  world. The  U.S.-Mexico
Border region hosts a growing population of
more than  14.1 million people and  accounts
for three of the ten poorest counties in  the
U.S. In  addition, 432,000  of the  over  14
million people in the region live  in 1,200
colonias,4   which    are    unincorporated
communities characterized  by substandard
housing  and unsafe drinking water. These
demographics pose unique drinking water
and wastewater infrastructure challenges as
well as air pollution issues. Border 2020  has
identified six long-term strategic  goals to
address  the  serious  environmental   and
environmentally-related    public    health
challenges    including  the   impact    of
transboundary transport of pollutants in  the
border region.  The six goals are:   reduce
conventional air pollutant  and  emissions;
improve   water  quality    and    water
infrastructure   sustainability   and   reduce
exposure to contaminated water;  materials
management  and  clean   sites;   improve
environmental  and public  health  through
chemical safety;  enhance joint preparedness
for environmental response; and compliance
assurance and environmental stewardship.

Preserve and Restore Land
In FY 2013, the Agency is requesting  $1.3
billion  to  continue  to  apply  the  most
effective approaches to preserve and restore
land  by   developing  and   implementing
prevention  programs,  improving response
capabilities,     and    maximizing     the
effectiveness  of   response   and  cleanup
actions under RCRA, Superfund, LUST and
other authorities.  This  strategy will help
ensure   that   human   health  and   the
environment are protected and that land is
returned  to  beneficial  use  in the  most
effective way.


In FY 2013, the EPA will continue to use a
hierarchy of approaches to protect the land:
reducing  waste  at its  source,  recycling
waste,  managing   waste   effectively  by
preventing  spills   and  releases  of  toxic
materials,  and  cleaning  up  contaminated
properties.   The   Agency   is  especially
concerned   about   threats   to  sensitive
populations,  such  as children,  the elderly,
and  individuals  with chronic diseases, and
prioritizes cleanups accordingly.5

The      Comprehensive     Environmental
Response, Compensation, and  Liability Act
(CERCLA, or Superfund) and the Resource
Conservation  and  Recovery  Act (RCRA)
provide legal authority for the EPA's work
to protect  the land. The  Agency and its
partners use Superfund authority to clean up
uncontrolled or  abandoned hazardous waste
sites, allowing  land  to  be  returned  to
productive use. Under  RCRA, the  EPA
works in partnership with states and tribes to
address  risks  associated with  anyone who
generates, recycles, transports, treats,  stores,
or disposes of waste.

In FY 2013, the EPA will work to preserve
and  restore the nation's land by ensuring
 http://www.borderhealth.org/border region.php
5 Additional information on these programs can be found
at: www.epa. gov/superfund.
http://www.epa. gov/oem/content/er cleanup.htnu
http: //www. epa. go v/epao swer/hazwaste/ca/.
http://www.epa. gov/Brownfields/,
http: //www. epa. go v/swerust 1 /.
http://www.epa.gov/swerffrr/ and
http://www.epa.gov/swerrims/landrevitalization.
                                            46

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
proper management of waste and petroleum
products,    reducing    waste   generation,
increasing  recycling and by supporting its
cleanup programs and oversight of oil and
chemical   facilities.   These   efforts   are
integrated  with  the  Agency's  efforts to
promote    sustainable     and    livable
communities.  The  EPA's  land  program
activities for FY 2013 include seven broad
efforts:  1)  Integrated Cleanup  Initiative; 2)
Land Cleanup and Revitalization; 3) RCRA
Waste Management and Corrective Action;
4) Recycling  and Waste Minimization; 5)
Underground  Storage  Tanks  management;
6) Oil Spills and Chemical  Safety, and 7)
Homeland  Security.

Integrated Cleanup Initiative-:

In FY 2010, the  EPA initiated a multi-year
strategy  called  the  Integrated   Cleanup
Initiative (ICI) to improve  accountability,
transparency,  and effectiveness by better
integrating  and  leveraging  the Agency's
land cleanup authorities.  The ICI establishes
a framework of  activities, milestone dates,
and  deliverables  to  enable  the  EPA to
address a greater number of sites, accelerate
the pace of cleanups, and put those  sites
back  into  productive use  while protecting
human health  and the environment. One of
the primary goals of ICI is to communicate
progress,  successes,  and  challenges  in a
transparent manner to  stakeholders and the
public.

In  FY  2013,  the  EPA will  continue to
accelerate    and   otherwise    improve
comprehensive management of all aspects of
the  Agency's  cleanup   programs  while
addressing  the three  critical points in the
cleanup process—starting,  advancing,  and
completing site  cleanup.  The Agency  is
exploring   new    project    management
efficiencies,   broadening   the   use   of
optimization techniques, and improving the
efficiency  of the  grants  and  contracting
processes  that  are so  important  to  our
cleanup programs.

Land Cleanup and Revitalization:

In addition to  promoting sustainable  and
livable  communities,  the EPA's  cleanup
programs   (e.g.,    Superfund   Remedial,
Superfund   Federal  Facilities  Response,
Superfund   Emergency   Response   and
Removal,   RCRA   Corrective   Action,
Brownfields,  and   Leaking  Underground
Storage    Tanks    (LUST)    Cooperative
Agreements) and their partners  are  taking
proactive steps to facilitate the cleanup and
revitalization of contaminated properties. To
support the Land  Revitalization Initiative,
the EPA created the Land Revitalization
Agenda7 to integrate reuse into the  EPA's
cleanup  programs,  establish   partnerships,
and help make land revitalization part of the
EPA's  organizational culture.  In FY 2013,
the  Agency    will   continue  to    help
communities clean up and  revitalize these
once  productive properties  by removing
contamination, helping limit urban  sprawl,
fostering  ecologic   habitat enhancements,
enabling  economic  development,   taking
advantage  of existing infrastructure,  and
maintaining or improving quality of life. In
addition, the EPA  will continue to support
the RE-Powering America's Land initiative8
in  partnership  with  the Department of
Energy, and support ongoing work with the
General    Services   Administration   to
expeditiously  identify  parcels of federally-
owned property ready for reuse as  part of
cleanup.  These projects encourage reuse and
6 Additional information on this initiative may be found on
http://www.epa.gov/oswer/integratedcleanup.htm.
7 Additional information on this agenda can be found on
http://www.epa. gov/landreuse/agenda full.htm
8 Additional information on this initiative can be found on
http://www.epa.gov/renewableenergyland/.
                                            47

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
development  on   currently  or   formerly
contaminated land.

RCRA Waste Management and Corrective
Action:

In partnership with the  states,  the Agency
implements the Resource Conservation and
Recovery Act (RCRA),  which is  critical to
comprehensive and protective management
of solid and hazardous materials from cradle
to grave. In FY 2013, the EPA and the states
will oversee and manage RCRA permits for
10,000  hazardous   waste units  at   2,466
facilities.  The EPA is responsible for  the
continued oversight and  maintenance of the
regulatory  controls at facilities covered by
RCRA  and directly implements  the  entire
RCRA program in Iowa and Alaska.9 The
EPA provides leadership, worksharing, and
support  to the  50  states and  territories
authorized  to  implement  the  permitting
program.  The  RCRA permitting program
faces   a  significant workload  to  ensure
controls  remain protective. With declining
state  resources,  the  EPA  is  facing  the
potential of an increasing amount of direct
implementation responsibility.

The  EPA's Corrective  Action  program is
responsible for  overseeing and  managing
cleanups that protect human health and the
environment at active RCRA sites. The EPA
focuses its corrective action resources on the
3,747  operating hazardous waste facilities
that  are a subset  of approximately  6,000
sites  with  corrective   action  obligations.
These  facilities  include  some of the most
highly      contaminated,      technically
challenging, and potentially threatening sites
the EPA confronts in any of its cleanup
programs.10 In FY 2013, the EPA will focus
resources on  those sites  that  present  the
highest  risk  to  human  health   and  the
environment and implement actions to end
or reduce  these threats.  To  this  end,  the
Agency will focus on site investigations to
identify threats, establish  interim remedies
to reduce and eliminate exposure; and  select
and  construct  safe,   effective  long-term
remedies that maintain the viability  of the
operating facility.

Recycling and Waste Minimization:

In FY 2013,  the EPA  will continue  to
advance     the    sustainable    materials
management (SMM) practices and  a cradle-
to-cradle    perspective   representing   an
important   emphasis   shift  from   waste
management to materials management. This
involves  integrating information to foster a
national  focus,  formulating  and  issuing
policy, and  addressing market challenges  on
raw material usage (non-fossil fuel  or food).
The  EPA considers the human health and
environmental  impacts associated  with  the
full lifecycle of materials—from the amount
and  toxicity of raw  materials  extraction,
through     transportation,     processing,
manufacturing,  use and  re-use, recycling,
and  disposal.  The  Agency's approach  to
SMM  integrates the safe reuse of materials
with  economic  opportunity.  The   initial
strategy  areas  include:  1)  federal   green
challenge to reform government purchasing
practices  in an  environmentally  friendly
manner; 2)  sustainable  food management to
help capture and  prevent  food from  being
disposed in  landfills; and 3) safe handling of
used electronics to increase the amount  of
used  electronics  managed  by  accredited
third party electronics recyclers.
http://www.epa.gov/wastes/hazard/tsd/permit/pgprarpt.htm
10 There are additional facilities that have corrective action
obligations that the EPA does not track under GPRA, as
they are typically smaller, less significant facilities or sites.
The EPA recognizes that the total universe of such facilities
or sites "subject to" corrective action universe is between
five and six thousand facilities or sites.
                                            48

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
The EPAct and Underground Storage Tanks:

The EPAct11 contains numerous provisions
that significantly affect  federal  and  state
underground storage tank (UST) programs
and requires  that  the  EPA  and  states
strengthen  tank  release   and  prevention
programs.  In  FY  2013,  the  EPA  will
continue to provide grants to states to help
them  meet  their  EPAct  responsibilities,
which  include:  1)  mandatory inspections
every three years for all underground storage
tanks   and   enforcement   of   violations
discovered   during  the  inspections;   2)
operator training; 3) prohibition of delivery
for  non-complying   facilities12;  and  4)
secondary    containment    or    financial
responsibility for tank  manufacturers  and
installers.

In  FY   2013,  the   EPA  will   bolster
communication and outreach to petroleum
brownfields  stakeholders;  provide targeted
technical assistance to state, tribal,  and local
governments; evaluate policies to facilitate
increased   petroleum   brownfields   site
revitalization; and pursue corridor and smart
growth projects  to  promote  investment in
and the  sustainable  reuse  of petroleum
brownfields.

Oil Spills and Chemical Safety:

The Oil Spill  program helps protect  U.S.
waters by effectively  preventing, preparing
for, responding to, and monitoring  oil spills.
In FY  2013,  the EPA will continue to focus
efforts on oil spill prevention, preparedness,
  For more information, refer to
 http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-
 bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=109_cong_public_laws&docid=f:
 publ058.109.pdf(scroll to Title XV - Ethanol And Motor
 Fuels, Subtitle B - Underground Storage Tank
 Compliance, on pages 500-513 of the pdf file).
  Refer to Grant Guidelines to States for Implementing the
 Delivery Prohibition Provision of the Energy Policy Act
 of 2005, August 2006, EPA-510-R-06-003,
 http://www.epa.gov/oust/fedlaws/epact Q5.htm#Final.
compliance  assistance,  and  enforcement
activities associated with the more than 600
thousand    non-transportation-related    oil
storage facilities  that  the EPA  regulates
through  its  Spill  Prevention  Control  and
Countermeasure   (SPCC)  Program.   The
Agency requests redirected resources of $4.1
million  to  increase  the  frequency  of
compliance  inspections  at  high-risk  oil
facilities from the current 20 year frequency
to a seven to ten year cycle, develop a third-
party audit program, and develop a National
Oil database. The EPA's regulated universe
includes approximately 4,500 FRP facilities
and over 600,000 SPCC facilities.

The  RMP  (Risk  Management  Program)
provides the foundation for community and
hazard  response   planning  by   requiring
chemical   facilities  to take  preventative
measures, as well as collecting and sharing
data   to   assist   other   stakeholders  in
preventing and responding to releases of all
types. Taken together, the Risk Management
Program  and  Emergency  Planning  and
Community  Right-to-Know Act  (EPCRA)
establish a  structure within which federal,
state, local,  and Tribal partners  can work
together to protect the public, the economy,
and the  environment from chemical risks.
For FY 2013,  the  EPA requests  redirected
resources of $1.6 million to conduct on-site
inspections at approximately five percent of
RMP facilities nationwide  and at least 30
percent of those inspections will be at high
risk facilities.

In the Oil spill program, the goal in FY 2013
is that 40 percent  of FRP facilities found to
be  non-compliant during FY 2010 through
FY 2012 will be brought into compliance by
the end of the  fiscal  year.  In  addition to its
prevention responsibilities,  the EPA serves
as  the  lead  responder  for cleanup of all
inland zone spills,  including transportation-
related  spills from  pipelines,  trucks,  and
                                            49

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
other transportation  systems, and  provides
technical assistance and support to the U.S.
Coast Guard for coastal and maritime oil
spills.

In FY 2013, the EPA will continue to review
and revise, as appropriate, the National  Oil
and   Hazardous   Substances   Pollution
Contingency Plan, including  Subpart  J that
regulates the use of dispersants and  other
chemicals as a tool in oil spill  response. In
addition, the EPA is establishing a National
Oil database to help streamline the process
for  assisting facilities  with  compliance,
better equip inspectors for more  efficient
inspection  processes, and inform  program
management and measurement activities. In
FY 2013, the EPA will finalize development
and begin  implementation of this  National
Oil    database    including   identifying
requirements for electronic submission  of
FRPs in order to create reporting efficiencies
for the agency, states, local government and
industry.

Homeland Security:

The  EPA's Homeland Security work  is an
important  component  of  the  Agency's
prevention,    protection,   and   response
activities. The EPA will continue to provide
Homeland Security emergency preparedness
and response capability related to chemical,
biological,  and  radiological  (CBR) agents
and catastrophic incidents. In FY 2013,  the
Agency requests $38.7 million  to:  maintain
its  capability to  respond  effectively  to
incidents that may involve  harmful  CBR
substances;   operate   the   Environmental
Response   Laboratory  Network   (ERLN);
maximize    the   effectiveness    of  its
involvement in  national  security events
through pre-deployments of assets  such as
emergency  response  personnel and  field
detection     equipment;    maintain    the
Emergency Management Portal (EMP); and
manage,    collect,   and    validate   new
information for new and existing chemical,
biological,   and  radiological   agents   as
decontamination techniques are developed
or as other information emerges from  the
scientific community.

Improve   Human   Health   and    the
Environment in Indian Country

In FY 2013, the EPA will assist federally-
recognized tribes in assessing environmental
conditions in Indian country. The Agency is
requesting $96.4 million for the Tribal GAP
program, a $28.7 million increase, in order
to  help  tribes  build  their  capacity  to
implement  environmental  programs. This
additional funding will increase the average
cost of grants made to eligible tribes  and
will   fund   limited   targeted  assistance
initiatives focused on mutually agreed-upon
concerns in Indian country.  This will help to
reduce  staff turn-over  rates  and  thereby
enhance  longer-term  sustainability of  the
programs being developed. It will further the
EPA's partnership  and collaboration with
tribes to address a  wider  set  of program
responsibilities and challenges and will fund
focused targeted assistance on long-standing
and   mutually  agreed-upon  concerns   in
Indian  country.   The   EPA   also   will
strengthen   the  scientific   evidence   and
research  supporting environmental  policies
and   decisions  on   compliance, pollution
prevention, and  environmental  stewardship
in  Indian   country   through   continued
collaboration with  Agency  program offices
and   through  the   EPA's  Tribal   Science
Council.

Since adopting the EPA  Indian Policy in
1984, the EPA has worked with federally-
recognized  tribes   on  a   government-to-
government  basis,  in  recognition of  the
federal government's trust  responsibility to
federally-recognized tribes. Under federal
                                           50

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                   FY 2013 Annual Plan
environmental  statutes,   the  Agency  is
responsible for protecting human health and
the environment in Indian country.  In FY
2013, the EPA's Office of International and
Tribal Affairs will continue to lead agency-
wide program efforts to work with tribes,
Alaska  Native  Villages,  and  inter-tribal
consortia to  fulfill  this responsibility. The
EPA's strategy for  achieving this  objective
has three major components:

•   Establish an Environmental Presence in
    Indian   Country:   The   Agency  will
    continue to provide funding through the
    Tribal   General   Assistance   Program
    (GAP) so each federally-recognized tribe
    can establish an environmental presence.

»   Provide    Access   to   Environmental
    Information:  The EPA will provide the
    information tribes need to meet the EPA
    and  tribal environmental priorities and
    characterize  the   environmental  and
    public health  improvements that result
    from joint actions.

•   Implementation     of    Environmental
    Goals:   The   Agency   will   provide
    opportunities for the implementation  of
    tribal environmental programs  by tribes
    through  1) media-specific programs,  2)
    tribes themselves,  or 3)  directly  by the
    EPA, if necessary.

Research

The Sustainable and Healthy  Communities
Research Program  (SHCRP) will  continue
research to  support  the  EPA's  program
offices,  and our state  and tribal partners in
protecting and restoring land, and supporting
community health. The work of the SHCRP
falls into four inter-related themes:

    1. Data  and   Tools    to   Support
      Sustainable  Community Decisions
   uses  interactive  social  media  and
   other  innovative  means  to enable
   communities  and  stakeholders  to
   actively  engage   in  the  planning,
   design, and implementation of SHC
   research  to  meet  their   desired
   sustainability goals;

2.  Forecasting      and     Assessing
   Ecological and  Community Health
   will enable communities to ensure
   the    sustainable   provision    of
   ecosystem  services and  to assess
   how   the    natural   and   built
   environment affects the health and
   well-being of their residents;

3.  Near-term      Approaches     for
   Sustainable Solutions  builds  upon
   the EPA's program office experience
   to  improve  the   efficiency   and
   effectiveness   of  methods   for
   addressing existing  sources of land
   and   groundwater  contamination,
   while    moving    to   innovative
   approaches that reduce new sources
   of    contamination    and   enable
   recovery of  energy, materials,  and
   nutrients from waste;

4.  Integrated Solutions for Sustainable
   Outcomes assesses the state of the art
   of  sustainable  practices  for  four
   high-priority  community   decision
   areas:    waste    and    materials
   management;         infrastructure,
   including   energy    and   water;
   transportation;  and  planning   and
   zoning for buildings and land use. It
   will use whole-system  modeling to
   integrate these four areas  to better
   achieve  outcomes  with   multiple
   benefits  and  to   develop  and  test
   Taskforce on Research to Inform and
   Optimize    (TRIO)    accounting
   methods.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
In FY 2013, the SHCRP will address many
facets of site contamination and cleanup.
This  includes   source   elimination   of
contaminated ground water and migration at
Superfund sites and plume management to
reduce exposures  via  drinking  water and
vapor intrusion. Research efforts  are leading
to  screening,  sampling,  and   modeling
approaches  to assess  risks  from  vapor
intrusion  and  to  define the   need  for
mitigation in homes, schools, and places of
employment. This science will  be used to
develop  guidance in site ranking  and  in
remedial investigations.

Research  will characterize  contaminated
sediments, remediation options, and ways to
enhance cleanup of contaminated sediments,
leading  to  restored  ecological   functioning
and lifting of fish consumption advisories in
impaired waters.  The EPA  will use this
research to improve the cost effectiveness of
sediment remediation cleanups and achieve
human health, environmental, and economic
benefits of cleanup projects along lakes and
rivers. This  research provides site-specific
and general technical support to  the EPA as
it  evaluates  options  for remediation  of
Superfund sites.

The EPA will continue to develop or revise
protocols to test oil spill  control agents or
products  for  listing  on   the National
Contingency   Plan   Product    Schedule,
including  dispersants  performance  and
behavior in deep water. In addition, working
with  the  Agency's Underground Storage
Tanks  program,   SHCRP  will  deliver
improved characterization and remediation
methods  for fuels  released  from  leaking
underground storage tanks.
                                           52

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and
Congressional Justification
Ensuring the Safety of  Chemicals and
Preventing Pollution
Reduce the  risk and increase the safety of
chemicals  and  prevent pollution  at  the
source.
                 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES:
                    •  Reduce the risk of chemicals  that
                       enter our products, our environment,
                       and our bodies.
                    •  Conserve    and   protect   natural
                       resources   by  promoting  pollution
                       prevention and the adoption of other
                       stewardship practices by companies,
                       communities,          governmental
                       organizations, and individuals.
                            GOAL, OBJECTIVE SUMMARY
                                    Budget Authority
                                   Full-time Equivalents
                                  (Dollars in Thousands)
Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
and Preventing Pollution
Ensure Chemical Safety
Promote Pollution Prevention
   Total Authorized Workyears
FY 2011
Actuals

$697,917.4
$639,000.0
$58,917.5
2,734.4
FY 2012
Enacted

$662,826.3
$604,596.5
$58,229.7
2,680.0
                                                                    FY 2013 Pres Budget
                                                        FY 2013     v.
                                                        Pres Budget  FY 2012 Enacted
$699,261.0
$639,243.7
$60,017.3
2,679.9
$36,434.7
$34,647.2
$1,787.6
-0.1
                                           53

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Introduction

Chemicals are ubiquitous  in our everyday
lives  and  products.  They  are used  in the
production of everything  from our  homes
and cars to the cell phones we carry and the
food  we eat. Chemicals often are released
into  the environment  as  a  result of  their
manufacture, processing, use, and disposal.
Research shows  that  children  are  getting
steady  infusions  of  industrial   chemicals
before they are even given solid food.13'14'15
Other vulnerable  groups,  including  low-
income,    minority,    and    indigenous
populations,   may   be  disproportionately
impacted by chemical exposure  and  thus
particularly at risk.16'17'18

A requested  increase of $36.4 million in FY
2013  will support  a  crucial stage  of the
EPA's  strengthened  approach  to  address
existing chemicals that have not been tested
for adverse health or environmental effects.
The FY 2013 request  of $699 million will
allow the EPA to  sustain  its success  in
managing  the   potential   risks  of  new
chemicals    entering   commerce   and  to
significantly  accelerate progress in assessing
13 The Disproportionate Impact of Environmental Health
Threats on Children of Color
(http://vosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/8d49f7ad4bbcf4
ef852573590040b7f6/79a3fl3c301688828525770c0063b2
77! OpenDocument)
14 Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children from
Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks
15 Guide to Considering Children's Health When
Developing EPA Actions: Implementing Executive Order
13045 and EPA's Policy on Evaluating Health Risks to
Children
(http://vosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/ADPgu
ide.htm/SFile/EPA ADP Guide 508.pdf)
16 Holistic Risk-based Environmental Decision Making: a
Native Perspective
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241171)
17 Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address
Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low
Income Populations
18 Interim Guidance on Considering Environmental Justice
During the Development of an Action
(http://www.epa.gov/compliance/ej/resources/policv/consid
ering-ej-in-rulemaking-guide-07-2010.pdf)
and   ensuring   the   safety   of  existing
chemicals. In FY 2013, the EPA will move
forward  in  its transition from an approach
dominated  by   voluntary  chemical  data
submissions by industry, to a more proactive
approach to  ensure chemical  safety. The
approach focuses on: 1) using all available
authorities under TSCA to take immediate
and  lasting  action  to  eliminate or  reduce
identified chemical risks and develop  proven
safer  alternatives;   2)   using  regulatory
mechanisms to fill remaining gaps in  critical
exposure data, and  increasing transparency
and  public  access to information on TSCA
chemicals; 3) using data  from all available
sources  to  conduct  detailed  chemical risk
assessments on priority chemicals to  inform
the need for  and support development and
implementation of risk management actions;
and  4)  preventing  introduction of  unsafe
new chemicals into commerce.

In FY 2013, the EPA's Pesticide Licensing
program  will  continue   to   screen  new
pesticides before  they reach the market and
will   continue to  ensure  that pesticides
already in commerce are  safe when used in
accordance with the label. As directed by the
Federal    Insecticide,     Fungicide,    and
Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Federal Food,
Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA),  and the
Food Quality Protection  Act (FQPA),  the
EPA will  register  pesticides to   protect
consumers,  pesticide  users,  workers  who
may be exposed  to pesticides, children, and
other sensitive populations. The EPA also
will   review   potential   impacts  on  the
environment,  with  particular attention  to
endangered species.

The  EPA has a long history of international
collaboration  on  a wide  range of  global
environmental issues.  Research under this
goal  supports  the  EPA's  bilateral  and
multilateral partnerships which have taken
on new  significance in the face of shared
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
environmental  and governance  challenges
such   as  global  climate   change   and
improving  children's  environmental health
outcomes.

The   EPA  envisions  that  environmental
progress in cooperation with global partners
can catalyze even greater progress toward
protecting   our   domestic   environment,
including  adapting   to   climate  change,
ensuring that trade-related activities sustain
environmental  protection,  enhancing  the
ability of our trading partners to protect their
environments and develop in a sustainable
manner     and,   improving  international
cooperation and  enhancing  opportunities
through    effective    consultation    and
collaboration related  to   issues  of mutual
interest. To advance all of these efforts, the
EPA  continues to focus  on the following
international  priorities:    building  strong
environmental    institutions    and   legal
structures;  combating  climate  change  by
limiting  pollutants; improving air quality;
expanding  access to clean water; reducing
exposure to toxic  chemicals; and cleaning up
e-waste.

Pollution prevention is central to the EPA's
sustainability strategies.  In FY  2013, the
EPA  will  enhance cross-cutting efforts to
advance    sustainable    practices,    safer
chemicals   and   sustainable   lower   risk
processes and practices, and safer products.
The   EPA   will  incorporate  sustainability
principles into our policies, regulations, and
actions. The combined  effect of community-
level   actions,   geographically   targeted
efforts, attention  to chemicals, and concern
for ecosystems—implemented through the
lens of science, transparency, and law—will
bring real improvements and protections. To
help ensure that communities have access to
timely  and  meaningful  data  on   toxic
chemical releases, the  EPA will update the
Toxic Release  Inventory  (TRI)  to clarify
certain reporting requirements, consider the
regulatory  addition  of selected chemicals,
and consider whether to regulate additional
industry sectors under TRI.

Achieving  an environmentally sustainable
future demands that the EPA address today's
environmental problems by using a science-
based    process    while   simultaneously
preparing  for  long-term  challenges. The
EPA's  Science  Advisory  Board  (SAB)
recognizes   this  and  that  solutions  must
tackle   issues   collectively,   rather  than
individually, to be effective.19 This belief is
a core philosophy  of the EPA's  FY  2013
research  program, and it will position the
Agency  to   address   the   environmental
challenges  of the 21st Century.

Major FY  2013 Changes

Recognizing the tight limits on discretionary
spending across government,  the  EPA has
evaluated its priorities and made necessary
adjustments to focus FY 2013  resources on
the most significant  efforts that help protect
health  and  the environment from  chemical
risks. The  FY 2013 request reflects EPA's
program  priorities  and  needs in  light  of
current  program  activity levels and fiscal
constraints. The EPA requests  an increase in
FY 2013 of approximately $11 million over
the FY 2012 enacted level for critical work
in Enhancing Chemical Safety. This priority
work targets increased support for initiating,
continuing, and completing actions to reduce
chemical risks; assessing chemical risks; and
obtaining needed information on potentially
hazardous  chemicals while maximizing the
availability of information to the public. In
the  research  programs,  an   increase  of
approximately    $4   million    supports
http://yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/E989ECFC125
966428525775B0047BE1 A/$File/EPA-SAB-l 0-010-
unsigned.pdf
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
sustainable molecular design research. The
EPA will use this program to generate the
critical     information     needed     by
manufacturers to develop inherently safer
processes and  products  that  minimize  or
eliminate the associated adverse impacts on
human  health  and  the  environment that
could result  from the manufacturing, use,
and   disposal   of  chemicals,   including
nanomaterials.

Program priorities  and needs  in light  of
current  program  activity levels  and  fiscal
constraints   required  difficult   decisions
resulting in requests for program reductions
and eliminations. In FY 2013, the EPA will
reduce by approximately $2  million  all  of
the non-enforcement activities of the PCB
and  fibers  programs,  acknowledging  the
program's  maturity, broad  adoption, and
well-documented  and  understood  human
health risks. In FY 2013, the EPA also will
reduce the Endocrine Disrupter program by
approximately  $1 million  as a  result  of
progress being made to establish a full set of
screening  assays.   The  program   will
transition to  more  efficient methodologies
for   screening   chemicals,    such    as
computational  toxicology (CompTox),  as
new technologies  are  validated,  yielding
benefits such as automated, rapid screening
that will be  used to generate data on the
adverse  effects   of   large  numbers   of
chemicals.

FY 2013 Activities

Chemicals Program

Existing chemicals  activities fall  into three
major    components:   1)   strengthening
chemical      information      collection,
management,   and  transparency   ($13.9
million);  2)  screening   and   assessing
chemical  risks  ($14.9  million); and  3)
reducing chemical risks ($24.6 million).  In
FY 2013, the toxics program will  maintain
its  'zero tolerance' goal in preventing  the
introduction of unsafe new chemicals into
commerce. However, thousands  of existing
('pre-TSCA')    chemicals   already    in
commerce remain un-assessed.

In  FY  2013,  the  increased   resources
requested will allow the EPA to complete
detailed  chemical   risk   assessments   of
priority chemicals that  began in FY 2012
and  to  initiate  five  to  ten  additional
assessments,  several  of  which  will  be
completed in FY 2013. The EPA also plans
to develop hazard characterizations for 450
additional High Production Volume  (HPV)
chemicals using the data obtained through
TSCA test rules, bringing the projected total
by the end of FY 2013 to 2,433 of the 3,761
HPV chemicals identified prior to the 2011
TSCA Chemical Data Reporting rule. The
major  activity  of  the  New  Chemicals
program  is premanufacture notices (PMN)
review and management, which address the
potential risks  from  approximately  1,000
chemicals,  products  of biotechnology, and
new chemical  nanoscale materials received
annually prior to their entry into the  US
marketplace.

In FY 2013, the Agency will continue to
implement the chemicals  risk management
program  to further eliminate  risks from
high-risk "legacy" chemicals. As illustrated
on the opposite page, the EPA will build on
the successful  national  effort  to  reduce
childhood blood lead incidence and continue
ongoing   implementation   of   the   Lead
Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule
though   outreach   efforts   and  targeted
activities to support renovator certifications.
In  collaboration  with  states   and  local
governments, the Agency will continue to
address   "hotspots"   where  there   are
remaining incidences of children with high
blood lead levels.
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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
                            Children's Risk
               Blood Lead Levels for Children aged 1-5
            30%


            25%


            20%


            15%


            10%


             5%


             0%

                                                                 >10 ug/dL
                                                                 Elevated Lead
                                                                 Levels
                                                                 >5 ug/dL
                                                                 New Concern Lead
                                                                 >5 Ug/dL
                                                                 TARGET Lead Levels
                                                                 For near Future
                                              J>
Endocrine Disrupter Program

In  FY  2013,  the  Endocrine  Disrupter
Screening  Program  will  focus  on:  1)
finalizing the  inter-laboratory validation of
three  Tier 2  assays;  2)  prioritizing  and
selecting  additional chemicals  for  Tier  1
screening; 3) continuing to issue Tier 1 Test
Orders  for  selected  chemicals  evaluating
results of Tier  1 screening data submitted for
the first  list  of  pesticide  chemicals;  4)
conducting weight  of evidence  evaluations
to determine which  pesticide chemicals have
the potential  to interact with  endocrine
systems  (Tier 1),  and if  so whether they
should be further tested for effects (Tier 2);
and   5)   continuing    coordination   and
collaboration   with  the  research   and
development  program   to  determine  the
applicability of computational  toxicology-
based  approaches   to assess  a  chemical's
potential  to   interact  with  the  estrogen,
androgen, and  thyroid systems.

Pesticides Program
Key  components   of  chemical  safety  in
protecting human health, communities, and
ecosystems are identifying, assessing, and
                                                   A"
                                              *-reducing  the  risks  presented  by  the
                                              pesticides   on  which  our   society  and
                                              economy depend. Chemical and biological
                                              pesticides  help meet national and  global
                                              demands for  food.  They provide  effective
                                              pest  control for homes, schools,  gardens,
                                              highways,   utility   lines,  hospitals,  and
                                              drinking  water  treatment  facilities  and
                                              control  animal vectors  of  disease.  Many
                                              regulatory  actions  involve  reduced  risk
                                              pesticides that, once registered, will result in
                                              increased societal benefits.

                                              In FY 2013, $129.0 million is requested to
                                              support the EPA pesticide review processes
                                              for all pesticide applications. The EPA also
                                              will   focus   on    improving   pesticide
                                              registrations'    compliance    with    the
                                              Endangered  Species  Act  and  achieving
                                              broader Agency objectives for  water quality
                                              protection. The EPA  also will continue to
                                              emphasize  the  protection  of  potentially
                                              sensitive groups,  such as   children,  by
                                              reducing exposures from pesticides used in
                                              and around homes, schools, and other public
                                              areas. In  addition,   the  Agency  worker
                                         57

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
protection,   certification,   and   training
regulations will  encourage safe application
practices.  Together,  these  programs  will
minimize  exposure to pesticides, maintain a
safe and  affordable  food  supply,  address
public health issues, and minimize property
damage that can  occur from  insects and
pests.

Pollution  Prevention Program

In FY 2013, the requested funding of $20.9
million for the EPA's Pollution Prevention
(P2)   Program    will   target   technical
assistance, information, and assessments  to
encourage the  use  of greener  chemicals,
technologies, processes,  and products. The
EPA will  continue to support programs with
proven  records   of  success,   including
Environmentally   Preferable   Purchasing
(EPP), Design for the Environment  (DfE),
Green   Suppliers    Network,   Pollution
Prevention      Technical      Assistance,
Partnership   for   Sustainable  Healthcare,
Green Chemistry and Green Engineering.  In
addition,  the EPA's P2   Programs  will
support   the   Economy,   Energy,   and
Environment  (E3)   Partnership   among
federal agencies,  local  governments, and
manufacturers to promote energy efficiency,
job     creation,     and     environmental
improvement.  Work under  these programs
also supports the  energy  reduction  goals
under  Executive  Order  13514.  Through
these  efforts,  the  EPA will continue  to
encourage government and business to adopt
source  reduction  practices  that  can help
prevent   pollution   and  avoid   potential
adverse human  health and  environmental
impacts.

Research

The   EPA's   Chemical    Safety   and
Sustainability,   Human    Health   Risk
Assessment,   and   Homeland   Security
Research Programs underpin the analysis of
risks and potential health impacts across the
broad  spectrum  of  EPA  programs  and
provide  the   scientific  foundation   for
chemical safety and pollution prevention. In
FY 2013, the EPA will further strengthen its
planning  and   delivery  of  science  by
continuing  an  integrated research approach
that tackles problems  systematically instead
of individually.

The requested increase of $2.5 million to the
Chemical Safety and Sustainability Research
Program (CSSRP) will  support  the  EPA's
efforts  to  develop  enhanced  chemical
screening   and   testing  techniques  that
improve    context-relevant     chemical
assessment and  management.   New tools
promise  to  transform  the  way the EPA
evaluates risks of chemical products.  The
EPA  will combine these new  tools with
existing test  methods,  integrating toxicity
and exposure pathways in the context of the
life cycle of the chemical.  This approach
will yield benefits such  as automated, rapid
screening that  will be used to generate data
on the adverse effects of large numbers of
chemicals. Previous approaches  were more
narrowly targeted to single chemicals or
problem areas.

In FY  2013,  the EPA will  continue  the
multi-year   transition  away   from   the
traditional   assays   used   in   Endocrine
Disrupter   Screening   Program  (EDSP)
through  efforts  to   validate   and  use
computational     toxicology   and    high
throughput screening methods.  This  will
allow   the  Agency   to  more  quickly,
efficiently,   and  cost-effectively   assess
potential chemical toxicity. For example, the
average cost of testing  300  chemicals with
computational  toxicology is about $20,000
per chemical, compared to more traditional
approaches that  can  cost  more than  $6
million per chemical.  In FY 2013, the EPA
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
will continue to evaluate endocrine-relevant
ToxCast assays.

The CSSRP also supports decision makers
in individual  localities  and  communities
with research on their priority contaminants.
This  will  support better  air  toxics  and
drinking water-related regional and  local
decision-making.  Under the  consolidated
research  program,  the  EPA  also   will
continue to support the scientific foundation
for addressing the  risks of  exposure  to
chemicals in wildlife.

In FY2013,  the  Agency's Human Health
Risk  Assessment  Research Program  will
continue to develop assessments including:
   •   Integrated Risk Information System
       (IRIS)  health  hazard  and  dose-
       response assessments,
   •   Integrated   Science    Assessments
       (ISAs)of criteria air pollutants;
   •   Community   Risk  and  Technical
       Support, and
   •   Methods, models, and approaches to
       modernize  risk assessment  for  the
       21st Century.

The program  will release draft Integrated
Science Assessments  for nitrogen oxides
and carbon monoxide for Clean Air Science
Advisory  Committee  review  and public
comment.    The   program    will   make
significant  progress   on  health  hazard
assessments of high priority chemicals (e.g.,
dioxin,  methanol,   cumulative  phthalate
assessment, benzo-a-pyrene, Libby asbestos
cancer  assessment,   and  polychlorinated
biphenyl (PCB) non-cancer assessment).

The Homeland Security  Research  Program
(HSRP)  will  continue  to  enhance   the
nation's    preparedness,   response,   and
recovery capabilities for  homeland security
incidents and other hazards. The HSRP will
provide stakeholders with valuable detection
and   response  analytics   for  incidents
involving    chemical,    biological,     or
radiological  agents.  The  program   will
emphasize   research  needed   to   support
response  and  recovery  from wide-area
attacks   involving   radiological   agents,
nuclear agents, and biothreat agents such as
anthrax.

The EPA will allocate $164.4 million to the
Chemical Safety and Sustainability, Human
Health  Risk  Assessment,  and Homeland
Security Research Programs in FY 2013.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013  Annual Performance Plan  and
Congressional Justification

Enforcing Environmental Laws
Protect human health and the environment
through vigorous  and  targeted civil  and
criminal  enforcement.  Assure  compliance
with environmental laws.
                       STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES:


                    •   Pursue vigorous civil  and criminal
                       enforcement  that targets  the most
                       serious  water,   air,  and  chemical
                       hazards in  communities.    Assure
                       strong,  consistent,   and  effective
                       enforcement       of       federal
                       environmental laws nationwide.
                           GOAL, OBJECTIVE SUMMARY
                                    Budget Authority
                                  Full-time Equivalents
                                 (Dollars in Thousands)
Enforcing Environmental Laws
Enforce Environmental Laws
   Total Authorized Workyears
                                    FY 2013 Pres Budget
FY2011     FY2012     FY 2013     v.
Actuals      Enacted     Pres Budget  FY 2012 Enacted

$820,541.2    $784,884.0    $830,411.9    $45,527.9

$820,541.2    $784,884.0    $830,411.9    $45,527.9

3,888.4      3,933.2      3,885.0      -48.2
                                           60

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Introduction

The  EPA's civil  and criminal  enforcement
programs  perform   the  core  function  of
assuring  compliance  with   our  nation's
environmental laws.  A strong and effective
enforcement   program   is   essential   to
maintain respect  for the rule of law and a
level economic playing field, and to realize
the promise of federal statutes to protect the
environment   and  the   public  health  of
citizens.

On January   18, 2011,  President  Obama
issued   a   "Presidential  Memoranda   -
Regulatory Compliance"20  which  reaffirms
the importance of effective  enforcement and
compliance in regulations.  In part, it states
"Sound regulatory   enforcement   promotes
the welfare of Americans in many ways,  by
increasing public safety, improving working
conditions, and protecting the air we breathe
and   the   water   we    drink. Consistent
regulatory  enforcement  also  levels  the
playing  field  among  regulated  entities,
ensuring that those that fail to comply with
the law do not have an unfair advantage over
their law-abiding competitors."

In FY  2013, the EPA seeks to maintain the
strength of its core national Enforcement
and    Compliance   Assurance   program.
Recognizing  the  limitations  of the  federal
budget  and the  declining  resources of the
states,   the   Agency   will   continue  to
implement strategies that use resources more
efficiently  and find  opportunities to focus
and leverage  efforts to  assure compliance
with environmental laws.
The EPA has achieved impressive pollution
control and health benefits through vigorous
compliance  monitoring  and  enforcement,
but  tough  enforcement  alone  will  not
address all noncompliance problems.  The
sheer number  of regulated facilities,  the
contribution of large  numbers  of smaller
sources  to  environmental  problems, and
federal and  state budget constraints, mean
the EPA can no longer rely primarily on the
traditional  single facility   inspection and
enforcement approach to ensure widespread
compliance21.     In  light  of  the  fiscal
constraints, the need to innovate  is even
greater if the  EPA is to achieve gains in
compliance over the long-term. Instead, the
EPA needs to develop and implement a new
paradigm that  relies heavily on advances in
both monitoring and information technology
and that  will  improve oversight  and reduce
burdens on business.

This  new  paradigm   is   called   "Next
Generation Compliance." There are multiple
components to this new paradigm: the use of
modern  monitoring technology  to  detect
pollution problems; electronic reporting by
facilities  so   that  quality,   complete and
timely  information  on  compliance and
pollutants can be obtained; transparency so
the  public   is  aware  of  facility  and
government   environmental   performance;
implementation of innovative enforcement
approaches;  and  structuring regulations  to
drive compliance. In FY 2013, the national
Enforcement   and  Compliance  Assurance
program  will increase efforts to implement
Next  Generation  Compliance approaches to
help  achieve  the   EPA's  goals  more
efficiently and effectively while continuing
to pursue high priority work.
20 For more information regarding the Regulatory
Compliance Memo, please refer to:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-
office/2011/01/18/presidential-memoranda-regulatorv-
compliance
www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/policies/civil/cwa/acti
onplanl01409.pdf
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
In  FY 2013,  the  EPA  will  focus  on
addressing the most important public health
and environmental compliance problems. In
addition, the Agency proposes to accelerate
its Next Generation Compliance  approaches
to  harness   the   tools  of  21st   century
technology to  make  this program  more
efficient and effective for the future. For
example, the burden and costs of monitoring
and compliance reporting can be reduced for
the EPA, states and businesses by investing
in  modern  monitoring  and  electronic
reporting technology.  This would allow the
EPA  and  states  to move  away from  the
traditional  model  of reliance  on  time-
consuming and  expensive individual facility
inspections and paper reporting. The Agency
also  will   continue   to  emphasize   the
importance    of   making    compliance
information  publicly   available  to  better
serve the  American people and  provide an
efficient and effective incentive to promote
compliance with environmental laws.

Major FY 2013 Changes

It  is  critically  important that the  EPA
continually assess its priorities and embrace
new approaches that can  help achieve goals
more efficiently and effectively.  The EPA's
FY  2013  budget   submission  for   the
Enforcement  and  Compliance  Assurance
program decreases  some program  areas so
the Agency  can  continue to pursue  the
highest priority work,  including work on the
national enforcement initiatives.

In FY 2013, the  Agency  will  redirect or
refocus resources within the enforcement
and  compliance   programs  in   order to
accelerate efforts  to  increase compliance
with the nation's environmental  laws.  This
effort  will enhance the  EPA's ability to
detect  violations that  impact  public health,
reduce transaction  costs  for  the regulated
community, and better engage the public to
drive behavioral changes in compliance. The
EPA   will    promote   e-reporting   by
implementing   new  technologies,  develop
and disseminate advanced monitoring tools,
upgrade Agency IT infrastructure to exploit
more fully the wealth of new  monitoring
data, and modernize the EPA's approach to
enforcement by ensuring  new and existing
rules incorporate electronic reporting. In FY
2013, a key element of this approach will be
modifying  data systems  to  implement  e-
reporting with regulated facilities, leading to
improved compliance and transparency, and
more efficient processes that do  not rely on
paper-based reporting. The EPA and states
will  have  access to  more complete,  timely
and  accurate  data  that  will  improve  our
ability to  prioritize permitting, monitoring,
and  enforcement  actions. Funding for this
effort  in FY  2013  would allow  the  cost
savings and  cost  avoidance  to begin  to
accrue to the EPA, states, and industry as a
result of converting paper-based reporting to
electronic reporting.

The   EPA's   National   Enforcement  and
Compliance Assurance program  will  see an
overall reduction of  45.0 FTE, a cut of 1.3
percent from FY 2012 FTE levels. The EPA
will  prioritize resources to  continue  to
address the most important public health and
environmental  compliance problems,  and
will  reduce efforts in a variety of program
areas based on objective factors  such  as
relative risks  to   public health   or   the
environment,  levels of non-compliance,
states'   ability  to   provide  compliance
oversight and enforcement, and other factors
such as statutory or treaty  obligations.  In
times of declining resources it is critical not
only to carefully assess the highest priorities
but also to develop strategies  that  can  help
achieve   goals  more   efficiently   and
effectively.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
The EPA is reducing  by  $1.3  million,
funding    associated   with    Potentially
Responsible  Party  (PRP)   searches  and
settlement activity  under  the   Superfund
Enforcement program. This reduction also
would decrease  funding  provided  to  the
Department  of   Justice   for   Superfund
settlement efforts. The  request would also
reduce compliance assistance  and clean up
oversight  activities at federal facilities under
the    Superfund    Federal     Facilities
Enforcement program.
Priority Goal

The EPA has established a FY 2012-2013
Priority Goal on electronic reporting. While
the enforcement program has a lead role in
implementing this  goal by  co-chairing  a
newly formed Agency task force, this is an
Agency goal  across  EPA programs.  This
Priority Goal will:

•   Increase transparency and reduce burden
    through  e-Reporting. By September 30,
    2013, develop a plan to convert existing
    paper  reports into electronic reporting,
    establish electronic reporting in at  least
    four key programs, and adopt a policy
    for including electronic reporting in new
    rules.

Additional   information  on  the Agency's
Priority   Goals    can   be    found    at
www.performance.gov.

FY 2013 Activities

The FY 2013 budget incorporates  difficult
decisions  to  reduce   spending  for lower
priority activities. Nevertheless, the Agency
is  committed  to  implementing a strong
enforcement  and   compliance  program
focused on  identifying and reducing  non-
compliance  and deterring future violations.
To meet these goals, the program employs a
variety   of   activities,   including   data
collection   and    analysis,   compliance
monitoring,  assistance  and incentives,  civil
and   criminal  enforcement  efforts  and
innovative  problem-solving approaches  to
identify and address  the most significant
environmental  issues.  In FY  2013  these
efforts  will  be  enhanced  through  Next
Generation Compliance approaches that rely
on  21st century reporting and monitoring
tools  to advance  implementation  of  the
Administrator's  priorities as  well  as  the
Agency's core program work. In  FY 2013,
the  Agency is requesting a  total  of $620.1
million and 3,324.6 FTE for its Enforcement
and  Compliance  Assurance program.  The
major activities include the following:

   Focus Areas:

•  Protecting Air  Quality:  The  EPA will
   focus  on  the  largest sources  of air
   pollution,  including   coal-fired  power
   plants  and the  cement,  acid  and glass
   sectors,   to   improve   air    quality.
   Enforcement to cut toxic air pollution in
   communities  improves  the  health  of
   communities,     particularly      those
   overburdened by pollution.

   The Energy Independence and Security
   Act  (EISA) of 2007  requires  increased
   use of renewable fuels. The EPA's Civil
   Enforcement  program  will  help  the
   regulated community understand their
   statutory   obligations   under   EISA;
   inspect   renewable   fuel  production
   facilities;  monitor  compliance   with
   renewable  fuel requirements;  monitor
   and  enforce the credit trading program;
   and,   undertake   administrative   and
   judicial    enforcement   actions,    as
   appropriate.
•  Protecting America's  Waters: Pursuant
   to the Clean Water Act Action Plan, the
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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
 EPA is working  with  states  to revamp
 compliance and enforcement approaches
 to  more  effectively   and  efficiently
 address  the  most  important  water
 pollution problems. This work includes
 getting raw sewage out of water, cutting
 pollution  from   animal   waste,   and
 reducing  pollution  from  stormwater
 runoff. These efforts will help to clean
 up great waters like the Chesapeake Bay
 and  will  focus  on revitalizing  urban
 communities by protecting and restoring
 urban  waters.  Enforcement   also  will
 support  the   goal  of  assuring  clean
 drinking  water  for  all  communities,
 including small  systems and  in Indian
 country.

 Cleaning Up Our Communities:  The
 EPA protects communities by ensuring
 that    responsible   parties    conduct
 cleanups, saving federal dollars for  sites
 where  there  are  no viable contributing
 parties. Ensuring  that responsible parties
 clean up the sites also reduces  direct
 human exposure to hazardous pollutants
 and  contaminants,  provides   for long-
 term  human  health  protection,   and
 ultimately     makes     contaminated
 properties available for reuse.

 The  EPA's Resource Conservation and
 Recovery  Act   (RCRA)   Corrective
 Action  enforcement program  supports
 the goal  set by the Agency and its  state
 partners of attaining remedy construction
 at 95 percent of  3,747 RCRA facilities
 by the  year 2020. In  2010,  the  EPA
 issued    the   "National  Enforcement
 Strategy  for  Corrective  Action"  to
 promote  and communicate   nationally
 consistent enforcement  and  compliance
 assurance principles, practices, and tools
 to help achieve this goal. In  FY 2013,
 the  EPA   will  continue   targeted
 enforcement under the Strategy and will
   work with its state partners to assess the
   contribution of enforcement in working
   towards the 2020 goal.

•  Ensuring the  Safety  of Chemicals and
   Preventing   Pollution:   Strengthening
   chemical   safety   enforcement   and
   reducing  exposure  to pesticides  will
   improve  the  health  of  Americans.
   Enforcement  reduces   direct  human
   exposures  to   toxic  chemicals  and
   pesticides and supports long-term human
   health protection.

Compliance Monitoring

The EPA's Compliance Monitoring program
reviews and evaluates  the activities of the
regulated    community    to    determine
compliance    with     applicable    laws,
regulations,    permit    conditions    and
settlement  agreements,   as  well   as   to
determine  whether  conditions  presenting
imminent  and  substantial  endangerment
exist. In FY 2013, the EPA's compliance
monitoring   activities    will   be   both
environmental media- and sector-based. The
EPA's media-based inspections complement
those performed by states and tribes, and are
a key  part of the  strategy for meeting  the
long-term and annual goals established for
the air, water, pesticides, toxic  substances
and  hazardous waste programs.  The EPA
will  target its  inspections to the  highest
priority  areas  and  coordinate  inspection
activity  with   states    and  tribes,   but
noncompliance    may    potentially    go
undetected  or increase.  In FY 2013, as part
of Next Generation Compliance, the Agency
will  continue to enhance the  efficiency and
effectiveness of the Compliance Monitoring
program   by    emphasizing    electronic
reporting   (e-reporting),  enhancing   data
systems   to   collect,    synthesize   and
disseminate monitoring data,  and deploying
                                        64

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
state of the art monitoring equipment to the
field.

Compliance monitoring  also  includes the
EPA's management and use of data systems
to  run its  compliance  and  enforcement
programs  under the  various  statutes  and
programs  that  the  EPA  enforces.  In FY
2013, the Agency will accelerate the process
of enhancing its data systems to support
electronic   reporting,   providing    more
comprehensive, accessible data to the public
and improving integration of environmental
information  with  health data and  other
pertinent data  sources from other federal
agencies  and private  entities.  The Agency
will  complete  Phase II  of its  multi-year
project to modernize the Permit Compliance
System  (PCS)  by   moving  all  of the
remaining states from PCS to the Integrated
Compliance Information System (ICIS). The
EPA will then focus its resources on the last
Phase of ICIS,  Phase III, to modernize the
Air Facility System (AFS). ICIS  supports
both  compliance   monitoring  and   civil
enforcement.  In FY  2013, the  proposed
Compliance Monitoring  budget is $126.6
million and 634.5 FTE.

Civil Enforcement

The    Civil     Enforcement    program's
overarching  goal is to assure compliance
with the nation's environmental laws and
regulations in order to protect human health
and   the  environment.  The   program
collaborates with the Department of Justice,
states, local agencies and  tribal governments
to ensure consistent and fair enforcement of
all environmental laws and regulations. The
program  seeks to protect public health and
the environment and ensure a level playing
field by strengthening partnerships  with co-
implementers  in the  states,  encouraging
regulated  entities to  rapidly  correct their
own violations,  ensuring  that  violators do
not  realize  an  economic  benefit  from
noncompliance and pursuing enforcement to
deter future violations. In FY 2013, the Civil
Enforcement program will benefit from the
Next Generation Compliance initiative by
deploying  state  of  the  art  monitoring
equipment to the field and increasing the use
of e-reporting.  The EPA and states will be
able  to  target  limited   inspection   and
enforcement resources in those  areas where
they  are  most  needed such  as  complex
industrial   operations   requiring   physical
inspection,  repeat  violators,  and   cases
involving  significant harm to human health
or the  environment, or potential criminal
violations.

The  Civil  Enforcement program  develops,
litigates and settles administrative and  civil
judicial cases against  serious  violators  of
environmental laws.  In  FY 2011, the EPA
enforcement actions  required companies to
invest an  estimated  $19 billion  in actions
and   equipment  to   control   pollution
(injunctive relief) - a record amount. Also in
FY  2011,  the  EPA's enforcement actions
required companies to reduce pollution by
an estimated 1.8 billion pounds per year -
the second highest amount  since the EPA
began measuring pollutant  reductions from
enforcement     cases    using    current
methodologies. In addition,  the EPA's top
15 Clean Air Act enforcement actions of FY
2011  reduced  emissions   of  particulate
matter,  sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides,  and
VOCs, resulting in projected health benefits
and   other   environmental   improvements
valued at $15 to $36 billion each year.

In FY 2013, the EPA will focus on national
priorities and repeat  violators, especially in
communities that may be disproportionately
exposed to risks and harm from  pollutants in
their environment, including minority and/or
low-income areas.  Specifically,  in FY 2013,
the   EPA   will    continue  to   target
                                          65

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
implementation of the National Enforcement
Initiatives  established  for  FY 2011-2013.
These national  initiatives address problems
that  remain  complex  and  challenging,
including Clean Water Act "wet weather"
discharges, violations of the Clean Air Act
New    Source    Review/Prevention    of
Significant Deterioration requirements and
Air Toxics regulations, RCRA violations at
mineral  processing  facilities,  and  multi-
media   problems  resulting  from  energy
extraction   activities.   Information   on
initiatives,     regulatory     requirements,
enforcement alerts and EPA results will be
made  available  to  the  public  and  the
regulated community through web sites. The
Civil Enforcement program also will support
the Environmental Justice program and the
Administrator's priority to address pollution
impacting   vulnerable  populations.    In
addition, the  Civil  Enforcement  program
will  help  to   implement  the President's
directive  to  develop   and  implement  a
compliance and enforcement strategy for the
Chesapeake Bay, providing strong oversight
to ensure existing regulations  are complied
with consistently and in a timely manner. In
FY 2013,  the  proposed budget  for  Civil
Enforcement is $192.7 million and  1,205.7
FTE.

Criminal Enforcement

Criminal Enforcement  underlies  the EPA's
commitment to  pursuing the  most serious
pollution violations.  The EPA's Criminal
Enforcement program investigates and helps
prosecute  environmental  violations  that
seriously  threaten public  health  and  the
environment  and  involve   intentional,
deliberate or criminal behavior on the part of
the violator.  The  Criminal  Enforcement
program deters violations of environmental
laws and regulations by demonstrating that
the  regulated  community  will  be   held
accountable through  jail   sentences  and
criminal  fines.  Bringing criminal  cases  to
court sends  a strong deterrence message to
potential  violators,  enhances   aggregate
compliance  with laws and regulations, and
protects communities.

The  program has  completed its three-year
hiring strategy, raising the number of special
agents to 200. To make the best use  of
resources, the program will work to reduce
case work in lower priority areas and use the
special agent capacity to address  complex
environmental  cases  in  FY  2013.  To
accomplish  this, the Criminal Enforcement
program  will expand its identification and
investigation  of  cases  with  significant
environmental, human health and deterrence
impact.  The EPA's Criminal  Enforcement
program will focus on cases across all media
that   involve   serious   harm  or  injury;
hazardous   or  toxic   releases;   ongoing,
repetitive,  or  multiple releases;  serious
documented  exposure  to  pollutants;  and
violators with significant repeat or chronic
noncompliance or prior  criminal conviction.
In  FY  2013,  the  proposed  budget  for
Criminal Enforcement is $59.6 million and
298.2 FTE.

Superfund Enforcement

The EPA's Superfund Enforcement program
protects  communities  by  ensuring  that
responsible  parties  conduct  cleanups  of
hazardous waste  sites,   preserving federal
dollars for sites where  there are  no viable
contributing parties. Superfund Enforcement
uses an "enforcement  first"  approach that
maximizes the  participation  of liable and
viable parties in performing and paying for
cleanups in  both the remedial and removal
programs;  however,  due  to  the  fiscally
constrained  environment,  the  EPA  will
reduce  resources   that  support  program
activities,  including PRP searches,  cleanup
settlements,  and  cost  recovery.  Similarly,
                                           66

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
cuts  in   Superfund   Federal  Facilities
enforcement  will  place greater focus  on
federal  agencies actively  managing  their
own  cleanup  efforts.  The  Agency  will
continually assess its priorities and embrace
new approaches that can help  achieve  its
goals more efficiently and effectively.
Enforcement authorities play a unique role
under   the   Superfund   program.   The
authorities  are  used  to   ensure  that
responsible parties conduct a majority of the
cleanup actions and reimburse  the  federal
government  for  cleanups  financed   by
Federal  resources.   In  tandem  with  this
approach,   various  reforms   have   been
implemented to  increase fairness,  reduce
transaction   costs,   promote   economic
development and make  sites  available for
                    99
appropriate     reuse.     Ensuring    that
responsible parties cleanup sites ultimately
reduces   direct   human   exposures   to
hazardous  pollutants   and   contaminants,
provides  for  long-term  human  health
protections   and    makes    contaminated
properties available for reuse.

The Department of Justice  supports  the
EPA's  Superfund  Enforcement  program
through negotiations and judicial actions to
compel  PRP  cleanup  and   litigation  to
recover Trust Fund monies.  The Agency is
providing  $23.7 million to the Department
of   Justice    through    an    Interagency
Agreement.  In  FY  2011,  the  Superfund
Enforcement program secured private party
commitments that exceeded $3.3 billion.  Of
this amount, PRPs have committed to future
response work with  an estimated value  of
approximately $3 billion; PRPs have agreed
to reimburse the agency for $298.6 million
in past costs; and PRPs have been billed  by
the EPA for approximately  $74  million in
oversight  costs. The EPA  also works  to
22 For more information regarding the EPA's enforcement
 program and its various components, please refer to
 http://www.epa.gov/compliance/cleanup/superfund/
ensure  that  required  legally  enforceable
institutional controls and financial assurance
instruments are in place and adhered to at
Superfund  sites and at facilities  subject to
RCRA Corrective Action to ensure the long-
term protectiveness of cleanup actions.

The  Forensics Support  program  provides
specialized scientific and technical support
for the nation's most complex Superfund
civil and criminal enforcement cases, as well
as   technical   expertise   for    Agency
compliance efforts. In FY 2013, the National
Enforcement Investigations  Center (NEIC)
will  continue to  function  under rigorous
International  Standards Organization 17025
requirements   for   environmental   data
measurements to maintain its accreditation.
Due to reduced funding  and  the need to
direct  resources to  the Agency's highest
priorities, the Agency is  reducing funding
for the forensics laboratory  at  the National
Enforcement Investigations  Center (NEIC).
This decrease would reduce NEIC's support
for civil enforcement cases under CERCLA
authorities   and  their  ability  to  support
complex enforcement  cases, and criminal
investigations.

Partnering  with   States,  Tribes   and
Communities

The   EPA   shares  accountability   for
environmental and human health  protection
with  states  and   tribes.  Most states  are
authorized  or have been delegated the legal
responsibility for  implementing the major
federal environmental  protection  programs,
including the compliance and  enforcement
responsibilities. The  Agency works together
with the states to target the  most important
pollution   violations   and  ensure   that
companies  that meet their obligations  and
are responsible neighbors are not put at a
competitive disadvantage.  The EPA also has
a responsibility to oversee  state  and tribal
                                           67

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
implementation of federal laws to provide
that  the  same level of protection for the
environment and  the public applies across
the country.  In  FY 2013  the Agency is
requesting  $24.3  million  for  enforcement
and compliance categorical grants.

The  EPA's enforcement  and  compliance
program  promotes environmental justice by
targeting    pollution    problems     that
disproportionately   affect   low   income,
minority,   and/or   tribal    communities.
Compliance with environmental  laws is
particularly important in communities  that
are exposed to greater environmental health
risks. The EPA also fosters  community
involvement by  making information about
compliance and government action available
to the public.  The  Agency  also strives to
provide increased transparency; by making
information on violations both available and
understandable  to  communities, the  EPA
empowers citizens to demand, and motivates
regulated   facilities   to   provide,   better
compliance with environmental laws.
                                          68

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
               FY 2013 Annual Plan
   PERFORMANCE: STRATEGIC GOALS 1-5 EIGHT-YEAR ARRAY
   (Boxes shaded gray indicate that a measure has been terminated for FY 2012 and beyond, therefore, data are no longer collected.)

   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY
   Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and develop adaptation strategies to address climate change, and protect and improve air quality.
Objective 1 - Address Climate Change: Reduce the threats posed by climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and taking actions
that help communities and ecosystems become more resilient to the effects of climate change
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, additional programs from across EPA will promote practices to help Americans save energy and
                conserve resources, leading to expected greenhouse gas emissions reductions of 740.1 MMTCO2Eq.From a baseline without
                adoption  of efficient practices. This reduction  compares to 500.4  MMTCO2Eq. Reduced  in  2008. (Baseline  FY  2008:
                ENERGY STAR 140.8 MMTCO2Eq., Industrial Programsl  314.2 MMTCO2Eq., SmartWay  Transportation Partnership 5.9
                MMTCO2Eq.,  Pollution Prevention Programs  6.5  MMTCO2Eq.,  Sustainable  Materials Management  Programs2  34.3
                MMTCO2Eq., WaterSense Program 0.4 MMTCO2Eq., Executive Order 135143 GHG Reduction Program 0.0 MMTCO2Eq.)
                (PM G02) Million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCO2E) of greenhouse gas reductions in the buildings sector.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   97 2
(!)    Address
Climate         Actual   110.4
Change
107.8

132.4
118.8

140.8
130.2

143.4
143.0

163.5
                                                                                  156.9
                                                                                  Data
                                                                                  Avail
                                                                                  12/2012
168.7
182.6
          MMTCO2e
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 89.5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent reductions. To serve as a
                basis for comparison in future years, EPA used the 2004 baseline to project into the future assuming no impact on greenhouse
                gas emissions from U.S. climate change programs. The baseline was developed as part of an interagency evaluation of the U.S.
                climate change programs in 2002, which built on similar baseline forecasts developed in  1993 and 1997 in the U.S. Climate
                Change Action Report (2002). Baseline  data for carbon emissions related to energy use is based on data from the Energy
                Information Agency (EIA) and from EPA's Integrated Planning Model of the U.S. electric power sector. Baseline data for non-
                carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, including nitrous oxide and other high global warming potential gases are maintained by EPA.
                (PM G06) Million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCO2E) of greenhouse gas reductions in the transportation
                sector.
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
                Target
2.2
                Actual   2.2
           4.2
5.5
5.9
9.5
6.0
7.2
7.0
FY2011

9.0
Data
Avail
12/2012
FY 2012

11.3
                                                                                           Unit
                                                                                                                    MMTCO2e
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 0.7 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent reductions from the
                SmartWay program. To serve as a basis for comparison in future years, EPA projected from the 2004 baseline into the future
                assuming no impact on greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. climate change programs. The baseline was developed as part of an
                interagency evaluation of the U.S.  climate change programs in 2002, which built on similar baseline forecasts developed in
                1993 and  1997 in the U.S. Climate Change Action Report (2002). Baseline data for carbon emissions related to energy use is
                based on data from the Energy Information Agency (EIA) and from EPA's Integrated Planning Model of the U.S. electric power
                sector. Baseline data for non-carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, including nitrous oxide and other high global warming potential
                gases are maintained by EPA.
                (PM G16) Million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCO2E) of greenhouse gas reductions in the industry sector.
                          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   212.0      229.6       248.3       267.3       304.0
                Actual   251.9      267.3       289.7       293.7       362.8
                                                         346.2
                                                         Data
                                                         Avail
                                                         12/2012
                                              372.9
                                              421.9
                                                                                                                    MMTCO2e
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 201 million metric tons of carbon  dioxide equivalent reductions  from
                ENERGY STAR for the Industrial Sector, Non-CO2 Partnership Programs, Combined Heat and Power Partnership, Significant
                New Alternatives Policy (SNAP), and the Landfill Rule. To serve as a basis for comparison in future years, EPA projected from
                the 2004 baseline into the future assuming no impact on greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. climate change programs. The
                baseline was developed as part of an interagency  evaluation of the U.S. climate change programs in 2002, which built  on
                similar baseline forecasts developed in 1993 and 1997 in the U.S. Climate Change Action Report (2002). Baseline data is based
                on data from the Energy Information Agency (EIA) and from EPA's Integrated Planning Model of the U.S. electric power
                sector. Baseline data for non-carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, including nitrous oxide and other high global warming potential
                gases are maintained by EPA.
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic  Measure: By 2015, EPA will  integrate climate change science trend and scenario information into five major
                scientific models and/or decision-support tools used in implementing Agency environmental management programs to further
                EPA's mission, consistent with existing authorities (preference for one related to air quality, water quality, cleanup programs,
                and chemical safety). (Baseline FY 2010: 0 scientific models)
                (PM  ADI) Cumulative  number  of  major scientific  models  and  decision  support tools  used in  implementing
                environmental management programs that integrate climate change science data.
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                              Major
                              Models   and
                              Tools
                Additional Information: To ensure EPA's mission, EPA will build resilience to climate change by integrating considerations of
                climate data into major scientific models and decision support tools. Many of the outcomes EPA is working to attain are
                sensitive to climate, and every action EPA takes must be resilient to these fluctuations. The FY 2011 baseline is  0 major
                scientific models/decision support tools.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, EPA will account for climate change by integrating climate change science trend and  scenario
                information into five rule-making processes to further EPA's mission, consistent with existing authorities (preference for one
                related to air quality, water quality, cleanup programs, and chemical safety). (Baseline FY 2010: 0)
                (PM AD2) Cumulative number of major rulemakings with climate sensitive, environmental impacts, and within existing
                authorities, that integrate climate change science data.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
        1
Major
Rulemakings
                Additional Information: To ensure EPA's mission, EPA will build resilience to climate change by integrating considerations of
                climate data into major rule making processes. Many of the outcomes EPA is working to attain are sensitive to climate, and
                every action EPA takes must be resilient to these fluctuations. The FY 2011 baseline is 0 major proposed rules.
                Strategic  Measure: By 2015,  EPA will build resilience to climate change by  integrating considerations  of climate change
                impacts and adaptive measures  into five major grant, loan, contract, or technical assistance programs to further EPA's mission,
                consistent with existing authorities  (preference for one related to air quality, water quality,  cleanup programs, and scientific
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                research). (Baseline FY 2010: 0)
                (PM ADS) Cumulative number of major grant,  loan, contract, or  technical assistance agreement programs that
                integrate climate science data into climate sensitive projects that have an environmental outcome.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
        1
Major
Programs
                Additional Information: To ensure EPA's mission, EPA will build resilience to climate change by integrating considerations of
                climate data into grant, loan, contract, and technical assistance programs. Many of the outcomes EPA is working to attain are
                sensitive to climate, and every action EPA takes must be resilient to these fluctuations. The FY 2011 baseline is 0 programs
                (PM G17) Percentage of registered facilities that submit required and complete GHG data by the annual reporting
                deadline.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit

                Target                                                                      100        100       Percent    of


                Additional Information: The Greenhouse Gas Reporting Registry tracks the number registered facilities emitting greenhouse
                gases. Approximately 13,000 reporters will be required to submit reports by September 30, 2011 (the first reporting cycle), but
                the exact number of required reporters is unknown and may vary each year.

Objective 2 - Improve Air Quality: Achieve and maintain health-based  air pollution standards and reduce risk from toxic air pollutants  and
indoor air contaminants.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, the population-weighted average concentrations of ozone (smog) in all monitored counties will
   .   .          decrease to .073 ppm compared to the average of 0.078 ppm in 2009.
Criteria         (PM A01) Annual emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from electric power generation sources.
RegtomdHa^e            FY 2006   FY 2007    FY2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   10,300,00   9,900,000   9,400,000   9,400,000   8,450,000   6,000,000  6,000,000   6,000,000  Tons
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                           FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                          0
                                                         Emitted
                Actual    9,300,000   8,900,000   7,600,000   5,700,000   5,166,000
                        Data
                        Avail
                        12/2012
                Additional Information: The baseline in 1980 is 17.4 million tons of SO2 emissions from electric utility sources. Statutory SO2
                emissions capped in 2010 at 8.95 million tons,  approximately 8.5 million tons below 1980 emissions level.  "Allowable SO2
                emission level" consists of allowance allocations granted to sources each year under several provisions of the Act and additional
                allowances carried over, or banked, from previous years. This inventory was developed by  National Acid Precipitation
                Assessment Program (NAPAP) and is used as the basis for reductions in Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments. The data is
                contained in EPA's National Air Pollutant Emissions Trends Report. Targets for this measure through 2010 are based on
                implementation of the Acid Rain Program alone whereas the (lower) target of 6 million tons for 2011  and  2012 recognizes
                implementation of the Cross State Air Pollution Rule program in eastern states in combination with the nationwide Acid Rain
                Program
                (PM  M9) Cumulative  percentage reduction in population-weighted ambient  concentration  of ozone in monitored
                counties from 2003 baseline.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012     FY 2013   Unit
                Target  5           6          8           10         11           12         13
                                                                                                                     Percent
                Actual    7
13
15
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                         Reduction
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 15,972 million people parts per billion.  The ozone concentration measure
                reflects improvements (reductions) in ambient ozone concentrations across all monitored counties, weighted by the populations
                in those  areas. To calculate the weighting, pollutant concentrations in monitored counties are multiplied by the associated
                county populations.
                Strategic Measure:  By 2015, the population-weighted average concentrations  of inhalable fine particles in all monitored
                counties will decrease to 10.5 |ig/m3 compared to the average of 11.7 |ig/m3 2009.
                (PM M91) Cumulative percentage reduction in population-weighted ambient concentration of fine particulate matter
                (PM-2.5) in all monitored counties from 2003 baseline.
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
Target   23456
                Actual   7
                                13
                       17
                       23
                       Data
                       Avail
                       12/2012
                                                                                                                    Unit
                                                                                                    Percent
                                                                                                    Reduction
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 2,581 million people micrograms per cubic meter. The PM-2.5 concentration
                reduction annual measure  reflects improvements (reductions) in the ambient concentration of fine particulate  matter PM-2.5
                pollution across all monitored counties, weighted by the populations in those areas. To calculate this weighting,  pollutant
                concentrations in monitored counties are multiplied by the associated county populations.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to 14.7 million tons per year compared to the 2009
                level of 19.4 million tons emitted.
                (PM O34) Cumulative millions of tons of Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) reduced since 2000 from mobile sources.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
         2.03
         2.03
2.37
2.37
2.71
2.71
3.05
3.05
3.39
3.38
3.73
3.73
4.07
4.41
                      Tons
                      Reduced
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2000 for Nitrogen Oxide emissions from mobile sources is 11.8 million tons. The
                2000 Mobile6 inventory is used as the baseline for mobile source emissions.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce emissions  of direct particulate matter (PM) to 3.9 tons per year compared to the 2009
                level 4.2 million tons emitted.
                (PM P33) Tons of PM-10 Reduced since 2000 from mobile sources.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                Target   74,594     87,026      99,458      111,890    124,322
                Actual   74,594     87,026      99,458      111,890    124,322
                                                                  FY2011

                                                                  136,755
                                                                  Data
                                                                  Avail
                                                                  12/2012
                                                         FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                                                                               Tons
                                                                               Reduced
                Additional Information: The 2000 Mobile6 inventory is used as the baseline for mobile source emissions. The 2000 baseline

   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                for PM-10 emissions from mobile sources is 613,000 tons.
                (PM P34) Cumulative tons of PM-2.5 reduced since 2000 from mobile sources.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011
                Target   73,460     85,704      97,947      110,190    122,434     136,677
                Actual   73460     85,704      97,497      110,190    122,434     136,677
       FY 2012

       146,921
FY 2013

159,164
Unit

Tons
Reduced
                (PM M92) Cumulative percentage reduction in the number of days with Air Quality Index (AQI) values over 100 since
                2003, weighted by population and AQI value.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target

Actual

17

39

21

42

25

52

29

59

33

70

37
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                            50
                                                                                                                  Percent
                                                                                                                  Reduction
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 for the Air Quality Index (AQI) is zero percent reduction and the 2004 result is a
                15.5% reduction. The AQI is an index for reporting daily air quality. An AQI value of 100 generally corresponds to the national
                air quality standard for the pollutant, which is  the level EPA has set to protect public health.  AQI values below 100 are
                generally thought of as satisfactory. When AQI values are above 100, air quality is considered  to be unhealthy for certain
                sensitive groups of people and then for everyone as AQI values get higher.
                (PM M93) Cumulative percentage reduction in the  number of days with (AQI) values over 100 since  2003 per grant
                dollar allocated to the states in support of the NAAQS.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY  2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target

Actual

21

28

21

31

25

34

29

31

33

43

37
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                            41
                                                                                                                  Percent
                                                                                                                  Reduction
                (PM M94) Percent of major NSR permits issued within one year of receiving a complete permit application.
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
Target   70         75         78          78         78
                Actual   70
                    83
79
76
46
FY2011

78
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                             FY 2012

                                                                                             78
                                                                    Unit
                                                                                                   Percent
                                                                                                   Issued
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 61%. New Source Review (NSR) requires stationary sources of air pollution to
                get permits before they start construction. Permits are legal documents that the source must follow, and they specify what
                construction is allowed, what emission limits must be met, and often how the source must be operated. Usually NSR permits are
                issued by state or local air pollution control agencies, and the EPA issues the permit in some cases.
                (PM M95) Percent of significant Title V operating permit  revisions issued within 18 months of receiving a complete
                permit application.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   91         94         97         IQQ        100         100        100        100
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Actual   91
                    81
85
87
82
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                                   Issued
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 100%. Operating permits are legally enforceable documents that permitting
                authorities issue to air pollution sources after the source has begun to operate. Usually Title V permits are issued by state or
                local air pollution control agencies, and the EPA issues the permit in some cases. Title V permits must be renewed every five
                years.
                (PM M96) Percent of new Title V operating permits issued within 18 months of receiving a complete permit application.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   g3         87         91          95          99          99         99
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Actual   83
                    51
72
70
67
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                                   Issued
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 75%. Operating permits are legally enforceable documents that permitting
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                           FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                authorities issue to air pollution sources after the source has begun to operate. Usually Title V permits are issued by state or
                local air pollution control agencies, and the EPA issues the permit in some cases. Title V permits must be renewed every five
                years.
                (PM MM8) Cumulative percentage reduction in the number of days to process State Implementation Plan revisions,
                weighted by complexity.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Actual
1.2
                                               3.3
2.4
1.
           2.9
           14
3.1
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                             3.1
                                                        Percent
                                                        Reduction
                Additional Information: When a State Implementation Plan (SIP) is received by a Regional office for processing, the submittal
                is assigned a complexity factor. For most SIP elements the complexity factor will be 1.0, which corresponds to the overall
                processing time of 14 months. Under  certain  circumstances, in particular for SIP elements that are very complex such as
                attainment demonstrations for metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and for all redesignation requests, a complexity factor of
                1.28, corresponding to a review time of 18 months will be assigned.
                (PM MM9) Cumulative percentage reduction in the average number of days during the ozone season that the ozone
                standard is exceeded in non-attainment areas, weighted by population.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target                         19         23          26          29          45
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Actual
                                               37
47
           56
                                  Data
                                  Avail
                                  12/2012
                                                        Reduction
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is zero.
                (PM N35) Limit the increase of Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions from mobile sources compared to a 2000 baseline.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target   i 01        1.18        1.35        1.52        1.69

                Actual   101        1.18        1.35        1.52        1.69
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY
                       1.86

                       1.86
                                  2.02
                                                         2.19
                                                        Tons
                                                        Emitted

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                            FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Additional Information: The baseline in 2000 for Carbon Monoxide emissions from mobile sources is 79.2 million tons. The
                2000 Mobile6 inventory is used as the baseline for mobile source emissions.
                (PM O33) Cumulative millions of tons of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) reduced since 2000 from mobile sources.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
1.03
1.03
1.20
1.20
1.37
1.37
1.54
1.54
1.71
1.71
1.88
1.88
2.05
2.23
                      Tons
                      Reduced
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2000 for Volatile Organic Compounds emissions from mobile sources is 7.7 million
                tons. The 2000 Mobile6 inventory is used as the baseline for mobile source emissions.
                (PM O39) Tons of pollutants (VOC, NOX, PM, CO) reduced per total emission reduction dollars spent.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                             .011
                                                                      .011
                                              .012
                                              Data
                                              Avail
                                              12/2012
                                              .012
                                              .013
                                                                                          Tons
                                                                                          Dollar
                                                                                                                            per
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce emissions of air toxics (toxicity-weighted for cancer) to 4.2 million tons from the 1993
                toxicity-weighted baseline of 7.2 million tons
                (PM 001) Cumulative percentage reduction in tons of toxicity-weighted (for cancer risk) emissions of air toxics from
                1993 baseline.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
(2) Reduce Air  T
rr\   •               O—J"         —* _/         —* _/          —* \J         J \J          J \J         J I         "^<




                Additional Information: The baseline in 1993 is 7.24 million tons. The toxicity-weighted emission  inventory utilizes the
                National Emissions Inventory (NEI)  for air toxics  along with the Agency's compendium of cancer and non-cancer health risk
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                criteria to develop a risk metric that can be tabulated on an annual basis. Air toxics emissions data are revised every three years
                with intervening years (the two years after the inventory year) interpolated utilizing inventory projection models.
                (PM 002) Cumulative percentage reduction in tons of toxicity-weighted (for non-cancer risk) emissions of air toxics from
                1993 baseline.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target    53
                Actual    52
                    58
                    53
                       59
                       53
                       59
                       53
                       59
                       53
                        59
                        Data
                        Avail
                        12/2012
                        59
                                                                                                     Percent
                                                                                                     Reduction
                Additional Information: The baseline in 1993 is 7.24 million tons. The toxicity-weighted  emission inventory utilizes the
                National Emissions Inventory (NEI) for air toxics along with the Agency's compendium of cancer and non-cancer health risk
                criteria to develop a risk metric that can be tabulated on an annual basis. Air toxics emissions data are revised every three years
                with intervening years (the two years after the inventory year) interpolated utilizing inventory projection models.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, the number of future premature lung cancer deaths prevented annually through lowered radon
                exposure will increase to 1,460 from the 2008 baseline of 756 future premature lung cancer deaths prevented.
                (PM R50) Percentage  of existing homes with an operating radon mitigation system compared to the estimated number
                of homes at or above EPA's 4pCi/L action level.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
(4)     Reduce
Exposure   to
Indoor
Pollutants
Target
No Target
Establishe
d
                Actual   94
No Target
Establishe
d

10.3
11.1
                                11.0
11.5
                                  12.0
12.0
                       12.3
12.5

Data
Avail
12/2012
13.3
13.9
                                                                                                     Percent
                                                                                                     Homes
                                                                                                     of
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 6.9 percent of homes with radon operating mitigation systems. Radon causes
                lung cancer, and is a threat to health because it tends to collect in homes, sometimes to very high concentrations. As a result,
                radon is the largest source of exposure to naturally occurring radiation.

                (PM R51) Percentage of all new single-family homes (SFH)  in high radon potential areas built with radon  reducing
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
features.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
         No Target  No  Target
         Establishe  Establishe
         d          d
                Actual   27.4
                    28.6
           30.0
            11.0
           31.5
           36.1
33.0
40.1
34.5

Data
Avail
10/2012
36.0
37.5
                                                                                                                  Percent
                                                                                                                  Homes
                                                                                                            of
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 20.7 percent of all new single-family homes. Radon causes lung cancer, and is
                a threat to health because it tends to collect in homes,  sometimes to very high concentrations. As a result, radon is the largest
                source of exposure to naturally occurring radiation.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, the number of people taking all essential actions to reduce exposure to indoor environmental
                asthma triggers will increase to 7.6 million from the 2003 baseline of 3 million. EPA will place special emphasis on children at
                home and in schools, and on other disproportionately impacted populations.
                (PM R16) Percentage of the public that is aware of the asthma program's media campaign.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
         >20
                         33
>20        >20        >20

Data  Not  Data  Not
                                    Avail
                               Avail
                                          33
                      >30

                      Data  Avail
                      4/2012
            >30
            Data
            Avail
            12/2012
           >30
           >30
                                                                                                  Percent
                                                                                                  Aware
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 27%. Public awareness is measured before and after the launch of a new wave
                of the campaign. "Data not available" indicates a time point that was not included in the assessment plan.
                (PM R17) Additional health care professionals trained annually on the environmental management of asthma triggers.
                                                          FY2009   FY2010     FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
         FY 2006

         2,000
FY 2007

2,000
FY 2008

2,000
                Target   2,000       2,000       2,000       2,000      2,000

                Actual   3^82       4,582       4,558       4,614      4,153

   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY
            2,000

            Data
            Avail
            ,000
             000
                                                                                                  Professionals
                                                                                                  Trained

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Additional Information: The baseline in 2003 is 2,360 trained health care professionals. Asthma is a serious, life-threatening
                respiratory disease that affects millions of Americans. In response to the growing asthma problem, EPA created a national,
                multifaceted asthma education and outreach program to share information about environmental factors that trigger asthma.
                (PM R22) Estimated annual number of  schools establishing indoor air quality management plans consistent with EPA
                guidance.
                                                                                               FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
FY 2006
1,200
1,200
FY 2007
1, 100
1,346
FY 2008
1,100
1,614
FY 2009
1,000
1,765
FY 2010
1,000
2,448
FY2011
1,000
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                               1,000
1,000
                                                                                                                     Schools
                Additional Information:  The baseline in 2003 is  3,200 schools.  Significant progress has been realized as a result of key
                program investments that drive bottom line results.  The EPA remains concerned about and committed to improving the health
                of America's children  and the staff at the  schools  they  attend.  Targets  reflect realistic  estimates of the  progress  that
                regional/state/local leadership will achieve.

Objective 3 - Restore the Ozone Layer: Restore the earth's stratospheric ozone layer and protect the public from the harmful effects of UV
radiation.
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
(1)     Reduce
Consumption
of     Ozone-
depleting
Substances
Strategic Measure: By 2015,  U.S. consumption of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), chemicals that deplete the Earth's
protective ozone layer, will be less than 1,520 tons per year of ozone depletion potential from the 2009 baseline of 9,900 tons
per year. By this time, as a result of worldwide reduction in ozone-depletion substances, the level of "equivalent effective
stratospheric chlorine" (EESC) in the atmosphere will have peaked at 3.185 parts per billion (ppb) of air by volume and begun
its gradual decline to less than 1.8 ppb (1980 level).
(PM SOI)  Remaining US  Consumption  of hydrochlorofluorocarbons  (HCFCs),  chemicals that deplete  the  Earth's
protective ozone layer, measured in tons of Ozone Depleting Potential (ODP).
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Target   <9QOO     <9,900      <9,900      <9,900     <3,811
                                                                            <3,700
                                                        <3,700
                Actual   6,205
                    6,296
5,667
3,414
2,435
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                                                 OOP Tons
                Additional Information:  The baseline in 1989 for Ozone Depleting Substances consumed is  15,240  tons.  The base of
                comparison for assessing progress is the domestic consumption cap of Class II HCFCs as set by the Parties to the Montreal
                Protocol. Each Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS) is weighted based on the damage it does to the stratospheric ozone - this is its
                ozone-depletion potential (OOP). Beginning on January 1, 1996, the cap was set at the sum of 2.8 percent of the domestic OOP-
                weighted consumption of CFCs in 1989 plus the ODP-weighted level of HCFCs in 1989. Consumption equals production plus
                import minus export.
                (PM S17) Total federal dollars spent per school joining the SunWise program.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target   560

                Actual   544
                    525

                    484
485

414
455

385
433

405
433
Data
Avail
12/2012
433
                      Dollars  per
                      School
Objective 4 - Reduce Unnecessary Exposure to Radiation: Minimize unnecessary releases of radiation and be prepared to minimize impacts
should unwanted releases occur.
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
(1) Prepare for
Radiological
Emergencies
Strategic Measure: Through 2015, EPA will maintain a 90 percent level of readiness of radiation program personnel and assets
to support federal radiological emergency response and recovery operations, maintaining the 2010 baseline of 90 percent.
(PM R34) Percentage of most populous US cities with a RadNet ambient radiation air monitoring system, which will
provide data to assist in protective action determinations.
         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010
                                                                                 FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   67         80         85         90         95
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY
                                                                 100
                                                                   Percent

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                          FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Actual    67         87         92
98
100
Data
Avail
12/2012
               Additional Information: The baseline is 55% for the 100 most populous cities.
               (PM R35) Level of readiness of radiation program personnel and assets to  support federal radiological emergency
               response and recovery operations.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target

Actual

78

78

80

83

85

87

90

90

90

97

90
Data
Avail
6/2012
                                                                                           90
                                                                                                                 Percent
                                                                                                                 Readiness
               Additional Information: The baseline in 2005 is a 50% level of readiness. The level of readiness is measured as the percentage
               of response team members and assets that meet scenario-based response criteria.
               (PM R36) Average time before availability of quality assured ambient radiation  air monitoring data  during an
               emergency.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013    Unit
Target
Actual
1.9
1.9
1.3
1.3
1.0
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.5
0.7
Data
Avail
12/2012
                                                                                           0.5
                                                                                                                 Days
               Additional Information: The baseline in 2005 is 2.5 days. The average time in availability is measured as time in days between
               collection and availability of data for release by EPA during emergency operations.
               (PM R37) Time to approve site changes affecting waste characterization at DOE waste generator sites to ensure safe
               disposal of transuranic radioactive waste at WIPP.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   105        90         80         70         70

   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY
                       70
                       70
                      70
Days

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                          FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Actual   100         86          75
75
66
               Additional Information: The baseline in 2004 is 150 days.
Data
Avail
12/2012
                (PM R38) Population covered by Radiation Protection Program monitors per million dollars invested.
                        FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   3,471,000  4,159,000   4,729,000   5,254,000   5,779,000    5,779,000

                                                                          ...   Data
                Actual   3,471,000  4,418,000   4,536,000   5,228,000   4,^19       Avail
                                                                      '           12/2012
                                                       Population
                                                       per  Million
                                                       Dollars
   GOAL 1: TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
   Protect and restore our waters to ensure that drinking water is safe, and that aquatic ecosystems sustain fish, plants and wildlife, and
   economic, recreational, and subsistence activities.

Objective 1 - Protect Human Health: Reduce human exposure to contaminants in drinking water, fish and shellfish, and recreational waters,
including protecting source waters.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, 90 percent of community water systems will provide drinking water that meets all applicable
                health-based drinking water standards through approaches including effective treatment and  source water protection. (2005
                baseline:89 percent. Status as of FY 2009: 89 percent.)
                (PM F) Percent of community water systems for which minimized risk to public health through source water protection
                is achieved.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011     FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
           No Target  No  Target
           Establishe   Establishe
            ,           ,
           d           d
                                                  T
                                             „ . , ,. , ° ,   50
                                             Established
                                                                                   40.2
                                                                                                                     Percent
                                                                                                                     CWSs
(1) Water Safe  Explanation of Results: The target of 50 percent was established during the development of the 2006-11 Strategic Plan. As the
to Drink        target has remained  unchanged,  the measure has not performed  as  well  as the program initially anticipated; however,
                performance has improved over each year.
                Additional Information: In 2002, community water systems for which minimized risk to public health through source water
                protection is achieved was at 8 percent.

                (PM aa) Percent of population served by CWSs that will receive drinking water that meets all applicable health-based
                drinking water standards through approaches including effective treatment and source water protection.
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
93
89
94
91.5
90
92
90
92.1
90
92
91
93.2
91
                      Percent
                      Population
                Additional Information: In 2005, 89 percent of the population served by community water systems received drinking water that
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                met applicable drinking water standards.
                (PM ape) Fund utilization rate for the DWSRF.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
                                                                  FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013
Target   g3.3       85         86          89          86          89         89         89
Actual   869       88         90          92          91.3         90
Additional Information: In 2005, the fund utilization rate for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund was 85 percent.
                                                                                                  Unit

                                                                                                  Percent
                (PM apd) Number of additional projects initiating operations.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
                                                                             FY 2012    FY 2013
                                                                  FY2011
Target   425        433        440        445         450         500
Actual   399        438        445        480         668         840
Additional Information: In 2005, 2,611 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund projects initiated operations (annual).
(PM apg) People receiving drinking water that meets all applicable health-based standards per million dollars spent to
manage the national drinking water program.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target

                Actual
                               No Target  No Target
                               Establishe  Establishe
                                ,           ,
                               d          d
                                                                  131,000
                                                      Established   ^'—                          People/Milli
                                                                                                  on
                                                                  124,165
Explanation of Results: EPA missed its target for this measure due to the difficulty of small  drinking water systems in
maintaining their managerial, technical, and financial capacity.
Additional Information: In 2005, 128,493 people were receiving drinking water that met all applicable health-based standards
per million dollars spent to manage the national drinking water program.
(PM aph) Percent of community water systems that have undergone a sanitary survey within the past three years (five
years for outstanding performance).
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                            FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Target   95         95         95
                Actual   94         92         87
                                 95
                                  95
                                  87
                                  95
                                  92
                                  95
                                                                                          Percent
                                                                                          CWSs
                Explanation of Results: This measure was not met as a result of fewer state resources. Sanitary surveys are resource-intensive
                efforts as state staffer contractors must physically visit the system to perform a sanitary survey.
                Additional Information: In 2007, 92 percent of community water systems had undergone a sanitary survey. Prior to FY 2007,
                this measure tracked states rather than community water systems in compliance with this regulation.
                (PM apj) Percent of identified Class V motor vehicle waste disposal wells and other high-priority Class V wells closed or
                permitted.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                             80
                                             91
                                              76
                                              92
                                                                   Percent
                                                                   Wells
                Additional Information: "Sensitive ground water protection areas" are defined by the UIC primacy program director but at a
                minimum must include groundwater-based community water system  source water areas. In 2005, 72 percent of Class V wells
                were closed or permitted.
                (PM apm) Percent of community water systems that meets all applicable health-based standards through approaches
                including effective treatment and source water protection.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
93.5
89.3
89
89
89.5
89
90
89.1
90
89.6
90
90.7
90
                      Percent
                      Systems
                Additional Information: In 2005, 89 percent of community water systems met all applicable  health-based drinking water
                standards.
                (PM apn) Percent of data for violations of health-based standards at public water systems that are accurate  and
                complete in SDWIS/FED for all MCL and TT rules.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
                      No Target  No Target  No  Target  90
                                                                               Percent Data

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area  Performance Measures and Data
                                                 Establishe
                                                 d
                Actual
            Data
            Avail
            1/2014
                Additional Information: In 2003, 65 percent of data for violations of health-based standards at public water systems were
                accurate and complete in SDWIS/FED for all MCL and TT rules.
                (PM apo) Percent of deep injection wells that are used to inject industrial, municipal, or hazardous waste (Class I) that
                lose mechanical integrity and are returned to compliance within 180 days, thereby reducing the potential to endanger
                underground sources of drinking water.
                          FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
92
96
92
83
Percent
Wells
                Explanation of Results: The number of wells that lost mechanical integrity was very small (22). In returning 18 of the 22 wells
                back into compliance within the 180 days, the percentage (86 percent) doesn't completely express the complexity of having a
                small universe. The measure has been revised to account for classes I, II, and III wells, collectively allowing for a broader
                universe. The hope is that this change provides an improved measure while eliminating the challenge of the smaller universe
                with separate classes. Knowing how many wells that will  lose mechanical integrity (MI) in a given year is very critical to
                establishing the target for this measure. It is nearly impossible to predict  how many wells will lose mechanical integrity in a
                given year.  Many  regions estimate the target based on  historical trends and how many wells they believe they can address
                within the 180 days. When  more wells lose mechanical integrity than anticipated, it becomes more difficult to achieve the
                target. In addition,  the measure is hampered by its very low universe. For example, out of the 22 wells nationally, some regions
                may only have 3 wells, and if their target is 100 percent, but they're only able to return 2 of 3 wells back into compliance  within
                the 180 days,  then missing  1 immediately drops them to 67 percent. For many regions, this measure is  pretty much all or
                nothing.  The measure has been revised in the NWPG for 2012 to account for all three classes of wells together  rather than
                separately. We anticipate this change will improve the denominator so that  the measure is less of a hit or miss due to the smaller
                denominator.
                Additional Information: In 2009, 100 percent of Class I wells that lost mechanical integrity were returned to compliance  within
                180 days.
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM app) Percent of deep injection wells that are used to enhance oil/natural gas recovery or for the injection of other
                (Class II) fluids associated with oil and natural gas production that have lost mechanical integrity and are returned to
                compliance within 180 days, thereby reducing the potential to endanger underground sources of drinking water.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
89
89
89
86
Percent
Wells
                Explanation of Results: The number of wells that lost mechanical integrity was very small (22). In returning 18 of the 22 wells
                back into compliance within the 180 days, the percentage (86 percent) doesn't completely express the complexity of having a
                small universe. The measure has been revised to account for classes I,  II, and III wells, collectively allowing for a broader
                universe. The hope is that this change provides an improved measure while eliminating the challenge of the  smaller universe
                with separate  classes. Knowing  how many wells will  lose mechanical  integrity (MI) in a given year is very critical to
                establishing the target for this measure. It is nearly impossible to predict how many wells that will lose mechanical integrity in a
                given year. Many regions estimate the target based on historical trends and how many wells they believe they can address
                within the  180 days. When more wells lose mechanical integrity than anticipated, it  becomes more difficult to achieve the
                target.  In addition, the measure is hampered by its very low universe. For example, out of the 22 wells nationally,  some regions
                may only have 3 wells, and if their target is 100 percent, but they're only able to return 2 of 3 wells back into compliance within
                the 180 days,  then missing 1 immediately drops them to 67 percent. For many regions, this measure is pretty much all or
                nothing. The measure has been revised in the NWPG for 2012 to account for all three  classes of wells  together  rather than
                separately. We anticipate this change will improve the denominator so that the measure is less of a hit or miss due to the smaller
                denominator.
                Additional Information: In 2009, 90 percent of Class II wells that lost mechanical integrity were returned to compliance within
                180 days.
                (PM apq) Percent of deep injection wells that are  used for salt solution mining (Class III) that lose mechanical integrity
                and  are returned  to compliance within  180 days, thereby reducing the potential to endanger  underground  sources of
                drinking water.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY  2012     FY 2013    Unit
                Target

                Actual

   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
93

75
93
100
Percent
Wells

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Additional Information: In 2009, 100 percent of Class III wells that lost mechanical integrity were returned to compliance
                within 180 days.
                (PM aps) Percent of Classes I, II and III salt solution mining wells that have lost mechanical integrity and are returned
                to compliance within 180 days, thereby reducing the potential to endanger underground sources of drinking water.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                                              90
                                                        Percent
                                                        (Class
                                                        Wells)
                Additional Information: There is no fixed point that can be used as a baseline for this measure, since the activity that we are
                monitoring - "MI Loss" - has not yet occurred. The universe of wells losing mechanical integrity is not static.
                (PM apt) Number of Class V motor vehicle waste disposal  wells (MVWDW) and large capacity  cesspools (LCC)
                [approximately 23,640 in FY 2010] that are closed or permitted  (cumulative).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                              20,840
                                              24,327
                                                                   Wells
                Additional Information: OW will be establishing a baseline this year, as it is our first year reporting. This can be problematic,
                however, since regions don't know exactly how many new facilities they will identify.
                (PM dw2) Percent of person months during which community water  systems provide drinking water that meets all
                applicable health-based standards.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
95
97
95
97.2
95
97.3
95
97.4
95
                      Percent
                      Months
                Additional Information: In 2005, community water systems  provided drinking water that met  all  applicable health-based
                drinking water standards during 95 percent of "person months."

                (PM pil) Percent of population in each of the U.S. Pacific Island Territories (served by community water systems) that
                meets all applicable health-based drinking water standards, measured on a four-quarter rolling average basis.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
 Performance Measures and Data
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
          FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011

 Target                         72          73         73          75

 Actual                         79          go         82          87
                                                                                              FY 2012
                                                                                              80
                                                                                          FY 2013
                                                                                          82
                                 Unit

                                 Percent
                                 Population
                Additional Information: In 2005, 95 percent of the population in American Samoa, 10 percent in the Commonwealth of the
                Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) and 80 percent of Guam were served by CWSs that received drinking water that meets all
                applicable health-based standards. This measure is on a four-quarter rolling average basis.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, 88 percent of the population in Indian Country served by community water systems will receive
                drinking  water that meets all applicable health-based drinking water standards. (2005 baseline:86 percent.  Status as of FY
                2009:81 percent.)
                (PM E) Percent of the population in Indian Country served by community water systems that receive drinking water
                that meets all applicable health-based drinking water standards.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                               87
                                                                                                     Percent
                                                                                                     Population
         90          87         87         87          87          87
         86.6        87         83         81.2        87.2         81.2
Explanation of Results: Almost all tribal water systems are small; many of these systems have poor source water quality, and
there is difficulty supporting sustainable pricing for water services.
Additional Information: In 2005, 86 percent of the population served by community water systems received drinking water that
met applicable drinking water standards.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, in coordination with other federal agencies, provide access to safe drinking water for 136,100
American Indian and Alaska Native homes. (FY 2009 baseline: 80,900 homes. Universe: 360,000 homes.)
(PM Gpa) Percent of Alaska population served by public water systems in compliance with Safe Drinking Water Act
regulatory requirements.
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                     No Target  No Target  No  Target
                     Establishe  Establishe   Establishe
                     d          d           d
                                                       No  Target
                                                       Established
100
Households
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                            FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual
                                                                         Data
                                                                         Avail
                                                                         6/2012
(2)   Fish
Shellfish
to Eat
and
Safe
                (PM dw5) Percent of homes on tribal lands lacking access to safe drinking water.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                                      No Target
                                      Establishe
                                      d
                                           No Target
                                           Establishe
                                           d
           No  Target
           Established
                                                         Households
Explanation of Results: The percent of tribal homes that lack access to safe drinking water missed the target for a couple of
reasons. The percent calculation is based on a static  2003 baseline, and since 2003,  there has been an increase in the total
number of tribal homes included in the Indian Health Service (MS) data system and an increase in the need for basic drinking
water infrastructure to serve homes  which previously had access  to safe drinking water. As a result,  the  Agency  has
recategorized this measure to an indicator measure. The agency is now measuring the number of homes "provided" access to
safe drinking water (in coordination with other federal agencies) rather than a percentage of homes. The Agency has established
targets for and begun reporting against this new matrix.
Additional Information: In 2005, 11 percent of homes on tribal lands lacked access to safe drinking water. The 2011 universe
is currently 385,822.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce the percentage of women of childbearing age having mercury levels in blood above the
level of concern  to 4.6 percent. (2002 baseline:  5.7 percent of women of childbearing age have  mercury  blood  levels above
levels of concern identified by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).)
(PM fsl) Percent of women of childbearing age having mercury levels in blood above the level of concern.
               FY 2006   FY 2007
                Target
                Actual
                                FY 2008

                                5.5
                                Data
                                Unavailab
FY 2009

5.2

2.8
FY 2010

5.1
Data
Unavailabl
FY2011

4.9
Data
Unavailab
FY 2012

4.9
Unit

Percent
Women
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Explanation of Results: EPA has received data for this measure from the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination
                Survey (NHANES) and is in the process of analyzing and validating the information.
                Additional Information: Baseline is 7.8 percent based on data collected in 1999-2000. Universe is population of women of
                childbearing age.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, maintain the percentage of days of the beach season that  coastal and Great Lakes beaches
                monitored by state beach safety programs are open and safe for swimming at 95 percent.  (2007 baseline: Beaches open 95
                percent of the 679,589 days of the beach season (beach season days are equal to 3,647 beaches multiplied by variable number of
                days of beach season at each beach). Status as of FY 2009:95 percent.)
                (PM pi3) Percent of days of the beach season that beaches in each of the U.S. Pacific Island Territories monitored under
                the Beach Safety Program will be open and safe for swimming.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                70
                                                80
80
 81
80
80
82
77
Percent Days
for Swimming
                Explanation of Results: Specific reasons for not meeting the target are unknown, but the lower than expected result may be due
(3) Water Sate  ^o an increase in precipitation (which can cause an increase in indicator bacteria detected at beaches). This measure is scheduled
                to be deleted in FY 2012.
                Additional Information: In 2005, beaches were open and safe 64 percent of the beach season in American Samoa, 97 percent in
                the CNMI & 76 percent in Guam.
                (PM ssl) Number of waterborne disease outbreaks attributable to swimming in  or  other  recreational contact with
                coastal and Great Lakes waters measured as a 5-year average.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                2
                                                0
2
0
2
0
2
0
Outbreaks
                Additional Information: Very few outbreaks have been reported over the ten years of data reviewed in consideration of a
                baseline for this measure. In 2005, two waterborne diseases were reported. Universe is not applicable to this baseline.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM ss2) Percent of days of beach  season that  coastal and  Great Lakes  beaches monitored  by state beach safety
                programs are open and safe for swimming.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
         94
         97
           92.6
           95.20
           92.6
           95
           93
           95
           95
           95
95
95
95
                      Percent
                      Days/Season
                Additional Information: In 2005, beaches were open 96% of the 743,036 days of the beach season (i.e., beach season days are
                equal to 4,025 beaches multiplied by variable number of days of beach season at each beach).

Objective 2 - Protect and Restore Watersheds and Aquatic Ecosystems: Protect the quality of rivers,  lakes,  streams,  and wetlands on a
watershed basis, and protect urban, coastal, and ocean waters.
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
(1)    Improve
Water Quality
on           a
Watershed
Basis
Strategic Measure: By 2015, attain water quality standards for all pollutants and impairments in more than 3,360 water bodies
identified in 2002 as not attaining standards (cumulative). (2002 universe: 39,798 water bodies identified by states and tribes as
not meeting water quality standards.  Water bodies where  mercury  is among multiple pollutants causing impairment may be
counted toward this target when all pollutants but mercury attain standards but must be identified as still needing restoration for
mercury; 1,703  impaired water bodies are  impaired by multiple pollutants, including mercury,  and  6,501  are impaired by
mercury alone. Status as of FY 2009: 2,505 water bodies attained standards.)
(PM L) Number of water body segments identified by states in 2002 as not attaining standards, where water quality
standards are now fully attained (cumulative).
                                                       FY 2010
FY 2006
Target
Actual
FY 2007

1,166
1,409
FY 2008

1,550
2,165
FY 2009

2,270
2,505
                                             2,809
                                             2,909
FY2011

3,073
3,119
FY 2012

3,324
FY 2013

3,524
Unit
                                                                                                                     Segments
                Additional Information: 2002 baseline:  39,798  water bodies identified  by states and tribes as  not meeting water quality
                standards. Water bodies where mercury is among multiple pollutants causing impairment may be counted toward this target
                when all pollutants but mercury attain standards but must be identified as still needing restoration for mercury; 1,703  impaired
                water bodies are impaired by multiple pollutants, including mercury, and 6,501 are impaired by mercury alone.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM bpa) CWSRF long-term revolving level ($billion/yr).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                                                         FY2011   FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
           No Target  No Target  No Target  NQ      ^
           I—i o + ol*\l i ol"»zi  I—< o + ol*\l i ol"» zi   I—i o + ol*\l i ol"» zi          ^
           Establishe
           d
           Establishe
           d
           Establishe
           d
                                                                      Established
                       3.4

                       Data
                       Unavailab
                       le
                                                                                                                   Dollars
                                                                                                                   (Billion)/Yea
                                                                                                                   r
                Explanation of Results: The $3.4 billion target assumed a set level of federal funding through 2011. ARRA, FY 2010 and FY
                2011 appropriations have greatly impacted this assumption.
                Additional Information: In 2001, $3.9 billion of Clean Water SRF  dollars were at the long term revolving level. The  $3.4
                billion was a forecasted average of what the CWSRFs could provide once federal capitalization ended. It was developed under
                the assumption that federal capitalization would continue until 2011 and then cease. It was also assumed that it would  take
                approximately 4 to 5 years for the federal funds to work through the program. The $3.4 billion was calculated by taking a 25-
                year average over the projection period of 2015 through 2040.
                (PM bpb) Fund utilization rate for the CWSRF.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                Target
                Actual
93.3
94.7
93.4
96.7
93.5
98
94.5
98
92
100
FY2011

94.5
98
FY 2012

94.5
FY 2013

94.5
Unit

Percent
                Additional Information: In 2002, 91 percent was used as the baseline for this measure. It was calculated using data collected
                annually from all 51 state CWSRF programs (50 states and Puerto Rico).
                (PM bpc) Percent of all major publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) that comply with their permitted wastewater
                discharge standards.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                      86
                      86
                       86
                       Data
                       86
                       86.9
                       86
                       86.7
                       86
                                             Percent
                                             POTWs
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                                                           Unavailab
                                                           le
                (PM bpf) Estimated annual reduction in  millions of pounds of phosphorus from nonpoint sources to  water bodies
                (Section 319 funded projects only).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target   4.5
                Actual
                                    4.5
                                    75
4.5
                                3.5
4.5
           3.5
4.5
           2.6
4.5
Data
Avail
4/2012
4.5
                                              Pounds
                                              (Million)
                Explanation of Results: EPA collects this information in its Grants Reporting and Tracking System (GRTS) for Section 319-
                funded on-the-ground implementation projects that will reduce phosphorus loads to water bodies. States are not required to
                enter this information into GRTS until after one full year of project implementation so that field data can be collected to support
                the model calculations. Results are expected by April 2012.
                Additional Information: In 2005, there was a reduction of 558,000 Ibs of phosphorus from nonpoint sources.
                (PM bpg) Estimated additional reduction in million pounds of nitrogen from nonpoint sources to water bodies (Section
                319 funded projects only).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   g.5        8.5
                Actual   14.5        19.1
                                8.5
                                11.3
           9.1
           9.8
            Data
            Avail
            4/2012
                                 Pounds
                                 (Million)
                Explanation of Results: EPA collects this information in its Grants Reporting and Tracking System (GRTS) for Section 319-
                funded on-the-ground implementation projects that will reduce phosphorus loads to water bodies. States are not required to
                enter this information into GRTS until after one full year of project implementation so that field data can be collected to support
                the model calculations. Results are expected by April 2012.
                Additional Information: In 2005, there was a reduction of 3.7 million Ibs of nitrogen from nonpoint sources.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM bph) Estimated  additional reduction in  thousands of tons of sediment from nonpoint sources to water bodies
                (Section 319 funded projects only).
                Target
FY 2006

700
                Actual   1200
FY 2007

700

1,200
FY 2008

700

2,100
FY 2009

700

2,300
FY 2010

700

2,100
FY2011

700
Data
Avail
4/2012
FY 2012

700
           Unit


           Tons
           (Thousand)
                Explanation of Results: EPA collects this information in its Grants Reporting and Tracking System (GRTS) for Section 319-
                funded on-the-ground implementation projects that will reduce phosphorus loads to water bodies. States are not required to
                enter this information into GRTS until after one full year of project implementation so that field data can be collected to support
                the model calculations. Results are expected by April 2012.
                Additional Information: In 2005, there was a reduction of 1.68 million tons of sediment from nonpoint sources.
                (PM bpk) Number of TMDLs that are established by states and approved by the EPA [state TMDL] on a schedule
                consistent with national policy (cumulative).  [A TMDL is a technical plan for reducing pollutants in order to obtain
                water quality standards. The terms "approved" and "established" refer to the completion and approval of the TMDL
                itself.]
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
15,428
17,682
20,232
21,685
28,527
30,658
33,540
36,487
39,101
38,749
41,235
41,231
43,781
46,331
                      TMDLs
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, States developed 2,482 TMDLs. Alabama, Kentucky, and South Carolina had several
                TMDLs with technical  and/or legal issues that still need to be resolved,  and most states  continue to suffer due to budget
                shortfalls. Additionally,  Region 10 states are developing watershed TMDLs, which require  a significant amount of resources
                and time.
                Additional Information: Cumulatively, more than 40,000 state TMDLs were completed through FY 2011. A  TMDL is a
                technical plan for reducing pollutants in order to attain water quality standards. The terms "approved" and "established" refer to
                the completion and approval of the TMDL itself.
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM bpl) Percent of high-priority state NPDES permits that are issued in the fiscal year.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012
                Target
                Actual
         95
         96.4
95
112
95
120
95
147
95
142
100
135
100
FY 2013

80
Unit

Percent
Permits
                Explanation  of Results: States  have continued  their efforts in  coordination with the EPA Regions  to  maintain  strong
                performance in the issuance of their high priority permits. When states establish their lists each year, they designate a pool of
                priority permits and commit to issuing a certain number of these in the fiscal year. If a State is able to issue permits designated
                as priority ahead of schedule, they receive credit toward the current fiscal year target, which may result in issuing more permits
                than originally targeted.
                Additional Information: Priority Permits  are  permits  in need  of reissuance  that have  been identified by  states as
                environmentally  or programmatically significant.  The annual universe  of Priority Permits includes the number of permits
                selected as priority, from which a subset will be issued in the current fiscal year.  In 2005, 104% of the designated priority
                permits were  issued in the fiscal year. Starting in FY2013, results can no longer exceed 100% issuance due to a refinement of
                the measure definition, and the target was revised accordingly. The universe used to calculate percentage results changed from
                the number of permits committed to issuance in the current fiscal year to the total number of permits selected as priority.
                (PM bpm) Cost per water segment restored.
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                                                                   FY2011    FY2012   FY 2013   Unit
                                                                                                                     Dollars
Target    1,358,351   615,694    684,200     708,276    771,000     681,445     721,715    685,885
Actual    576,618     512,735    547,676     570,250    581,281     578,410
Additional Information: The cost per water segment restored was $1,544,998 in 2004.
(PM bpn) Percent of major dischargers in Significant Noncompliance (SNC) at any time during the fiscal year.
          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target    22.5        22.5        22.5        22.5        22.5         22.5        22.5        22.5
                                                                   Data                           I Percent
                Actual   20.2
                     22.6
           23.9
           23.3
           23.5
            Avail
            3/2012
                                  Dischargers
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                            FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Explanation of Results: The FY 2011 EOY data is not available at this time due to the current DMR reporting cycle. Final
                EOY data will be available March 2012.
                (PM bpp) Percent of submissions of new or  revised water quality standards from states and territories that are
                approved by the EPA.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
90.9
89
85
85.6
                               87
                               92.5
85
93.2
85
90.9
85
91.8
85
                     Percent
                     Submissions
                Additional Information: In 2004, the baseline was 87.6 percent submissions approved. Approval rates are expected to decline
                in 2011 and 2012 due to the increasing complexity of technical and policy issues that rose in state standards revisions submitted
                to the EPA.
                (PM bpr) Loading (pounds) of pollutants removed per program dollar expended.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                   385
                                                                   385
         233        285        332        368        371         377
         233        331        332        368        371         377
Additional Information: The loading (pounds) of pollutants removed per program dollar expended was 122 in 2004.
                                                                                         Pounds
                (PM bps) Number of TMDLs that are established or approved by the EPA [total TMDL] on a schedule consistent with
                national policy (cumulative). [A  TMDL is a technical plan for reducing pollutants in order to attain water  quality
                standards. The terms "approved" and "established" refer to the completion and approval of the TMDL itself.]
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
20,275
22,648
25,274
26,844
                               33,801
                               35,979
38,978
41,866
44,560
46,817
49,375
49,663
52,218
54,773
                      TMDLs
                Additional Information: Cumulatively, EPA and states completed more than 49,000 TMDLs through FY 2011. A TMDL is a
                technical plan for reducing pollutants in order to attain water quality standards. The terms "approved" and "established" refer to
                the completion and approval of the TMDL itself.
                (PM bpt) Percent of waters assessed using statistically valid surveys.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                   FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                          FY 2006    FY 2007   FY 2008
                Target   54         54         65
                Actual   54         54         65

                Additional Information: In 2000, 31  percent of waters were assessed using statistically valid surveys.
FY 2009
65
65
FY 2010
82
82
FY2011
100
100
                                                          FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                                                                                 Percent
                                                                                 Waters
                (PM bpv) Percent of high-priority EPA and state NPDES permits (including tribal) that are issued in the fiscal year.
                          FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   95
                Actual   98 5
95
104
95
119
95
144
95
138
100
132
100
                      Percent
                      Permits
                Explanation of Results: States and EPA have continued their efforts in coordination with the EPA Regions to maintain strong
                performance in the issuance of their high priority permits. When states establish their lists each year, they designate a pool of
                priority permits and commit to issuing a certain number of these in the fiscal year. If a  State or EPA Region is able to issue
                permits designated as priority ahead of schedule, they receive credit toward the current fiscal year target, which may result in
                issuing more permits than originally targeted.
                Additional Information: Priority Permits are permits in need of reissuance that have been identified by states or EPA Regions
                as environmentally or programmatically significant. The annual universe of Priority Permits includes the number  of permits
                selected as priority, from which a subset will be issued in the current fiscal year. In 2005,  104%  of the designated priority
                permits were issued in the fiscal year. Starting in FY2013,  results can no longer exceed 100% issuance due to a refinement of
                the measure definition, and the target was revised accordingly. The universe used to calculate percentage results changed from
                the number of permits committed to issuance in the current fiscal year to the total number of permits selected as priority.
                (PM bpw) Percent of states and territories  that, within the preceding 3-year period, submitted new or revised water
                quality criteria acceptable to the EPA that reflect new scientific  information from  the EPA or sources not considered in
                previous standards.
                          FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   66         67

                Actual   66.1        66.1
            68

            62.5
            68

            62.5
            66

            67.9
            64.3

            69.6
           64.3
                      Percent
                      States    and
                      Territories
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Additional Information: In 2004, the baseline was 70% of states and territories submitting acceptable water quality criteria
                reflecting new scientific information. In response to an EPA national priority,  states are focusing on adopting water quality
                criteria for nutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). Because developing these criteria is a complex multi-year process for many
                states, EPA expects some decline in performance in the short term.
                (PM cr2) Clean up acres of known contaminated sediments (cumulative starting FY 2006).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
           5
           10
           20
           20
            60
            63
                                 Acres
                Additional Information: In 2006,  400 acres of known highly contaminated sediments were found in the main-stem of the
                Lower Columbia and Lower Willamette Rivers.
                (PM cr3) Demonstrate a  reduction in mean  concentration of contaminants of concern found in water and fish tissue
                (cumulative starting in FY 2006).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                  10
                                  Data
                                  Avail
                                  3/2012
                                                        Mean
                                                        Concentratio
                                                        n
                Additional Information: In 2005, 5 sites demonstrated a reduction in mean concentration of certain contaminants of concern
                found in water and fish tissue.
                (PM pi2) Percent of time that sewage treatment plants in the U.S. Pacific Island Territories comply with permit limits
                for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
67
67
62
65
62
52
63
50
Percent Time
                Explanation of Results: The EOY result reflects continued noncompliance at Guam treatment plants (Guam plants were in
                compliance only 21% of the time in FY11). We expect this trend to continue in FY12.
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Additional Information: The sewage treatment plants in the Pacific Island Territories complied 59 percent of the time with
                BOD and TSS permit limits.
                (PM wq2) Remove the specific causes of water body impairment identified by states in 2002 (cumulative).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
4,607
6,723
6,891
7,530
8,512
8,446
9,016
9,527
10,161
10,711
                      Causes
                Additional Information: In 2002, an estimate of 69,677 specific causes of water body impairments were identified by states.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, improve water quality conditions in 330 impaired watersheds nationwide using the watershed
                approach (cumulative). (2002 baseline: Zero watersheds improved of an estimated 4,800 impaired watersheds of focus having
                one or more water bodies impaired. The watershed boundaries for this measure are those established at the "12-digit" scale by
                the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Watersheds at this scale average 22 square miles in size.  "Improved" means that one or
                more of the impairment causes identified in 2002 are removed for at least 40 percent of the impaired water bodies or impaired
                miles/acres or there is significant watershed-wide improvement (as demonstrated by valid scientific information) in one or more
                water quality parameters associated with the impairments. Status as of FY 2009: 104 improved watersheds.)
                (PM uwl) Number of urban water projects initiated addressing water quality issues in the community.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                    Projects
                Additional Information: This measure tracks progress in the implementation of grants that help communities access, improve,
                and benefit from their urban waters and surrounding land. Projects that address water quality in the community will be tracked
                through grantee reporting and can include the following activities (as authorized under Section 104(b)(3) of the Clean Water
                Act): planning, outreach, training, studies, monitoring, and demonstration of innovative approaches to manage water quality.
                (PM wq3) Improve water  quality  conditions  in impaired watersheds  nationwide using  the  watershed  approach
                (cumulative).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
40
102
141
208
112
352
Watersheds
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual                          60
                       104
                Additional Information: In 2002, there were  10 watersheds improved of an estimated 4,800 impaired watershed of focus
                having 1 or more water bodies impaired. The watershed boundaries for this measure are those established at the "12-digit" scale
                by the U.S. Geological Survey. Watersheds at  this scale average 22 square miles in size. "Improved" means that that one or
                more of the impairment causes identified in 2002 are removed for at least 40 percent of the impaired water bodies or impaired
                miles/acres, or there is significant water shed-wide improvement, as demonstrated by valid scientific information, in one or more
                water quality parameters associated with the impairments.
                Strategic  Measure:  By 2015, in coordination with other federal agencies, provide access to  basic sanitation for  67,900
                American  Indian and Alaska Native homes. (FY 2009 baseline: 43,600 homes. Universe: 360,000 homes.)
                (PM Opb) Percent of serviceable rural Alaska homes with access to drinking water supply and wastewater disposal.
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
92

92
94

91
96

91
98

92
92
Data
Avail
5/2012
93
                      Percent
                      Homes
                Additional Information: In 2003, 77 percent  of serviceable rural Alaska homes had access to drinking water supply and
                wastewater disposal.
                (PM wq6) Percent of homes on tribal lands lacking access to basic sanitation.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
           No Target
           Establishe
           d
           No Target
           Establishe
           d
           No  Target
           Established
                                                                                   8.6
                                              Percent
                                              Homes
                Explanation of Results: The percent of tribal homes lacking access to basic sanitation target was not met for two reasons; 1.)
                the percent calculation is based on a static 2003 baseline and since 2003 there has been an increase in the total number of tribal
                homes included  in  the  Indian Health Service (MS) data system and  2.) An increase in the need for basic  sanitation
                infrastructure to serve homes which previously had access to basic sanitation. As a result, the Agency has re-categorized this
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
measure as an indicator and is now measuring, identifying targets, and reporting out on the number of homes provided basic
sanitation (in coordination with other federal agencies) rather than a percentage of homes.
Additional Information: In 2005, 6.64 percent of homes on tribal lands lacked access to basic sanitation.
(PM uw2) Number of urban water projects  completed addressing water quality issues in the community.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                              0
           0
                                                                                                    Projects
                Additional Information: As this is a new measure, it is not anticipated that any projects will be completed in FY 2013.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, improve regional coastal aquatic ecosystem health, as measured on the "Good/Fair/Poor" scale of
                the National Coastal Condition Report. (FY 2009 baseline: National rating of "Fair" or 2.8, where the rating is based on a 4-
                point system ranging from 1 to 5, in which  "1"  is "Poor" and "5" is  "Good"  using the National Coastal Condition Report
                indicators for water and sediment, coastal habitat, benthic index, and fish contamination.)
                (PM sf3) At least seventy-five percent of the monitored  stations in the near shore and coastal waters of the Florida Keys
                National Marine Sanctuary will maintain  Chlorophyll a(CHLA) levels at  less than or equal to 0.35 ug 1-1  and light
                clarity (Kd) levels at less than or equal to 0.20 m-1.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
(2)    Improve  Tar§et
Coastal    and  Actual
Ocean Waters
                                                                  75
                                                                  85.4
75
                      Percent
                      Stations
                Additional Information: In 2005, total water quality  was at chl <  0.2 ug/1, light attenuation < 0.13/meter, DIN < 0.75
                micromolar, and TP < 0.2 micromolar.
                (PM sf4) At least seventy-five percent of the monitored stations in the near shore and coastal waters of the Florida Keys
                National Marine Sanctuary will maintain dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) levels at less than or equal to 0.75 uM and
                total phosphorus (TP) levels at less than or equal to 0.25 uM.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                  75
                                                                  73.6
75
                      Percent
                      Stations
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area  Performance Measures and Data

                Explanation of Results: In 2010, a total of 1,000 stations exhibited dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) levels at less than or
                equal to 0.75uM for results of 84.3% that met the target. Total phosphorus numbers did not achieve the measure with 738 of
                1,003 stations meeting the target for results of 73.6%.
                Additional Information: The baseline for DIN is <0.75 uM (76.3 percent); TP < 0.25 uM (89.9 percent).
                (PM sf5) Improve the water quality of the Everglades ecosystem as measured by total phosphorus, including meeting the
                10 ppb total phosphorus criterion throughout the Everglades Protection Area marsh.
                          FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
Maintain    Maintain   Maintain     Maintain    Maintain    Maintain
Not
Maintaine
d
Not
Maintaine
d
Not
Maintained
Not
Maintaine
d
                                                                                                                      Parts/Billion
                Explanation of Results: This measure is tracked in 2 parts: 1) Water year 2011 annual geometric mean total phosphorus (TP)
                concentration throughout the Everglades Protection Area did  not meet the  10 ppb water quality criterion in the impacted
                portions  of the Refuge, WCA2 and WCA3. 2) Water year 2011  annual phosphorus load reductions for the  Stormwater
                Treatment Areas (STA) did not meet their permit discharge limits. Inflow phosphorus concentrations to the Everglades continue
                to exceed the lOppb criterion, in spite of significant progress.
                Additional Information: In 2005, the average annual geometric mean phosphorus concentrations were 5 ppb in the Everglades
                National Park, 10 ppb in Water Conservation 3 A,  13 ppb in the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, and 18 ppb in Water
                Conservation Area 2A;  annual  average flow-weighted from total phosphorus discharges from Stormwater Treatment Areas
                ranged from 13 ppb for area 3/4 and 98 ppb for area 1W. Effluent limits will be established for all discharges, including
                Stormwater Treatment Areas.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, 95 percent of active dredged material ocean dumping sites, as determined by the 3-year average,
                will have achieved environmentally acceptable conditions (as reflected in each site's management plan and measured through
                onsite monitoring programs). (2009 baseline: 99 percent. FY 2009 universe is 65.) (Due to variability in the universe of  sites,
                results vary from year to year (e.g., between 85 percent and 99 percent). While this much variability is not expected every  year,
                the results are expected to have some change each year.)
                (PM co5) Percent of active dredged material  ocean dumping sites that will have achieved environmentally acceptable
                conditions (as reflected in each site's management plan).
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                          FY 2006    FY 2007
                Target                         95
                Actual                         99
           FY 2009
           98
           99
           FY 2010
           98
           90.1
            FY2011
            98
            93
           FY 2012
           95
           FY 2013
           95
           Unit

           Percent Sites
                Explanation of Results: Gulfport Western Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites (ODMDS) has exceeded the minimum depth
                limitation. The Miami ODMDS has elevated PCB levels. In addition, multiple Gulf of Mexico (ODMDSs) likely do not meet
                environmentally acceptable conditions due to the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill and need to be evaluated.
                Additional Information: The baseline was calculated in 2005 at 60 sites.
                Strategic Measure:  By 2015, working with partners, protect or restore an  additional (i.e., measuring from 2009 forward)
                600,000  acres of habitat  within the study  areas for the 28 estuaries that are part of the National  Estuary Program.  (2009
                baseline: 900,956 acres of habitat protected  or restored, cumulative from  2002-2009. In FY 2009, 125,437 acres were protected
                or restored.)
                (PM 202) Acres protected or restored in National Estuary Program study areas.
                          FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target   25,000
                Actual   140,033
50,000
83,490
100,000
125,410
100,000
89,985
100,000
62,213
100,000
100,000
                      Acres
                     50,000
                     102,462.9
Explanation of Results: There are a large number of variables that affect the habitat acres actually reported at EOY. Two of the
biggest factors affecting the NEP's work and acres reported are: 1) the economy (non-federal match is a significant challenge
because state and local budgets have been severely cut), 2) the number of larger ready-to-go projects has greatly diminished
over these last years, leaving much smaller projects. We expect these factors will continue to influence our results in the future.
Therefore, we are working to determine a more appropriate target for the future.
Additional Information: 2009 Baseline: 900,956 acres of habitat protected or restored; cumulative from 2002-2009.
                (PM 4pc) Program dollars per acre of habitat protected or restored.

Target
Actual
FY 2006
510
401
FY 2007
505
492
FY 2008
500
909
FY 2009
500
659
FY 2010
500
2,046
FY2011
500
2,454
                                                                                               FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                                                                                                                      Dollars
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Explanation of Results:  Our target was missed due to receiving unexpected appropriations and fewer than expected habitat
                acres protected or restored in FY 2011. There are a large number of variables that affect the habitat acres actually reported at the
                end of the year. Two of the biggest factors affecting the NEPs' work and therefore acres reported are: 1) the economy (non-
                federal match is a significant challenge because state and local budgets have been severely cut so funds  are extremely tight),
                and 2) the number of larger ready to go projects has greatly diminished over these last year's leaving much smaller ones. FY
                2011 was the last year for reporting on this performance measure.
                Additional Information: In 2004, $519 program dollars per acre of habitat protected or restored.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, working with partners, achieve a net increase of wetlands nationwide, with additional focus on
                coastal wetlands, and biological and functional measures and  assessment of wetland condition. (2004 baseline: 32,000 acres
                annual net national wetland gain.)
                (PM 4E) In partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, states,  and tribes, achieve no net loss of wetlands each
                year under the Clean Water Act Section 404 regulatory program.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
         No
         Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No
     Loss
Net  No   Net
     Loss
(3)    Increase
Wetlands
         Data  Not  Data  Not  Data  Not  No   Net  No    Net No    Net
         Available  Available   Available   Loss       Loss        Loss
                                                                                                                    Acres
Additional Information: EPA receives data for this measure from the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE). ACE recently finalized
its database and was able to collect actual data for the first time in FY 2009.
(PM 4G) Number of acres  restored  and improved under  the 5-Star, NEP, 319, and  great  water body  programs
(cumulative).
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                75,000
                                82,875
                            88,000
                            103,507
                            110,000
                            130,000
                             150,000
                             154,000
                             170,000
                            180,000
                                                   Acres
                Additional Information: This measure describes the wetland acres restored through only EPA programs. Information on the
                national status of wetland gains and losses regardless of the cause is provided every five years by the USFWS. The most recent
                report noted an annual net loss of 13,800 acres.
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM Opd) Percent of project federal funds expended on time within the anticipated project construction schedule set
                forth in the Management Control Policy.
                         FY 2006    FY 2007    FY 2008
                Target
                Actual
           FY 2009

           94

           90.5
           FY 2010

           94.5

           85
            FY2011

            95
            Data
            Avail
            5/2012
           FY 2012

           95.5
Unit


Percent
Projects
                Explanation of Results: Data available May 2012
                Additional Information: A baseline had been set in 2008 of 93.5 percent.
                (PM crl) Protect, enhance, or restore acres of wetland habitat and acres of upland habitat in the Lower Columbia River
                watershed (cumulative starting FY 2006).
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010
                Target
                Actual
8,000
12,986
10,000
15,700
16,000
16,000
FY2011

16,300
16,661
                                              FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
Acres
                Additional Information: In 2005, 96,770 acres of wetlands were available for protection, enhancement or restoration in the
                Lower Columbia River Estuary.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, prevent water pollution and protect aquatic systems so that the overall ecosystem health of the
                Great Lakes is at least 24.7 points on a 40-point scale. (2009  baseline: Great Lakes rating of 22.5 (expected) on the 40-point
                scale where the rating uses select Great Lakes State of the Lakes Ecosystem indicators based on a 1- to -5 rating system for each
(4)    Improve  indicator, where "1" is "Poor" and "5" is "Good".)
the Health  of  (PM 433) Improve the overall ecosystem health of the Great Lakes by preventing water pollution and protecting aquatic
the      Great  systems (using a 40-point scale).
Lakes                    FY 2006   FY 2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   21
                                    21
21
No Target  , T   „
T? * ur u   No  Target  0,  .
Estabhshe  _   ,,. ,   ,  23.4
 ,          Established
                       21.9
                      23.4
The 40-point
scale has no
unit
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual   21.1       22.7        23.7

                Explanation of Results: The Great Lakes Index score of 21.9 does not indicate worsening environmental conditions in the
                Great Lakes over the long term. Rather, the change is a result of an adjustment to one of the eight index components - beach
                closures. In 2010, 62% of Great Lakes beaches were reported as open more than 95% of the swimming season. This represents
                a large decrease from the previous year (82%), and caused the beach closure component of the index to drop from a "2" to a "1."
                While this gives the appearance that beach - and therefore general Great Lakes - conditions are deteriorating, approximately the
                same number of beaches did not meet the 95% threshold in 2010 as in 2009. This is attributable to a more rigorous standard of
                reporting. Prior to 2010, states had been considering non-monitored beaches as open and safe  for swimming for 100% of the
                beach season because the lack of monitoring resulted in no closings. The inclusion of non-monitored beaches in the category of
                "beaches meeting the criteria of being open more than 95% of the swimming season" raised the number of beaches considered
                safe for  swimming, and  in turn raised the percentage. In 2010, non-monitored beaches were no longer reported by states, which
                resulted in a smaller number of beaches monitored and counted in this component of the index.
                Starting in FY12, the beach closure component of the index will be revised to assess the percentage of days of the beach season
                that the  Great Lakes beaches monitored by state  beach safety programs are open and safe for swimming. This component will
                then  be  consistent with  the national beach program measure and the revised Great Lakes beach program measure under the
                GLRI Action Plan.
                Additional Information: The ecosystem health index  for the Great Lakes in 2002 was 20. Index value for 2010 = 22.7. This
                was previously a long-term measure, so no data is included for FY 2009 or FY 2010.
                (PM 620) Cumulative  percentage decline for  the long-term trend in concentrations of PCBs in whole lake trout and
                walleye samples.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
5
6
5
6
5
6
10
43
37
44
40
                      Percent
                      Decline
                Additional Information: On average, total PCB concentrations in whole Great Lakes top predator fish have recently declined 5
                percent annually - average concentrations at Lake sites from 2002 were:  L Superior-9ug/g; L Michigan- 1.6ug/g; L Huron-
                .8ug/g L Erie- 1.8ug/g; and L Ontario- 1.2ug/g.

                (PM 625) Number of Beneficial Use Impairments removed within Areas of Concern (cumulative).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012     FY 2013   Unit
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Target                          16
Actual
                                                           21
                                                           12
20
12
26
26
33
                      BUIs
                      Removed
                Additional Information: Under the GLRI, EPA collaborated extensively with state and federal partners to conduct projects
                supporting the removal  of the following beneficial use impairments: 'Restrictions on Drinking Water' BUI at Rochester
                Embayment AOC (11/3) and Detroit River AOC (7/9); 'Beach Closing' BUI at Kalamazoo River AOC (3/3), Lower Menominee
                AOC (3/3),  Waukegan Harbor AOC (9/28),  Manistique River AOC (5/5/10  - not previously  counted); 'Restrictions on
                Dredging' BUI at St. Clair River AOC  (3/3), Muskegon Lake AOC (9/26), and White Lake AOC (9/30); 'Added Costs to
                Agriculture or Industry' BUI at Rochester Embayment AOC (7/9) and Grand Calumet River AOC (9/30); 'Eutrophication' BUI
                at Deer Lake AOC (9/26); 'Bird or Animal Deformities'  BUI at Deer Lake AOC (9/26); and  Tainting of Fish and Wildlife' BUI
                at St. Clair River AOC (11/17/09 - not previously counted).
                (PM 626) Number of Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes where all management actions necessary for  delisting have
                been implemented (cumulative).
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target                                                 1           i
                Actual                                                             2

                Additional Information: Universe of 31; baseline of 1.
                (PM 627) Number of nonnative species newly detected in the Great Lakes ecosystem.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012
                                                                                                    AOCs
                Target
                Actual
                                                       1.1
            1.0
            0.83
                       FY 2013    Unit

                       0.8
                                  Species
                Additional Information: During the ten-year period prior to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (2000-2009), thirteen new
                invasive species were believed to be discovered within the Great Lakes. This is a baseline rate of invasion of 1.3 species per
                year. NOAA scientists have since reclassified the detection dates of three species based on a reassessment and categorization of
                available data. This alters the baseline to 1.0 species per year (10 species from 2000-2009).  The FY 2012 target of 0.8 is based
                on this new baseline of 1.0  species per year. This target also assumes the same rate of detection (one species over the five years
                of the Action Plan) as the original targets.
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM 628) Acres managed for populations of invasive species controlled to a target level (cumulative).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
1,000
1,500
13,045
15,500
18,000
                                              Acres
                Explanation of Results: This result is higher than anticipated. The unprecedented level of funding for invasive species work
                capitalized on a backlog of projects and appears to have achieved economies of scale due to  significantly larger projects.
                Approximately 4,800 acres of this effort contribute to efforts to protect, restore, and enhance costal habitat (GL-12) and are also
                included in the results for that measure. Reporting for this measure relies heavily upon receiving and validating information
                from funding recipients (grantees, states, federal agencies, sub-grantees).
                Additional Information: There were zero acres managed for populations of invasive species controlled to a target level in 2005.
                (PM 629) Number of multi-agency rapid response plans established, mock exercises to practice responses carried out
                under those plans, and/or actual response actions (cumulative).
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                        12
                                  Number
                                  Responses/Pi
                                  ans
                Additional Information: There were zero multi-agency rapid response plans established, mock exercises to practice responses
                carried out under those plans, and/or actual response actions in 2005.
                (PM 630) Five-year average annual loadings of soluble reactive phosphorus (metric tons per year) from tributaries
                draining targeted watersheds.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009
                Target

                Actual
FY 2010

0
FY2011

0
Data
Unavailab
le
FY 2012

0.5
           Unit
                                              Metric
                                              Tons/Year
                Explanation of Results: Sufficient historical data does not currently exist to allow for calculation of 5-year averages through

   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
the 2010 water year for the  Saginaw, Genesee, and St. Louis Rivers. This measure tracks  changes in the five-year average
annual loadings of SRP. Under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, improved phosphorus data are now being collected in all
five targeted watersheds (Fox, Saginaw, Maumee, St. Louis, and Genesee) to better estimate annual loadings of soluble reactive
phosphorus (SRP). Some historical data reflecting five years or more of sampling does exist for the Fox and Maumee Rivers,
allowing for loads to be estimated. While limited data is available, the assessment of these 5-year average annual loadings
illustrate the inherent problems with tracking changes to SRP loadings from tributaries, given the yearly variability of rainfall
and other climatic factors; therefore, results of this measure may not indicate a trend from year to year.
Additional Information: This measure is being reported in percent reductions of five-year average annual loadings of soluble
reactive phosphorus (metric tons per year). The existing measure cannot provide technically sound and statistically valid results
sufficient to provide  long-term trend  information. The program proposes to develop  a replacement for this measure in the
summer of 2012.
(PM 631) Percentage of beaches meeting bacteria standards 95 percent or more of beach  days.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                       86
87
62
                                                                                                     Percent
                                                                                                     Beaches
                Explanation of Results: The measure has been changed for FY 2012 so that it only counts monitored beaches and is consistent
                with the national coastal and Great Lakes beach measure. Reasons for missing the target included a change in reporting so that
                non-monitored beaches were not counted as "open."
                Additional Information: The baseline is 86 percent (2006).
                (PM 632) Acres in Great Lakes watershed with USDA conservation practices implemented to reduce erosion, nutrients,
                and/or pesticide loading.
                          FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                    2
                                                                    62
                                  Percent
                                  Acres
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, 268,107 acres in the Great Lakes watershed were put into USDA conservation practices to
                reduce erosion, nutrients and/or pesticide loadings under Farm Bill Programs.  This represents a 62 percent increase over the
                baseline of 165,000 acres (based on FY 2008 data). The significant increase in FY 2011 is a combined result of greater funding
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
(base USDA programs  and GLRI) and increased participation in NRCS programs. The acres tracked in this measure are not
cumulative but are for new conservation practices  implemented in a given fiscal year.  The percent increase will vary
considerably from year to year due to funding, the conservation universe, and the difficulty of conservation practices.
Additional Information: The baseline is 165,000 acres in the Great Lakes watershed with USDA conservation practices
implemented to reduce erosion, nutrients, and/or pesticide loading.
(PM 633) Percent of populations of native aquatic non-threatened and non-endangered species self-sustaining in the wild
(cumulative).
          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                       33%;
                                                       48/147
33%;
48/147
31; 46/147
33%;
48/147
34%;
50/147
                                                                                                                     Species
                Explanation of Results: Actions have been taken which we believe will increase the percentage of populations self-sustaining
                in the wild; however, this environmental indicator will require additional time for the impacts to affect species populations. We
                expect that the actions taken will realize the targets established, albeit on a delayed schedule. Lake Huron whitefish and lake
                trout populations (two species targeted to meet this measure) are making significant progress in measurable population metrics,
                but the impacts of our efforts will not be fully known for several years, since lake trout are a long-lived, slow-growing, late
                maturing species that does not recruit to most sampling gears until age 5+.
                Additional Information: In 2009, 27 percent of populations of native aquatic non-threatened and non-endangered species were
                self-sustaining in the wild.
                (PM 634) Number of acres of wetlands and wetland-associated uplands protected, restored and enhanced (cumulative).
                          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                       5,000
5,000
9,624
11,000
13,000
                                                                                                     Acres
                Additional Information: There were zero acres of wetlands and wetland-associated uplands protected, restored and enhanced in
                2005 through GLRI.
                (PM 635) Number of acres of coastal, upland, and island habitats protected, restored and enhanced (cumulative).
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
                                                                                                                 Acres
Performance Measures and Data
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
Target                                               15^000
Actual
                                                                 FY2011   FY2012   FY 2013   Unit

                                                                 15,000     15,000     20,000
                                                                 12,103
Explanation of Results: Funding delays and permitting process delays have slowed project implementation. These project areas
are expected to be protected, restored, or enhanced in CY 2012.
Additional Information: There were zero acres of coastal, upland, and island habitats protected, restored and enhanced in 2005.
(PM 636) Number of species delisted due to recovery.
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
Target
Actual
                                                                     0
                                                                 FY2011

                                                                 0
                                                                            FY 2012

                                                                            1
FY 2013

2
                                                                                                                 Unit
                                                                                                                  Species
                Additional Information: There were zero species delisted due to recovery in 2005.
                (PM 637) Percent of days of the beach season that the Great Lakes beaches monitored by state beach safety programs
                are open and safe for swimming.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target
Actual
                                                                            90
                                                                                                       90
                                                                                                                 Percent Days
                Additional Information: Results do not indicate a worsening of beach conditions since approximately the same number of
                beaches did not meet the 95% threshold in 2010 as in 2009. The measure was revised for FY 2012 so that it only counts
                monitored beaches and is consistent with the national coastal and Great Lakes beach measure (SS-SP9.N11). Furthermore, non-
                monitored beaches are not counted as "open."
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, remediate a cumulative total of 10.2 million cubic yards of contaminated sediment in the Great
                Lakes. (2009 baseline: Of the 46.5 million cubic yards once estimated to need remediation in the Great Lakes, 6.0 million cubic
                yards of contaminated sediments have been remediated from 1997 through 2008.)
                (PM 606) Cubic yards of contaminated sediment remediated (cumulative from 1997) in the Great Lakes.
                        FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Target   32        4.5         5.0
Actual   4.1        4.5         5.5
                                                          5.9
                                                          6.0
           6.3
           7.3
                                                                            9.1
                      9.6
                                                                 8.4
                                 Cubic Yards
                                 (Million)
                Additional Information: 7.3 million cubic yards of contaminated sediments were remediated from 1997 through 2009 of the
                46.5 million requiring remediation.
                (PM 623) Cost per cubic yard of contaminated sediments remediated (cumulative).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                            200
                                             200
                                                                                                  Dollars/Cubi
                                                                                                  c Yard
                                          200        200         200
                                          122        125         144
Additional Information: In 2006, the cost per cubic yard of contaminated sediments remediated was $115.
Strategic Measure: By  2015,  achieve 50 percent (92,500 acres) of the  185,000  acres of submerged aquatic vegetation
necessary to achieve Chesapeake Bay water quality standards. (2008 baseline: 35 percent, 64,912 acres.)
(PM 233) Total nitrogen reduction practices implementation achieved as a result  of agricultural best management
practice implementation per million dollars to implement agricultural BMPs.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011
                                    47,031
                               48,134
49,237
                                                     49,237
49,237
FY 2012

49,660
                                                                                                       FY 2013   Unit
                                    43,529
                               45,533
49,660
                                                     49,660
Data
Unavailab
le
                      Pounds/Doll
                      ars
                      (Millions)
                Target
(5)    Improve
the Health  of  Actual
the
Chesapeake
Bay Ecosystem  Explanation of Results: Not able to track this measure since FY 2010 (due to the development of the Bay TMDL). Measure
                replaced with PM 234.
                Additional Information: The 2001 baseline is 43,289.
                (PM cbl) Percent of submerged Aquatic Vegetation goal of 185,000 acres achieved based on annual monitoring from
                previous goal.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target

   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
                               No  Target  No Target  No  Target  45
                                                        Percent

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
   FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual
                                              Establishe
                                              d
                                                                                43
               Additional Information: In 1985, 21percent of the Submerged Aquatic Vegetation goal of 185,000 acres was achieved (38,226
               acres).
               (PM cb6) Percent of goal achieved for implementing nitrogen reduction actions to achieve the final TMDL allocations,
               as measured through the phase 5.3 watershed model.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
1
22.5
                                Percent Goal
                                Achieved
               Additional Information: The FY 2010 baseline is 0 percent. The universe is 100 percent goal achievement by December 31,
               2025 (FY 2026). FY 2013 target is a placeholder and will be revised after finalization of Phase 2 WIPs being developed in
               association with Bay TMDL.
               (PM cb7) Percent of goal achieved for implementing phosphorus reduction actions to achieve final TMDL allocations, as
               measured through the phase 5.3 watershed model.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                      22.5
                                Percent Goal
                                Achieved
               Additional Information: The FY 2010 baseline is 0 percent. The universe is 100 percent goal achievement by December 31,
               2025 (FY 2026). FY 2013 target is a placeholder and will be revised after finalization of Phase 2 WIPs being developed in
               association with Bay TMDL.
               (PM cb8) Percent of goal achieved for implementing sediment reduction actions to achieve final TMDL allocations, as
               measured through the phase 5.3 watershed model.
                        FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
1

11
22.5
          Percent Goal
          Achieved

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Additional Information: The FY 2010 baseline is 0 percent. The universe is 100 percent goal achievement by December 31,
                2025 (FY 2026). FY 2013 target is a placeholder and will be revised after finalization of Phase 2 WIPs being developed in
                association with Bay TMDL.
                (PM 234) Reduce per capita nitrogen loads (pounds per person per year) to levels necessary to achieve Chesapeake Bay
                Total Maximum Daily Load allocations.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                                                        15.17
                                 Pounds/Pers
                                 on/Year
                Additional  Information:  FY  1986  baseline is 27.4  pounds of  nitrogen/person/year. Universe  is  10.57  pounds  of
                nitrogen/person/year by December 31, 2025 (FY 2026).
                (PM cb2) Percent of Dissolved Oxygen goal of 100 percent standards attainment achieved based on annual monitoring
                from the previous calendar year and the preceding 2 years.
                Target
                Actual
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010

                                               No Target  No Target  , T   „
                                               T? 4. ur u    T? * ur u   No  Target
                                               Estabhshe  Estabhshe  _   , ,• ,   ,
                                               ,           ,          Established
                                               d          d
                                                                                 FY2011   FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
40
                                                                                 38.5
Percent
Dissolved
Oxygen
                Additional Information: Historic data for measure changed due to new assessment method adopted during development of the
                Bay TMDL. Results from FY 2011 reflect new method, The revised historic results are FY 2006: 35.2 percent; FY 2007: 32.3
                percent; FY 2008: 40.5 percent; FY 2009: 42.1 percent; FY 2010: 39.4 percent.

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce releases of nutrients throughout the Mississippi River Basin to reduce the size of the
                hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico to less than 5,000 km2, as measured by the 5-year running average of the size of the zone.
                (Baseline: 2005-2009 running average size is 15,670 km2.)
                (PM 22b) Improve the overall health of coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico on the Good/Fair/Poor scale of the National
                Coastal Condition Report.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit

                Target   2.4         2.4         2.5         2.5        2.5         2.5         2.4         2.4        Scale
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS
(6)     Restore
and    Protect
the  Gulf  of
Mexico

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual   2.4         2.4         2.2
           2.2
                Explanation of Results: The NCCR IV assessment is based on environmental stressor and response data collected by the states
                of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi,  Louisiana, and  Texas from  2003-2006. The  hurricanes of 2005  (Katrina  and Rita)
                significantly affected the data collected and Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana did not collect data in 2005 except for water
                quality indicators in Mississippi. These factors influenced the overall condition score which represents no significant change
                from the previous ratings in NCCR II and III but did not improve.
                Additional Information: In 2008, the Gulf of Mexico rating of Fair/Poor was 2.2, where the rating is based on a 5-point system
                in which 1 is Poor and 5 is Good and is expressed as an aerially weighted mean of regional scores using the National Coastal
                Condition Report II indicators: water quality index, sediment quality index, benthic index, coastal habitat index, and fish tissue
                contaminants.
                (PM xgl) Restore water and habitat quality to meet water quality standards in impaired segments in 13 priority coastal
                areas (cumulative starting in FY 2007).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                              320
                                               360
                                64         96          96          202
                                131        131         170         286
Additional Information: In 2008, the Gulf of Mexico coastal wetlands habitats included 3,769,370 acres
                                                                     Impaired
                                                                     Segments
                (PM xg2) Restore, enhance, or protect a cumulative number of acres of important coastal and marine habitats.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
18,200
25,215
26,000
29,344
                                                       27,500
                                                       29,552
30,000
30,052
30,600
30,600
                      Acres
                Additional Information: In 2008, 25,215 acres were restored, enhanced, or protected in the Gulf of Mexico.
(7)     Restore  Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce the maximum area of hypoxia in Long Island Sound by 15 percent from the pre-TMDL
and    Protect  avera§e °f 208 square miles as measured by the 5-year running average size of the zone. (Baseline: Pre-total maximum daily
the      Long  ^oa<^ (TMDL)  average conditions based on 1987-1999 data is 208 square miles. Post-TMDL includes  years 2000-2014.
Island Sound    Universe: The total surface area of Long Island Sound is approximately 1,268 square miles; the potential for the maximum area
                of hypoxia would be 1,268 square miles.)
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
(PM 115) Percent of goal achieved in reducing trade-equalized (TE) point source nitrogen discharges to Long Island
Sound from the 1999 baseline of 59,146 TE Ibs/day.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                      52
                                                                      70
72
Data
Avail
3/2012
74
                                                                                                   Percent Goal
                                                                                                   Achieved
                Additional Information: The 2000 TMDL baseline is 59,146 Trade-Equalized (TE) pounds/day. The 2014 TMDL target is
                22,774 TE pounds/day.
                (PM H8) Restore, protect or enhance acres of coastal habitat from the 2010 baseline of 2,975 acres.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                             218
                       480
                                                                                                   Acres
                Additional Information: The 2010 baseline is 2,975 acres. The long-term goal of this measure was significantly exceeded in
                FY 2010. EPA revised this measure in FY 2012 to measure acres instead of percent of goal achieved. EPA establishes annual
                targets with partners to  measure annual progress. Out-year estimates  are based on continued state progress, feasibility, and
                funding for habitat restoration projects.
                (PM H9) Reopen miles of river and stream corridors to diadromous fish passage from the 2010 baseline of 17.7  river
                miles by removal of dams and barriers or by installation of bypass structures.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                             28
                       51
                                                                                                   Miles
                Additional Information: The long-term goal of this measure was significantly exceeded in FY 2010. The EPA revised this
                measure in FY 2012 to measure river miles instead of percent of goal  achieved. The EPA will establish annual targets with
                partners to measure annual progress. Out-year estimates are based on continued state progress, feasibility, and funding for fish
                passage and  bypass projects. The EPA revised its FY 2012 target for this measure in the FY 2013 submission due to a
                miscalculation. It is not a reflection of reduced effort.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM 116) Percent of goal  achieved  in restoring, protecting  or  enhancing 240 acres of coastal habitat from the 2008
                baseline of 1,199 acres.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                       33
                       740
                       50
                       890
                                             Percent Goal
                                             Achieved
                Explanation of Results: Achieved 890 percent of the 2014 habitat acres goal. The 2014 target was significantly exceeded in FY
                2011 due partially to increased prior year appropriations that enabled the leveraging of funding for acquisitions of several
                properties that helped exceed expectations for this measure.
                Additional Information: The Long Island Sound Study established a goal to restore or protect 240 additional acres of coastal
                habitat from 2009-2014, from a 2008 baseline of 1,199 acres.
                (PM H7) Percent of goal achieved in  reopening 50  river and stream miles to diadromous  fish passage from the 2008
                baseline of 124 miles.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                                                                                             ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
                Target                                                33          50
                Actual                                                72          72
                                                                    Percent Goal
                                                                    Achieved
                Additional Information: The Long Island Sound Study established a goal to reopen 50 river/stream miles to diadromous fish
                passages in 2009-2014, from a 2008 baseline of 124 miles.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, improve water quality and enable the lifting of harvest restrictions in 4,300 acres of shellfish bed
                growing areas impacted by degraded or declining water quality in the Puget Sound. (2009 baseline: 1,730 acres of shellfish beds
                with harvest restrictions in 2006 had their restrictions lifted. Universe: 30,000 acres of commercial shellfish beds with harvest
(8)     Restore  restrictions in 2006.)
and    Protect  (PM psl) Improve water quality and enable the lifting of harvest restrictions in acres of shellfish bed growing  areas
the      Puget  impacted by degrading or declining water quality.
Sound Basin             FY 2006   FY 2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
450
1,566
600
1,730
1,800
4,453
4,953
1,525
7,758
           Acres
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, Puget Sound's Samish Bay 4,037 acres were placed under new harvest restrictions
                primarily due to pathogen pollution. Also, in FY 2011, there were 1,109 acres in Puget Sound that had harvest restrictions
                lifted. The net loss in harvestable acres for FY 2011 is 2,928 acres; an EOY FY cumulative total of 1,525 acres.
                Additional Information: The universe of potentially recoverable shellfish beds in Puget Sound closed due to nonpoint source
                pollution is approximately 10,000 acres. In 2010, 4,453 acres (cumulative) of shellfish-bed growing areas had improved water
                quality, resulting  in the  lifting of harvest restrictions. In 2011, a downgrading of approximately  4,000  acres in Samish Bay
                occurred due to non-point pollution exacerbated by La Nina weather conditions. The Puget Sound program is strategically
                directing resources in  FY 2012 and beyond to  address the  pathogen  pollution problem impacting shellfish harvest in Puget
                Sound. The program is addressing this both in the near term - focusing on specific geographical locations (e.g. Samish Bay),
                and in the long term for the universe of potentially recoverable shellfish acres basin-wide in Puget Sound.
                (PM ps2) Remediate acres of prioritized contaminated sediments.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
                                   FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
100
123
125
123.1
123
123.1
127
123
                      Acres
                Explanation of Results: Work anticipated to meet this measure was delayed. The additional acres projected for remediation in
                FY 2011 are still being worked on to complete the clean-up (expected in February 2012).
                Additional Information: In 2008, 123 acres of prioritized contaminated sediments were remediated.
                (PM ps3) Number of near shore, riparian, and wetland habitat acres protected or restored.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
2,310
4,413
3,000
5,751
6,500
10,062
12,363
14,629
19,063
24,063
                      Acres
                Additional Information: In  2008,  4,413  acres (cumulative) of tidally-  and seasonally-influenced estuarine wetlands were
                restored.
(9) Sustain and  Strategic Measure: By 2015, provide safe drinking water or adequate wastewater sanitation to 75 percent of the homes in the
Restore    the  U.S.-Mexico Border area that lacked access to either service in 2003. (2003 Universe: 98,515 homes lacked drinking water, and
U.S.-Mexico     690,723 homes lacked adequate wastewater sanitation, based on a 2003 assessment  of homes in the U.S.-Mexico Border area.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                    FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
Border          2015 target: 73,886 homes provided with safe drinking water, and 518,042 homes with adequate wastewater sanitation.)
Environmental   (PM 4pg) Loading of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) removed (million pounds/year) from the U.S.-Mexico border
Health
area since 2003.
         FY 2006
Target
Actual
                                   FY2007   FY2008   FY 2009   FY 2010
                                             FY 2012
                                             115
                                             FY 2013
                                             121.5
                                            Unit
                                                                                                                 Million
                                                                                                                 Pounds/Year
                                                                 FY2011
                                                                 108.2
                                                                 108.5
Additional Information: The baseline starts in 2003 with zero pounds of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) removed.
(PM xb2) Number of additional homes provided safe drinking water in the U.S.-Mexico border area that lacked access
to safe drinking water in 2003.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                    1,200
                    (Annual)
                    1,276
                    (Annual)
2,500
(Annual)

5,162
(Annual)
1,500
(Annual)

1,584
(Annual)
28,434
(Cumulativ
e)
52,130
(Cumulativ
e)
                                                                 54,130
                                                                 (Cumulati
                                                                 ve)
                                                                 54,734
                                                                 (Cumulati
                                                                 ve)
1,000
(Annual)
3,000
(Annual)
                                                                                                                 Homes
               Additional Information: Units and Baseline: "Additional homes" represents the  number of existing households that  are
               provided access (i.e., connected) to safe drinking water as a result of Border Environment Infrastructure Fund (BEIF)-supported
               projects. The program measures from a baseline of zero additional homes since this measure was developed in 2003. Universe:
               The known universe is the number of existing households in the U.S.-Mexico border area lacking access to safe drinking water
               in 2003 (98,515 homes). The known universe was calculated from U.S. Census and  the Mexican National Water Commission
               (CONAGUA) sources. This measure was modified from cumulative to annual beginning in FY 2012 to better capture annual
               program progress.
               (PM xb3) Number of additional homes provided adequate wastewater sanitation in the U.S.-Mexico border area that
               lacked access to wastewater sanitation in 2003.
                        FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011     FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                    70,750
15,000
105,500
246,175
                                                                 461,125
10,500
27,000
Homes
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
(Annual)
73,475
(Annual)
(Annual)
31,686
(Annual)
(Annual)
43,594
(Annual)
(Cumulativ
e)
254,125
(Cumulativ
e)
(Cumulati
ve)
513,041
(Cumulati
ve)
                                                                                               (Annual)    (Annual)
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual
                Additional Information:  Units  and Baseline: "Additional homes" represents the number of existing  households  that are
                provided access (i.e., connected) to adequate wastewater sanitation as a result of Border Environment Infrastructure Fund
                (BEIF)-supported projects. The program measures from a baseline of zero additional homes since this measure was developed
                in 2003. Universe: The known universe is the number of existing households in the U.S.-Mexico border area lacking access to
                adequate wastewater sanitation services in 2003  (690,723). The known universe of unconnected homes was calculated from
                U.S. Census and the Mexican National Water Commission (CONAGUA) sources. This measure was modified from cumulative
                to annual beginning in FY 2012 to better capture annual program progress.
   GOAL 2: PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
   GOAL 3: CLEANING UP COMMUNITIES AND ADVANCING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
   Clean up communities, advance sustainable development, and protect disproportionately impacted low-income, minority, and tribal
   communities. Prevent releases of harmful substances and clean up and restore contaminated areas.

Objective 1  - Promote Sustainable and Livable Communities: Support sustainable, resilient, and livable communities by working with local,
state, tribal, and federal  partners to promote smart growth, emergency preparedness and recovery planning, brownfield redevelopment, and the
equitable distribution of environmental benefits.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, conduct environmental assessments at 20,600 (cumulative) brownfield properties. (Baseline: As
                of the end of FY 2009, EPA assessed 14,600 properties.)
                (PM B29) Brownfield properties assessed.
                                                                                             FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   1,000      1,000       1,000       1,000      1,000       1,000      1,200      1,200
                Actual
FY 2006
1,000
2,139
FY 2007
1,000
1,371
FY 2008
1,000
1,453
FY 2009
1,000
1,295
FY 2010
1,000
1,326
FY2(
1,000
1,784
                                                                                                   Properties
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, the Agency embarked on a major data improvement effort to collect additional data and
                prior existing data. The Agency is increasing the target for this measure in FY 2012.
(2) Assess  and  Additional Information: The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. However, the targets above are
Cleanup        not estimated based on these additional funds. ARRA resources and performance measures for EPA's Brownfields program are
Brownfields     tracked separately on EPA's internet site http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.html#quarterly and the government-wide ARRA
                site www.recovery.gov.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, make an additional 17,800 acres of brownfield properties ready for reuse from the 2009 baseline.
                (Baseline: As of the end of FY 2009, EPA made 11,800 acres ready for reuse.)
                (PM B33) Acres of Brownfields properties made ready for reuse.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target
                Actual
                         No Target  No Target
                         Establishe  Establishe  225
                         d          d
                           598
                    2,399
4,404
           1,000
2,660
            1,000
3,627
            1,000
6,667
           3,000
3,000
                                                                                                   Acres
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, the Agency embarked on a major data improvement effort to collect additional data and
                prior existing data. The Agency is increasing the target for this measure in FY 2012.
                Additional Information: The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. However, the targets above are
                not estimated based on these additional funds. ARRA resources and performance measures for EPA's Brownfields program are
                tracked separately on EPA's internet site http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.html#quarterly and the government-wide ARRA
                site www.recovery.gov.
                (PM B32) Number of properties cleaned up using Brownfields funding.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
60
88
60
77
60
78
60
93
60
109
60
130
           120
                                              120
                                 Properties
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, the Agency embarked on a major data improvement effort to collect additional data and
                prior existing data. The Agency is increasing the target for this measure in FY 2012.
                Additional Information: The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. However, the targets above are
                not estimated based on these additional funds. ARRA resources and performance measures for EPA's Brownfields program are
                tracked separately on EPA's internet site http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.html#quarterly and the government-wide ARRA
                site www.recovery.gov.
                (PM B34) Jobs leveraged from Brownfields activities.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009
                Target
                Actual
5,000
5,504
5,000
5,209
5,000
5,484
5,000
6,490
FY 2010
5,000
5,177
FY2011
5,000
6,447
                                   FY 2012
                                   5,000
                                   FY 2013
                                   5,000
                                 Unit

                                 Jobs
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, the Agency embarked on a major data improvement effort to collect additional data and
                prior existing data. The Agency is increasing the target for this measure in FY 2012.
                Additional Information: The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. However, the targets above are
                not estimated based on these additional funds. ARRA resources and performance measures for EPA's Brownfields program are
                tracked separately on EPA's internet site http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.html#quarterly and the government-wide ARRA
                site www.recovery.gov.
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            125

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM B37) Billions of dollars of cleanup and redevelopment funds leveraged at Brownfields sites.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   1-0
                Actual   i 48
                    0.9
                    1.69
0.9
1.48
0.9
1.06
0.9
1.40
0.9
2.14
1.2
                      Dollars
                      (Billions)
(3)     Reduce
Chemical
Risks       at
Facilities  and
in
Communities
Explanation of Results: In FY 2011, the Agency embarked on a major data improvement effort to collect additional data and
prior existing data. The Agency is increasing the target for this measure in FY 2012.
Additional Information: The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. However, the targets above are
not estimated based on these additional funds. ARRA resources and performance measures for EPA's Brownfields program are
tracked separately on EPA's internet site http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.html#quarterly and the  government-wide ARRA
site www.recovery.gov.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, continue to maintain the Risk Management Plan (RMP) prevention program and further reduce
by 10 percent the number of accidents at RMP facilities. (Baseline: There  was an annual average of 190 accidents based on
RMP program data between 2005-2009).
(PM CH2) Number of risk management plan audits and inspections conducted.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target   40o        400        400       400        400         560        530        500
                                                                                                 I Audits
Actual   550        628        628       654        618         630
                Additional Information: Between FY 2000 and FY 2011, more than 6,800 Risk Management Plan audits/inspections were
                completed.

Objective 2 - Preserve Land: Conserve resources and prevent land contamination by reducing waste generation, increasing recycling, and
ensuring proper management of waste and petroleum products.
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
(1)      Waste  Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase the amount of municipal solid waste reduced, reused, or recycled by 2.5 billion pounds.
Generation      (At the end of FY 2008, 22.5 billion pounds of municipal solid waste had been reduced, reused, or recycled.)
and Recycling   (PM MW9) Billions of pounds of municipal solid waste reduced, reused, or recycled.
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            126

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010
Target                                    19.5       20.5
                                                                                                        FY 2013   Unit
                Actual
                                                          23.7
                                                     22.6
                                  Data
                                  Avail
                                  12/2012
                                                        Pounds
                                                        (Billions)
                Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2013. FY 2012 data will be available December 2013.
                (PM SMI) Tons of materials and products offsetting use of virgin resources through sustainable materials management.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010
                                                                 FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                 No Target
                                                                 Establishe   8,549,502   8,650,995
                                                                 d
                                                                 8,449,458
                                                                                                                  Tons
                Additional Information: New measure to reflect the national program shift from waste management to sustainable materials
                management. This new measure replaces our retired waste management measure, "Billions of pounds of municipal solid waste
                reduced, reused or recycled." The FY 2011 results will be used as the baseline for this new measure.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase beneficial use of coal combustion ash to 50 percent from 40 percent in 2008.
                (PM MW2) Increase in percentage of coal combustion ash that is beneficially used instead of disposed.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                    1.8
                                    -0.7
1.8
                               1.8
1.
           -6
1.4

Data Avail
12/2012
1.4
Data
Avail
12/2013
1.4
                                                                                                  Percent
                                                                                                  Increase
                Additional Information: In 2008, approximately 136 million tons of coal combustion ash was generated, and 40 percent was
                used rather than landfilled. Data lag for FY 2010 and FY 2011  results is two years, to allow for the use of finalized survey
                numbers in the budget cycle.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase by 78 the number of tribes covered by an integrated waste management plan compared
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                           127

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                to FY 2009. (At the end of FY 2009, 94 of 572 federally recognized tribes were covered by an integrated waste management
                plan.)
                (PM MW8) Number of tribes covered by an integrated solid waste management plan.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                                                                                                                    Tribes
                Actual
27
28
26
35
16
31
23
23
14
17
                Additional Information: The baseline for this measure was set at zero, in response to new criteria for reporting identified in
                2006. Beginning in FY 2012, RCRA Program grant funding supporting the development of integrated waste management plans
                is no longer available. However, the performance target may be achieved with the assistance of other funding sources, including
                tribes, other EPA programs, or other federal agencies. Technical  assistance to the tribes, such as that provided through tribal
                circuit riders, will remain  available. At the  end of FY 2011, 134 of 574 federally recognized  tribes were covered by an
                integrated waste management plan.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, close, clean up, or upgrade 281 open dumps in Indian country and on other tribal lands compared
                to FY 2009. (At the end of FY 2009, 412 open dumps were closed, cleaned up, or upgraded. As of April 1, 2010, 3,464 open
                dumps were listed in the Indian Health Service Operation and Maintenance System Database, which is dynamic because of the
                ongoing assessment of open dumps.)
                (PM MW5) Number of closed, cleaned up, or upgraded open dumps in Indian country or on other tribal lands.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
30
107
30
166
27
129
22
141
45
82
45
                      Dumps
                Explanation of Results: Leveraged available EPA resources and tribal funds to greatly accelerate the expected pace of open
                tribal lands.

                Additional Information: The baseline for this measure was set at zero, in response to new criteria for reporting identified in
                2006.

(2)   Minimize  Strategic Measure: By 2015, prevent releases at 500 hazardous waste management facilities with initial approved controls or
Releases    of  updated controls resulting in the protection of an estimated 3 million people living within a mile of all facilities with controls.
Hazardous      (Baseline:  At the end of FY 2009, it was estimated that 789 facilities will require these controls out of the universe of 2,468

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            128

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Waste     and
Petroleum
Products
Performance Measures and Data
facilities with about 10,000 process units. The goal of 500 represents 63 percent of the facilities needing controls.)
(PM HWO) Number of hazardous waste facilities with new or updated controls.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Actual
                                                        100
                                                        115
100
140
100
130
                                                                              100
                                                                                                          100
                                                                                                                    Facilities
                Explanation of Results: Regional offices and their state counterparts were able to maintain a high permit renewal rate, which
                accounts for over half of the reported results.
                Additional Information: There are an estimated 894 facilities that will require initial approved or updated controls out of the
                universe of 2,450 facilities.
                (PM HWE) Number of facilities with new or updated controls per million dollars of program cost.
                          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                    2.00
                       3.79
                                                                                                    Facilities
                                             3.64        3.68        3.72         3.75
                                             3.72        3.75        3.91         4.01
             Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2013. FY 2012 is the last year that results will be reported.

             (PM PBS) Number of pounds  of priority  chemicals reduced from all phases  of the manufacturing lifecycle through
             source reduction and/or recycling.
                      FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009     FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit



             Explanation of Results: Several Regions reported unexpected results from their partners, partly due to  the closeout of this
             measure. Region 6 was able to challenge and encourage a partner to make a significant component substitution which accounted
             for almost half the national total.
             Additional Information: The National Partnership  Environmental Program (NPEP) has over 260 partners, including many
             federal and state facilities, who have removed more than  nearly 30 million pounds of priority chemicals through both source
             reduction and recycling activities.

GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                         129

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic Measure: Each year through 2015, increase the percentage of UST facilities  that are in significant operational
                compliance (SOC) with both release detection and release prevention requirements by  0.5 percent over the previous year's
                target. (Baseline: This means an increase of facilities in SOC from 65.5 percent in 2010 to  68 percent in 2015.)
                (PM ST6)  Increase the percentage of UST facilities that are in significant operational  compliance (SOC) with both
                release detection and release prevention requirements by 0.5% over the previous year's target.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   66
                Actual   62
67
63
68
66
           65
           66
                                  65.5
                                  69
                                                                   66
                                                                   71
66.5
                      Percent
                Additional Information: Implementing the 2005 Energy Policy Act requirements, EPA and states are inspecting infrequently
                inspected facilities, and are finding many out of compliance, impacting our ability to achieve compliance rate goals. As a result,
                the significant operational compliance targets have been adjusted to reflect a 0.5 percent increase each year to maintain
                aggressive goals.
                Strategic Measure: Each year through 2015, reduce the number of confirmed releases at UST facilities to 5 percent fewer than
                the prior year's target. (Baseline: Between FY 1999 and FY 2009, confirmed UST releases averaged 8,113.)
                (PM ST1) Reduce the number of confirmed releases at UST facilities to five percent (5%) fewer than the prior year's
                target.
         FY2006
Target   
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
(2)  Emergency
Preparedness
and Response
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, achieve and maintain at least 80 percent of the maximum score on the Core National Approach to
                Response (NAR) evaluation criteria. (Baseline: In FY 2009, the average Core NAR Score was 84 percent for EPA headquarters,
                regions, and special teams prepared for responding to emergencies).
                (PM Cl) Score on annual Core NAR.
                        FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                                          No Target
                                          Establishe
                                          d
                                          84.3
                      55
                                                                     87.9
                       60
                                  77.5
                       70
                      72
                                                                   Percent
Explanation of Results: The value of 77.5 is a composite score that includes both Core ER and Core CBRN for all 10 Regions,
EPA HQ and EPA Special Teams. The Regional scores are only the Core ER portion of the evaluation.
Additional Information: In FY 2009, the average Core NAR Score was 84 percent for EPA headquarters, regions, and special
teams prepared for responding to emergencies.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, complete an additional 1,700 Superfund removals through Agency-financed actions and through
oversight of removals conducted by potentially responsible parties (PRPs). (Baseline: In FY 2009, there were 434 Superfund
removal actions completed including 214 funded by the Agency and 220 overseen by the Agency that were conducted by PRPs
under a voluntary agreement, an administrative order on consent or a unilateral administrative order).
(PM 132) Superfund-lead removal actions completed annually.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   195
                Actual   157
                    195
                    200
195
215
195
214
170
199
170
214
170
170
                     Removals
                Explanation of Results: The Removal program is designed to respond to threats as they arise. It is difficult to predict how many
                will occur in a year. However, due to the experience and expertise of EPA's On-Scene Coordinators, EPA is able to quickly and
                effectively respond to those that do occur.

                Additional Information: Between 2006 and 2011 EPA completed an average of 200 Superfund-lead removal response actions.
                (PM 135) PRP removal completions (including voluntary, AOC, and UAO actions) overseen by EPA.

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                           131

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
 Performance Measures and Data
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011

 Target   115         120        125        130        170        170

 Actual   93         151        157        154        192        191
                                                                                             FY 2012

                                                                                             170
                                                                                        FY 2013

                                                                                        170
                                                        Unit

                                                        Removals
                Additional Information: In FY 2010, EPA will begin implementing a new measure to track removals undertaken by potentially
                responsible parties, either voluntarily or pursuant to an enforcement instrument,  where EPA has overseen the  removals.
                Between 2006 and 2011, EPA completed an average of 156 PRP-lead removal response actions.

                (PM 136) Superfund-lead removal actions completed annually per million dollars.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                             0.97
                                                                                                   Removals
         0.91       0.92       0.93        0.94        0.95         0.96
         1.02       1.04       1.05        1.30        1.97         2.04
Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2013. FY 2012 is the last year that results will be reported.
                Strategic Measure:  By 2015, no more than 1.5 million gallons will be spilled annually at Facility Response Plan (FRP)
                facilities, a 15 percent reduction from the annual average of 1.7 million gallons spilled from 2005-2009.
                (PM 325) Gallons of oil spilled to navigable waters  per  million program dollar  spent annually on  prevention  and
                preparedness at Facility Response Plan (FRP) facilities.
                                                                     FY2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
          FY 2006    FY 2007    FY 2008
                Target
          No Target  No Target
          Establishe  Establishe
          d          d
                               90,000
FY 2009

No Target
Establishe
d
No  Target
Established
                Actual   Triennial   Triennial   152,165    Triennial    Triennial
81,000


Data
Avail
3/2012
                                                                                                                  Gallons
                Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2012. FY 2011 is the last year that results will be reported.

                (PM 337) Percent of all FRP inspected facilities found to be non-compliant which are brought into compliance.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            132

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
(3)    Cleanup
Contaminated
Land
Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
                                                                      15
                                                                      48
30
48
35
                      Percent
                Explanation of Results:  Since the establishment of this measure, there has been a change in focus in the program to bring
                facilities into compliance. The measure does not have Regional Commitments, and due to the short history of this measure
                (baseline  established in 2010), it is difficult to establish expectations for Regional performance. Despite this difficulty, the
                Agency intends to increase the target percentage by 5 percent each year from 2011 through 2013.
                Additional Information: New measure in FY 2010.
                (PM 338) Percent of all SPCC inspected facilities found to be non-compliant which are brought into compliance.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                      15
                                                      36
30
45
35
40
                      Percent
Explanation of Results: Since the establishment of this measure, there has been a change in focus in the program to bring
facilities into compliance. The measure does not have Regional Commitments, and due to the short history of this measure
(baseline established in 2010), it is difficult to establish expectations for Regional performance. Despite this difficulty, the
Agency intends to increase the target percentage by 5 percent each year from 2011 through 2013.
Additional Information: New measure in FY 2010.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, complete 93,400 assessments at potential hazardous waste sites to determine  if they warrant
Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation,  and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial  response  or other cleanup
activities. (Baseline: As of 2010, the cumulative total number of assessments completed was 88,000.)
(PM 115) Number of Superfund remedial site assessments completed.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target
Actual
900
1,020
900
650
                                                                                                                   Assessments
                Additional Information: This measure accounts for all remedial assessments performed at sites addressed under the Superfund
                program. At the end of FY 2011, the cumulative total number of assessments completed was 89,916.

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            133

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                            FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase to 84 percent the number of Superfund final and deleted NPL sites and RCRA facilities
                where human exposures to toxins from contaminated sites are under control. (Baseline: As  of October 2009, 70 percent
                Superfund final and deleted NPL sites and RCRA facilities have human exposures under control out of a universe of 5,330.)
                (PM 151) Number of Superfund sites with human exposures under control.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
10
34
10
                                10
                                24
10
11
10
18
10
10
10
                                                                              Sites
                Additional Information: Through FY 2011, Superfund had controlled human exposures at 1,348 final and deleted NPL sites.
                The FY 2010 through FY 2012 targets represent the expected total from base funding plus ARRA.
                (PM 157) Human exposures under control per million dollars.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                                                                    FY 2012    FY 2013
                                                                              Unit

                                                                              Sites
                                                                  FY2011

                    6.1        6.4         6.7         7.0          7.3
Actual              6.9        7.6         8.5         7.9          7.5
Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2012. FY 2011 is the last year that results will be reported.
(PM CA1) Cumulative percentage of RCRA facilities with human exposures to toxins under control.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                 No Target
                                 Establishe  69
                                 d
                                                          65
                                            72
                                             72
                                             77
                                                                             81
                                             85
                                                                                                                  Percent
                Additional Information: There is a universe of 3,746 low, medium, and high National Corrective Action Prioritization System-
                ranked facilities.

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase to 78 percent the number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facilities
                with migration of contaminated groundwater under control. (Baseline: At the end of FY 2009, the migration of contaminated
                groundwater was controlled at 58 percent of all 3,746 facilities needing corrective action.)

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            134

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
(PM CA2) Cumulative percentage of RCRA facilities with migration of contaminated groundwater under control.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

                Actual
                                          No Target
                                          Establishe   61
                                          d
                                                          58
                                                      63
            64
            67
           69
73
                                             Percent
                Additional Information: There is a universe of 3,746 low, medium, and high National Corrective Action Prioritization System-
                ranked facilities.

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase to 56 percent the number of RCRA facilities with final remedies constructed. (Baseline:
                At the end of FY 2009, all cleanup remedies had been constructed at 32 percent of all 3,746 facilities needing corrective action.)
                (PM 117) Percent increase of  final remedy components constructed at RCRA corrective action facilities per federal,
                state, and private sector dollars per year.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                               7
                                          3

                                          40
3

-9
-11.7
                                 Percent
                                 Increase
                Explanation of Results: The 11.7 percent decrease in efficiency in FY 2011 is due to the complexity of sites currently in the
                corrective action pipeline. As some of the smaller and less complex sites are cleaned up, the remaining universe has a greater
                proportion of more complicated sites which takes more resources to clean up, meaning a longer time frame.
                Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2013. FY 2012 is the last year that results will be reported.

                (PM CAS) Cumulative percentage of RCRA facilities with final remedies constructed.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                          No Target
                                          Establishe   35
                                          d
            38
           46
51
                                                                                                                   Percent
                                                          32          37          42

                Additional Information: There is a universe of 3,746 low, medium and high National Corrective Action Prioritization System-
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            135

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
ranked facilities.
Strategic Measure: Each year through 2015, reduce the backlog of LUST cleanups (confirmed releases that have yet to be
cleaned up) that do not meet state risk-based standards for human exposure and groundwater migration by 1 percent.  This
means a decrease from 21 percent in 2009 to 14 percent in 2015.(At the end of FY 2009, there were 100,165 releases not yet
cleaned up.)
(PM 112) Number of LUST cleanups completed that meet risk-based standards for human exposure and groundwater
migration.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                          12,250
                                          12,944
                                  12,250
                                  11,591
                                  12,250
                                  11,169
                                  11,250
                                  10,100
                                                        Cleanups
         13,600     13,000     13,000
         14,493     13,862     12,768
Explanation of Results: Completing cleanups continues to get more challenging. Many states are facing significant staff and
resource constraints, while at the same time cleanup costs are rising.
Additional Information: Through FY 2011, EPA completed a cumulative total of 413,740 leaking underground storage tank
cleanups. The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. The FY 2010 through FY 2012 targets
represent the expected total from base funding plus ARRA.
Strategic Measure: Each year through 2015, reduce the backlog of LUST cleanups (confirmed releases that have yet to be
cleaned up) in Indian country that do not meet applicable risk-based standards for human exposure and groundwater migration
by 1 percent. This means a decrease from 28 percent in 2009 to 22 percent in 2015.
(PM 113) Number of LUST cleanups completed that meet risk-based standards for human exposure and groundwater
migration in Indian Country.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target
                                                                                                  Cleanups
                Actual
         30
         43
30
54
30
40
30
49
30
62
38
42
                Additional Information: Through FY 2011, EPA completed a cumulative  total of 961 leaking  underground storage  tank
                cleanups in Indian country, out of a universe of 1,284 confirmed releases. This is a subset of the national total  of 413,740
                leaking underground storage tanks cleanups completed.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, ensure that 799 Superfund NPL sites  are "sitewide ready for anticipated use." (Baseline:-As of
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
October 2009, 409 final and deleted NPL sites had achieved "sitewide ready for anticipated use.")
(PM 162) Number of Federal Facility Superfund sites where all remedies have completed construction.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013
Target   51         56         60          64         68          70
Actual   55         59         61          65         69          70
                                                                                                                   Unit

                                                                                                                   Sites
                Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2012 because the Federal Facility Program has limited
                control over achieving this output and is dependent on the lead Federal agencies' budget, contracts, and timeliness. The number
                of Federal Facility Superfund sites  completing construction has always been reported  as part of the  overall  Superfund
                Construction Completion measure (PM 141). FY 2011 is the last year that results will be reported in a separate measure.
                (PM 163) Cumulative number of Federal Facility Superfund sites where the final remedial decision for contaminants at
                the site has been determined.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   61         76         81         77          92          104
                Actual   70         71         73         77          82          82
                                                                                                   Sites
                Explanation of Results: Measure not met due to a variety of factors including delayed cleanup schedules, new contamination,
                funding shortfalls, documentation issues, weather conditions, and change of site personnel.
                Additional Information: EPA is discontinuing this measure in FY 2012 because the Federal Facility  Program has limited
                control over achieving this output and is dependent on the lead Federal agencies' budget, contracts, and timeliness. FY 2011 is
                the last year that results will be reported under this measure.
                (PM S10) Number of Superfund sites ready for anticipated use site-wide.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                    30
                    64
30
85
65
66
65
66
65
65
65
                      Sites
                Additional Information: Through FY 2011, EPA's Superfund program had ensured that 540 final and deleted NPL sites met the
                criteria to be determined ready for anticipated use site-wide.

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                 FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                (PM 141) Annual number of Superfund sites with remedy construction completed.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                        22
                                                                              Completions
         40         24         30         20         22          22
         40         24         30         20         18          22
Additional Information: Through FY 2011, Superfund had completed construction at 1,120 final and deleted NPL sites. The
program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. The FY 2010 through FY 2012 targets represent the expected
total from base funding plus ARRA.
(PM 152) Number of Superfund sites with contaminated groundwater migration under control.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target
Actual
                         10
                         21
10
19
15
20
15
16
15
18
15
21
15
15
                      Sites
                Explanation of Results: Superfund reviews groundwater data regularly during its 5-year Review of Completed Remedies. Until
                the 5th year, the program cannot accurately predict whether a contaminated plume has stabilized or not. In FY11, several sites
                underwent the 5th year review in the 4th quarter. Based on the data, Regions determined that the sites should be categorized as
                Under Control, which resulted in exceeding the target.
                Additional Information: Through FY 2011, Superfund had controlled groundwater migration at 1,051 final and deleted NPL
                sites.
                (PM 170) Number of remedial action project completions at Superfund NPL sites.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                             103
                                             132
                                                                             130
                                                                                                  Completions
                Explanation of Results: This is a new measure. Substantial effort was made to clarify relevant guidance, stress the importance
                of finalizing RA completion documentation in a timely manner, hold contractors, responsible parties, and other federal agencies
                accountable for deadlines and submitting documentation. Projects were completed using base funding plus ARRA.
                Additional Information: Since program inception through the end of FY 2011, Superfund had completed 2,830 remedial action
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                projects at final and deleted NPL sites. The program which this measure supports receives funds from ARRA. The FY 2010
                through FY 2012 targets represent the expected total from base funding plus ARRA.

Objective 4 - Strengthen Human Health and Environmental Protection in Indian Country: Support federally-recognized tribes to build
environmental management capacity, assess environmental conditions and measure results, and implement environmental programs in  Indian
country.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase the percent of tribes implementing federal regulatory environmental programs in  Indian
                country to 18 percent. (FY 2009 baseline: 13  percent of 572 tribes).
                (PM 5PQ) Percent of Tribes implementing federal regulatory environmental programs in Indian country (cumulative).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target                         6          7          14          18         22          24
                Actual
                                6
                                14
7
13
14
14
18
17
                      Percent
(1)    Improve
Human Health
and        the
Environment
in      Indian
Country
Explanation of Results: While a substantial increase was made in the number of total tribes with TAS approval in FY 2011, the
total percentage of tribes implementing federal regulatory programs barely missed the target due to tribes moving from the use
of DITCAs (a portion of how the measure is calculated) to other cooperative agreements such as PPGs.
Additional Information: There are 572 tribal entities that are eligible for GAP funding. The Strategic Measure refers to the total
number of tribes and inter-tribal consortia that are eligible for GAP funding.
Strategic  Measure: By 2015, increase  the percent of tribes  conducting EPA-approved environmental monitoring  and
assessment activities in Indian country to 50 percent. (FY 2009 baseline: 40 percent of 572 tribes).
(PM 5PR) Percent of Tribes conducting EPA approved environmental monitoring and  assessment activities in Indian
country (cumulative.)
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                21
                                42
23
40
42
50
52
52
54
                      Percent
                Additional Information: There are 572 tribal entities that are eligible for GAP funding. The Strategic Measure refers to the total

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                number of tribes and inter-tribal consortia that are eligible for GAP funding.
                (PM 5PS) Percent of Tribes with an environmental program (cumulative).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011
                Target
                Actual
57
57
60
64
65
68
70
72
FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
73
                      Percent
                Additional Information: There are 572 tribal entities that are eligible for GAP funding. The Strategic Measure refers to the total
                number of tribes and inter-tribal consortia that are eligible for GAP funding. During the past four years, significant progress has
                been made in  GAP, adding environmental programs for  almost  75  tribes. In efforts to focus the EPA's suite of annual
                performance to the most important and useful information, the EPA will no longer be collecting this specific data in future
                years.
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
   Reduce the risk and increase the safety of chemicals and prevent pollution at the source.

Objective 1 - Ensure Chemical Safety: Reduce the risk of chemicals that enter our products, our environment, and our bodies.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure:  By 2015,  reduce by 40 percent the number of moderate to severe exposure incidents associated with
                organophosphates and carbamate insecticides in the general population. (Baseline is 316 moderate and severe incidents reported
                to  the Poison Control  Center  (PCC)  National Poison Data System  (NPDS)  in  2008  for organophosphate and carbamate
                pesticides.)
                (PM 143) Percentage of agricultural acres treated with reduced-risk pesticides.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011
                Target   17
                Actual
                         18
                                    18
                                    20
18.5
21
20
21.5
21
21
21
Data
Avail
10/2012
                                                                                                                  Unit
                                                                                                                  Percent
(1)     Protect
Human Health  Explanation of Results: Data Lags one year.
from Chemical  Additional Information:  Baseline year  is 1998 using Doane Marketing Research,  Inc. a private sector research database.
                Baseline was 3.6% of total acreage. Results are reported end of calendar year.
                (PM 111) Reduction  in moderate  to severe exposure  incidents associated with  organophosphates and carbamate
                insecticides in the general population.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Risks
                Target
                Actual
                                                                                             10
                                                         15
                                                                                                                  Percent
                Additional Information: Moderate to severe exposure incidents reported during 2008 is 316 as reported in the American
                Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poisoning Data System.

                Strategic Measure: By 2014, reduce the percentage of children with blood lead levels above 5  ig/dl to 1.0 percent or less.
                (Baseline is 3.0 percent in the 2005-2008 sampling period.)

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
(PM 008) Percent of children (aged 1-5 years) with blood lead levels (>5 ug/dl).
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                      3.5
                                                      Data Avail
                                                      11/2012
                                                                  No Target
                                                                  Establishe
                                                                  d

                                                                  Biennial
1.5
No
Target
Establish
ed
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Additional Information: Data released by CDC from the National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (NHANES) in
                March of 2009 estimated 4.1% of children aged 1-5 with lead poisoning (blood lead levels of 5 ug/dl or greater) from 2003/4
                sampling data. Data for this measure are reported biennially.
                (PM 009) Cumulative number of certified Renovation Repair and Painting firms
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011
                Target
                Actual
                                                      100,000
                                                      59,143
                                                                  100,000
                                                                  114,834
FY 2012

140,000
FY 2013

152,000
Unit

Firms
                Explanation of Results: Twelve states are now authorized to implement the RRP Program and contributed additional Firm
                Certifications to those processed by EPA in states without authorized programs.
                Additional Information: The baseline is zero in 2009. This year was chosen because 2010 is the first year that firms will submit
                applications to EPA to become certified. Over time, firms will either become certified directly through EPA (tracked through
                Federal Lead-based Paint Program (FLPP) or through an authorized State program (tracked through grant reports/ACS).
                (PM 10A) Annual percentage of lead-based paint certification and refund applications that require less than 20 days of
                EPA effort to process.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                             95
                                                                                                   Percent
                    90          91          92         92          92
                    92          91          92         96          95
Additional Information: Baseline for percentage of lead-based paint certification and refund applications that require less than
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                 FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                20 days of EPA effort to process is 87% in 2008, which is taken from the Federal Lead Based Paint Program (FLPP) database
                records.
                (PM 10D) Percent difference in the geometric mean blood level in low-income children 1-5 years old as compared to the
                geometric mean for non-low income children 1-5 years old.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   29
                Actual   35
No Target
Establishe
d
           29
Biennial    23.5
No Target
Establishe
d

Biennial
28
                                  Data Avail
                                  10/2012
No Target
Establishe
d

Biennial
13
No
Target
Establish
ed
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Additional Information: Baseline for percent difference in the geometric mean blood level in low-income children 1-5 years
                old as compared to the geometric mean for non-low income children 1-5 years old is 32% in 1999-2002. Data for this measure
                is reported biennially.
                Strategic Measure: By 2014, reduce the percent difference in the geometric mean blood lead level in low-income children 1 to
                5 years old as compared to the geometric mean for non-low income children 1 to 5 years old to 10.0 percent. (Baseline is 23.4
                percent difference in the geometric mean blood lead level in low-income children 1 to 5 years old as  compared to the geometric
                mean for non-low-income children 1 to 5 years old in 2005-2008.)
                (PM D6A) Reduction in concentration of PFOA in serum in the general population.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                    No
                                                                    Target
                                                                    Establish
                                                                    ed
                                                                               Percent
                                                                               Reduction
                Additional Information: Baselines  are  derived from  the  Centers  for Disease Control's National Health and Nutrition
                Examination Survey (NHANES) concentration data in the general  population and results  are reported biennially.  PFOA
                baselines are based on 2005/2006 geometric mean data in serum: 3.92 |ig/L.
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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic Measure: By 2014,  reduce concentration for the following chemicals in children: non-specific  organophosphate
                metabolites by 75 percent and chlorpyrifos metabolite (TCPy) by 75  percent. (Baselines are derived from the Centers for
                Disease Control and Prevention's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) metabolite concentration data
                in children  and  results are reported  biennially.  Pesticide baselines  are  based  on 2001-2002 data  for  non-specific
                organophosphate metabolites (0.55 imol/L) and chlorpyrifos metabolite (TCPy) (16.0 ig/L).)
                (PM 012) Percent reduction of children's exposure to rodenticides.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
            10
            0
                                  Percent
                Explanation of Results: Mitigation actions not yet fully represented by the data.
                Additional Information: The total number of confirmed and likely rodenticide exposures to children in 2008 is 11,674 based
                data from the Poison Control Centers' National Poison Data System.
                (PM 091) Percent of decisions completed on time (on or before PRIA or negotiated due date).
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
99
99.7
99
98.4
99
                      Percent
                Explanation of Results: In order to ensure adequate protection to human health and the environment, EPA delayed registration
                decisions on certain actions until measures sufficient to allow these protections were in place. Some of the issues involved in
                seven of the actions included pollinator risk, impurities, and child resistant packaging. In these cases,  the registrants were
                unwilling to allow a time extension and negotiation of the PRIA due date. An additional nine actions were delayed because the
                chemical associated with those actions was the subject of a lawsuit. All existing registrations for the chemical were vacated in
                response to the lawsuit, and therefore the pending PRIA actions associated with amendments to those registrations could not
                move forward within the PRIA time frame.
                Additional Information: Baseline for decisions completed on time is 99.9% in 2008.
                (PM 164) Number of pesticide registration review dockets opened.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                             144
            FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
                                                                       70
                                                                       75
70
81
70
                      Dockets
                Explanation of Results: The chemical cases in FY 2011  required less effort than average cases reviewed. Future (pending)
                cases are  expected to be more resources intensive.  Exceeding the goal  is a result of closing cases that involved active
                ingredients for which there  are no longer active registrations. Because there are no active registrations, these cases did not
                require risk assessments. When a case is closed a count is given for docket / workplans target(s). The remaining cases have
                active registrations and will require full-fledged risk assessments.
                Additional Information: Baseline for registration review work dockets is 71 opened in 2008.
                (PM J15) Reduction in concentration of targeted pesticide analytes in children.
                          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                              50,50
                       No
                       Target
                       Establish
                       ed
                                                                                                                     Percent
                Additional Information: NHANES (2001-2002 baseline) measure is based on NHANES 95th percentile concentrations for six
                no-specific organophosphate analytes (0.55 |imol/L), and a chlorpyrifos-specific metabolite (TCPy) (16.0 |ig/L). Data for this
                measure are reported biennially.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, complete endocrine disrupter screening program (EDSP) decisions for 100 percent of chemicals
                for which complete EDSP information is expected to be available by the end of 2014. (Baseline is no decisions have been
                completed through 2009 for any of the chemicals for which complete EDSP information is anticipated to be available by the
                end of 2014. EDSP decisions for a chemical can range from determining potential to interact with the estrogen, androgen, or
                thyroid hormone systems to otherwise determining whether further endocrine  related testing is necessary.)
                (PM E01) Number  of chemicals for which  Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program (EDSP) decisions have been
                completed
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008     FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                             145
                                                                                          20
                                  Chemicals

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Actual

Additional Information: FY 2010 baseline is 11 chemicals for which EDSP decisions have been completed. Several factors
will impact the schedule for completing EDSP decisions including, for example, the number of pesticide cancellations and other
actions that will  remove a chemical from  commerce and/or discontinue manufacture and import, the number of pesticide
cancellations involving minor agricultural uses, the number of pre-enforcement challenges to test orders, unforeseen laboratory
capacity limits, and unforeseen technical problems with completing the Tier 1 assays for a particular chemical.
(PM 240) Maintain timeliness of Section 18 Emergency Exemption Decisions
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                            45
                                                                                                  Days
         45         45         45         45         45          45
         48         36.60      34         40         50          52
Explanation of Results: Active Ingredients with significant risks elements required more time to review.
Additional Information: Baseline for S18 decisions is 45 days in 2005.
(PM 247) Percent of new chemicals or organisms  introduced into commerce that do not pose unreasonable risks to
workers, consumers, or the environment.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target   10o
                Actual   100
                    100
                    100
                               100
                               100
100
97
100
91
100
Data
Avail
10/2012
100
100
                                                                                                                 Percent
                Explanation of Results: Data lag

                Additional Information: Baseline for percent of new chemicals or organisms introduced into commerce that do not pose
                unreasonable risks to workers, consumers, or the environment was developed from a 2 year analysis from 2004-2005 comparing
                8(e) reports to New Chemical submissions and is 100%.

                (PM 281) Reduction in the  cost per submission  of managing PreManufacture Notices (PMNs) through  the  Focus
                meetings as a percentage of baseline year cost per submission.
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
                                                                      61
                                                                      50
63
59
65
                      Percent
                Explanation of Results: Target missed due to revision of baseline cost and because final PMN e-reporting rule allowed paper
                submissions to continue longer than anticipated when targets were set and provided option for submitting via CDs through first
                half of FY 2012, resulting in lower than anticipated portion of submissions coming in electronically.
                Additional Information: Baseline for percent reduction from baseline year the cost per submission of managing PMNs through
                the Focus meeting is $160 in FY 2009. The current cost per submission is $65.60.
                (PM 282) Annual reduction in the production adjusted risk based score of releases and transfers of ITJR chemicals from
                manufacturing facilities
                         FY2006    FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   30
                Actual
                         0.27
FY 2007
2.6
5.09
FY 2008
2.5
Data
Avail
10/2012
FY 2009
2.4
Data
Avail
10/2012
FY 2010
2.2
Data Avail
10/2012
FY2011
2.0
Data
Avail
10/2012
                                                                                                   % RSEI Rel
                                                                                                   Risk
                Explanation of Results: Results for FY 2004 - FY 2006 are revised to reflect changes made in the RSEI model that calculates
                them and reflect revisions made by facilities to prior years TRI reports. FY 2007 target exceeded significantly in part due to
                these changes. The FY 2008 - 2010 data are still undergoing quality review. Measure terminates in FY 2012 so no future target
                adjustments are warranted.
                Additional Information: Baseline for the analysis of IUR chemicals using the Risk Screening Environmental Indicators Model
                in 1998 was zero percent. 1998 was  selected as the baseline year because this was the first year that most of these chemicals
                were targeted through the HPV challenge  program. Targets  for this measure were  established in 2004, however, a 35%
                reduction has been observed from 1998-2006.
                (PM Ar5) Number of countries completing phase out of leaded gasoline, (incremental)
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
                                    No Target
                Target   7          Establishe  743
                                    d
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            147
                                                                                                   Countries

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Actual   7          13         7

Additional Information: As of 2006, the baseline is 159 countries, out of a universe of 194, that have phased out lead gasoline.
Since 2006,  186 countries have completed the  phase out of leaded gasoline. As  a result  of these successes, EPA's two
performance measures related to the Partnership will no longer be tracked after FY 2011.
(PM Ar8) Number of countries introducing low sulfur in fuels, (incremental)
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   2
                Actual
                    No Target
                    Establishe
                    d
                    14
                                                                                                                  Countries
                Additional Information: As of 2006, out of a universe of 194, 39 countries introduced low-sulfur gasoline. Since 2006,  61
                countries introduced low-sulfur gasoline. As a  result  of these successes, EPA's  two performance measures  related to the
                Partnership will no longer be tracked after FY 2011.
                (PM E02) Number of chemicals for which EDSP Tier 1 test orders have been issued
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                  40
                                                                  0
40
                      Chemicals
                Explanation of Results: Test orders for the first list of 67 pesticide chemicals were issued in FY 2010 (baseline). Before test
                orders for additional chemicals can be issued, amendment to the existing Information Collection Request (ICR) is necessary.
                Once the ICR is amended and approved, test orders for additional chemicals can be ordered. The Agency is in the process of
                developing the ICR amendment and related documents.
                Additional Information: FY 2010 baseline is 67 chemicals for which EDSP Tier 1 test orders have been issued.
                (PM EOS) Number of screening and testing assays for which validation decisions have been reached
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                                                                                                   Assays
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            148

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual

                Additional Information: FY 2010 baseline is 15 screening and testing assays for which validation decisions have been reached.
                There are several  steps within the validation process  including:  preparation  of detailed review papers,  performance of
                prevalidation studies, validation by multiple labs, and peer reviews. A decision to discontinue validation efforts for a particular
                assay could  occur during any of these steps while a decision to accept an assay as validated occurs after all the steps are
                successfully  completed.
                (PM HC1) Annual number of hazard characterizations completed for HPV chemicals
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                       230
                                                       270
                                                          300
                                                          318
                                                          300
                                                          450
                                                                                Chemicals
(2)     Protect
Ecosystems
from Chemical
Risks
Additional Information:  The cumulative baseline through FY 2009  is 1,095.  This is made up on US and internationally
sponsored Hazard  Characterization through 2009. International HCs  started being produced in  the early 1990's  and US
sponsored HCs started to be produced in 2007. Through FY 2011 1,683  hazard characterizations have been completed.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, no watersheds will exceed aquatic life benchmarks for targeted pesticides.  (Based on FY 1992-
2001  data  from the watersheds sampled by the USGS National  Water Quality Assessment  (NAWQA)  program,  urban
watersheds that exceed the National Pesticide Program aquatic life benchmarks are 73 percent  for diazinon, 37 percent for
chlorpyrifos, and  13 percent for carbaryl. Agricultural watersheds  that exceed the National Pesticide Program  aquatic life
benchmarks are 18 percent for azinphos-methyl and 18 percent for chlorpyrifos.)
(PM Oil) Number of Product Re-registration Decisions
                                                       FY 2010
FY 2006
Target
Actual
FY 2007
545
962
FY 2008
1,075
1,194
FY 2009
2,000
1,482
                                              1,500
                                              1,712
FY2011
1,500
1,218
FY 2012
1,200
FY 2013
1,200
Unit
                      Decisions
                Explanation of Results: The number of products subject to review has declined. Outyear targets were reduced in expectation of
                continued decline.
                Additional Information: Actual in FY 2005 is 501 product re-registrations.

                (PM 230) Number of pesticide registration review final work plans completed.
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                             149

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
 Performance Measures and Data
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011

 Target                                                70          70

 Actual                                                70          75
                                                                                              FY 2012

                                                                                              70
                                              FY 2013

                                              72
           Unit

           Work Plans
                Explanation of Results: In FY 2011 the Agency was able to close cases that involved active ingredients for which there are no
                longer active registrations. Because there are no active registrations, these cases did not require risk assessments. When a case is
                closed a count is given for docket / work plans performance. The remaining cases have active registrations and will require risk
                assessments.
                Additional Information: Baseline for final work plans for registered pesticides reviewed is 47 in 2008.

                (PM 268) Percent of urban watersheds that do not exceed EPA aquatic life benchmarks for three  key  pesticides of
                concern (diazinon, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl).
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                25,25,30
No Target
Establishe   5, 0, 20
d
No Target
Establishe 5, 0, 10
d
No
Target
Establish
ed
                                                                                                                    Percent
                                                40, 0, 30    Biennial    6.7, 0, 33
                                                                   Biennial
                Additional Information: Based on FY 1992 - 2001 data from the watersheds sampled by the USGS National Water Quality
                Assessment (NAWQA) program, urban watersheds that exceeded the National Pesticide Program aquatic life benchmarks are
                73% for diazinon, 37% for chlorpyrifos, and 13% for carbaryl. Data for this measure are reported biennially.

                (PM 269) Percent of agricultural watersheds that do not exceed EPA aquatic life benchmarks for two key pesticides of
                concern (azinphos-methyl and chlorpyrifos).
                Target
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010
                                                       0, 10
                                                                   FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
                       No Target
                       Establishe   0, 10
                       d
No
Target
Establish
ed
Percent
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            150

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual

                Additional Information: Based on FY 1992 - 2001 data from the watersheds sampled by the USGS National Water Quality
                Assessment (NAWQA) program, agricultural watersheds that exceeded the National Pesticide Program aquatic life benchmarks
                are 18% for azinphos-methyl and 18% for chlorpyrifos. Data for this measure are reported biennially.
                (PM 276) Percent of registration review chemicals with identified endangered species concerns, for which EPA obtains
                any mitigation of risk prior to consultation with DOC and DOI.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013  Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                                                               Percent
(3)     Ensure
Transparency
of   Chemical
Health     and
Safety
Information
             Additional Information: The baseline is 0% for each annual reporting period as percentages are not cumulative. The data is
             tracked by  OPP using internal  tracking numbers. The data  is  obtained from  ecological  risk  assessments and effects
             determinations prepared to support a registration review case.
             Strategic Measure: Through 2015, make all health and safety studies available to the public for chemicals in commerce, to the
             extent allowed by law. (Baseline is 21,994 confidential business information (CBI) cases of Toxic Substances Control Act
             (TSCA) health and safety studies  as defined in TSCA Section 3(6) that were submitted for chemicals potentially in commerce
             between the enactment of TSCA and January 21, 2010.)
             (PM CIS)  Percentage of  existing  CBI  claims for chemical identity  in health and safety studies reviewed and, as
             appropriate, challenged.
                      FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
             Target
             Actual
5
5.3
10
                      Percent
             Additional Information: Prior to August 2010, 22,483 existing TSCA CBI claims for chemical identity, which potentially
             contain health and safety studies, had not been reviewed or challenged, where appropriate. Through FY 2011 that number has
             declined to roughly 21,300.

             (PM C19) Percentage of CBI claims for chemical identity in  health and safety studies reviewed  and challenged, as
             appropriate, as they are submitted.
                      FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
                                                                                  100
                                                                                  100
                                              100
                                              100
                                                                    Percent
                Additional Information: Prior to August 2010, 0% of TSCA CBI cases with claims for chemical identity, which potentially
                contain health and safety studies, had been reviewed or challenged, where appropriate.

Objective 2 - Promote Pollution Prevention:  Conserve and protect natural resources by promoting pollution prevention and the adoption of
other stewardship practices by companies, communities, governmental organizations, and individuals.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce 15 billion pounds of hazardous materials cumulatively through pollution prevention.
                (Baseline is 4.8 billion pounds reduced through 2008.)
                (PM 264) Pounds of hazardous materials reduced through pollution prevention.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011
                Target   401
                Actual
                         394
                    414
                    386.1
429
469.8
494
605.6
1,625
1,383.7
1,549
Data
Avail
10/2012
FY 2012

1,064
Unit


Pounds
(Millions)
(1)     Prevent
Pollution   and
Promote        Explanation of Results: Incomplete data due to data lag from Regions and Centers.
Environmental  Additional Information: Baseline is 4.8 billion pounds reduced from  1997 through 2008. Commencing in 2010 targets and
Stewardship     results incorporate both new annual results and recurring results for up to 10 prior years for each of the six individual Pollution
                Prevention programs.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce 9 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2Eq.) cumulatively through
                pollution prevention. (Baseline is 6.5 MMTCO2Eq. reduced through 2008. The data from this measure are also calculated into
                the Agency's overall GHG measure under Goal 1.)
                (PM 297) Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (MTCO2e) reduced or offset through pollution prevention.
                         FY2006    FY2007     FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target                                     2           5.9
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            152
                                                                  5.7
                                              6.8
                                              4.2
                                             MTCO2e

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                      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Actual
                                                            1.618
                                             3.45
                                              Data
                                              Avail
                                              10/2012
                Explanation of Results: Incomplete data due to data lag from Regions and Centers.
                Additional Information: Baseline is  6.5 MMTC02e reduced through from 1997 through 2008. Commencing in 2010 targets
                and results incorporate both new annual results and recurring results for up to 10 prior years for each of the six individual
                Pollution Prevention programs.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce water use by an additional 24 billion gallons cumulatively through pollution prevention.
                (Baseline is 51 billion gallons reduced through 2008.)
                (PM 262) Gallons of water reduced through pollution prevention.
                         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010
                Target
                Actual
0.329
                         2.27
1.79
           1.75
1.64
           21.18
1.79
           4.67
26.2
           29.8
FY2011

28.6
FY 2012

27.8
            Data
            Avail
            10/2012
                                                                                           Unit
                                  Gallons
                                  (Billions)
                Explanation of Results: Incomplete data due to data lag from Regions and Centers.
                Additional Information: Baseline is 51.3 billion gallons reduced from 1997 through 2008. Commencing in 2010 targets and
                results incorporate both new annual results and recurring results for up to 10 prior years for each of the six individual Pollution
                Prevention programs.
                Strategic  Measure: By 2015, save $1.2 billion through pollution prevention improvements in business, institutional, and
                government costs cumulatively. (Baseline is  $3.1 billion saved through 2008.)
                (PM 263)  Business, institutional and government costs reduced through pollution prevention.
                          FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit

                Target    33.2        44.3        45.9         130        1,060       1,042      847         738        Dollars
                                                                                                                     Saved
                Actual
38.2
282.7
44.3
282.7
45.9
227.2
130
276.5
1,060
935.6
                                                          Data
                                                          Avail
                                                                                                                     (Millions)
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                             153

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Explanation of Results: Incomplete data due to data lag from Regions and Centers.
                Additional Information: Baseline is 3.1 billion dollars saved from 1997 through 2008. Commencing in 2010 targets and results
                incorporate both new annual results  and  recurring results for up  to 10 prior years for each of the six individual  Pollution
                Prevention programs.
                Strategic  Measure: Through 2015, increase the use  of safer chemicals  cumulatively by 40 percent.  (Baseline: 476 million
                pounds of safer chemicals used in 2009 as reported to be in commerce by Design for the Environment program.)
                (PM 239) Annual number of chemicals with final values for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGL).
                          FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
                Target                          37         6          14           20
                Actual                          37         4          15           7
                                  Chemicals
                Explanation of Results: FY 2011 performance has been hampered by delays in the transition to new contract support vehicles
                and uncertainty over FY 2011 and future program funding levels, which prompted the program to allocate available resources in
                a manner that placed priority on developing information supporting technical aspects of the AEGL values development process
                (preparing dossiers for consideration by the review committee) at the expense of supporting the work to formally publish the
                final values. Final Values for 7 chemicals will be published in September, 2011. The FY 2011 target will be achieved in the first
                quarter of FY 2012 supported by resources already allocated to the program.
                Additional Information: Baseline from program initiation in 1996 through 2008 is 37 chemicals.
                (PM P25) Percent increased in use of safer chemicals
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010

                Target

                Actual
FY2011   FY2012    FY 2013    Unit
No Target
Est.
60.1
Percent
                Explanation of Results: No target was established for FY 2011 since this was a new measure for FY 2012. In FY 2011, the
                Program made substantial one year progress through heavy reliance on leveraging partner resources. The level of FY 2011
                success is not expected to be achieved in future years. Third-parties, paid for by product manufacturers and approved by DfE,

   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                             154

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                           FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                now conduct a significant portion of the  product reviews for manufacturers who seek the DfE label and  manage  the
                CleanGredients  database,  a marketplace  for  chemicals that  meet DfE criteria.  While the third-parties gather ingredient
                information, conduct literature reviews, and summarize their findings in a report, DfE maintains quality control over the process
                by reviewing each and every report and application for the DfE label. These activities have allowed DfE to meet the growing
                demand for the DfE label.
                Additional  Information: Baseline  is 476 M Ibs. of safer chemicals in commerce  in 2009  as reported  by Design for  the
                Environment.
                (PM 298) Energy savings per dollar invested in the Federal Electronics Challenge (FEC) program.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013
                Target

                Actual
1.31M
                                                           1.66M
1.89
           1.24M
2.19M
Data
Avail
10/2012
2.32 M
                                                         Unit
                                                         BTUs/$
                Explanation of Results: Incomplete data due to data lag from Regions and Centers.
                Additional Information: The baseline for energy saved per dollar invested in 2007 is 0.79 M BTUs/$.
   GOAL 4: ENSURING THE SAFETY OF CHEMICALS AND PREVENTING POLLUTION
                                                            155

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
   Protect human health and the environment through vigorous and targeted civil and criminal enforcement. Assure compliance with
   environmental laws.

Objective 1 - Enforce  Environmental Laws: Pursue vigorous civil and criminal enforcement that targets the most serious water, air,  and
chemical hazards in communities. Assure strong, consistent, and effective enforcement of federal environmental laws nationwide.

Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Strategic Measure: By  2015,  conduct 105,000  federal  inspections and  evaluations  (5-year cumulative). (FY 2005-2009
                baseline: 21,000 annually)
                (PM 409) Number of federal inspections and evaluations.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit

                Target                                                                        19^00    ^^00     Inspections/


                Additional  Information: FY 2005-2009 baseline: 21,000 annually. The  FY 2012 President's Budget  provides additional
                resources to the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance to strengthen its monitoring program and  expand the use of
                electronic reporting.  The President's Budget also provides additional resources to EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency
                Response for enforcement and compliance activities for two programs: Oil Spill Prevention and Preparedness, and the Resource
                Conservation and Recovery Act Hazardous Waste and Risk Management Programs.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, initiate 19,500 civil judicial and administrative enforcement cases  (5-year  cumulative). (FY
                2005-2009 baseline: 3,900 annually)
                (PM 410) Number of civil judicial and administrative enforcement cases initiated.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
(1)   Maintain
Enforcement
Presence
                Target
                Actual
                                                                                             3,300
3,200
                                                                                                                   Cases
                Additional Information: FY 2005-2009 baseline: 3,900 cases annually.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015,  conclude 19,000 civil judicial and administrative enforcement cases (5-year cumulative). (FY
                2005-2009 baseline: 3,800 annually)
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
                                                            156

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
                                                                                                                   Unit

                                                                                                                   Cases
Performance Measures and Data
(PM 411) Number of civil judicial and administrative enforcement cases concluded.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013
Target                                                                       3,200       3,000
Actual
Additional Information: FY 2005-2009 baseline: 3,800 annually.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, maintain review of the overall  compliance status of 100  percent of the open consent decrees.
(Baseline 2009:  100 percent)
(PM 412) Percentage of open consent decrees reviewed for overall compliance status.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
Target                                                                       100        100
Actual
                                                                                                                   Percent
                Additional Information: FY 2009 baseline: 100 percent.
                Strategic Measure: Each year through 2015, support cleanups and save federal dollars for sites where there are no alternatives
                by: (1) reaching a settlement or taking an enforcement action before the start of a remedial action at 99 percent of Superfund
                sites  having viable responsible parties other than the federal government; and (2) addressing all cost recovery statute of
                limitation cases with total past costs greater than or equal to $200,000. [Baseline: 99 percent of sites reaching a settlement or
                EPA taking an enforcement action  (FY 2007-2009 annual average); 100 percent  cost recovery statute of limitation cases
                addressed (FY 2009)]
                (PM 418) Percentage of criminal cases having the most significant health, environmental, and deterrence impacts.
                         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                                             43
43
                                                                                                   Percent
                Additional Information: FY 2010 baseline: 36 percent.
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase the  percentage of criminal cases with charges  filed to 45 percent. (FY 2006-2010
                baseline: 36 percent)
                (PM 420) Percentage of criminal cases with charges filed.
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data

                Target
                Actual
                                                                 FY2011
                       FY 2012
                       40
           FY 2013
           40
          Unit
          Percent
                                                                                                                 Unit
                                                                                                                 Percent
Additional Information: FY 2006-2010 baseline: 36 percent.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, maintain an 85 percent conviction rate for criminal defendants. (FY 2006-2010 baseline: 85
percent)
(PM 419) Percentage of criminal cases with individual defendants.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012   FY 2013
Target                                                                      75         75
Actual
Additional Information: FY 2006-2008 baseline: 78 percent.
(PM 421) Percentage of conviction rate for criminal defendants.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011
Target
Actual
Additional Information: FY 2006-2010 baseline: 87 percent.
                                                                                            FY 2012
                                                                                            85
                                  FY 2013
                                  85
                      Unit
                      Percent
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce, treat, or eliminate 2,400 million estimated pounds of air pollutants  as a result of
                concluded enforcement actions (5-year cumulative). (FY 2005-2008 baseline: 480 million pounds, annual average over the
(2)    Support  period)
Taking  Action  (PM 400) Millions of pounds of air pollutants reduced, treated, or eliminated through concluded enforcement actions.
on     Climate
Change   and
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009
Improving Air
Quality
Target
Actual
FY 2010
480
410
FY 2012
480
FY 2013
480
Unit
                      Million
                      Pounds
                                                                              FY2011
                                                                              480
                                                                              1,100
             Explanation of Results: Each year a small number of big cases provide the majority of pollutant reductions, which makes
             setting targets for pollutant reduction measures highly uncertain. This year  1 case provided 64% of the total air pollutant
GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
                                                        158

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
(3)     Support
Protecting
America's
Waters
(4)     Support
Cleaning   Up
Communities
and Advancing
Sustainable
Development
Performance Measures and Data
reductions.
Additional Information: FY 2005-2008 Average Baseline: 480 million pounds, annual average over the period.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce,  treat, or eliminate  1,600 million estimated pounds of water pollutants  as a result of
concluded enforcement actions (5-year cumulative). (FY 2005-2008 baseline: 320 million pounds, annual  average over the
period)
(PM 402) Millions of pounds of water pollutants reduced, treated, or eliminated through concluded enforcement actions.
         FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
Target
Actual
320
1,000
320
740
320
320
                      Million
                      Pounds
Explanation of Results: Each year a small number of big cases provide the majority of pollutant reductions, which makes
setting targets for pollutant reduction measures highly uncertain. This year 2 water cases account for over half of the total of
water pollutant reductions.
Additional Information: FY 2005-2008 Average Baseline: 320 million pounds, annual average over the period. For FY 2010,
two stormwater home builder actions contributed to more than half of the one billion pound pollutant reduction result.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce, treat, or eliminate 32,000 million estimated pounds of hazardous waste as  a result of
concluded enforcement actions (5-year cumulative). (FY 2008 baseline: 6,500 million pounds)
(PM 405) Millions of pounds of hazardous waste reduced, treated, or eliminated through concluded enforcement actions.
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit

Target                                               6,500        6,500       6,500       6,500      Million
Actual                                                11 son       3 600                             Pounds
Explanation of Results: The hazardous waste metric is generally dominated by results from one or two very big cases. This
results in substantial variability in this measure from year to year.
Additional Information: FY 2008 Baseline: 6,500 million pounds. The results for this measure are driven by a small number of
very large cases and do not necessarily represent typical annual results. For example, in FY 2010 over 99% of the total 11.75
billion pounds of hazardous  waste reduced,  treated, or eliminated came from two cases - CF Industries Inc. (9.87 billion
pounds) and Exxon Mobil Oil Corporation (1.86 billion pounds).
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
                                                            159

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                 FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area   Performance Measures and Data
                Strategic Measure: By 2015, obtain commitments to clean up 1,500 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and groundwater
                medial as a result of concluded CERCLA and RCRA corrective action enforcement actions (5-year cumulative).  (FY 2007-
                2009 baseline: 300 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and groundwater media, annual average over the period)
                (PM 078) Percentage of all Superfund statute of limitations  cases addressed at sites with unaddressed total  past costs
                equal to or greater than $200,000.
                        FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
100
98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
                     Percent
               Additional Information: In FY 2009, the Agency will have addressed 100 percent of Cost Recovery at all NPL and non-NPL
               sites with total past costs equal to or greater than $200,000.
               (PM  285) Percentage of Superfund sites having viable, liable responsible parties other than the federal government
               where EPA reaches a settlement or takes an enforcement action before starting a remedial action.
                        FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target   90
                Actual   100
95
98
95
95
95
100
95
98
95
100
99
                     Percent
               Additional Information: In FY 1998 approximately 70 percent of new remedial work at NPL sites (excluding Federal facilities)
               was initiated by private parties. In FY 2003, a settlement was reached or an enforcement action was taken with non-Federal
               PRPs before the start of the remedial action at approximately 90 percent of Superfund sites.
               (PM 417) Millions of cubic yards of contaminated soil and groundwater media EPA has obtained commitments to clean
               up as a result of concluded CERCLA and RCRA corrective action enforcement actions.
                         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
               Target                                                                      300        300       Million

               Additional Information: FY 2007-2009 baseline: 300 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and groundwater media, annual
               average over the period.
(5)    Support Strategic Measure: By 2015, reduce, treat, or eliminate  19.0 million estimated pounds of toxic and pesticide pollutants as a
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
                                                           160

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                     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program Area
Ensuring  the
Safety      of
Chemicals and
Preventing
Pollution
(6)    Enhance
Strategic
Deterrence
through
Criminal
Enforcement
Performance Measures and Data
result of concluded enforcement actions (5-year cumulative). (FY 2005-2008 baseline: 3.8 million pounds, annual average over
the period)
(PM  404) Millions  of pounds of toxic  and pesticide pollutants reduced, treated, or eliminated through concluded
enforcement actions.
         FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008   FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                Target
                Actual
                                                     3.8
                                                     8.3
3.8
6.1
Million
Pounds
Explanation of Results: Each year a small number of big cases provide the majority of pollutant reductions, which makes
setting targets for pollutant reduction measures highly uncertain.
Additional Information: FY 2005-2008 Average Baseline: The program used existing data to estimate results for FY 2005-
2008, which yielded an approximate average baseline of 3.8 million pounds. FY 2010 results were driven by a small number of
enforcement cases, which yielded the majority of the 8.3 million pounds addressed.
Strategic Measure: By 2015, increase the percentage of criminal cases having the most significant health, environmental, and
deterrence impacts to 50 percent. (FY 2010 baseline: 36 percent)
(PM 408) Percent of closed cases with criminal enforcement consequences (indictment, conviction, fine, or penalty).
         FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
                                                                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m
Target                                               33          33
 .                                                                                                 Percent
Actual                                               35          37

Additional Information: FY 2006-2008 Average Baseline: 33%.
   GOAL 5: ENFORCING ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS
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                        U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
      PERFORMANCE: RESEARCH EIGHT-YEAR ARRAY
      (Boxes shaded gray indicate that a measure has been terminated for FY 2012 and beyond, therefore, data are no longer collected.)

      The following measures are  associated with EPA's research programs. In 2012, EPA reorganized its research programs to focus on
      sustainability  and to  better  address Agency priorities and stakeholders' needs.  Correspondingly, EPA  developed new measures
      associated with these  "sustainable research" programs. While there are fewer measures in 2012 than previously, the new measures
      comprehensively assess EPA's research. For example, EPA used to measure the completion of research by  "long term goal." Moving
      forward, EPA will report the completion of research by "program." The new measures utilize a similar but more aggregated approach
      to allow for more meaningful and concise data collection. The table below reflects past and existing measures.

      NPM: AA RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Performance Measures and Data

(PM AC1) Percentage of products completed on time by Air, Climate, and Energy research program.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012
Target
Actual
  100
FY 2013

100
Unit

Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated  completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output. The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM AC2) Percentage of planned research outputs delivered to clients for use in taking action  on climate change or improving air quality.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a  research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
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partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program Strategic Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage  partners when making  modifications. Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.
(PM CS1) Percentage of planned research products completed on time by the Chemical Safety for Sustainability research program.
          FY2006      FY2007       FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output.  The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM  CS2)  Percentage of planned research  outputs delivered to clients  and  partners  to  improve their  capability to advance  the
environmentally sustainable  development, use, and assessment of chemicals.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program Strategic Plan.  At the end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program  outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.

(PM HC1) Percentage of planned research products completed on time by the Sustainable and Healthy Communities research program.
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          FY 2006      FY 2007
Target
Actual
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY2011
FY 2012

100
FY 2013

100
Unit

Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output. The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM HC2) Percentage of planned research outputs delivered to clients, partners, and stakeholders for use in pursuing their sustainability
goals.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011       FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
                                                       100
                                                       100
                                                                                  Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program  Strategic Plan. At the  end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program  outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage  partners when making modifications. Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.
(PM HS1) Percentage of planned research products completed on time by the Homeland Security research program.
          FY2006      FY2007     FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
                                                       100
                                                       100
                                                                                  Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
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Performance Measures and Data
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output. The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM  HS2)  Percentage of  planned  research outputs delivered to clients and partners  to  improve  their  capabilities  to  respond to
contamination resulting from homeland security events and related disasters.
         FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program Strategic Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program  outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.
(PM RA1) Percentage of planned research products completed on time by the Human Health Risk Assessment research program.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output. The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM RA2) Percentage of planned research outputs delivered to clients and partners for use in informing human health decisions.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
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Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program Strategic Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORE) has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program  outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.
(PM RA6) Number of regulatory decisions in which decision-makers  used HHRA peer-reviewed assessments (IRIS, PPRTVs, exposure
assessments and other assessments)
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target

Actual
  no     target
  established
20
              Number
Additional Information: The measure calculates the percent of Agency regulatory decisions for which clients use HHRA peer-reviewed health
assessments. The measure is calculated by reviewing regulatory decisions and Records of Decision (ROD) made by EPA program offices in recent
years, determining how many quantitative health assessment values were used in these EPA program decisions, and what percentage of these values
had been developed by the HHRA Program.
(PM RA7) Annual milestone progress score for completing draft IRIS health assessments.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  50
50
                             Score
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that includes such factors as client interest,
complexity of science, and level of effort required. Points are scored by multiplying the weight of each assessment by the number of milestones
completed in the assessment process. The program plans to target an average score of 50 points each year beginning in 2009, representing a steady
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and timely completion of draft assessments throughout each fiscal year. Near-term targets are based on the large volume of ongoing assessments
that have not been released in draft due to the change in the process for external review. This measure will be assessed as a rolling average with
potential annual excess rolled over to the next target year so as to provide incentives for completion of more milestones.
(PM RA8) Annual progress score for finalizing IRIS health assessments.
          FY2006       FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012     FY 2013       Unit
Target
Actual
  20
20
                             Score
Additional Information: This measure tracks the program's ability to make progress in finalizing and releasing IRIS assessments under LTG1. The
annual score, tracked cumulatively throughout the year, is based on the relative weighting of each chemical. Chemicals are weighted using a 3-tier
system that  includes client interest, complexity of science, and level of effort required. Points  are scored by multiplying the weight of each
assessment by the number of milestones completed in the assessment process. The program plans to target an average score of 20 points each year
beginning in 2009, representing a steady and timely completion of final assessments throughout each fiscal year. Near-term targets are based on the
large volume of ongoing assessments that have not been finalized due to the change in the process for external review and completion. This measure
will be assessed as rolling average.
(PM SW1) Percentage of planned research products completed on time by the Safe and Sustainable Water Resources research program.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
  100
100
                             Percent
Additional Information: A research product is "a deliverable that results from a specific research project or task. Research products may require
translation or synthesis before integration into an output ready for partner use." This secondary performance measure tracks the timely completion
of research products. Working with its partners, each program develops a list of planned research products and their associated outputs. The list
reflects all products the program plans to complete by the end of each fiscal year. The estimated completion date is based on when the output is
needed for partner use and when the research products are needed to be transformed into the output. The actual product completion date is self-
reported. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned products each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs.
(PM SW2) Percentage of planned research outputs delivered to clients and partners to improve the Agency's capability to ensure clean and
adequate supplies of water that support human well-being and resilient aquatic ecosystems.
          FY2006       FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
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Performance Measures and Data
Target
Actual
                                                                    100
                                                                    100
                                                                                                Percent
Additional Information: Research outputs result from the translation or synthesis of one or more research products into the format compatible with
the partner's decision needs. "Delivery of a research output" means that the output is transferred to ORD's research partner ready for the intended
partner use. EPA identifies and describes the planned outputs in the program's Research Program Strategic Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the
program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that
it can best meet EPA and other partners' needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORE) has better formalized the process
for developing and modifying program  outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications.  Involving
partners in this process helps to ensure the ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility.
(PM H29) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of public health outcomes long-term goal.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009       FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual    100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H30) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of mechanistic data long-term goal.
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    10o
Actual    92
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
75
Percent
Explanation of Results: Delay in report of publications describing the potential usefulness of in vitro liver models for screening and mode of action
prediction. This report was completed in December 2011.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year,  the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
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Performance Measures and Data
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H31) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of aggregate and cumulative risk long-term goal.
         FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010     FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual    100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
87.5
Percent
Explanation of Results: A no-cost extension was granted  on a report on interpreting biomarkers using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic
modeling. The no-cost extension was necessary to provide the extramural researchers with the time necessary to successfully complete their project
and to thereafter submit the final report. Two unanticipated developments necessitated the extension. First, an instrument malfunction required the
replenishment of additional cell cultures. Second, newly acquired data have led the researchers to revise the assumptions underlying their model.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of  Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H32) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the susceptible subpopulations long-term goal.
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target

Actual    100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
64
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
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Performance Measures and Data
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H35) Percentage of planned actions accomplished toward the long-term goal of reducing uncertainty in the science that supports
standard setting and air quality management decisions. (Research)
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual    94
                           100
                           100
                           100
                           100
                           100
                           80
                           100
                           100
                                                      Percent
Additional Information: Beginning in FY 2008, this measure will track the program's success in completing its planned outputs on time. Prior to
FY 2008, the measure tracked success in completing both planned outputs and planned actions in response to independent review recommendations.
(PM H66) Percentage of planned outputs (in support of WQRP long-term goal #1) delivered
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011       FY 2012      FY 2013     Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
92
100
90
Percent
Explanation of Results: Resources and research on a review of published vertebrate gene expression in fathead minnow were redirected to more
effectively focus on higher priority efforts related to sustainability, partners' needs, and Administrator's priorities.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual  outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing  and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H68) Percentage of planned outputs (in support of WQRP long-term goal #2) delivered
         FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    10o
Actual    100
              100
              100
             100
             100
             100
             86
              100
              100
              100
              85.7
                                        Percent
Explanation of Results: A draft assessment report on flowing waters was delayed due to our partners' delay in forming data analysis teams. The
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report is expected to be completed in December 2012.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H70) Percentage of planned outputs (in support of WQRP long-term goal #3) delivered
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual    92
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
66.7
Percent
Explanation of Results: A report on the effects of CAFOs on ground water quality was delayed to support the development of the Safe and
Sustainable Water Resources program and higher priority efforts related to sustainability, partners' needs, and Administrator's priorities. This CAFO
study involves comprehensive data from different analytical labs for seven study sites. The study includes antibiotic data from USGS. An instrument
failure prevented analysis completion for one of the sites. ORD decided to delay this report to allow these data to be included and to better tailor this
report to the Safe and Sustainable Water Resources framework (established during 2011). EPA's wastewater decision makers are aware of this
delay. EPA's report has been peer-reviewed and recommended for publication with revisions, which are now in progress. Completion is expected in
the second quarter of FY12.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year,  the program reports on its success in meeting its planned  annual outputs (detailed in  the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in  this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness  of outputs on the basis of partner utility.  In addition, EPA's  Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H72) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of efficient and effective clean-ups and safe disposal of contamination wastes.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    IQO           100          100
Actual    100           100          92
      ENABLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS
                           100

                           85
                           100

                           100

                          171
                           80

                           100
                                                       Percent

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                        U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                   FY 2013 Annual Plan
Performance Measures and Data

Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific  Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H73) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of water security initiatives.
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010       FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    10o
Actual    100
100
100
100
83
100
100
100
100
80
100
Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific  Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H76) Percentage of Global publications rated as highly cited publications.
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010       FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target

Actual
                        22
                        25
             No    Target
             Established
             Biennial
              23
              25
             No    Target
             Established
              Biennial
              24

              Data    Not
              Collected
                                                                                                Percent
Explanation of Results: Due to program restructuring and discontinuation of programmatic BOSC reviews, funds for bibliometric analyses were
redirected to an interagency initiative supporting the development of a data infrastructure that will aid in more effective assessment of the long term
impacts of research. Since bibliometric analyses were not conducted in FY 2011, no data were collected for this measure and therefore will not be
available to report.
Additional Information: The criteria and the "highly cited" rankings will be provided using "Thomson's Essential Science Indicator (ESI)
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Performance Measures and Data

(PM H77) Percentage of Global publications in high impact journals.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
                       23.6
                       24.1
                           No    Target
                           Established

                           Biennial
                           24.6
                           24.1
                           No    Target
                           Established

                           Biennial
                           25.6

                           Data    Not
                           Collected
                                                                                                                      Percent
Explanation of Results: Due to program restructuring and discontinuation of programmatic BOSC reviews, funds for bibliometric analyses were
redirected to an interagency initiative supporting the development of a data infrastructure that will aid in more effective assessment of the long term
impacts of research.  Since bibliometric analyses were not conducted in FY 2011, no data were collected for this measure and therefore will not be
available to report.
Additional Information: The criteria and the "impact factor" rankings will be provided using "Thomson's Journal Citation Reports (JCR)
(PM H79) Percentage of planned outputs delivered under the Global Change research program.
         FY2006      FY2007     FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013     Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: Annual research outputs will be outlined in the program's revised Multi-Year Plan. This measure will track progress
toward completing those milestones across the program.
(PM H83) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of HHRA Technical Support Documents.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    No    Tar§et  90
          Established
Actual    g \
             81
                           90
             89
                           90
             100
                           90
              100
                           90
             100
                                                                                                                      Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
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Performance Measures and Data
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM H89) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the manage material streams, conserve resources  and appropriately
manage waste long-term goal.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
          100
          100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
83.3
Percent
Explanation of Results: A delay in research on the use of organic- based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems for the treatment of heavy
metals and arsenic occurred so that researchers could focus on higher priority Hydraulic Fracturing work. Research is expected to be completed in
FY2012.
Additional Information: Annual research outputs are included in the program's Multi-Year Plan (MYP). Outputs in support of this long-term goal
include reports on technologies,  methods, and models to manage material streams and reduce uncertainty in assessments.  Additional details are
described in the MYP.
(PM H90) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the mitigation, management and long-term stewardship of contaminated
sites long-term goal.
         FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011     FY 2012      FY 2013     Unit
Target
Actual
                       100           100          100           100          100
          96           100           100          100           100          66.67
Explanation of Results: A report on dispersant effectiveness was delayed so that researchers could attend to higher priority efforts.
                                                                                              Percent
Additional Information: Annual research outputs are included in the program's Multi-Year Plan (MYP). Outputs in support of this long-term goal
include reports, technologies, methods, and models related to the characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.  Additional details are
described in the MYP.
(PM H91) Peer-reviewed publications over FTE.
          FY 2006      FY 2007      FY 2008
Target    79            gO           .81
Actual    Data    Not  Data    Not  0.73
      ENABLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS
                                                  FY2009      FY2010      FY2011
                                                  .82           .83           .84
                                                  Data    Not  Data    Not  Data    Not
                                                              174
                                                                   FY 2012
                                                                   FY 2013
                                                                   Unit

                                                                   Publications

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                        U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                               FY 2013 Annual Plan
Performance Measures and Data
          Collected     Collected
                                        Collected
Explanation of Results: Due to program restructuring and discontinuation of programmatic BOSC reviews, funds for bibliometric analyses were
redirected to an interagency initiative supporting the development of a data infrastructure that will aid in more effective assessment of the long term
impacts of research. Since bibliometric analyses were not conducted in FY 2011, no data were collected for this measure and therefore will not be
available to report.
Additional Information: The universe of peer-reviewed publications includes 1) journal articles, 2) books and book chapters, and 3) EPA reports,
where at least one EPA author is listed or where the publication is the result of an EPA grant. If a publication includes more than one EPA author,
that publication is counted only once. Materials submitted for publication but not yet published are not included. FTE are actual program full time
equivalents. The program is also submitting data on extramural vs. intramural costs to support the measure. Data and targets are based on a three
year moving average.
(PM106) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the SP2 program's long-term goal one.
         FY2006      FY2007     FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual    go
              100
              86
             100
             100
             100
             100
              100
              88
             100
             100
                                        Percent
Additional Information: Annual research outputs are included in the program's Multi-Year Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports
on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year.
(PM 108) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the SP2 program's long-term goal two.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: Annual research outputs are included in the program's Multi-Year Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports
on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year.
(PM 110) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of the SP2 program's long-term goal three.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    10o
              100
             100
             100
              100
             100
                                        Percent
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Performance Measures and Data
Actual    100           80
                                      100
100
Additional Information: Annual research outputs are included in the program's Multi-Year Plan. At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports
on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs. The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year.
(PM 119) Percentage of Ecological Research publications rated as highly-cited publications.
          FY2006      FY2007       FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012     FY 2013      Unit
Target    No    Tar§et  20-4
          Established
Actual    Biennial
                        21.10
No   Target
Established
_,.   .  ,
Biennial
Data   Avail
11/2012
                            No    Target
                            Established

                            Biennial
              Data    Not
              Collected
                                                                                                                        Percent
Explanation of Results: Due to program restructuring and discontinuation of programmatic BOSC reviews, funds for bibliometric analyses were
redirected to an interagency initiative supporting the development of a data infrastructure that will aid in more effective assessment of the long term
impacts of research. Since bibliometric analyses were not conducted in FY 2011, no data were collected for this measure and therefore will not be
available to report.
Additional Information: This metric provides a systematic way of quantifying research performance and impact by counting the number of times an
article is cited within other publications. The "highly cited" data are based on the percentage of all program publications that are  cited in the top
10% of their field, as determined by "Thomson's Essential Science Indicator"  (ESI). Each analysis evaluates the publications from the last ten year
period, and is timed to match the cycle for independent expert program reviews by the Board  of Scientific Counselors (BOSC). This "highly cited"
metric provides information on the quality of the program's research, as well as the degree  to which that research is impacting the science
community. As such, it is an instructive tool both for the program and for independent panels such as the BOSC in their program reviews.
(PM 120) Percentage of Ecological research publications in "high-impact" journals.
          FY2006       FY2007       FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011       FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target

Actual
          No    Target  20.3
          Established
          Biennial
                        20.80
No   Target
Established

Biennial
Data   Avail
11/2012
No   Target
Established

Biennial
                                         Data    Not
                                         Collected
                                                                                                                        Percent
Explanation of Results: Due to program restructuring and discontinuation of programmatic BOSC reviews, funds for bibliometric analyses were
redirected to an interagency initiative supporting the development of a data infrastructure that will aid in more effective assessment of the long term
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impacts of research. Since bibliometric analyses were not conducted in FY 2011, no data were collected for this measure and therefore will not be
available to report.
Additional Information: This measure provides a systematic way of quantifying research quality and impact by counting those articles that are
published in prestigious journals. The "high impact" data are based on the percentage of all program articles  that are published in prestigious
journals, as determined by "Thomson's Journal Citation Reports" (JCR). Each analysis evaluates the publications  from the last ten year period, and
is timed to match the cycle for independent expert program reviews by the Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC). This "high impact"  metric
provides information on the quality of the program's research, as well as the degree to which that research is impacting the  science community. As
such, it is an instructive tool both for the program and for independent panels such as the BOSC in their program reviews.
(PM121) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of State, tribe, and EPA office needs for causal diagnosis tools and methods to
determine causes of ecological degradation.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
88
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs.  To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM 122) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of State, tribe, and EPA office needs for environmental forecasting tools and
methods to forecast the ecological impacts of various actions.
          FY2006     FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target    100
Actual    100
100
100
100
83
100
93
100
100
100
62.5
Percent
Explanation  of Results: A delay in research  on Lyme  disease projections and  scenarios was  delayed due to a  landcover  classification
incompatibility in scenarios delivered by USGS. The incompatibility is now being addressed and research can continue once resolved.

Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the

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program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM 123) Percentage of planned  outputs delivered in support of State, tribe, and EPA office needs for  environmental restoration and
services tools and methods to protect and restore ecological condition and services.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target

Actual    100
100
100
100
100
100
93
100
100
100
75
Percent
Explanation of Results: Research on limitations of curve number relationship between rainfall and runoff was delayed due to weather-related
limitations. The research output is expected to be delivered by April 2012.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM 128) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in  support of STS's  goal that decision makers adopt ORD-identified and developed
metrics to quantitatively assess environmental systems for sustainability.
          FY2006       FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
              100
              100
              100
              100
              100
              100
              100
              66.67
                                         Percent
Explanation of Results: Research on the impact of current biofuels policies has been delayed in order to address critical needs of the ACE program.
The research output is expected to be complete by March 2012.
Additional Information: At the  end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
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needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM 129) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of STS's goal that decision makers adopt ORD-developed decision support
tools and methodologies.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
87.5
Percent
Explanation of Results: Research on a decision support tool integrating life cycle assessment methods with material flow approaches was slightly
delayed in order to address critical needs of the ACE program. This research is expected to be complete in February 2012.
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures, ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis  of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
(PM 130) Percentage of planned outputs delivered in support of STS's goal that decision makers adopt innovative technologies developed or
verified by ORD.
          FY2006       FY2007      FY 2008      FY 2009     FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: At the end of the fiscal year, the program reports on its success in meeting its planned annual outputs (detailed in the
program's Multi-Year Plan). The program strives to complete 100% of its planned outputs each year so that it can best meet EPA and other partners'
needs. To ensure the ambitiousness of its annual output measures,  ORD has better formalized the process for developing and modifying program
outputs, including requiring that ORD programs engage partners when making modifications. Involving partners in this process helps to ensure the
ambitiousness of outputs on the basis of partner utility. In addition, EPA's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) periodically reviews programs'
goals and outputs and determines whether they are appropriate and ambitious.
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Performance Measures and Data

(PM 134) Percentage of planned risk management research products delivered to support EPA's Office of Water, Regions, water utilities,
and other key stakeholders to manage public health risk.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010     FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013     Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
93
100
100
100
100
Percent
Additional Information: The outputs tracked by this measure demonstrate progress towards completing DWRP's long term goal 1, which supports
the Office of Water (OW) in rule implementation, simultaneous compliance, and evaluating the effectiveness of risk management decisions. ORD's
work under this goal also supports OW, regions, states, utilities, and key stakeholders in protecting sources of drinking water, managing water
availability, improving water infrastructure sustainability, increasing water and energy use efficiency, and responding to short and long-term water
resource impacts of environmental stressors such as climate change, population growth and land use changes.
(PM 135) Percentage of planned methodologies, data, and tools delivered in support of EPA's Office of Water and other key stakeholders'
needs for developing health risk assessments under the SDWA.
          FY2006      FY2007      FY 2008     FY 2009      FY 2010      FY2011      FY 2012      FY 2013      Unit
Target
Actual
100
100
100
100
100
86
100
90
Percent
Explanation of Results: Research on leak, purge and gas permeability testing methods was slightly delayed in order to attend to more critical needs
of the SSWR program, and to more effectively focus on efforts related to sustainability, partners' needs, and Administrator's priorities. Research is
expected to be completed in FY 2012.
Additional Information: The outputs tracked by this measure demonstrate progress towards completing DWRP's long term goal 1, which primarily
supports the Office of Water in decisions relating to: Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR), regulating/not regulating contaminants
on the Contaminant Candidate List (CCL), the six year review, and the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. ORD's work under this goal
also supports regions and key stakeholders in meeting simultaneous compliance requirements while also aiding risk assessors in developing risk
assessments that inform regulatory decisions.
      PERFORMANCE: ENABLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS EIGHT-YEAR ARRAY
      (Boxes shaded gray indicate that a measure has been terminated for FY 2012 and beyond, therefore, data are no longer collected.)
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    FY 2013 Annual Plan
NPM: OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

             Performance Measures and Data

             (PM 007) Percent of GS employees (DEU) hired within 80 calendar days.
                     FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
15
18
20
                     Percent
            Additional Information: In FY 2009, 10.7% of GS employees Designated Employee Unit (DEU) were hired on average in
             189.2 days.
             (PM 008) Percent of GS employees (all hires) hired within 80 calendar days
                      FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
23
21
25
                     Percent
            Explanation of Results: Metric was not met due to external factors that lengthen the hiring process such as the number of days
            a vacancy must be announced per the Collective Bargaining Unit; a new hire's availability to report within the established time
            frame; and the selecting office's review time (e.g., receipt of incomplete vacancy packages,  Subject Matter Expert review of
            certificates, and final selection by management).
            Additional Information: In FY 2009, 14.6% of GS employees (other than DEU) were hired on average in 163 days.
            (PM 009) Increase in number and percentage of certified acquisition staff (1102)
                      FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
           335/80    335/80
                     Number/
                     Percent
            Additional Information: There were 304 GS-1102 Staff on board as of July 26, 2010. There were 240 GS-1102 Staff, 78.9%,
            certified as of September 2, 2010.1

            (PM 010) Cumulative percentage reduction in Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

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                                                 FY 2013 Annual Plan
             Performance Measures and Data
                      FY 2006    FY 2007    FY 2008
             Target
             Actual
                      FY 2009
                      FY 2010
                      1.0
                      79.5
                       FY2011
                       0.4
                       59
                       FY 2012
                       6.4
                      FY 2013
                      11.9
                      Unit

                      Percent
             Additional Information: On October  8,  2009,  the  President signed Executive Order  13514,  "Federal Leadership in
             Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," requiring all Federal Agencies to reduce their Green House Gas Scope 1
             and 2 emissions (EPA committed to a 25% reduction by FY 2020 from a FY 2008 baseline). EPAs FY 2008 GHG Scope 1 and
             2 emissions were  140,720 mTCO2e's. The Energy Policy Act of 2005  requires  each federal agency to reduce energy use
             intensity by 3% annually through FY 2015. For the Agency's 29 reporting facilities, the FY 2003 energy consumption of British
             Thermal Units (BTUs) per square foot is 346,518 BTUs per square foot. EPA reset its annual/intermediate Scope 1 and 2 GHG
             reduction goals in its June 2011 Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (S2P2).
             (PM 098) Cumulative percentage reduction in energy consumption.
                      FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010
                                              FY2011    FY2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target   2
             Actual   3
6
9
9
13
12
18
15
18.3
18
18.1
21
                      Percent
             Additional Information: On January 24, 2007,  the  President  signed  Executive  Order 13423, "Strengthening  Federal
             Environment,  Energy, and Transportation Management," requiring all Federal Agencies to reduce their Green House Gas
             intensity and energy use by 3%  annually through  FY 2015. For the Agency's 29 reporting facilities, the FY 2003 energy
             consumption of British Thermal Units (BTUs) per square foot is 346,518 BTUs per square foot.
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NPM: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION
             Performance Measures and Data
             (PM 052) Number of major EPA environmental systems that use the CDX electronic requirements  enabling faster
             receipt, processing, and quality checking of data.
                     FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
29
32
36
37
45
48
50
55
60
60
60
64
67
                     Systems
            Additional Information: The Central Data Exchange program began in FY 2001 to enable States, Tribes and others to send
            environmental data to EPA through a centralized electronic process.
            (PM 053) States, tribes and territories will be able to exchange data with CDX through nodes in  real time,  using
            standards and automated data-quality checking.
                     FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
50
42
55
57
55
59
60
59
65
69
65
72
80
                     Users
            Additional Information: The Central Data Exchange program began in FY 2001 to enable States, Tribes and others to send
            environmental data to EPA through a centralized electronic process.
            (PM  998) EPA's TRI program will work with partners to conduct  data quality checks  to enhance accuracy and
            reliability of environmental data.
                     FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012   FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
                                                                             500
                                                                             Quality
                                                                             Checks
            Additional Information: This metric will allow EPA to for the first time report on performance of the Toxics Release Inventory
            (TRI) program. Data checks will improve the accuracy and reliability of environmental data.
            (PM 999) Total number of active unique users from states, tribes, laboratories, regulated facilities and other entities that
            electronically report environmental data to EPA through CDX.
                      FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
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                                                             FY 2013 Annual Plan
             Performance Measures and Data
             Target
             Actual
                                                         Baseline
                                                         Year
                                                         56,200
                                                          58,000
                                                          60,000
                                                                                Users
             Additional Information: This metric replaces PM 054, which is being discontinued. PM 999 measures the total number of
             active individual CDX users. This new metric only includes users who have logged in within the previous two years (active
             users).  Each distinct user is counted only once, regardless of the number of different accounts, roles, or locations. This new
             metric  will provide a more accurate portrayal of current CDX usage by focusing programmatic assessment on active unique
             users, screening out dormant accounts, test accounts, and multiple accounts registered to the same user.
             (PM 054) Number of users from states, tribes, laboratories, and others  that choose CDX to report environmental data
             electronically to EPA.
                      FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010    FY2011    FY 2012     FY 2013   Unit
Target
Actual
47,000
62,000
55,000
88,516
100,000
127,575
130,000
184,109
210,000
231,700
                                                                                210,000
                                                                                                                 Users
                                                                                Data  Not
                                                                                Reported
             Explanation of Results: This metric is being discontinued. PM 999 will now more accurately measure CDX usage by screening
             out inactive users and multiple accounts from the same user.
             Additional Information: Zero. The Central Data Exchange program began in FY 2001. Prior to that there were no users.
             (PM 408) Percent of Federal  Information  Security Management  Act  reportable  systems  that are certified and
             accredited.
                       FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target
             Actual
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
                      Percent
             Additional Information: FISMA assigns specific responsibilities to Federal agencies and National Institute of Standards and
             Technology (NIST) to strengthen information system security. The continued goal, as required by FISMA, is for the Agency to
             achieve a continuous 100% compliance status with Certification and Accreditation (C&A) of all reportable systems.
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NPM: INSPECTOR GENERAL
             Performance Measures and Data

             (PM 35A) Environmental and business actions taken for improved performance or risk reduction.
                      FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target   303
             Actual   407
318
464
334
463
318
272
334
391
334
315
334
375
                      Actions
             Explanation of Results: While the OIG achieved over 94% of this target in FY 2011, this measure represents subsequent
             intermediate outcome actions taken by the Agency on OIG recommendations as well as any long- term outcome improvements
             achieved as a result of those actions. Actions taken on OIG recommendations are dependent upon the complexity of the
             recommendation and how quickly the Agency acts to implement them, which is out of the OIGs control. Generally there is a 2
             to3 year time lag to implement OIG  recommendation, but the Agency often seeks and has extended the completion dates
             beyond the normal lag time making the predictability of results difficult. More complex OIG recommendations from a fewer
             number of OIG reports in previous years have made achievement of this target more difficult.
             Additional Information: The baseline is a moving average for the three most recent years. For the period concluding with fiscal
             year 2010, the baseline is 375 actions.
             (PM 35B) Environmental and business recommendations or risks identified for corrective action.
                      FY2006   FY2007    FY 2008    FY 2009   FY 2010    FY2011   FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target   925
             Actual   i  024
925
949
971
624
903
983
903
945
903
2011
903
950
                      Recommend
                      ations
             Explanation of Results: The number of OIG results in terms of recommendations and risk identified has generally reflected the
             staffing levels of the OIG and the types of audits and evaluations performed. More complex evaluations and audits have fewer
             total but more complex recommendations and risks identified. The type of work changes as the OIG identifies different areas of
             risks requiring reviews. The number of recommendations dramatically increased in FY 2011 as the OIG included 1137 findings
             from Single Audit review of ARRA grant recipients. The non-ARRA portion of recommendations identified was 874.
             Additional  Information:  In  FY 2009  the OIG  established  a  revised baseline  of  865  environmental  and business
             recommendations or risks identified for  corrective actions.  The baseline was adjusted to reflect  an average of the  actual
             reported results  for the period  FY 2006-2008. The baseline has generally decreased to reflect the transfer of DCAA audit
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             Performance Measures and Data
             oversight from the OIG directly to the EPA, and a significant gap between the OIG ceiling and actual staffing levels.
             (PM 35C) Return on the annual dollar investment, as a percentage of the OIG budget, from audits and investigations.
                      FY2006    FY2007    FY 2008   FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013   Unit
             Target   150        150
             Actual   1610       189
            150
            186
            120
            150
            120
            36
             120
             151
                       120
                                  Percent
             Explanation of Results: The OIG has been fairly consistent in the dollar level of questioned costs, cost efficiencies identified
             from audits and evaluation, and fines, penalties and settlements from investigations. Some years may have vast differences
             from the normal level, often dependent upon an extraordinary recovery from a criminal case settlement of great magnitude as in
             FY 2006, or a significant decrease in FY 2010, as we focused resources  on fewer quantitative monetary reviews in preference
             to more qualitative reviews such as internal controls. During FY 2011, the OIG refocused its efforts on areas of monetary
             benefit  resulting in both a significant increase over the results of FY 2010, but also significantly  exceeding the target for FY
             2011.
             Additional Information: The  baseline reflects potential dollar  return on investment as a percentage of OIG budget  from
             identified opportunities for savings,  questioned costs, fines, recoveries and settlements. The baseline is a moving average for
             the three most recent years. For the period concluding with fiscal year 2010, the baseline is 112%.
             (PM 35D) Criminal, civil, administrative, and fraud prevention actions.
                       FY2006   FY2007   FY 2008    FY 2009    FY 2010     FY2011    FY 2012    FY 2013    Unit
             Target    gO
             Actual    121
80
103
80
84
80
95
75
115
80
160
85
                       Actions
             Explanation of Results: Results from Investigative work is extremely unpredictable since the nature of the work itself is
             response oriented (to indicators of fraud, wrong doing, or allegations received) and dependent upon the subsequent actions of
             the Department of Justice. However, OIG investigative results have generally correlated to the levels of investigative staffing
             and have increased steadily since FY 2008 - a trend we anticipate to continue as the OIG continues to reach its authorized staff
             level. Our Office of Investigations exceeded its target by 100% as a result of 1) its ability to increase its staffing level closer to
             its  authorized level; 2) extraordinary  number  of  administrative  actions in  the form of debarments and suspensions  and
             disciplinary actions resulting from investigative cases; and, 3) an increased  number of proactive fraud prevention outreach
             briefings with other federal, state and local organizations.
ENABLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS
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             Performance Measures and Data
             Additional Information: In FY 2009 the OIG established a revised baseline of 80 criminal, civil and administrative actions,
             which has remained constant over time.
ENABLING AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS
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VERIFICATION/VALIDATION OF
PERFORMANCE DATA

Beginning with the EPA's FY 2013 budget,
the Agency  has developed  Data  Quality
Records      (DQRs)      to      present
validation/verification    information    for
selected  performance measures, consistent
with   guidance   from  the   Office  of
Management   and   Budget.   A   DQR
documents    the   management   controls,
responsibilities,  quality   procedures,  and
other metadata  associated  with the  data
lifecycle  for  an  individual  performance
measure,  and  is  intended to  enhance the
transparency, objectivity, and usefulness of
the performance result. To access a pdf file
containing all current Data Quality Records,
please               go               to
http://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/annualpl
an/fy2013.html.
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COORDINATION WITH OTHER
FEDERAL AGENCIES

Environmental Programs

Goal   1-  Taking  Action   on  Climate
Change and Improving Air Quality

Objective: Address Climate Change

Voluntary  climate  protection  programs
government-wide stimulate the development
and use of renewable  energy technologies
and energy efficient products  that will help
reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The effort
is  led  by  EPA and DOE with  significant
involvement from  USDA, HUD, and the
National   Institute  of   Standards    and
Technology (NIST).

Agencies throughout the  government make
significant  contributions  to  the  climate
protection programs.  For example,  DOE
pursues actions such  as  promoting  the
research, development, and deployment of
advanced   technologies   (for   example,
renewable energy  sources).  The Treasury
Department   administers   proposed   tax
incentives for specific investments that will
reduce emissions. EPA is responding to the
President's directive to work  with NHTSA
to  develop a coordinated national program
that will set further standards to improve
fuel efficiency and reduce GHG emissions
for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017
and later. EPA is broadening  its  public
information transportation choices campaign
as  a joint effort with DOT. EPA coordinates
with each of the above-mentioned agencies
to   ensure   that   our  programs   are
complementary and in no way  duplicative.

The 2009 Memorandum  of Understanding
(MOU) on ENERGY STAR, signed by EPA
and   DOE,   defines    clear   lines   of
responsibility between the Agencies that
build upon  and leverage their  respective
areas of expertise and outlines a number of
program   enhancements  that will  drive
greater efficiency for American consumers
and  greater  efficiency   in   homes  and
buildings. As part of the  MOU, EPA and
DOE  developed  an  annual  work  plan
detailing  key work across the  two Agencies
and highlighting their cooperative work  on
energy   efficiency   in   commercial  and
residential buildings  and the  products and
equipment that go into these buildings. For
example, in 2011, EPA and  DOE will  be
expanding the program for ENERGY STAR
products  to  include verification testing run
by  certification  bodies  (CBs) as  well  as
DOE's parallel, targeted verification testing.

EPA works  primarily with the Department
of State,  USAID, and DOE as well as with
regional   organizations  in   implementing
climate-related  programs  and projects.  In
addition,   EPA   partners   with   others
worldwide,     including      international
organizations such as  the United  Nations
Environment  Programme,   the   United
Nations  Development  Programme,   the
United Nations Economic Commission for
Europe, the International  Energy Agency,
the OECD,  the World Bank, the Asian
Development Bank,  and our  colleagues  in
Canada, Mexico, Europe, and Japan.

An example of EPA's coordination with
other  federal   agencies,   as  well   as
international partners, is the Global Methane
Initiative (formerly known as the Methane to
Markets   Partnership).   GMI    is    an
international  public-private  initiative  that
advances cost-effective,  near-term methane
recovery  and use as a clean energy source in
four  sectors:    agriculture,   coal   mines,
landfills,  and  oil and gas  systems. These
projects reduce greenhouse gas emissions in
the near term  and  provide  a number  of
important environmental and  economic co-
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benefits. There are 40 partner countries and
over 1,000 members of the Project Network,
including   private   sector,   NGO,   and
multilateral organizations such as the World
Bank, the  Asian Development Bank, and the
Inter-American Development Bank. EPA is
the  lead   agency  from   the  USG  and
coordinates with Department of State, DOE,
USDA,  USAID, and  the  US Trade  and
Development Agency.

The  Agency  coordinates its global change
research with other federal agencies through
the U.S. Global  Change Research Program
(USGCRP).23 EPA's global change research
efforts focus  on understanding the impacts
of climate change  to  air  quality,  water
quality, and aquatic ecosystems, and include
efforts to  improve models  that address air
and water pollution formation and transport
in the context of a changing climate. These
modeling  efforts require close coordination
with other agencies to use the results  of
global-scale  models  as  input  to   more
detailed   regional   models  that   describe
pollutant formation and transport at levels
needed  by   local  and   state   resource
managers.  This  work includes research  to
better understand the emissions,  transport,
and impacts to health and climate of black
carbon.  Additional  coordination  of global
change research occurs through the National
Science    and   Technology    Council's
(NSTC's)  CENRS Subcommittee  on Water
Availability and Quality.

Objective: Improve Air Quality

The  EPA  cooperates  with other federal,
state, Tribal,  and local agencies to achieve
goals related  to ground level ozone  and
particulate matter  (PM) and  to ensure the
actions of other agencies do  not interfere
with   state   plans   for   attaining   and
  For more information, see .
maintaining  the   National  Ambient  Air
Quality Standards. EPA continues to work
closely with the Department of Agriculture
(USDA), the Department of Interior  (DOI),
and the Department of Defense (DOD)  in
developing   a   policy   that   addresses
prescribed   burning  at   silviculture  and
agricultural     operations.     EPA,    the
Department of Transportation (DOT), and
the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) work
with state  and local  agencies to  integrate
transportation and air quality plans,  reduce
traffic  congestion,  and  promote   livable
communities. EPA continues to  work with
the  Department   of  the  Interior   (DOI),
National  Park Service (NFS),  and U.S.
Forest  Service in implementing its regional
haze program and  operating the Interagency
Monitoring     of    Protected      Visual
Environments    (IMPROVE)    visibility
monitoring  network. The  operation  and
analysis  of  data  produced  by  this  air
monitoring  system is an example  of the
close coordination of efforts  between the
EPA and state and  Tribal governments.

For  pollution  assessments  and  transport,
EPA   is   working   with  the   National
Aeronautics  and   Space   Administration
(NASA)   on  technology  transfer  using
satellite imagery.  EPA will work to  further
distribute   NASA  satellite  products  and
National    Oceanic   and    Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) air quality forecast
products  to Regions,  states,  local agencies,
and Tribes  to provide a better understanding
of air quality on  a day-to-day basis  and  to
assist  with  air quality  forecasting. EPA
works  with  NASA  to  develop  a  better
understanding  of  PM  formation  using
satellite  data.  EPA  works  with  the
Department  of  the  Army  on  advancing
emission measurement technology and with
NOAA for meteorological  support for our
modeling   and  monitoring   efforts.  EPA
collects    real-time    ozone    and    PM
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measurements from State and local agencies,
which are used by both NOAA and EPA to
improve  and  verify Air Quality  Forecast
models.

EPA's AIRNow program (the national real-
time AQI reporting and forecasting system)
works  with the National Weather Service
(NWS)  to coordinate NOAA air quality
forecast  guidance  with  state  and  local
agencies  for  air quality  forecasting efforts
and to render the NOAA model output in the
EPA Air Quality Index (AQI), which helps
people determine appropriate  air  quality-
protective behaviors. The AIRNow program
also collaborates with the U.S. National Park
Service and  the  U.S.  Forestry  Service  in
receiving     air     quality    monitoring
observations,  in  addition  to  observations
from over 130 state, local, and Tribal air
agencies.  AIRNow  also collaborates with
NASA in a project to incorporate  satellite
data with air quality observations.

To better understand the magnitude,  sources,
and causes of mobile source pollution, EPA
works  with   the  Department  of  Energy
(DOE) and DOT to fund research  projects.
A program to characterize exhaust emissions
from  light-duty  gasoline  vehicles  is  co-
funded by DOE  and DOT.  Other DOT
mobile source projects include TRANSEVIS
(TRansportation ANalysis  and SEVIulation
System) and  other  transportation modeling
projects;   DOE  is  funding these   projects
through the  National Renewable  Energy
Laboratory.  EPA also works  closely with
DOE on refinery cost modeling analyses and
the  development of clean fuel programs. For
mobile  sources  program  outreach,   the
Agency is participating  in  a  collaborative
effort  with   DOT's   Federal   Highway
Administration (FHWA) and the  Federal
Transit Administration (FTA) to educate the
public  about the impacts of transportation
choices on traffic  congestion,  air  quality,
and  human health. This community-based
public education initiative also includes the
Centers  for  Disease  Control  (CDC).  In
addition, EPA is working with  DOE  to
identify  opportunities  in the Clean Cities
program. EPA also works with other federal
agencies,  such as  the U.S. Coast Guard
(USCG), on air emission issues,  and other
programs targeted to reduce air toxics from
mobile sources are coordinated with DOT.
These partnerships  can   involve  policy
assessments and  toxic emission  reduction
strategies in different regions of the country.
EPA  continues to work with DOE, DOT,
and   other  agencies   as  needed  on  the
requirements of the Energy Policy Act  of
2005  and  the Energy Independence and
Security Act of 2007.

To  develop air pollutant  emission factors
and   emission  estimation   algorithms  for
aircraft,  ground  equipment, and  military
vehicles, EPA partners with the Department
of Defense. This partnership will provide for
the     joint     undertaking    of    air-
monitoring/emission  factor  research  and
regulatory implementation.

To  reduce air toxics  emissions  that  may
inadvertently  increase worker   exposure,
EPA is continuing to work closely with the
Department of Labor's Occupational Safety
and   Health   Administration  (OSHA)  to
coordinate  the development of  EPA and
OSHA standards. EPA also works closely
with other health agencies such as the CDC,
the   National  Institute of Environmental
Health Sciences (NIEHS), and the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
on health risk characterization for  both toxic
and criteria air pollutants.
EPA is also contributing air quality data to
the   CDC's Environmental Public Health
Tracking Program,  which  is made publicly
available and used by state and local public
health agencies.   To  assess  atmospheric
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deposition   and   characterize   ecological
effects,  EPA works with NOAA, the U.S.
Fish and  Wildlife  Service  (USFWS),  the
National Park Service  (NFS),  the  U.S.
Geological Survey (USGS), the USDA, and
the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

EPA  has  worked extensively  with  the
Department of Health and Human Services
(HHS)  on  the  National  Health   and
Nutritional  Evaluation  Study  to identify
mercury accumulations in humans. EPA also
has worked  with DOE  on the  Fate of
Mercury  study  to  characterize  mercury
transport and traceability in  Lake Superior.
EPA  is a  partner with  the  Centers  for
Disease  Control   and Prevention  in  the
development of the National Environmental
Public Health  Tracking Network, providing
air quality indicators as well  as  air pollution
health effects expertise.

To   improve   our   understanding   of
environmental   issues   related   to    the
agricultural sector, EPA is working closely
with  the   USDA  and  others  to  reduce
emissions  and improve  air  quality while
supporting  a sustainable agricultural sector.
Our  approach to  the  agriculture  sector
includes scientific assessment, outreach and
education,  and implementation/compliance.
The scientific assessment will ensure that we
are all guided by sound science.  Because we
do not  have adequate emissions estimates
for this sector, we  need  to  develop an
understanding  of  emissions profiles  and
establish   monitoring  and   measurement
protocols,  technology   transfer,   and  a
research agenda.  Through   outreach  and
education,  we  will  instill  a  long-term
commitment    to   working   with    the
agricultural  community;  build  respect and
trust;  and  identify, promote, and quantify
new/existing control technologies. We also
will encourage partnerships  between  EPA,
USDA,  and their  established partners and
utilize existing USDA  infrastructure  (e.g.,
Extension  Service,   NRCS,   land   grant
colleges  and  universities,  and  Farm  Bill
programs). Additionally, we will engage in
active dialogue with agriculture community.
Our implementation/compliance  approach
will fully institute policies  and practices to
ensure that farming  and land management
communities continue to consider air quality
as  an  integral  part  of   their  resource
management.  An   appropriate  mix   of
voluntary and regulatory programs will be
implemented   and we will utilize USDA
infrastructure  to  implement  air  quality
programs and compliance assistance  where
practical.

In developing regional and international air
quality  programs and  projects,  and  in
working on regional agreements, EPA works
with NOAA, NASA,  DOE,  USDA, USAID,
and OMB,   as  well  as   with  regional
organizations.   EPA's   international   air
quality management  program  complements
EPA's programs on children's health, Trade
and the Environment,  climate change, and
trans-boundary air pollution.  In addition,
EPA  partners with  other   organizations
worldwide, including  the  United Nations
Environment   Programme,   the  European
Union,  the  Organization   for  Economic
Development  and Cooperation, the United
Nations Economic Commission for Europe,
the  North   American  Commission   for
Environmental  Cooperation,   the  World
Bank,  the Asian Development Bank,  the
Clean  Air Initiative  for Asian Cities,  the
Global Air Pollution Forum, and our air
quality  colleagues  in  several   countries,
including Canada, Mexico, Europe, China,
and Japan.

EPA works closely,  through  a variety  of
mechanisms, with a broad range of federal,
state, Tribal, and local government agencies,
industry,  non-profit  organizations,   and
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individuals,  as well as  other  nations,  to
promote  more  effective  approaches  to
identifying  and solving indoor air  quality
(IAQ) problems. At the federal level,  EPA
works closely with several departments  or
agencies on healthy homes, healthy schools,
healthy buildings,  and  international  issues.
Examples include:

Healthy Homes
    •  Department of  Health  and Human
       Services (HHS)  to reduce the burden
       of  asthma  —  by   coordinating
       research,    building    community
       capacity, raising public awareness,
       and  promoting the  adoption  of
       reimbursement   for  asthma  care
       services, with a  special  emphasis  on
       controlling   indoor  environmental
       exposures — and to track progress  on
       this objective;
    •  Department of  Housing and Urban
       Development (HUD)  to  improve
       IAQ in homes;
    •  Consumer      Product     Safety
       Commission (CPSC) to identify and
       mitigate  the   health   hazards  of
       consumer   products  designed  for
       indoor use;
    •  Department of   Energy (DOE)  to
       address IAQ in home weatherization
       programs; and
    •  Department of Agriculture (USDA)
       to   encourage   USDA  extension
       agents to  conduct local  projects
       designed to  improve   indoor  air
       quality.
    •  EPA plays  a leadership role on the
       President's    Task    Force    on
       Environmental  Health   Risks  and
       Safety   Risks    to    Children,
       particularly with respect to  asthma
       and  school  environmental  health
       issues.
    •  EPA is a member of the  National
       Asthma Education  and Prevention
       Program  Coordinating  Committee
       and the Federal  Liaison  Group on
       Asthma—the          overarching
       coordination groups  that focus on
       national asthma control efforts.

Healthy Schools
    •   Department of Education (DoEd) on
       a  wide  range  of  school   related
       indoor    environmental     quality
       initiatives, including development of
       voluntary    guidelines    mandated
       under the Energy Independence  and
       Security Act of  2007 for siting of
       school facilities  and state  school
       environmental  health programs,  as
       well as the establishment of a DoEd-
       led Green Ribbon Schools initiative;
       and
    •   Department  of Health  and  Human
       Services,    Centers   for   Disease
       Control and Prevention to promote
       healthy,  asthma-friendly   schools,
       and track progress on this objective.

Other Healthy Buildings
    •   As  a co-chair   of  the  Federal
       Interagency  Committee  on  Indoor
       Air    Quality    (CIAQ),    EPA
       coordinates   the   exchange    of
       information on lAQ-related research
       and activities. The co-chair agencies
       include the  CPSC,  DOE,  NIOSH
       and OSHA,  and  another 20 Federal
       departments  and agencies participate
       as members.

International
    •   U.S. Government-wide Cookstoves
       Interagency Working Group, whose
       members  include the Department of
       State,   Environmental   Protection
       Agency,  Agency for International
       Development,    Department    of
       Energy, and Department  of Health
       and Human  Services,  to improve
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       health, livelihood, and quality of life
       in developing countries by reducing
       exposure  to  indoor air  pollution
       from household energy use through
       public-private partnership initiatives
       such as the Partnership  for Clean
       Indoor Air and the Global Alliance
       for Clean Cookstoves.

EPA coordinates its air quality research with
other   federal   agencies   through   the
Subcommittee on Air Quality Research24 of
the NSTC Committee on Environment and
Natural   Resources   and   Sustainability
(CENRS). The Agency  and  NIEHS  co-
chaired   the   subcommittee's   Paniculate
Matter  Research   Coordination  Working
                                    9S
Group, which produced a strategic plan  for
federal   research   on   the   health   and
environmental      effects,      exposures,
atmospheric        processes,       source
characterization and control  of fine airborne
particulate matter. EPA coordinates specific
research   projects    with  other   federal
agencies,  where appropriate, and supports
air-related  research  at  universities   and
nonprofit  organizations through its Science
to Achieve Results  (STAR) research grants
program.

EPA works with other federal agencies to
coordinate U.S. participation in the Arctic
Mercury Project, a partnership established in
2001  by  the eight  member states  of the
Arctic Council—Canada, Denmark, Finland,
Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the
U.S.

EPA will  partner with the Army, as part of
the Army's  Net Zero Initiative, to develop
and    demonstrate    innovative    energy
technologies to accomplish the Army's goal
of net zero energy, water and waste by 2020.

Objective: Restore the Ozone Layer

EPA   works   very   closely  with   the
Department of  State  and  other  federal
agencies in international negotiations among
Parties   to  the   Montreal   Protocol   on
Substances that Deplete the  Ozone  Layer
and   in  developing  the  implementing
regulations. While the environmental goal of
the Montreal Protocol is to protect the ozone
layer,  the ozone depleting  substances  it
controls   also   are significant  greenhouse
gases. Therefore,  this work also protects the
Earth's climate system. According to a 2007
study published in the  Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences,26  chemical
controls  implemented under  the  Montreal
Protocol will - by 2010 - have delayed the
onset of serious climate effects by a decade.
EPA   works   on   several   multinational
environmental agreements to simultaneously
protect the ozone layer  and climate system,
including  working   closely   with   the
Department of  State  and  other  Federal
agencies,  including  OMB,  OSTP,  CEQ,
USDA,   FDA,  Commerce,   NOAA,   and
NASA.

EPA works with other agencies, including
the  Office  of  the  United  States  Trade
Representative    and   Department    of
Commerce,  to  analyze  potential  trade
implications   in   stratospheric  protection
regulations that affect imports and exports.
EPA leads a task force with the Department
of Justice (DOJ), Department of Homeland
Security (DHS),  Department of Treasury,
24 For more information, see
.
25 For more information, see

26 Guus J. M. Velders, Stephen O. Andersen, John S.
Daniel, David W. Fahey, and Mack McFarland;
The Importance of the Montreal Protocol in
Protecting Climate; PNAS 2007 104:4814-4819;
published online before print March 8, 2007;
doi: 10.1073/pnas.0610328104.
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and  other  agencies  to  curb  the  illegal
importation of ozone-depleting substances
(CDS).  Illegal  import  of CDS  has  the
potential to prevent the United  States from
meeting the goals of the Montreal Protocol
to restore the ozone layer.

EPA has continued discussions with DOD to
assist in the effective transition from ODS
and  high-GWP  substitutes to  a  suite of
substitutes  with  lower  global  warming
potential (GWPs).
EPA works with USDA and the Department
of State to facilitate research, development,
and  adoption  of  alternatives  to  methyl
bromide.   EPA  collaborates  with  these
agencies to prepare U.S. requests for critical
use exemptions of methyl bromide. EPA is
providing input to USDA on rulemakings
for methyl bromide-related  programs. EPA
also consults  with  USDA  on  domestic
methyl bromide needs.

EPA coordinates closely with Department of
State  and  FDA  to ensure  that  sufficient
supplies of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)  are
available for the production  of life-saving
metered-dose inhalers for the treatment of
asthma  and  other  lung   diseases.  This
partnership   between  EPA   and  FDA
combines  the  critical goals  of protecting
public  health  and  limiting  damage to  the
stratospheric ozone layer.

EPA's SunWise  program  works  with  the
National   Weather   Service  (NWS)   to
coordinate  the  UV Index, a forecast  of  the
next day's ultraviolet radiation levels, which
helps  people   determine  appropriate sun-
protective behaviors. The SunWise program
also collaborates  with  the  CDC  when
developing new sun safety and skin cancer
prevention  resources, including  a  shade
planning guide,  state-specific skin cancer
fact   sheets,   and   other  school-   and
community-based    resources.    SunWise
collaborates    with    state    and    local
governments   through    the    SunWise
Communities   program.   SunWise  is  a
successful    environmental   and    health
education program that teaches children and
their caregivers how to  protect themselves
from overexposure to the sun through the
use of classroom, school, and community-
based  components.  More  than   22,000
schools  have  received  SunWise teaching
materials—reaching  more than one  million
students  over the life of the program.  The
most recent study of the program, conducted
in 2006-2007, found that for  every dollar
invested  in SunWise, between approximately
$2  and  $4  in  medical  care  costs  and
productivity losses are saved, and concluded
that   from   a  cost/benefit   and   cost-
effectiveness perspective, it is worthwhile to
educate children about sun safety.
27
EPA coordinates with NASA and NOAA to
monitor the state of the stratospheric ozone
layer  and to collect and analyze UV data,
including science assessments that help the
public understand what the world may have
looked like without the Montreal Protocol
                     r\Q  _^
and  its  amendments.    EPA  works with
NASA on assessing essential uses and other
exemptions for critical shuttle  and  rocket
needs, as well as effects of direct emissions
27 Jessica W. Kyle, James K. Hammitt, Henry W.
Lim, Alan C. Geller, Luke H. Hall-Jordan, Edward
W. Maibach, Edward C. De Fabo, Mark C. Wagner;
"Economic Evaluation of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's SunWise Program: Sun
Protection Education for Young Children."
Pediatrics, Vol. 121 No. 5 May 2008, pp. e!074-
e!084
28 The Ozone Layer: Ozone Depletion, Recovery in a
Changing Climate, and the "WorldAvoided;"
Findings and Summary of the U.S. Climate Change
Science Program Synthesis and Assessment Product
2.4; November 2008.
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of  high-speed   aircraft   flying   in   the
stratosphere.

EPA works with DOE on GreenChill29  and
Responsible  Appliance Disposal  (RAD)30
efforts.    The    GreenChill    Advanced
Refrigeration  Partnership  is  an  EPA
cooperative  alliance with the  supermarket
industry and  other stakeholders to promote
advanced   technologies,   strategies,   and
practices that reduce refrigerant charges  and
emissions  of ozone-depleting substances  and
greenhouse gases. EPA's RAD Program  is a
partnership program  that protects the ozone
layer  and  reduces  emissions of greenhouse
gases  through  the   recovery  of  ozone-
depleting  chemicals  from  old refrigerators,
freezers, air conditioners, and dehumidifiers.

EPA  coordinates with the Small  Business
Administration  (SBA)   to   ensure  that
proposed rules are developed in accordance
with   the  Small   Business  Regulatory
Flexibility Act.

Objective: Reduce Unnecessary Exposure
to Radiation

EPA  works   primarily with  the   Nuclear
Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department
of  Energy  (DOE),  and  Department   of
Homeland Security  (DHS)   on  multiple
radiation protection issues. EPA has ongoing
planning  and guidance  discussions with
DHS  on  Protective  Action Guidance  and
general  emergency   response  activities,
including  exercises  responding to nuclear
related incidents. As  the regulator of DOE's
Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility,
EPA has to continually coordinate oversight
activities  with DOE to keep  the facility
operating in compliance with its regulations.
29 For more information, see:
www. epa. gov/greenchill
30 For more information, see:
www. epa. gov/ozone/partnerships/rad
EPA also works with tribes to address public
health  and   environmental   issues   with
uranium mining.  EPA is  a member of the
interagency Radiation Source  Protection and
Security  Task Force,  established in  the
Energy Policy Act to improve the security of
domestic radioactive sources.  EPA also is a
working member  of the interagency Nuclear
Government Coordinating Council (NGCC),
which coordinates across government  and
the private  sector  on  issues  related  to
security,  communications, and  emergency
management within the nuclear sector.

For emergency preparedness purposes,  EPA
coordinates  closely  with   other  federal
agencies  through the Federal Radiological
Preparedness Coordinating Committee  and
other  coordinating bodies. EPA participates
in planning and implementing table-top and
field  exercises including  radiological  anti-
terrorism  activities,  with  the NRC, DOE,
Department of Defense (DOD), Department
of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and
DHS.

EPA  works   closely  with  other  federal
agencies  when developing radiation policy
guidance   under   its  Federal   Guidance
authority.  This authority was transferred to
EPA from  the Federal Radiation Council in
1970   and tasks   the Administrator   with
making        radiation        protection
recommendations  to  the  President.  When
signed by  the President, Federal Guidance
recommendations  are  addressed  to   all
federal agencies  and are published in the
Federal Register.  Risk managers at all levels
of government use this information to assess
health risks from  radiation exposure and to
determine appropriate levels for clean-up of
radioactively   contaminated  sites.  EPA's
radiation science  is widely relied on and is
the objective  foundation for EPA,  other
federal  agencies, and  states  to  develop
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radiation risk management policy, standards,
and guidance.

EPA is a charter member and co-chairs the
Interagency    Steering   Committee    on
Radiation Standards  (ISCORS).  ISCORS
was  created at the direction of Congress.
Through   quarterly   meetings  and   the
activities of its six subcommittees,  member
agencies  are kept informed of cross-cutting
issues   related  to  radiation  protection,
radioactive   waste    management,    and
emergency  preparedness  and  response.
ISCORS   also   helps   coordinate   U.S.
responses   to   radiation-related   issues
internationally.

Promoting  international  assistance,  EPA
serves   as   an  expert  member  of  the
International   Atomic  Energy  Agency's
(IAEA)    Environmental    Modeling   for
Radiation   Safety,    Naturally-Occurring
Radioactive   Materials   Working   Group.
Additionally,  EPA   remains  an  active
contributor   to  the   Organization   for
Economic Cooperation and Development's
(OECD)  Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA).
EPA serves  on both the  NEA Radioactive
Waste  Management  Committee (RWMC)
and the Committee on Radiation Protection
and Public Health (CRPPH).  Through the
RWMC,   EPA  is   able   to  exchange
information   with  other  NEA   member
countries on the management  and  disposal
of high-level and transuranic waste. Through
participation on the CRPPH and its working
groups, EPA has been successful in bringing
a U.S. perspective to international radiation
protection policy.

Goal 2- Protecting America's Waters

Objective: Protect Human Health
Collaboration  with  Public  and Private
Partners on  Critical Water Infrastructure
Protection

The  EPA  coordinates with  other  federal
agencies,    primarily    Department    of
Homeland  Security,  Centers  for Disease
Control, Food and Drug Administration, and
Department  of Defense,  on   biological,
chemical, and radiological contaminants of
high concern, and how to detect and respond
to their  presence  in drinking  water  and
wastewater systems.  A close linkage with
the  FBI  and  the  Intelligence Analysis
Directorate  in  Department  of  Homeland
Security,   particularly   with  respect  to
ensuring the timely dissemination of threat
information through existing communication
networks, will be continued.  The Agency is
strengthening its working relationships with
the Water Research Foundation,  the Water
Environment  Research  Foundation,   and
other research  institutions to increase our
knowledge   on  technologies   to   detect
contaminants,   monitoring  protocols   and
techniques, and treatment effectiveness.

EPA  will  continue to work with the US
Army   Corps  of   Engineers   to   refine
coordination   processes   among   federal
partners engaged in providing  emergency
response support to the water sector.  These
efforts  will   include  refining  existing
standard operating procedures, participating
in cross-agency training opportunities, and
planning  multi- stakeholder   water   sector
emergency  response exercises. EPA will be
determining  how  US  Army   Corps  of
Engineers and the  EPA are to clarify their
roles  and  responsibilities under the new
National Disaster Recovery Framework.

Geologic Sequestration

The EPA coordinates with federal agencies
to plan and obtain research-related data, to
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coordinate  regulatory  programs,   and  to
coordinate implementation of regulations to
protect  underground  sources of  drinking
water   during    geologic    sequestration
activities.   The   EPA   works  with   the
Department  of Energy to plan research on
monitoring,  modeling,  verification,  public
participation,  and other topics related  to
Department  of Energy -sponsored geologic
sequestration  partnership  programs.  The
EPA also coordinates with U.S. Geological
Survey,   Internal   Revenue    Service,
Department  of Interior,  and Department of
Transportation to ensure that Safe  Drinking
Water   Act  regulations   for   geologic
sequestration   sites    are    appropriately
coordinated with  efforts  to deploy projects,
map   geologic    sequestration    capacity,
provide tax incentives for CC>2 sequestration,
and manage  the  movement of CC>2 from
capture facilities  to  geologic  sequestration
sites.

Collaboration with U.S. Geological Survey

The EPA and U.S. Geological Survey have
established  an Interagency Agreement  to
coordinate    activities   and   information
exchange  in  the  areas  of  unregulated
contaminants occurrence, the environmental
relationships      affecting     contaminant
occurrence,   protection  area   delineation
methodology,  and analytical methods.  This
collaborative effort has improved the quality
of information to support risk management
decision-making at all levels of government,
generated valuable new data, and eliminated
potential redundancies.

Sustainable Rural Drinking and Wastewater
Systems

In 2011, the  EPA and U.S. Department of
Agriculture-RD-RUS     signed    a    new
memorandum of  agreement  -  Promoting
Sustainable  Rural Water and Wastewater
Systems.  The EPA and U.S. Department of
Agriculture have agreed to work together to
increase the sustainability of rural drinking
water and wastewater systems to ensure the
protection of public health,  water quality,
and  sustainable communities. The MOA
addresses the  following  four  areas:  1)
Sustainability   of  Rural   Communities  -
promote  asset management planning, water
and  energy  efficiency practices,  and  other
sustainable utility management practices; 2)
System Partnerships - educate communities
and  utilities  on the  types of partnership
opportunities that can  lead  to  increased
compliance   and   reduced    costs,    and
encourage  struggling  systems to  explore
these options; 3) Water Sector Workforce -
work together  to  promote  careers in the
water sector to attract a new  generation of
water professionals to rural systems; and 4)
Compliance of Small  Rural  Public Water
and  Wastewater   Systems with  Drinking
Water and  Clean  Water  Regulations  -
partner  and  provide  timely   regulation
training to water and wastewater systems in
rural  areas.  In addition, the  two agencies
will    work   to   address   funding   for
infrastructure  projects  that  aid  in   the
compliance of national  drinking water and
clean water regulations.

Tribal Access Coordination

In 2003,  the EPA and its federal partners in
the Department of Agriculture, Department
of  Housing  and   Urban   Development,
Department of Health and Human Services,
and  Department  of  Interior  set  a   very
ambitious goal to  reduce the number of
homes without access to safe drinking water.
This  goal  remains ambitious due to the
logistical challenges, capital and  operation,
and maintenance costs involved in providing
access. The EPA is working with its federal
partners to coordinate spending and address
some of  the challenges  to access on Tribal
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lands,  and  expects  to  make measureable
progress on the access issue.

Source Water Protection

The   EPA   is   coordinating  with   U.S.
Department   of   Agriculture   and   U.S.
Geological  Survey   as   part  of  a  3-
organization  collaborative  to  support  state
and local implementation  of  source water
protection actions. In  addition,  the  EPA
works  with  U.S. Geological Survey  on
coordinating mapping of source water areas
on  a  national  scale with   the  National
Hydrography Database,  as  well as working
with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and
the Department of Education.
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Data Availability,  Outreach and Technical
Assistance

The EPA coordinates with U.S. Geological
Survey,  U.S.  Department  of Agriculture
(Forest   Service,    Natural    Resources
Conservation  Service,  Cooperative  State
Research, Education, and Extension Service,
Rural Utilities Service, Centers for Disease
Control,  Department   of  Transportation,
Department of  Defense,  Department  of
Energy, Department of the Interior (National
Park Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs,
Land  Management,   and   Reclamation),
Department of Health and Human Services
(Indian Health Service) and the Tennessee
Valley Authority.

Research

While EPA is the  federal  agency mandated
to ensure safe drinking water, other federal
and non-federal  entities  are  conducting
research  that complements EPA's research
priority contaminants in drinking water. For
example, the  CDC and  NIEHS conduct
health effects  and exposure research. FDA
also performs research on children's risks.

Many  of these research activities are being
conducted   in   collaboration   with  EPA
scientists. The private sector, particularly the
water  treatment industry,  is  conducting
research in  such  areas as analytical methods,
treatment technologies, and the development
and  maintenance   of  water   resources.
Cooperative  research  efforts  have  been
ongoing  with  the  American Water  Works
Association,  Water Research Foundation
and  other  stakeholders   to  coordinate
drinking  water   research.  EPA  also  is
working    with    USGS    to   evaluate
performance of  newly developed methods
for measuring microbes in potential drinking
water sources.
EPA has developed joint research initiatives
with  NOAA  and   USGS   for  linking
monitoring data and field study information
with available toxicity data and assessment
models for developing sediment criteria.

In addition, EPA  is  coordinating research
with DOE and  USGS to  understand and
address  the  potential human  health and
environmental   impacts   of   hydraulic
fracturing.

Objective: Protect and Restore Watersheds
and Aquatic Ecosystems

Watersheds

Protecting  and  restoring  watersheds  will
depend largely on the direct involvement of
many federal agencies and state, Tribal, and
local   governments    who   manage   the
multitude of programs necessary to address
water quality on a watershed  basis. Federal
agency   involvement  will   include  U.S.
Department    of   Agriculture   (Natural
Resources  Conservation  Service,  Forest
Service  Agency, and Agriculture Research
Service), Department of the Interior (Bureau
of Land Management, Office of  Surface
Mining, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of
Indian  Affairs),   National   Oceanic  and
Atmospheric Administration, Department of
Transportation, and Department of Defense
(Navy and US Army Corps of Engineers).
At  the  state level,  agencies  involved in
watershed  management  typically  include
departments  of  natural  resources  or  the
environment, public  health agencies, and
forestry and  recreation agencies. Locally,
numerous agencies are involved, including
regional planning entities such as councils of
governments, as well as local departments of
environment, health,  and  recreation who
frequently have strong interests in watershed
projects.
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National Pollutant Discharge  Elimination
System Program

Since  inception  of  the  NPDES  program
under Section 402 of the Clean Water Act,
the EPA  and  the  authorized  states have
developed   expanded  relationships  with
various  federal  agencies  to   implement
pollution  controls for point sources.  The
EPA works closely with  the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife  Service  and the National  Marine
Fisheries   Service   on  consultation   for
protection of endangered species through a
Memorandum  of Agreement.   The  EPA
works  with  the Advisory  Council  on
Historic Preservation on National Historic
Preservation Act  implementation. The EPA
and the states rely on monitoring data from
U.S. Geological  Survey  to help  confirm
pollution control decisions. The Agency also
works  closely with  the Small  Business
Administration   and   the    Office   of
Management  and Budget to  ensure  that
regulatory programs are fair  and reasonable.
The  Agency  coordinates  with NOAA on
efforts  to  ensure that NPDES  programs
support coastal and national estuary  efforts
and with the Department of the Interior on
mining issues.

Joint   Strategy   for  Animal   Feeding
Operations

The  Agency is working  closely with  the
U.S.   Department   of   Agriculture  to
implement the Unified National Strategy for
Animal Feeding Operations (AFO Strategy)
finalized  on March 9, 1999. The  Strategy
sets forth  a framework of actions that U.S.
Department of Agriculture and the EPA will
take to minimize water quality and  public
health  impacts from  improperly managed
animal wastes in a  manner  designed to
preserve   and   enhance   the  long-term
sustainability  of  livestock production. The
EPA's recent revisions to the Concentrated
Animal   Feeding  Operations  Regulations
(effluent  guidelines  and NPDES  permit
regulations) will be a key element of the
EPA and U.S. Department of Agriculture's
plan  to  address   water  pollution  from
CAFOs.  The EPA and U.S. Department of
Agriculture   senior   management   meet
routinely  to  ensure effective  coordination
across the two agencies.

Clean Water State Revolving Fund

The EPA's State Revolving Fund program,
Department  of   Housing  and  Urban
Development's  Community  Development
Block   Grant  program,   and   the  U.S.
Department   of    Agriculture's   Rural
Development foster collaboration on jointly
funded infrastructure  projects through: (1)
coordination  of the funding cycles of the
three federal  agencies; (2) consolidation of
plans  of action (operating plans, intended
use plans, strategic plans,  etc.);  and (3)
preparation  of  one environmental  review
document,  when  possible,  to  satisfy the
requirements  of  all  participating  federal
agencies.  A coordination  group  at  the
federal  level has been formed  to  further
these   efforts  and   maintain   lines  of
communication.     In    many    states,
coordination   committees   have    been
established with  representatives  from the
three programs.

In implementation  of the Indian set-aside
grant program under Title VI of the Clean
Water Act, the EPA works closely with the
Indian  Health Service to administer  grant
funds to  the various Indian tribes, including
determination of the priority ranking system
for the various wastewater needs in Indian
Country. The EPA  and U.S. Department of
Agriculture Rural Development  partner to
provide coordinated financial and technical
assistance to tribes.
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Federal Agency Partnerships on Impaired
Waters Restoration Planning

The federal  government  owns  about  30
percent of the land in the United States and
administers over 90 percent of these public
lands through four agencies: Forest  Service,
Fish and  Wildlife Service, National  Park
Service, and  Bureau of Land Management.
In managing these extensive  public lands,
federal agencies have a substantial influence
on  the protection  and restoration of many
waters  of   the  United  States.     Land
management  agencies' focus on water issues
has increased significantly, with the Forest
Service,  Fish  and Wildlife  Service,  and
Bureau of Land Management  all initiating
new water quality and watershed protection
efforts. The EPA has been conducting joint
national assessments with these agencies to
enhance watershed protection and quantify
restoration needs  on  federal lands.  EPA's
joint  national  assessments  of Fish   and
Wildlife   Service  and   Forest   Service
properties  have  already documented  the
extent and type of impaired waters within
and  near  these agencies' lands, developed
GIS databases, reported national summary
statistics,    and    developed   interactive
reference  products  (on  any scale, local to
national),  accessible to  staff throughout the
agencies.  Similar  joint  assessments  are
planned with the  other major  federal  land
management  agencies.  These  assessments
have  already influenced the  agencies  in
positive ways.  The Forest Service  and the
Fish and Wildlife Service have  performance
measures  that involve impaired waters. The
Forest   Service    used   their   national
assessment data to institute improvements in
a national monitoring and Best Management
Practices  training  program  as  well  as
develop a watershed  condition framework
for proactively implementing restoration on
priority  National   Forest  and Grassland
watersheds. Also, under a Memorandum of
Agreement  between  the  EPA and Forest
Service,   numerous   aquatic   restoration
projects  have  been jointly  funded   and
carried out. The Fish and Wildlife Service is
using  their  national  assessment  data  to
inform   agency   planning   on   water
conservation,    quality,     and     quantity
monitoring and management in the National
Wildlife  Refuge System, and  also  is using
the assessment in National  Fish Hatcheries
System  planning.   Further   and   their
Contaminants    Program,    the     EPA
assessments  and   datasets  are  making
significant  contributions to the government-
wide   National   Fish   Habitat   Action
Partnership 2010 national assessment offish
habitat condition and the  restoration  and
protection efforts of 17 regional Fish Habitat
Partnerships.  Also,  EPA  has   provided
geospatial   analysis from   the   agencies
atmospheric mercury deposition modeling to
the National Park  Service  for each of the
properties they  manage. This analysis shows
not only  the amount of mercury falling onto
a particular watershed but also allocates the
deposition  among major contributing  U.S.
and global sources.

Monitoring and Assessment  of Nation's
Waters

The EPA  works with federal,   state,   and
Tribal    partners   to  strengthen  water
monitoring programs to support a range of
management needs  and to  develop tools to
improve  how we manage  and share water
data and report environmental results. The
EPA's   Monitoring   and   Assessment
Partnership is a forum for the EPA, states,
tribes  and  interstate  organizations  to
collaborate on  key program directions for
assessing the  condition  of  the  nation's
waters  in   a  nationally   consistent   and
representative manner. The EPA is co-chair,
along with U.S. Geological Survey, of the
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National Water Quality Monitoring Council,
a national forum for scientific discussion of
strategies and technologies to improve water
quality  monitoring  and data sharing.  The
council  membership includes other federal
agencies,  state and  Tribal  agencies, non-
governmental    organizations,    academic
institutions, and the private sector.

Nonpoint Sources Pollution Controls

The EPA will continue to work closely with
its federal partners to achieve our goals for
reducing pollutant discharges from nonpoint
sources,  including  reduction  targets  for
sediments, nitrogen, and phosphorous. Most
significantly, the EPA will continue to work
with the U.S.  Department  of Agriculture,
which has a key role in reducing sediment
loadings    through     its    continued
implementation   of   the   Environmental
Quality  Incentives  Program, Conservation
Reserve Program,  and other  conservation
programs. U.S. Department of Agriculture
also plays a major role in reducing nutrient
discharges. The EPA also will  continue to
work  closely with  the Forest Service  and
Bureau  of Land Management especially on
the vast  public  lands that comprise  30
percent  of all land in the United States.  The
EPA will work with these  agencies, U.S.
Geological  Survey,  and   the  states  to
document    improvements    in    land
management and water quality.

The EPA also will work with other federal
agencies to advance a watershed approach to
federal  land and resource  management to
help  ensure that federal  land management
agencies serve as a  model for water quality
stewardship in  the  prevention  of water
pollution and  the  restoration  of degraded
water   resources.   Implementation  of  a
watershed     approach    will     require
coordination among federal agencies at  a
watershed  scale  and collaboration  with
states,   tribes,    and   other    interested
stakeholders.

Marine Pollution Prevention

The EPA works closely with a number of
federal  agencies including the  U.S. Coast
Guard,  U.S.  Army  Corps  of Engineers,
Department of State, National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, and others to
prevent pollution from both land-based and
ocean-based   sources  from  entering  the
marine environment.

Specifically, the EPA will continue to work
closely with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
on  standards for permit review, as  well as
site  selection/designation  and   monitoring
related  to  dredged  material management.
The EPA will continue to work with the
U.S. Coast Guard in the development of best
management  practices   and    discharge
standards under the Clean Boating Act.  The
EPA also works closely with the U.S. Coast
Guard   on   addressing   ballast   water
discharges.

In addition, the  EPA works closely with a
number of other federal agencies to  prepare
reports to Congress as well as review reports
from other agencies. For example, the EPA
works with a number of federal  agencies on
the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating
Committee, which  prepares periodic reports
to Congress on the  progress of marine debris
prevention efforts  per  the  Marine Debris
Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act of
2006.

The EPA also participates with other federal
agencies (including: U.S. Coast  Guard, U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers, Department of
State,  U.S.  Department  of the Interior,
National    Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
Administration,  and  U.S.   Navy)  on  a
number of international  forums on marine
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protection     programs,     to    develop
international  standards that address vessel-
related transport of aquatic invasive species,
harmful antifoulants, operational discharges
from vessels, dumping of wastes and other
matter at sea, and marine debris. The EPA is
Head of the U.S. Delegation for the London
Convention / London  Protocol  (LC / LP)
Scientific Group, Alternate Head of the U.S.
Delegation for the LC / LP Consultative
Meeting of the Parties, and a member of the
U.S.    Delegation    to    the    Marine
Environmental Protection Committee.

The EPA works closely with the U.S. Coast
Guard   on   addressing   ballast  water
discharges.

National Estuary Program

The National Estuary Program is comprises
28   community-based   organizations  that
protect  and  restore  estuarine and coastal
watershed   a  long-term  Comprehensive
Conservation Management Plan that focuses
on the unique challenges of to their estuarine
watershed.       Each      Comprehensive
Conservation  Management  Plan  includes
priority actions that NEP will take to address
the estuary's problems and identifies the role
each partner  will play  in implementing the
actions.  Effective implementation of  the
Comprehensive Conservation  Management
Plan depends to a great extent on the long-
term   commitment,   collaboration,   and
involvement  of federal  and  state agency
partners. Federal partners that are typically
engaged in implementing the management
plan include the EPA's Water Programs; the
National   Oceanic    and    Atmospheric
Administration's     National     Estuarine
Research Reserves, Sea Grant, and Habitat
Protection  and Restoration  Programs;  the
U.S. Fish  and Wildlife  Service's Coastal
Program;   and the  U.S.  Department  of
Agriculture's      Natural       Resource
Conservation  Service  and Forest Service.
Other NEP partners  include  state natural
resource agencies;  municipal  government
planning  agencies  and   water  utilities;
regional  planning  agencies;   universities;
industry;  non-governmental  organizations,
and community members.

The   EPA  and  National   Oceanic  and
Atmospheric Administration have signed a
Memorandum  of  Agreement  to  facilitate
collaboration between the  two agencies and
to enhance the capacity of coastal managers
in helping communities to adapt to climate
change  and  to  become  more  resilient.
Collaborative efforts include  designing and
presenting  workshops  on how to develop
local climate adaptation strategies; providing
information to coastal managers such as the
National Estuary  Program  Directors  and
local  planners  on  incorporating  climate
change  into local  decision making about
ecosystem  restoration; identifying  climate
change  indicators in order to monitor and
assess trends  in local water  quality  and
living resource conditions; and enhancing
the  capacity  of  local  land  trusts  with
integrating climate adaptation strategies into
their land conservation  planning.

National Ocean Policy

The EPA will support implementation of the
Executive   Order  that  establishes   the
Nation's first comprehensive national policy
for stewardship of the ocean, U.S. coasts and
the  Great   Lakes.  The   Executive  Order
strengthens    ocean    governance    and
coordination, establishes guiding  principles
for ocean management, and adopts a flexible
framework for  effective coastal and marine
spatial planning.
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Wetlands

The  EPA, U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service,
U.S. Army  Corps  of Engineers,  National
Oceanic  and Atmospheric,  Administration,
U.S. Geological  Survey, U.S. Department of
Agriculture    (and    Federal   Highway
Administration)  currently coordinate on  a
range of wetlands activities.  These activities
include: studying and reporting on wetlands
trends  in the   United  States,  diagnosing
causes of coastal wetland loss, updating and
standardizing the digital map of the nation's
wetlands,    statistically    surveying   the
condition  of  the  nation's  wetlands,  and
developing  methods  for  better protecting
wetland function. Coastal wetlands remain a
focus area of current interagency  wetlands
collaboration.  The  agencies meet  monthly
and  are  conducting  a  series  of  coastal
wetlands  reviews  to identify causes  and
prospective tools and  approaches to address
the 84,100acreloss over five years in marine
and  estuarine  wetlands  that U.S. Fish  and
Wildlife  Service  documented in the 2011
"Status and  Trends  of Wetlands  in  the
Conterminous United  States: 2004 to 2009"
report. Additionally, the  EPA and the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers work very closely
together   in  implementing  the  wetlands
regulatory program under Clean Water Act
Section 404. Under the regulatory program,
the agencies coordinate  closely on overall
implementation  of the permitting decisions
made  annually  under Section 404 of the
Clean  Water Act,  through the headquarters
offices as well  as the  ten EPA Regional
Offices  and  38  U.S.  Army Corps  of
Engineers District Offices.  The  agencies
also    coordinate    closely   on   policy
development and litigation.   The EPA and
U.S.   Army  Corps   of   Engineers   are
committed to achieving the goal of no net
loss  of wetlands under the Clean Water Act
Section 404 program.
Great Lakes
                            31
The  Interagency  Task Force,   created  by
EO 13340, is charged with increasing and
improving  collaboration   and  integration
among federal  agencies  involved in Great
Lakes  environmental activities.  The Task
Force provides overall  guidance regarding
the Initiative and coordinates restoration of
the Great Lakes, focusing on outcomes such
as,  e.g.,  cleaner  water   and  sustainable
fisheries.   The   EPA   is   leading   the
Interagency Task Force to implement the
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

Following announcement of the Initiative in
2009, the EPA  led development of a FY
2010 - FY 2014 Great Lakes Restoration
Initiative Action  Plan (Action Plan) which
targets the most significant  environmental
problems  of the Great  Lakes  ecosystem.
Members  of the Interagency  Task  Force
enter into interagency agreements  to  fund
activities  intended  to  achieve  the goals,
objectives,  and targets in the Action Plan.
This   effort   builds    upon    previous
coordination  and  collaboration by the Great
Lakes National Program Office pursuant to
the mandate  in  Section  118 of  the  Clean
Water  Act  to  "coordinate action  of the
Agency with the actions  of  other  federal
agencies  and state  and local  authorities..."
The  Great  Lakes National Program Office
supports   the  Great  Lakes  Restoration
Initiative,  the Great Lakes Water Quality
Agreement, and other efforts to improve the
Great Lakes and, under the direction of the
EPA's  Great  Lakes  National   Program
Manager, is leading the implementation of
31 The Interagency Task Force includes eleven
agency and cabinet organizations: EPA; Department
of State, DOI, USD A, Department of Commerce,
Department of Housing and Urban Development,
Department of Transportation, DHS, Army, Council
on Environmental Quality, and Department of Health
and Human Services.
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Great Lakes restoration activities  by  the
federal   agencies   and   their  partners.
Coordinated  activities  to  implement  the
Initiative include:
   •  jointly establishing funding priorities
      for ecosystem restoration;
   D protecting  the  Great  Lakes  from
      invasive  species,  including  Asian
      carp;
   D coordinating habitat protection and
      restoration   with   states,   tribes,
      USFWS, andNRCS;
   •  coordinating    development    and
      implementation     of     Lakewide
      Management  Plans  for  each  of the
      Great  Lakes   and   for  Remedial
      Action Plans for the  30  remaining
      U.S./binational Areas of Concern;
   •  coordinating programs and funding
      efforts  to  accelerate  progress  in
      deli sting Areas of  Concern  and  to
      reduce phosphorus runoff and effects
      in a targeted group of watersheds;
   •  coordinating   state,   federal,  and
      provincial    partners,    both    to
      implement monitoring programs and
      to utilize  the  results  from  that
      monitoring   activity   to  manage
      environmental programs; and
   •  working  with  Great  Lakes  states,
      U.S.  Geological Survey, and the U.S.
      Army   Corps  of  Engineers  on
      dredging issues.

Chesapeake  Bay

The   Chesapeake  Bay  Program    is  a
partnership  of  several  federal  agencies,
states, local  governments, nongovernmental
organizations,  academic  institutions,  and
other interested  stakeholders. Only through
the coordinated efforts of all of these entities
will  the preservation and restoration of the
Chesapeake  Bay be  achieved. Recognizing
this  need for coordination, office directors
from the federal  agencies that  form  the
Chesapeake Bay Program meet on a regular
basis. This group includes representatives
of:

   •  Environmental Protection Agency
   •  Department of Commerce, National
      Oceanic      and      Atmospheric
      Administration
   •  Department of the Interior, National
      Park Service
   •  Department  of  the Interior,  U.S.
      Geological Survey
   •  Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish
      and Wildlife Service
   •  Department  of  Agriculture,  U.S.
      Forest Service
   •  Department of Agriculture, Natural
      Resources Conservation Service
   •  Department  of  Agriculture,   Farm
      Services Agency
   •  Department of Agriculture, Office of
      Environmental Markets
   •  Department of Defense, U.S. Navy
   •  Department of Defense, U.S. Army
   •  Department of Defense, U.S. Army
      Corps of Engineers
   •  Department of Transportation
   •  Department of Homeland Security,
      U.S. Coast Guard
   •  Other     agencies    as    deemed
      appropriate

The   EPA   also   is   the  lead   agency
representing the federal  government on  the
Chesapeake  Executive  Council,   which
oversees  the  policy  direction  of  the
Chesapeake Bay Program. In addition to the
EPA    Administrator,  the    Chesapeake
Executive Council consists  of the governors
of the Bay states, the mayor of the District
of Columbia, the chair  of the Chesapeake
Bay  Commission,  and  the   Secretary   of
Agriculture.
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President  Obama's May  2009  Executive
Order on  Chesapeake  Bay Protection  and
Restoration has brought the federal agencies
interested in the Bay and its watershed  to a
new level of interagency  coordination  and
cooperation.    The    Executive    Order
established    the    Federal    Leadership
Committee (FLC) for the  Chesapeake Bay,
which is chaired by the EPA and includes
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Department
of  Commerce,  Department  of  Defense,
Department    of   Homeland    Security,
Department of the  Interior, and Department
of   Transportation.  FLC  members  are
Secretary    and    Administrator   level
executives. FLC members are represented in
more regular  meetings  of  the  Federal
Leadership  Committee Designees,   which
includes Assistant  Secretary and  Assistant
Administrator   level   executives.   Daily
development   of   deliverables  under  the
Executive Order is  conducted by the Federal
Office Directors' group. Working together,
the FLC agencies released a coordinated
implementation strategy on May 12, 2010.
These  agencies  also  coordinate  on  the
development of an annual action plan  and
annual   progress  report  required  by  the
Executive Order.

Many  of the efforts  resulting  from  the
Executive  Order  and  described   in  the
implementation strategy will necessitate and
foster  increased   and  improved   federal
coordination. Revitalized efforts to improve
and   account  for    agricultural     best
management   practices    depend   upon
cooperation   between   the  EPA,   U.S.
Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological
Survey,  and others. The EPA is participating
on the interagency Environmental Markets
Team that is assisting in the development of
a   market-based   approach   under  the
Chesapeake  Bay   Total  Maximum  Daily
Load. The EPA, Department of the Interior,
and NOAA will expand the understanding of
the toxic contaminant problem in the Bay
and its watershed and develop contaminant
reduction  outcomes  and  strategies. The
EPA, Department of Transportation, and the
Department   of   Housing   and   Urban
Development   will   provide   technical
assistance to communities that undertake
development of  integrated transportation,
housing, and water infrastructure plans. The
Executive Order strategy  includes many
other examples  of how federal agencies are
coordinating  their  efforts  to  protect  and
restore  the  Chesapeake  Bay   and   its
watershed.

Gulf of Mexico

The  President   signed  Executive  Order
13554,   establishing   the   Gulf  Coast
Ecosystem   Restoration  Task  Force   on
October 5, 2010, giving  the Task Force a
mission to  restore  and  protect  the Gulf
ecosystem for future generations. Chaired by
the Environmental Protection  Agency, the
Task Force includes the five Gulf states and
the following federal agencies:

   •   Council  on Environmental Quality
   •   Department of Agriculture
   •   Department of Commerce
   •   Department of Defense
   •   Department of the  Interior
   •   Department of Justice
   •   Department of Transportation
   •   Domestic Policy Council
   •   Office of Management and Budget
   •   Office of Science and Technology
       Policy
In unprecedented collaboration,  the Task
Force,  charged  with developing a strategy
for   the    long-term   restoration   and
conservation of the diverse ecosystems of
the Gulf Coast that will ensure  its long-term
environmental,    economic,   and   health
benefits,  presented  the  Gulf of  Mexico
Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy to
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
the President  on December 2, 2011. This
Restoration  Strategy  builds upon existing
research,  planning  and  program   efforts
throughout the  Gulf that  have  generated
wide  interest  and  participation  by Gulf-
based   citizens,   businesses,    scientists,
industries and  governments.  In 2013,  the
EPA's responsibilities entail  the  ongoing
interagency  (federal and state) and  Tribal
governments'  coordination  and  technical
support required to continue implementation
of the Task Force's Gulf of Mexico Regional
Ecosystem Restoration Strategy.

Research

The Committee on Environment, Natural
Resources,  and  Sustainability  (CENRS) is
coordinating  the research efforts  among
federal agencies to  assess the impacts  of
nutrients and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

Urban wet weather flow research is being
coordinated with other organizations such as
the    Water    Environment    Research
Foundation's Wet Weather Advisory Panel,
the ASCE Urban Water Resources Research
Council,  the COE, and USGS. Research on
the characterization  and  management   of
pollutants from agricultural operations (e.g.,
CAFOs)  is being coordinated with USDA
through workshops and other discussions.

EPA  is  pursuing   collaborative research
projects  with  the  USGS  to  utilize water
quality  data  from   urban  areas obtained
through the USGS National Ambient Water
Quality Assessment  (NAWQA)  program,
showing  levels of pesticides that are even
higher  than  in many  agricultural area
streams. These data have potential uses  for
identifying sources  of urban pesticides and
EPA will evaluate how the USGS data could
be   integrated   into   the    Geographic
Information System (GIS) database system.
The EPA also is working to collaborate with
the American Water Works Association, the
Global  Water  Research  Coalition,  the
National Research Council,  Institute for
Research  in Construction,  the American
Society of Civil  Engineers  and  several
university research organizations including
Penn  State University, the University of
Houston, Louisiana Tech University, and the
Polytechnic University  of New York, on
water infrastructure research.

The  EPA  will  continue  work under the
MOA  with the USCG  and the  State of
Massachusetts  on  ballast water  treatment
technologies   and  mercury    continuous
emission   monitors.   The   agency   also
coordinates  technology verifications with
NOAA  (multiparameter   water   quality
probes); DOE (mercury continuous emission
monitors);  DoD (explosives monitors, PCB
detectors,    dust   suppressants);   USDA
(ambient ammonia monitors);  Alaska and
Pennsylvania (arsenic   removal);   Georgia,
Kentucky,   and   Michigan (storm  water
treatment);  and Colorado and New  York
(waste-to-energy technologies).

EPA  participates  in  the  Multi-Resolution
Land  Characterization (MRLC) consortium.
This   federal  partnership   for  national
environmental assessment  produces a set of
digital land-cover  databases.  Collaborators
include NOAA, USFS, USGS, LANDFIRE,
BLM,  NRCS, NFS,  NASA,  USFWS, and
OSM.

EPA will partner with the Army, as part of
the Army's Net Zero Initiative, to develop
and    demonstrate    innovative    water
technologies to accomplish the Army's goal
of net zero energy,  water and waste by 2020.

Community Water Priorities/Urban Waters
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
In response to early stakeholder feedback,
the EPA has  been working with  senior
executives  from eleven federal agencies to
form an Urban Waters Federal Partnership,
with  support  from   the  White   House
Domestic Policy Council. Agencies include:

•  Department of the Interior
•  Department of Agriculture
•  Department of Commerce - National
   Oceanic       and        Atmospheric
   Administration (NOAA)
•  Department of Commerce - Economic
   Development Administration
•  Army Corps of Engineers
•  Department of Transportation
•  Department  of  Housing  and   Urban
   Development
•  Department  of  Health   and  Human
   Services - Centers for Disease  Control
   and Prevention
•  Department  of  Health   and  Human
   Services   -   National    Institute   of
   Environmental Health Sciences
•  Corporation    for    National     and
   Community Service

This partnership seeks  to help communities
-  especially  underserved  communities  -
transform  overlooked  urban  waters  into
treasured centerpieces and drivers of urban
revival. The partnerships will advance urban
waters goals of: empowering and supporting
communities  in  revitalizing  their  urban
waters and  the surrounding  land;  helping
communities establish and maintain safe and
equitable  public  access  to  their  urban
waterways;   and   linking   urban   water
restoration  to  other community priorities
such as employment, education,  economic
revitalization,    housing,    transportation,
health, safety, and quality of life. To meet
these  goals, the  partnership  will leverage
member  agencies' authorities,   resources,
expertise, and  local support.  This  federal
partnership will advance an action  agenda
including the selection  of Urban Waters
Federal Partnership  Pilots for place-based
projects, the identification of policy actions
needed  to  integrate  federal  support  to
communities and to remove barriers to local
and  community action,  and other actions
such as  sharing information  and providing
information on urban waters to communities
in the nation.

San Francisco Bay-Delta

The  Interim  Federal Action Plan for  the
California  Bay-Delta, issued in December
2009,  signaled  the federal  government's
intent  to protect and restore this  critically
important  ecosystem -  one  that  provides
water to 25 million residents, sustains one of
the most productive agricultural regions in
the country, and until recently supported a
commercial and recreational fishing industry
that   normally  contributed  hundreds   of
millions of dollars annually to the California
economy. Improving water supply reliability
and  restoration  of  threatened  and listed
species remains the  priority.  The federal
government is participating with  the state
and stakeholders in the  development of the
Bay-Delta  Conservation Plan,  a long-term
plan for ecosystem restoration and water
management.  Further, U.S.  Department of
the Interior, U.S. Department of Agriculture,
National   Oceanic   and    Atmospheric
Administration, the EPA and the U.S. Army
Corps   of  Engineers have  undertaken  a
number of  other activities to restore habitat,
increase water efficiency, and improve water
quality.

Puget Sound Program

The Puget  Sound Program works to protect
and restore Puget Sound, which has been
designated   as  an  estuary  of  national
significance under  the   Clean Water   Act
National Estuary Program.  In addition to
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working  with  state agencies, Puget  Sound
tribes,  the government  of Canada,  local
governments, and  non-profit organizations,
EPA Region  10  initiated  and  chairs the
Puget Sound Federal Caucus.

The Puget Sound Federal Caucus is made up
of thirteen  federal  agencies  which  have
entered   into    a    Memorandum   of
             ^9
Understanding   to better integrate, organize
and focus federal efforts in the Puget Sound
ecosystem. Through  the Caucus, EPA and
other   member   agencies   are   aligning
resources   and   strengthening   federal
coordination  on Puget  Sound  protection,
science, recovery, resource management and
outreach efforts. By these actions, federal
agencies can  contribute significantly to the
restoration  and protection of Puget Sound.
Examples of Puget  Sound  federal caucus
work include a comprehensive cross-agency
assessment of federal authorities and actions
directed  towards  recovery  of habitat for
endangered  salmon  species. Additionally,
EPA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, and the U.S. Army Corp of
Engineers all participate in the Washington
Shellfish Initiative- an agreement launched
in December 2011  among federal and state
government,   tribes,   and  the   shellfish
industry to restore and expand Washington's
shellfish resources to promote clean-water
commerce and create family wage jobs.

The federal agencies that participate in the
Puget Sound Federal Caucus are:

     •    Federal Highway Administration
     •    Federal Transit Administration
     •    National Oceanic and Atmospheric
         Administration
     •    National Park Service
http://www.epa.gov/pugetsound/pdf/pugetsound_fede
ralcaucus_mou_ 13 signators.pdf
     •  National  Resource  Conservation
        Service
     •  Navy Region Northwest
     •  U.S. Army
     •  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
     •  U.S. Coast Guard
     •  U.S.   Environmental   Protection
        Agency
     •  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     •  U.S. Geological Survey
     •  U.S. Forest Service
Goal 3-Cleaning Up Our Communities

Objective:   Promote   Sustainable   and
Livable Communities

Brownfields

EPA continues  to  lead  the Brownfields
Federal Partnership, which includes  more
than 20  federal  agencies dedicated to  the
cleanup and redevelopment of brownfields
properties. Partner agencies work together to
prevent,  assess,  safely   clean  up,   and
redevelop  brownfields.  The  Brownfields
Federal  Partnership's   on-going  efforts
include promoting  the Portfields and Mine-
Scarred  Lands  projects and looking  for
additional opportunities to jointly promote
community revitalization by participating in
multi-agency collaborative projects, holding
regular meetings with federal  partners, and
supporting  regional efforts  to  coordinate
federal  revitalization support  to state and
local agencies.

Sustainable Communities

In June 2009, EPA, the U.S. Department of
Transportation, and the  U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development formed
the Partnership for  Sustainable Communities
to help protect the environment by providing
communities with  more options for public
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transportation  and better  access  to  green,
affordable housing. In FY13, EPA will build
on the successes of the past two years  to
achieve four goals:

   (1) Make    EPA's    resources    and
       assistance easier for communities  to
       understand and access.
   (2) Identify  and  remove  barriers   to
       cleaning   up    and   redeveloping
       contaminated land.
   (3) Provide     communities     with
       implementation    strategies    and
       assistance to address specific barriers
       to  more   efficient  and  more  cost-
       effective growth and development.
   (4) Promote environmental justice.

In   addition,    in   FY13,    EPA   will
institutionalize  assistance to  the Federal
Emergency   Management   Agency   by
developing  guidelines  and  procedures  to
help communities prepare for disasters and
rebuild  more  sustainably  after  a disaster.
EPA will continue to provide similar support
to other federal  agencies,  such  as the U.S.
Department of   Agriculture,  Centers for
Disease Control,  and  the National Oceanic
and   Atmospheric   Administration.   This
assistance helps  these agencies protect the
environment   through  their   community
development programs, policies, regulations,
and  resources,  while meeting  their core
agency objectives.  EPA  also  co-sponsors
the  Governor's   Institute  on  Community
Design with HUD and  DOT. The institute
works with governors and their cabinets  to
improve  environmental and  public  health
outcomes of community development.

Environmental Justice

EPA  will  continue its work in partnership
with  other federal agencies  to  address the
environmental   and  public  health  issues
facing  communities  with  environmental
justice concerns.  In 2013, the Agency will
continue its efforts to work collaboratively
and   constructively  with   all  levels   of
government, and  throughout the public and
private sectors. The issues range from lead
exposure, asthma, safe  drinking water and
sanitation systems to hazardous waste clean-
up,    renewable    energy/wind    power
development,        and        sustainable
environmentally-sound economies. EPA and
its  federal  partners  are utilizing  EPA's
collaborative problem-solving  model, based
on the experiences of federal  collaborative
partnerships,   to   improve   the   federal
government's effectiveness in addressing the
environmental and public health concerns
facing communities. As the lead agency for
environmental justice pursuant to Executive
Order 12898, EPA shares its knowledge and
experience and  offers  assistance to  other
federal  agencies  as  they  enhance  their
strategies to integrate environmental justice
into their programs, policies,  and activities.

U. S. -Mexico Border

The Governments of Mexico and the United
States agreed, in  November 1993, to  assist
communities on both sides of the border in
coordinating and carrying out environmental
infrastructure   projects.  The  agreement
between   Mexico  and  the  United  States
furthers the goals of the North American
Free  Trade   Agreement  and  the  North
American  Agreement  on  Environmental
Cooperation.    To   this   purpose,    the
governments established two international
institutions,   the  Border    Environment
Cooperation Commission (BECC) and the
North   American   Development    Bank
(NADBank),   which manages  the  Border
Environment Infrastructure Fund (BEIF), to
support the financing  and construction  of
much needed environmental infrastructure.
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The  BECC,  with  headquarters  in  Ciudad
Juarez,  Chihuahua,  Mexico,  assists  local
communities   and  other   sponsors  in
developing and implementing environmental
infrastructure  projects.  The  BECC   also
certifies projects as eligible for  NADBank
financing. The NADBank, with headquarters
in San  Antonio,  Texas, is capitalized in
equal shares  by  the  United  States  and
Mexico. NADBank provides new financing
to supplement existing sources of funds and
foster the expanded participation of private
capital.

A significant number of residents along the
U.S.-Mexico  border area are without  basic
services   such  as  potable  water   and
wastewater treatment and  the  problem has
become progressively worse in the last few
decades.  Over the last several years,  EPA
has continued to  work  with the U.S. and
Mexican  Sections  of the  International
Boundary  and  Water  Commission   and
Mexico's   national   water   commission,
Comision Nacional del Agua (CONAGUA),
to further efforts to improve drinking water
and  wastewater services  to  communities
within 100 km on  the U.S. and 300 km on
the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border.
The  U.S.-Mexico  Border  2012 Program
represents a successful joint effort between
the  U.S.   and Mexican  governments in
working with the 10 Border States and local
communities   to   improve   the  region's
environmental health,  consistent with the
principles of  sustainable development.  Over
the last several years, EPA has continued to
work with the U.S. and Mexican Sections of
the  International  Boundary  and  Water
Commission  and  Mexico's  national water
commission,  Comision Nacional del  Agua
(CONAGUA), to further efforts to improve
drinking  water and wastewater services to
communities within 100 km on the U.S. and
300  km  on the Mexico side  of the  U.S.-
Mexico border.

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Research

Research   in   ecosystems  protection   is
coordinated government-wide  through the
Committee   on   Environment,   Natural
Resources,  and  Sustainability  (CENRS).
EPA actively participates in the CENRS and
all  work  is  fully  consistent with,  and
complementary   to,    other   Committee
member activities. EPA scientists staff two
CENRS Subcommittees: the Subcommittee
on  Ecological  Systems  (SES)  and  the
Subcommittee  on Water  Availability  and
Quality   (SWAQ).  EPA  has   initiated
discussions within the SES on the subject of
ecosystem  services,  and  potential  ERP
collaborations  are being explored with the
U.S. Geological Service (USGS)  and with
USDA Forest  Service.  Within SWAQ, the
ERP has  contributed to an initiative for a
comprehensive census of water availability
and   quality,    including   the   use   of
Environmental  Monitoring and Assessment
Program  methods and  ongoing surveys as
data sources. In addition, EPA has taken a
lead role with  USGS in  preparing a SWAQ
document  outlining new  challenges  for
integrated management  of water resources,
including  strategic needs for monitoring and
modeling  methods, and identifying water
requirements   needed   to   support  the
ecological integrity of aquatic ecosystems.

Consistent with  the broad scope  of the
EPA's ecosystem research efforts, EPA has
had complementary and joint programs with
FS, USGS, USDA, NOAA, BLM, USFS,
NGOs,  and  many others specifically to
minimize  duplication, maximize scope, and
maintain a real time information flow. For
example,  all of  these   organizations work
together to produce the National Land Cover
Data  used  by  all landscape  ecologists
nationally.  Each   contributes    funding,
services   and   research  to  this  uniquely
successful effort.
EPA expends substantial effort coordinating
its  research with  other  federal  agencies,
including  work with DoD in its Strategic
Environmental Research  and Development
Program (SERDP) and the Environmental
Security Technology Certification Program,
DOE   and  its  Office   of  Health   and
Environmental Research. EPA also conducts
collaborative laboratory research with DoD,
DOE,  DOT (particularly the  USGS),  and
NASA to  improve  characterization and risk
management  options  for  dealing  with
subsurface contamination.

The Agency also is  working with NIEHS,
which   manages  a  large  basic  research
program focusing  on Superfund  issues, to
advance fundamental  Superfund  research.
The Agency  for  Toxic   Substances  and
Disease Registry (ATSDR) also provides
critical  health-based information to assist
EPA in making effective  cleanup  decisions.
EPA   works  with   these  agencies   on
collaborative    projects,      information
exchange,   and  identification  of  research
issues  and has a MOU with each agency.
EPA,  Army Corps of Engineers, and Navy
recently   signed   a  MOU   to   increase
collaboration    and    coordination    in
contaminated      sediments      research.
Additionally,  the   Interstate   Technology
Regulatory Council (ITRC) has proved an
effective forum for coordinating federal and
state activities and for defining continuing
research needs through its  teams  on topics
including   permeable   reactive   barriers,
radionuclides,  and Brownfields.  EPA has
developed  an  MOU33 with  several  other
agencies [DOE, DoD, NRC, USGS, NOAA,
and  USDA]  for  multimedia  modeling
research and development.
33 For more information please go to: Interagency
Steering Committee on Multimedia Environmental
Models MOU,
htto ://www. iscmem. ore/Memo randum. htm
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Other     research     efforts     involving
coordination include the unique controlled-
spill  field research  facility  designed  in
cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation.
Geophysical   research   experiments  and
development   of  software for  subsurface
characterization     and    detection     of
contaminants are being conducted with the
USGS  and   DOE's  Lawrence  Berkeley
National Laboratory.

The  Agency   coordinates  its  research
fellowship programs  with  other  federal
agencies and  the nonprofit sector through
the   National   Academies'    Fellowships
Roundtable, which meets biannually.34

EPA  is coordinating with  DoD's  Strategic
Environmental Research and Development
Program   (SERDP)    in    an   ongoing
partnership,  especially  in the  areas  of
sustainability research and  of incorporating
materials   lifecycle   analysis   into   the
manufacturing  process   for  weapons  and
military    equipment.   EPA's    People,
Prosperity, and Planet (P3) student  design
competition for  sustainability will partner
with NASA,  NSF,  OFEE,  USAID, USDA,
CEQ, and OSTP.

Several federal agencies sponsor research on
variability  and susceptibility  in risks from
exposure  to   environmental  contaminants.
EPA  collaborates with  a  number of the
Institutes  within  the  NIH and  CDC. For
example,    NIEHS    conducts    multi-
disciplinary biomedical research programs,
prevention and   intervention  efforts,  and
communication   strategies.  The   NIEHS
program includes an  effort  to study  the
effects  of chemicals,  including pesticides
and   other  toxics,  on  children.   EPA
34 For more information, see
.
collaborates with NIEHS in supporting the
Centers   for   Children's   Environmental
Health and Disease Prevention, which study
whether and how environmental factors play
a role in  children's  health  and with  the
National   Institute  on  Child Health and
Human Development on  the development
and   implementation   of  the   National
Children's Study.

Objective: Preserve Land

Pollution    prevention   activities    entail
coordination with other  federal departments
and agencies. For example, EPA coordinates
with the  General  Services  Administration
(GSA) on the use  of  safer  products  for
indoor painting  and  cleaning,  with  the
Department of Defense (DoD) on the use of
safer paving materials for parking  lots, and
with the Defense Logistics Agency on safer
solvents.  The program also works  with the
National    Institute   of  Standards   and
Technology and  other  groups to develop
standards  for  Environmental  Management
Systems.

In addition to business,  industry, and other
non-governmental    organizations,   EPA
works  with federal, state,  Tribal, and local
governments   to    encourage    reduced
generation and  safe  recycling  of wastes.
Partners    in   this   effort    include   the
Environmental  Council  of States  and  the
Association of State  and Territorial  Solid
Waste Management Officials.

The federal government is the single largest
potential  source for "green" procurement in
the country, for office products  as well  as
products for industrial use. EPA works with
the  Office   of  Federal   Environmental
Executive  and other  federal   agencies and
departments in advancing the  purchase and
use of recycled-content and  other "green"
products.   In  particular,  the  Agency  is
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currently engaged with other  organizations
within  the  Executive Branch  to  foster
compliance  with Executive  Order  13423,
and in tracking  and reporting purchases of
products made  with  recycled  contents, in
promoting   electronic  stewardship,   and
achieving waste reduction and  recycling
goals.

In addition, the Agency is currently engaged
with the DoD, the Department of Education,
the Department  of Energy  (DOE), the  U.S.
Postal  Service, and other agencies to foster
proper management of surplus electronics
equipment, with a preference for reuse and
recycling.  With these agencies,  and  in
cooperation  with the  electronics  industry,
EPA   and   the   Office  of  the  Federal
Environmental   Executive  launched   the
Federal Electronics  Challenge which  will
lead to increased reuse and recycling of an
array of computers and  other electronics
hardware  used  by  civilian  and military
agencies.

Objective: Restore Land

Super/and Remedial Program

As  referenced   above,   the  Superfund
Remedial program coordinates with  several
other federal agencies, such as ATSDR and
NIEHS, in providing numerous Superfund
related  services  in order to accomplish the
program's mission.

The U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers  also
substantially contributes to the cleanup of
Superfund   sites by  providing  technical
support for  the  design  and construction of
many  fund-financed  remediation projects
through      site-specific      interagency
agreements.  This federal  partner has the
technical design  and construction expertise
and contracting  capability  needed to assist
EPA regions in  implementing a number of
Superfund  remedial action projects.  This
agency   also  provides  technical   on-site
support  to  Regions  in  the  enforcement
oversight of numerous construction projects
performed     by    private     Potentially
Responsible Parties.

Superfund Federal Facilities Program

The  Superfund Federal Facilities program
coordinates  with federal  agencies,  states,
tribes,  state associations, and   others  to
implement  its  statutory  responsibilities  to
ensure cleanup  and  property  reuse.  The
program  provides technical and regulatory
oversight at  federal  facilities  to  ensure
human  health  and  the  environment  are
protected.

EPA   has    entered   into    Interagency
Agreements (lAGs) with  DOD,  DOE, and
other  federal  agencies   to  expedite  the
cleanup and transfer of federal properties. A
Memorandum of Understanding has been
negotiated   with  DOD  to  continue  the
Agency's   oversight    support   through
September  30, 2011 for the acceleration of
cleanup  and property  transfer  at specific
Base  Realignment  and  Closure  (BRAC)
installations affected by the first four  rounds
of BRAC.  In addition, EPA is currently in
negotiations with DOD  to extend  BRAC
oversight support through FY  2016. EPA
has signed  lAGs with the DOE to expedite
the cleanup  and to support DOE's efforts of
reducing the footprint at the Savannah River
Site, Oak Ridge Reservation, Hanford, and
the Idaho National Laboratory  sites using
DOE's ARRA funding. EPA also has  signed
an IAG  with DOE to  provide funding for
EPA Region  9  to  conduct a radiological
study   to   determine   the  radiological
contamination in soil and groundwater at the
Santa  Susana site.  EPA  will continue  to
provide technical input regarding innovative
and    flexible   regulatory   approaches,
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streamlining  of documentation,  integration
of  projects,  deletion  of  sites  from  the
National Priorities List,  field assessments,
and development of management documents
and processes.

Superfund     Financial     Responsibility
Regulations

EPA currently is developing new regulations
that will require facilities  in the hardrock
mining  and  mineral  processing, chemical
manufacturing,   petroleum   refining,  and
electric   power  generation   industry   to
provide appropriate financial responsibility
demonstrations  for damage to human health
and the environment that may be the result
of those manufacturing activities. This effort
will require close coordination with the DOT
(BLM)  and USDA (Forest Service) related
to mining/mineral processing activities on
federal lands, and DoD and DOE regarding
the  other industrial  facilities that will be
potentially impacted.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

The   RCRA   Waste   Management  and
Corrective   Action  programs  coordinate
closely   with   other   federal   agencies,
primarily the DoD and DOE,  which have
many sites in   the  corrective action and
permitting  universe.  Encouraging  federal
facilities to  meet the RCRA  Corrective
Action  and Waste Management permitting
program's goals remains a top priority.

RCRA  programs also  coordinate with  the
Department of  Commerce, the Department
of Transportation, and the Department  of
State  to  ensure  the  safe  movement  of
domestic  and  international  shipments  of
hazardous waste.

Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
States  and territories use the LUST  Trust
Fund  in  addition  to other  resources  to
administer their corrective action programs,
oversee  cleanups  by responsible  parties,
undertake necessary  enforcement  actions,
and  pay  for  cleanups  in cases where a
responsible  party  cannot be  found  or  is
unwilling or unable to pay for a cleanup.

States  are  key  to  achieving long-term
strategic   goals and  objectives. Except  in
Indian country where EPA directly  funds
oversight and clean-up activities, EPA relies
on state  agencies  to  implement the LUST
program,  including overseeing cleanups by
responsible  parties   and  responding   to
emergency    LUST    releases.     LUST
cooperative agreements awarded by EPA are
directly given  to the states to assist  them in
implementing    their    oversight    and
programmatic role.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

EPA plays a major role in reducing the risks
that  accidental and  intentional releases  of
harmful  substances and oil pose to human
health    and   the   environment.   EPA
implements  the Emergency  Preparedness
program    in    coordination   with    the
Department  of Homeland  Security (DHS)
and other federal agencies to deliver federal
assistance  to  state,  local,   and   Tribal
governments during  natural  disasters and
other major environmental incidents. This
requires continuous coordination with  many
federal,  state  and   local   agencies.   The
Agency   participates  with  other  federal
agencies  to  develop national  planning and
implementation policies  at the operational
level.

The  National Response Framework (NRF),
under the direction of the DHS, provides for
the delivery  of federal assistance to states to
help them deal  with the consequences  of
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terrorist events as well as natural and other
significant disasters. EPA maintains the lead
responsibility  for  the NRF's Emergency
Support Function covering inland hazardous
materials   and  petroleum   releases  and
participates  in  the  Federal  Emergency
Support  Function  Leaders  Group  which
addresses NRF planning and implementation
at the operational level.

EPA  coordinates its preparedness  activities
with DHS, FEMA, the Federal Bureau  of
Investigation,  and  other  federal  agencies,
states, and  local  governments. EPA will
continue   to    clarify    its    roles   and
responsibilities  to  ensure  that  Agency
security programs are consistent  with the
national homeland security strategy.

Super/and Enforcement (see Goal 5)

Oil Spills

Under the  Oil Spill Program,  EPA works
with other federal agencies such as U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Coast Guard
(USCG), NOAA, FEMA, DOT, DOT,  DOE,
and other federal agencies and states, as well
as with local government  authorities  to
develop  Area  Contingency  Plans.  The
Department   of   Justice  also   provides
assistance to agencies with judicial referrals
when  enforcement of violations  becomes
necessary.  EPA  will   have   an   active
interagency  agreement  with  the  USCG
providing continued support for the National
Response  Center  and  oil   spill  response
technical assistance. EPA and the USCG
work  in coordination with  other federal
authorities   to  implement   the   National
Preparedness for Response Program.

Objective: Strengthen Human Health and
the Environment in Indian Country
EPA  works  under  two  important  Tribal
infrastructure        Memoranda        of
Understandings (MOU) amongst five federal
agencies.  EPA,  the Department  of  the
Interior, Department of Health and Human
Services, Department of Agriculture, and the
Department   of  Housing   and   Urban
Development work as partners to improve
infrastructure on Tribal  lands and currently
focus efforts on providing access  to safe
drinking  water   and  basic  wastewater
facilities to tribes.

The  first,  or  umbrella  MOU,  promotes
coordination    between    federal    Tribal
infrastructure programs, including financial
services, while allowing federal programs to
retain their unique advantages. It is fully
expected   that   the   efficiencies   and
partnerships     resulting     from     this
collaboration will directly assist tribes with
their   infrastructure  needs.   Under   the
umbrella MOU,  for the  first  time,  five
federal  departments  joined  together and
agreed to work across  traditional  program
boundaries on  Tribal infrastructure  issues.
The  second  MOU,  addressing a specific
infrastructure issue,  was created under  the
umbrella authority and addresses the issue of
access to safe drinking water and wastewater
facilities on Tribal lands. Currently, the five
federal  agencies  are working  together  to
develop  solutions for specific  geographic
areas   of  concern  (Alaska,   Southwest),
engaging in coordination of ARRA funding,
and  promoting  cross-agency  efficiency.
These    activities   are   completed   in
coordination   with   federally   recognized
tribes.

For more information, please see the web
link:
http://www.epa.gov/tribalportal/mous.htm.

Additionally, EPA is continuing to work
closely with other federal agencies  as well
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as  the   Domestic   Policy  Council   to
implement  President   Obama's   directive
regarding the Tribal  consultation process.
The   President's  November   5th,   2009
Memorandum   directs   each   executive
department  to  develop a detailed  plan to
implement Executive  Order (EO)  13175,
"Consultation and Coordination with Indian
Tribal  Governments,"  issued by President
Clinton  in  2000. Under EO  13175,  "all
departments and  agencies are charged with
engaging  in  regular   and   meaningful
consultation  and  collaboration  with Tribal
officials  in  the  development  of  federal
policies that have Tribal  implications,  and
are  responsible   for   strengthening   the
government-to-government     relationship
between   the  United   States   and  Indian
tribes."

On May  4,  2011,  EPA  released its  final
policy  on consultation and coordination with
Indian  tribes. EPA is among the first of the
federal agencies to  finalize  its  consultation
policy in response to President Obama's first
tribal  leaders summit  in  November 2009,
and the issuance  of Executive Order 13175
to  establish  regular   and   meaningful
consultation  and  collaboration with tribal
officials  in  the  development  of  Federal
policies that have  tribal implications.

Goal   4  -  Ensuring  the  Safety   of
Chemicals and Preventing Pollution

Objective: Chemical and Pesticide Risks

Coordination with state lead agencies  and
with the  USDA provides  added impetus to
the implementation  of the Certification  and
Training   program.  States   also  provide
essential   activities   in  developing   and
implementing the Endangered  Species  and
Worker  Protection   programs  and   are
involved in numerous  special projects  and
investigations,    including     emergency
response  efforts.   The  Regions  provide
technical  guidance and assistance  to  the
states and tribes in the implementation of all
pesticide program activities.

EPA   uses   a  range  of  outreach   and
coordination approaches for pesticide users,
agencies  implementing  various  pesticide
programs and projects,  and  the  general
public. Outreach and coordination activities
are essential to effective implementation of
regulatory     decisions.     In     addition,
coordination activities  protect workers  and
endangered  species,  provide   training  for
pesticide  applicators,  promote  integrated
pest   management   and  environmental
stewardship,  and  support for   compliance
through EPA's Regional programs and those
of the states and tribes.

In addition to the training that EPA provides
to farm workers and restricted use pesticide
applicators,  EPA  works  with  the  State
Cooperative Extension  Services designing
and   providing  specialized training  for
various  groups.   Such  training  includes
instructing private  applicators on the proper
use of personal protective  equipment  and
application equipment  calibration, handling
spill  and  injury  situations, farm  family
safety, preventing  pesticide  spray drift,  and
pesticide  and  container  disposal.  Other
specialized training is  provided to public
works employees  on grounds maintenance,
to pesticide  control  operators on  proper
insect identification, and on weed control for
agribusiness.

EPA coordinates with and uses information
from   a  variety  of  federal,   state   and
international organizations and agencies in
our efforts to protect the safety of America's
health and environment from hazardous or
higher risk pesticides.  In May  1991,  the
USDA  implemented   the   Pesticide Data
Program  (PDF) to  collect objective  and
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statistically   reliable   data   on  pesticide
residues on  food commodities. This action
was in response to public concern about the
effects of pesticides on human health and
environmental quality.  EPA uses  PDF data
to  improve  dietary   risk  assessment to
support the  registration  of pesticides for
minor crop uses.

PDF is critical to implementing  the  Food
Quality Protection Act  (FQPA). The system
provides   improved  data  collection  of
pesticide  residues,  standardized  analytical
and  reporting methods,  and  sampling of
foods most likely consumed by infants and
children. PDF sampling, residue, testing and
data  reporting  are coordinated  by the
Agricultural   Marketing   Service    using
cooperative     agreements    with    ten
participating  states representing all  regions
of the country. PDF serves as a showcase for
federal-state  cooperation  on  pesticide and
food safety issues.

FQPA requires EPA to consult with  other
government  agencies on  major  decisions.
EPA, USDA and FDA work closely together
via working committees  to  deal  with  a
variety of issues that  affect  the involved
agencies'  missions. For example, agencies
work together on residue  testing  programs
and  on enforcement actions  that  involve
pesticide  residues on  food,  and agencies
coordinate   review   of    antimicrobial
pesticides.  The  Agency   coordinates  with
USDA/ARS     in    promotion     and
communication of  resistance  management
strategies.   Additionally,   EPA   actively
participates   in  the Federal   Interagency
Committee   on   Invasive  Animals   and
Pathogens (ITAP) which includes members
from USDA, DOL, DoD, DHS and CDC to
coordinate planning and  technical advice
among federal entities  involved in invasive
species research, control and management.
While  EPA  is  responsible  for  making
registration  and  tolerance  decisions, the
Agency relies on others to carry out some of
the  enforcement  activities.   Registration-
related  requirements  under  FIFRA are
enforced   by  the  states. The  HHS/FDA
enforces tolerances for most foods  and the
USDA/Food Safety and  Inspection  Service
enforces  tolerances for meat, poultry and
some egg products.

EPA's objective  is  to  promote  improved
health  and environmental protection, both
domestically and worldwide. The success of
this  objective is  dependent on successful
coordination not only with other countries,
but   also  with   various   international
organizations such as the Intergovernmental
Forum on  Chemical  Safety  (IFCS), the
North     American     Commission    on
Environmental Cooperation (CEC),  OECD,
the United Nations  Environment Program
(UNEP)   and  the  CODEX   Alimentarius
Commission. NAFTA and cooperation with
Canada and Mexico play an integral part in
the  harmonization  of  data  requirements.
These  partnerships  serve  to  coordinate
policies,    harmonize   guidelines,    share
information, correct deficiencies, build other
nations' capacity to reduce  risk, develop
strategies  to deal with  potentially harmful
pesticides  and develop greater confidence in
the safety  of the food supply.

The  nexus of  environmental protection and
international trade has long been a  priority
for EPA engagement. EPA has played a key
role  in   ensuring  trade-related  activities
sustain environmental protection  since the
1972 Trade  Act mandated  inter-agency
consultation    by   the   U.S.    Trade
Representative  (USTR)  on  trade   policy
issues. EPA is a member of the Trade Policy
Staff Committee  (TPSC)  and  the Trade
Policy Review Group (TPRG), interagency
mechanisms   that   are  organized   and
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coordinated  by USTR  to  provide  advice,
guidance and clearance to the USTR in the
development of U.S. international trade and
investment policy.

To effectively participate in the international
agreements on Persistent Organic Pollutants
(POPs), heavy metals, EPA must continue to
coordinate with other federal agencies and
external stakeholders, such as Congressional
staff,  industry,  and environmental  groups.
Similarly, the Agency typically coordinates
with FDA's National  Toxicology Program,
the    CDC/ATSDR,   NIEHS   and   the
Consumer   Product  Safety  Commission
(CPSC) on  matters relating to OECD test
guideline harmonization.

EPA also works closely with the Department
of State in leading the technical and policy
engagement    for    the   United   States
Government at international negotiations on
global mercury. EPA  provided  the impetus
for  UNEP's Global Mercury Program, and
the    agency  continues  to  work  with
developing  countries  and  with   other
developed countries in  the  context of that
program. In addition to the Department of
State, EPA collaborates closely with several
federal agencies including DOE and USGS;
and  has developed a  strong  network of
domestic    private   sector   and   non-
governmental partners interested in working
on this issue.

EPA  is a leader  in global discussions on
mercury and was instrumental in the launch
of UNEP's  Global Mercury Program, and
the  agency  will   continue  to  work  with
developing  countries  and  with   other
developed countries in  the  context of that
program. In  addition, we have developed a
strong  network   of   domestic  partners
interested in working on this issue, including
the DOE and the USGS.
One of the Agency's most valuable partners
on pesticide issues is the Pesticide Program
Dialogue Committee (PPDC), which brings
together    a   broad    cross-section   of
knowledgeable       individuals      from
organizations representing divergent views
to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy and
implementation issues. The  PPDC consists
of    members     from    industry/trade
associations, pesticide user and commodity
groups, consumer and environmental/public
interest groups and others.

The   PPDC    provides   a    structured
environment  for  meaningful  information
exchanges    and    consensus    building
discussions,  keeping the  public involved in
decisions  that affect  them.  Dialogue with
outside groups is essential if the Agency is
to remain responsive to the needs  of  the
affected  public,   growers,   and  industry
organizations.

EPA relies on data from HHS to help assess
the risk  of pesticides  to  children.  Other
collaborative efforts  that go beyond  our
reliance on  the  data they  collect  include
developing  and   validating  methods  to
analyze  domestic   and  imported  food
samples for  organophosphates, carcinogens,
neurotoxins and other chemicals of concern.
These joint efforts protect Americans from
unhealthful pesticide residue  levels.
EPA's  chemical  testing   data  provides
information for the OSHA worker protection
programs, NIOSH  for  research,  and  the
Consumer   Product   Safety  Commission
(CPSC)  for  informing  consumers  about
products  through labeling. EPA frequently
consults  with these  Agencies on  project
design, progress  and the results of chemical
testing projects.

The success of EPA's lead program is due in
part to  effective  coordination with  other
federal agencies, states  and Indian  Tribes
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through  the  President's  Task  Force  on
Environmental  Health  Risks  and  Safety
Risks to  Children. EPA  will  continue  to
coordinate with HUD to  clarify  how new
rules  may affect existing EPA and HUD
regulatory  programs,  and  with the FHWA
and  OSHA on worker  protection issues.
EPA will continue to work closely with state
and federally  recognized  Tribes  to ensure
that  authorized  state  and Tribal  programs
continue  to   comply with   requirements
established under TSCA,  that the ongoing
federal   accreditation  certification   and
training program for  lead professionals  is
administered  effectively,  and states  and
tribes adopt the Renovation and Remodeling
and the Buildings and  Structures Rules when
these rules become effective.

EPA  has  an Interagency  Agreement with
HUD on  coordination of efforts  on  lead-
based  paint  issues.  As  a   result of the
agreement, EPA and HUD have co-chaired
the President's Task Force since 1997.
There are  fourteen other federal  agencies
including CDC and DoD on the Task Force.
HUD and EPA also maintain the National
Lead   Information   Center   and   share
enforcement of the Disclosure Rule.
Coordination on safe  PCB  disposal is an
area of ongoing emphasis with the DoD, and
particularly with the U.S.  Navy, which has
special     concerns   regarding    PCBs
encountered during  ship scrapping. Mercury
storage and safe disposal also are important
issues   requiring  coordination   with  the
Department of Energy and  DoD as they
develop  alternatives   and  explore  better
technologies for storing and disposing high
risk chemicals.

Research

ToxCast™ is EPA's part of the multi-agency
Tox21  collaboration  that  is   currently
-L W/i-^CtOl   ID -L^L JT^ O JJCt
Tox21   collaboration  mat  is  currently
           nearly  10,000  environmental
                                               chemicals for potential  toxicity in high-
                                               throughput screening assays  at  the  NIH
                                               Chemical  Genomics  Center (NCGC).  EPA
                                               contributes under  an MOU with NIEHS'
                                               National   Toxicological  Program,  FDA's
                                               Center for Drug Evaluation and Research,
                                               and  NCGC's  National  Human  Genome
                                               Research  Institute.   EPA  also  has  an
                                               agreement to  provide NCGC  funding to
                                               support the effort.  ToxCast  is  currently
                                               finishing Phase  II in which 1,000 of the
                                               10,000 chemicals are being screened in an
                                               additional  -700  assays   through   EPA
                                               supported   contracts   with    a    dozen
                                               laboratories  around the country.  The data
                                               from these innovative, rapid testing methods
                                               will be made available to risk assessors.

                                               The  Next  Generation (NexGen)  of  Risk
                                               Assessment  is  a   multi-agency  project,
                                               chaired by EPA, that builds upon  ToxCast
                                               research  efforts. CDC's  ATSDR  and the
                                               State    of   California's    Environmental
                                               Protection Agency  participate in addition to
                                               most Tox21  collaborators. Using the wealth
                                               of  data   currently  being  generated  on
                                               molecular  systems   biology   and  gene-
                                               environment  interactions,  NexGen   will
                                               develop  approaches  to  make  these  data
                                               useful  for human  health risk  assessment.
                                               The goal is to make risk assessments faster,
                                               less  expensive,  and  more  scientifically
                                               robust. In particular,  NexGen is intended to
                                               help  assess the array of chemicals that are
                                               potential   environmental   contaminants  of
                                               concern that are too numerous to address by
                                               traditional approaches.

                                               EPA   coordinates   its    nanotechnology
                                               research with other federal agencies through
                                               the  National   Nanotechnology  Initiative
                                               (NNI),35   which  is   managed  under  the
                                               Subcommittee    on   Nanoscale   Science,
                                               Engineering and  Technology (NSET) of the
screening
                                                5 For more information, see .
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NSTC Committee  on Technology (CoT).
The  Agency's Science to Achieve Results
(STAR)  program, which  awards  research
grants  to  universities   and   non-profit
organizations,   has  issued   its   recent
nanotechnology   grants36   jointly   with
NIOSH, NIEHS, and NSF.
EPA coordinates  its research on endocrine
disrupters  with  other  federal  agencies
through the interagency working group on
endocrine disrupters under the  auspices of
the Toxics and Risk Subcommittee of the
CENR.  EPA coordinates its biotechnology
research    through    the     interagency
biotechnology research working group and
the agricultural biotechnology risk analysis
working  group  of  the   Biotechnology
Subcommittee of NSTC's Committee on
Science.

EPA coordinates  with ATSDR through a
memorandum  of  understanding  on  the
development of toxicological reviews and
toxicology profiles,  respectively. EPA also
consults with  other federal agencies about
the science  of individual IRIS  assessments
as  well  as  improvements to the  IRIS
Program through an interagency working
group including public health agencies (e.g.,
CDC, ATSDR, NIOHS, and NIEHS).  The
Agency   contracts    with   the  National
Academy  of  Sciences  (NAS)  on  very
difficult and  complex human  health  risk
assessments through consultation or review.

Homeland Security research is conducted in
collaboration  with   numerous  agencies,
leveraging funding across multiple programs
and  producing synergistic results.  EPA's
National  Homeland  Security  Research
Center  (NHSRC) works closely  with the
DHS to assure that EPA's efforts are directly
36 For an example, see

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Environmental    Performance    through
Pollution Prevention and Innovation
Environmental Preferable Purchasing (EPP)
initiative,   which  implements  Executive
Orders 12873 and 13101, promotes the use
of cleaner products by federal agencies. This
is  aimed  at stimulating demand  for the
development of such products by industry.

This   effort   includes  a   number   of
demonstration projects  with  other  federal
Departments and  agencies,  such  as  the
National Park Service (NFS) (to use Green
Purchasing  as   a  tool to   achieve  the
sustainability  goals  of the  parks),  the
Department of  Defense  (DoD) (use  of
environmentally  preferable   construction
materials),  and Defense Logistics  Agency
(identification of environmental attributes
for products in  its purchasing  system). The
program  also  is  working  within EPA to
"green" its  own  operations.  The program
also   works  with   the  Department  of
Commerce's National  Institute of Science
and Technology (NIST) to develop a life-
cycle   based  decision  support  tool  for
purchasers.

Under the   Suppliers'  Partnership  for the
Environment program  and  its  umbrella
program,  the  Green  Suppliers'  Network
(GSN),  EPA's  P2  Program  is working
closely with NIST  and its Manufacturing
Extension Partnership  Program to provide
technical  assistance  to the  process  of
"greening"  industry supply chains. The EPA
also  is  working  with  the  Department  of
Energy's  (DOE) Industrial  Technologies
Program  to  provide  energy  audits  and
technical assistance to these  supply chains.

The   Agency   is   required    to   review
environmental impact statements and other
major  actions impacting the  environment
and public health proposed by  all  federal
agencies, and make recommendations to the
proposing  federal  agency  on  how  to
remedy/mitigate  those impacts. Although
EPA is required under Section 309 of the
Clean  Air  Act  (CAA)  to  review  and
comment  on  proposed   federal  actions,
neither the National Environmental Policy
Act nor Section 309 CAA require a federal
agency   to   modify  its   proposal   to
accommodate  EPA's  concerns. EPA  does
have authority under these statutes to refer
major  disagreements  with other  federal
agencies  to the Council on Environmental
Quality. Accordingly, many of the beneficial
environmental  changes or mitigation that
EPA recommends must be negotiated with
the other federal agency. The majority of the
actions EPA reviews  are  proposed by the
Forest      Service,     Department     of
Transportation   (including   the   Federal
Highway   Administration  and   Federal
Aviation  Administration),  USAGE,  DOI
(including  Bureau  of Land  Management,
Minerals Management Service and National
Parks  Service),   Department   of  Energy
(including    the    Federal    Regulatory
Commission),   and  the    Department  of
Defense.
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Goal 5- Enforcing Environmental Laws

Objective:  Address  pollution  problems
through vigorous and  targeted civil and
criminal enforcement. Assure compliance
with environmental laws.

The    Enforcement    and    Compliance
Assurance Program coordinates closely with
the Department of Justice (DOJ) on all civil
and  criminal  environmental  enforcement
matters.   In   addition,   the   program
coordinates with other agencies on specific
environmental issues as described herein.

The    Enforcement    and    Compliance
Assurance  program coordinates  with  the
Chemical Safety and Accident Investigation
Board, OSHA,  and the Agency for  Toxic
Substances   and    Disease   Registry   in
preventing  and  responding  to  accidental
releases and endangerment situations, with
the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) on  Tribal
issues   relative   to    compliance   with
environmental laws on Tribal  lands,  and
with  the  Small  Business Administration
(SBA) on the implementation of the  Small
Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness
Act (SBREFA). The  program also  shares
information  with  the  Internal  Revenue
Service  (IRS)  on cases  which require
defendants  to  pay  civil penalties, thereby
assisting the  IRS in  assuring  compliance
with tax laws.  In addition,  it collaborates
with   the   SBA   to  maintain  current
environmental  compliance information  at
Business.gov, a website initiated as  an e-
government initiative in 2004 to help small
businesses   comply    with   government
regulations. The program also works with a
variety  of federal agencies,  including the
Department of Labor (DOL), and the IRS to
organize a  Federal Compliance Assistance
Roundtable   to    address   cross-cutting
compliance assistance issues. Coordination
also  occurs with  the  United States  Army
Corps of Engineers (USAGE) on wetlands
issues.

The   United   States   Department   of
Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation
Service  (USDA/NRCS) has a major role in
determining whether areas on  agricultural
lands meet the definition of wetlands for
purposes of the Food  Security  Act.  Civil
Enforcement coordinates with USDA/NRCS
on these issues also. EPA's Enforcement
and  Compliance  Assurance program also
coordinates with USDA on the regulation of
animal  feeding operations  and  on  food
safety issues arising from the  misuse  of
pesticides and shares joint jurisdiction with
the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)  on
pesticide    labeling    and    advertising.
Coordination also occurs with Customs and
Border  Protection  on  implementing the
secure  International Trade Data  System
across all federal  agencies and on pesticide
imports.  EPA  and  the  Food   and  Drug
Administration  (FDA)  share  jurisdiction
over general-purpose disinfectants used  on
non-critical surfaces and some dental and
medical    equipment    surfaces    (e.g.,
wheelchairs). The Agency has entered into
an  agreement  with Housing  and  Urban
Development      (HUD)      concerning
enforcement of the Toxic Substance Control
Act  (TSCA) lead-based  paint  notification
requirements.

The   Criminal   Enforcement   program
coordinates   with   other   federal  law
enforcement agencies (i.e., Federal  Bureau
of Investigation (FBI), Customs, DOL, U.S.
Treasury,   United  States   Coast  Guard
(USCG), Department of the Interior (DOI)
and DOJ) and with international, state and
local  law enforcement organizations in the
investigation     and    prosecution    of
environmental  crimes.  EPA  also actively
works with DOJ to establish task forces that
bring together federal, state, and  local law
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enforcement   organizations   to   address
environmental  crimes.   In   addition,  the
program has an Interagency Agreement with
the  Department  of  Homeland  Security
(DHS)  to  provide  specialized  criminal
environmental  training   to  federal, state,
local, and Tribal law enforcement personnel
at the Federal  Law Enforcement  Training
Center (FLETC) in Glynco, GA.

Under Executive  Order  12088,  EPA  is
directed to provide technical  assistance  to
other federal agencies to  help ensure their
compliance  with all  environmental laws.
The  Federal Facility Enforcement  program
coordinates  with other  federal  agencies,
states, local,  and  Tribal governments  to
ensure compliance by  federal agencies with
all environmental laws.  In FY 2013, EPA
also  will continue its  efforts to support the
FedCenter,     the    Federal    Facilities
Environmental Stewardship and Compliance
Assistance  Center   (www.fedcenter.gov),
which is now governed by a board of more
than  a dozen contributing federal agencies.

The    Enforcement    and   Compliance
Assurance  program collaborates with the
states and tribes. States perform  the  vast
majority  of inspections,  direct compliance
assistance,  and enforcement  actions. Most
EPA statutes envision  a partnership between
EPA  and  the states  under  which  EPA
develops national standards and policies and
the states  implement the program under
authority delegated by EPA. If a state does
not seek approval of a program, EPA must
implement  that  program  in  the state.
Historically, the level  of state approvals has
increased  as  programs   mature and  state
capacity  expands, with many  of  the  key
environmental    programs    approaching
approval  in  nearly  all  states.  EPA  will
increase its  effort to coordinate with states
on training,  compliance  assistance,  capacity
building,  and  enforcement.  EPA   will
continue to enhance the network of state and
Tribal compliance assistance providers.

The    Enforcement    and   Compliance
Assurance  program chairs  the  Interagency
Environmental    Leadership    Workgroup
established by Executive Order 13148. The
Workgroup    consists   of   over    100
representatives    from    most    federal
departments and agencies. Its mission is to
assist all federal agencies with meeting the
mandates of the Executive Order, including
implementation      of     environmental
management  systems   and  environmental
compliance  auditing   programs,  reducing
both releases and uses  of toxic  chemicals,
and  compliance with pollution  prevention
and pollution reporting requirements. In FY
2013, the program  also will work with its
Regions, states and directly with  a number
of  other  federal  agencies   to   improve
Resource  Conservation and Recovery Act
(RCRA),  Clean Water  Act  (CWA),  and
other  statutory  compliance   at  federal
facilities,  which  array  the full  range of
Agency tools to promote compliance in an
effective and efficient manner.

EPA  works   directly   with  Canada  and
Mexico bilaterally  and in the  Trilateral
Commission for Environmental Cooperation
(CEC). EPA's border activities require close
coordination with the  Bureau of Customs
and Border Protection, the Fish and Wildlife
Service, the DOJ, and the States of Arizona,
California, New Mexico, and Texas. EPA is
the  lead   agency  and  coordinates  U.S.
participation in the  CEC. EPA works with
the  National   Oceanic  and   Atmospheric
Administration   (NOAA),  the  Fish  and
Wildlife  Service, and the U.S. Geological
Survey   on  CEC  projects   to   promote
biodiversity cooperation and with the Office
of the U.S. Trade Representative  to reduce
potential trade  and environmental impacts
such as invasive species.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Super/and Enforcement

As   required   by   the   Comprehensive
Environmental   Response,   Compensation,
and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Executive
Order   12580,   the   Enforcement   and
Compliance Assurance program coordinates
with other  federal  agencies in their use of
CERCLA   enforcement  authority.   This
includes  the coordinated use of CERCLA
enforcement    authority   at    individual
hazardous waste sites that are located  on
both nonfederal land (EPA jurisdiction) and
federal lands (other agency jurisdiction).  As
required  by  Executive Order  13016, the
Agency  also   coordinates   the   use  of
CERCLA Section  106 administrative  order
authority by other departments and agencies.

EPA also coordinates with the Departments
of the Interior,  Agriculture, and Commerce
to  ensure   that  appropriate  and  timely
notices, required under CERCLA, are sent to
the Natural Resource Trustees to commence
the Natural  Resource Damage  Assessment
process.  The Department  of  Justice also
provides  assistance  to  EPA with judicial
referrals seeking recovery of response costs
incurred  by the U.S., injunctive relief to
implement response actions, or enforcement
of other CERCLA requirements.

Under    Executive    Order    12580,   the
Superfund  Federal  Facilities  Enforcement
program   assists   federal   agencies  in
complying with CERCLA. It ensures that 1)
all  federal facility sites  on the National
Priorities List have interagency  agreements,
also known as Federal Facility  Agreements
or  FFAs,  which   provide   enforceable
schedules for the progression of the entire
cleanup;  2)  these  FFAs  are monitored by
EPA for compliance; 3) federal sites that are
transferred to new  owners are transferred in
an environmentally responsible manner; and
4)  assistance  is  available,  to  the  extent
possible,   to   assist   federal   facilities  in
complying      with      their      cleanup
responsibilities.   It   is   this   program's
responsibility   to   ensure   that   federal
agencies, by  law,  comply with Superfund
cleanup obligations "in the same manner and
to the same extent" as private entities.  After
years of service and operation, some federal
facilities       contain      environmental
contamination,  such  as hazardous  wastes,
unexploded ordnance, radioactive wastes, or
other   toxic  substances.  To   enable  the
cleanup and reuse  of such sites, the Federal
Facilities Enforcement program coordinates
creative solutions  that protect both human
health   and   the   environment.   These
enforcement solutions help restore facilities
so they can once again serve an important
role in the economy  and welfare of local
communities and the country.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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COORDINATION    WITH    OTHER
FEDERAL AGENCIES

Enabling Support Programs
Office of the Administrator (OA)

The   Office  of  the  Administrator (OA)
supports the leadership of the Environmental
Protection  Agency's  (EPA) programs  and
activities  to  protect  human  health  and
safeguard  the air,  water,  and land upon
which  life   depends.  Several   program
responsibilities include  Congressional  and
intergovernmental    relations,   regulatory
management  and   economic   analysis,
homeland security - including intelligence
coordination, the Science  Advisory Board,
children's   health,   the  small   business
program,  and environmental  training  and
outreach.

 The    Office   of   Congressional   and
Intergovernmental  Relations (OCIR) is the
Agency's  principal  point  of  contact for
Congress, state and local  governments. As
liaison to the Agency's major programs, key
functions    include:   developing   EPA's
legislative agenda; facilitating coordination
and responses to requests  from Congress,
state  and  local  governments;  coordinating
the appearance of witnesses and preparing
them  for Congressional  hearings, including
confirmation  hearings;   managing   the
Agency's  Congressional and  gubernatorial
correspondence;       managing/moritoring
environmental  issues  through interaction
with state and local governments (and other
related  entities); managing  EPA's Local
Government Advisory Committee  and the
National    Environmental    Performance
Partnership    System   (NEPPS).    OCIR
coordinates testimony and questions for the
record with the Office of Management and
Budget  (OMB).   The  office  coordinates
EPA's  review  of  testimony   of  other
agencies,   and    coordinates   legislative
proposals   needing  interagency   review.
OCIR also coordinates  with other  Federal
agencies   on   issues    and/or   activities
involving state and local governments.

EPA's Office of Policy  (OP) interacts with a
number  of  federal  agencies  during  its
rulemaking activities. Per Executive Order
12866 - Regulatory  Planning and Review,
OP submits "significant" regulatory actions
to OMB  for  interagency review prior  to
signature  and publication  in the Federal
Register. Under  the  Congressional  Review
Act  (CRA),  rules are  submitted to  each
House of Congress and to  the Comptroller
General of the  United States. Regulatory
actions and other information are  published
through the Office of the Federal Register.
For regulations that may have a significant
economic impact on a substantial number of
small  entities,  OP  collaborates  with  the
Small  Business  Administration (SBA) and
OMB.

OP collaborates with other  federal agencies
in the collection of economic data  used in
the  conduct  of  economic   cost-benefit
analyses of environmental  regulations and
policies; and other  natural resource agencies
(e.g.,   the  United  States  Department   of
Agriculture (USDA), the Department of the
Interior (DOI),  and  the National Oceanic
Atmospheric  Administration (NOAA))  to
foster  improved interdisciplinary  research
and reporting of economic information. This
is achieved by  supporting  workshops and
symposiums  on environmental economics
topics  (e.g.,   economic   valuation    of
ecosystem  services,  adoption  of  flexible
regulatory    mechanisms    to     achieve
environmental goals) and measuring health
and  welfare  benefits  (e.g.,  represent  the
Agency's   issues  in cross-agency  groups
charged with  informing USDA  efforts  to
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
establish markets  for  ecosystem services).
Working   with   the   USDA   and   the
Department of Energy (DOE), OP continues
to evaluate and  improve climate change
integrated assessment  models and  develop
measures of the social  damages  attributable
to Greenhouse  Gas (GHG) emissions.  This
information is used to generate estimates of
the social  cost of  carbon  (SCC), which
enables   federal    agencies   to   better
incorporate climate impact assessments and
estimates of associated economic damages
into policy and regulatory analyses.

OP also works with the National Institute of
Standards and  Technology (NIST) and its
Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP)
program to help  the MEP Centers deliver
assistance  on  environmental and energy
matters as part of their  services to small and
medium-sized   businesses.   Under    the
Suppliers' Partnership  for the Environment
program and   its  umbrella  program,  the
Green   Suppliers'  Network  (GSN),   OP
provides technical assistance  to  the process
of "greening" industry  supply chains. OP is
working  with  the   DOE's   Industrial
Technologies  Program  to provide energy
audits  and  technical  assistance  to  these
supply chains. Toolkits on the integration of
environmental  and  energy  considerations
into  "lean  manufacturing" techniques are
widely used by MEP centers.  OP is assisting
the centers in  developing  their "sustainable
manufacturing" tools  and curriculum.  OP
participates    in    interagency    activities
organized by the Commerce Department's
Sustainable  Manufacturing  Initiative.   The
"Lean Manufacturing" toolkits are also used
by the  Department  of Defense  (DoD) for
training.

The Office of Children's  Health Protection
(OCHP) provides   leadership  for  cross-
Agency  efforts to  protect  children  from
exposure to  toxins,  pollution,  and  other
environmental health threats in their homes,
schools,  and communities. Children are at
greater  risk of  harm  from  exposure  to
environmental toxins than adults because of
their  unique  physiology  and   behavior
patterns.  The OCHP ensures that children's
unique    vulnerabilities   are    carefully
considered in Agency policy and  regulatory
development    and     that     children's
environmental health  is central in outreach
and  public  education  activities.  OCHP
works with other federal departments and
agencies,    state,    Tribal,   and   local
governments to coordinate diverse program
and  research efforts  to  help ensure that
children's environmental health is protected
where they live, learn, work, and play.

The  EPA's  Office of  Homeland Security
(OHS)  works  closely  with  many  other
federal departments and  agencies to meet the
goals of  presidential  homeland security
directives and plans.  These efforts include
working  through the  Interagency Planning
Committees  (TPCs) and  other avenues  to
ensure that the EPA's efforts  are integrated
into, and can build upon, the efforts of other
federal agencies.  OHS also coordinates the
development of responses to inquiries from
the White House, Department  of  Homeland
Security  (DHS), Congress, and others with
oversight  responsibilities  for   homeland
security efforts. EPA's ability  to effectively
implement  its  broad  range   of  homeland
security   responsibilities   is  significantly
enhanced through coordination  with other
federal  agencies.  OHS also  has a  strong
partnership  with various elements  of the
Intelligence  Community  and collaborates
with them on a weekly,  if not daily basis, to
ensure that interagency intelligence-related
planning and operational requirements are
met.  This is achieved through coordination
with the  Office of the Director for National
Intelligence,  the Department  of  Homeland
Security, the Central Intelligence Agency,
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
the National  Security Agency,  the Federal
Bureau of Investigation, the Department of
Defense,  and the White House National
Security Staff.

The  Science  Advisory  Board  (SAB)
primarily provides the Administrator with
independent peer reviews and advice on the
scientific   and   technical    aspects   of
environmental issues to inform the Agency's
environmental decision-making.  Often, the
Agency program  office seeking  the SAB's
review and advice has identified the federal
agencies interested in the scientific topic at
issue.  The  SAB  coordinates  with  those
federal agencies by providing notice of its
activities through the Federal Register., and,
as  appropriate,   inviting federal  agency
experts to participate in the  peer review or
advisory  activity. The  SAB, from time to
time,  also convenes  science workshops  on
emerging issues and  invites  federal  agency
participation  through  the  greater  federal
scientific and research community.

The Office  of Small  Business  Programs
(OSBP) works with  the Small Business
Administration  (SBA)  and  other  federal
agencies  to  increase the participation  of
small  and  disadvantaged  businesses  in
EPA's procurements.  OSBP works with the
SBA to develop EPA's  goals for contracting
with  small  and disadvantaged businesses;
address bonding issues that pose a roadblock
for small businesses  in specific industries,
such   as   environmental   clean-up   and
construction;  and address  data-collection
issues that are of concern to Offices of Small
and   Disadvantaged  Business   Utilization
(OSDBU)    throughout    the    federal
government.  OSBP  works  closely  with
regional and headquarters program  offices
and the Center for Veterans Enterprise to
increase the  amount of  EPA procurement
dollars   awarded   to   Service-Disabled
Veteran-Owned      Small      Businesses
(SDVOSB). OSBP,  through  its Minority
Academic Institutions (MAI) Program,  also
works with the Department of Education and
the White  House Initiative  on Historically
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) to
increase the institutional capacity of HBCUs
and to create opportunities for them to work
with federal agencies, especially in the  area
of  scientific   research  and  development.
OSBP   coordinates   with  the  Minority
Business   Development    Agency,    the
Department  of   Veterans   Affairs,   the
Department of Defense,  and  many other
federal agencies to provide outreach to small
disadvantaged   businesses   and  Minority-
Serving Institutions throughout the United
States  and the trust  territories.  OSBP's
Director  is an active  participant  in   the
Federal    OSDBU   Directors'   Council
(www.osdbu.gov).  The  OSDBU Directors'
Council  collaborates  to  support  major
outreach efforts to small and disadvantaged
businesses,    SDVOSB,   and   minority
academic   institutions  via  conferences,
business  fairs,  and speaking engagements.
The  OSBP's Asbestos and Small Business
Ombudsman program  partners  with  SBA
and  other  federal  agencies  to ensure  that
small business concerns are considered in
regulatory  development  and   compliance
efforts, and to provide networks, resources,
tools,  and forums  for  education  and
advocacy  on  behalf of small  businesses
across the country.
Office  of the  Chief  Financial  Officer
(OCFO)

OCFO  makes   active  contributions  to
standing     interagency      management
committees, including  the  Chief Financial
Officers  Council,  focusing on  improving
resources  management  and accountability
throughout the  federal  government. OCFO
actively  participates on the  Performance
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Improvement  Council which  coordinates
and  develops  strategic plans,  performance
plans, and performance reports as required
by law for the Agency. In addition, OCFO
participates in numerous OMB-led E-Gov
initiatives   such    as    the   Financial
Management  and Budget Formulation  and
Execution  Lines  of Business and  has
interagency agreements with the DoD for
processing agency payroll. OCFO provides a
Relocation  Resource Center   capable  of
managing "one-stop shopping" domestic and
international relocations. The EPA currently
provides  services internally to EPA, as well
as externally to the Transportation  Security
Administration  (TSA),  USDA, and  U.S.
Department  of Labor (DOL).  OCFO also
participates   with   the  Department   of
Commerce's (DOC) Bureau of Census in
maintaining the Federal Assistance  Awards
Data   System   (FAADS).    OCFO   also
coordinates appropriately with Congress and
other  federal   agencies,   such   as  the
Department  of  Treasury,  the  OMB,  the
Government Accountability Office  (GAO),
and  the  General  Services  Administration
(GSA). In addition, throughout FY 2012 and
FY 2013, the OCFO, in collaboration with
EPA's   Office  of  Administration   and
Resources  Management  and  Office  of
Environmental Information, will be working
with  the Department  of  the Interior's
National  Business  Center (NBC), which is
an OMB-approved Human Resource Line of
Business   snared  services  center.   OCFO
plans to migrate the EPA's existing time and
attendance IT  system services to NBC, as
well as move payroll services  from DoD's
Defense  Finance  and Accounting Services
(DFAS) to NBC.

Office of Administration and Resources
Management (OARM)

The OARM is committed to working with
federal partners  that focus  on improving
management and  accountability throughout
the  federal   government.  The  OARM
provides  leadership   and  expertise   to
government-wide activities in various areas
of human  resources,  grants  management,
contracts   management,   and   homeland
security. These activities  include  specific
collaboration  efforts with  federal agencies
and departments through:

    •      Chief Human Capital  Officers, a
           group   of  senior  leaders  that
           discuss human  capital initiatives
           across the federal government;

    •      The   Legislative  and   Policy
           Committee,    a     committee
           comprised   of  other  federal
           agency  representatives   who
           assist  the  Office  of Personnel
           Management   in    developing
           plans  and  policies  for  training
           and  development  across  the
           government; and

    •      The Chief Acquisition  Officers
           Council,     the      principal
           interagency     forum      for
           monitoring  and improving  the
           federal acquisition system. The
           Council also  is  focused   on
           promoting    the    President's
           specific initiatives and  policies
           in all  aspects of the acquisition
           system.
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The OARM is participating in government-
wide  efforts  to  improve the  effectiveness
and   performance  of   federal  financial
assistance  programs,  simplify application
and reporting requirements, and to improve
the delivery of services to the public. This
includes  membership on the  Grants Policy
Committee, the Grants Executive Board, and
the Grants.gov User's Group.  The EPA also
participates in  the  Federal  Demonstration
Partnership  to reduce  the   administrative
burdens associated with research grants.

In addition, throughout FY 2012 and FY
2013,  the  OARM, in  collaboration  with
EPA's Office of the Chief Financial  Officer
and    the    Office    of   Environmental
Information,  will  be  working  with the
Department  of  the   Interior's  National
Business Center (NBC), which is  an OMB-
approved Human Resource Line of Business
shared services center. The OARM plans to
migrate the existing EPA HR functions to
NBC,   which  offers   HR   transactional
processing, compensation management and
payroll processing,  benefits  administration,
time and attendance, and HR reporting.

The OARM is also working with the OMB,
the GSA, the DHS, and the DOC's National
Institute  of Standards  and Technology to
implement the Smart Card program.

Office  of  Environmental   Information
(OEI)
To support the EPA's overall mission, OEI
collaborates with a number of other federal
agencies, states, and tribal governments on a
variety  of  initiatives,  including  making
government more efficient  and transparent,
protecting   human    health    and   the
environment, and  assisting  in  homeland
security.  OEI is primarily  involved in the
information technology  (IT), information
management (EVI), and information security
aspects of the projects it collaborates on.

The Chief Information  Officer's (CIO)
Council: The CIO Council is the principal
interagency forum for improving practices
in the design, modernization, use, sharing,
and  performance  of  federal  information
resources.    The    Council     develops
recommendations  for   IT  management
policies,    procedures,    and    standards;
identifies opportunities to share information
resources; and  assesses and addresses the
needs of the federal IT workforce.

E-Rulemaking:  The EPA  serves  as the
Program Management Office (PMO) for the
eRulemaking  Program. The  eRulemaking
program's mission addresses two areas: to
improve public  access, participation in, and
understanding of the rulemaking process and
to improve the  agencies' efficiency  and
effectiveness  in promulgating regulations.
The  eRulemaking  Program  maintains  a
public website, www.Regulations.gov, that
enables  the general  public to  access  and
make comments on various documents that
are  published  in the Federal  Register,
including proposed regulations and agency-
specific   notices.  The   Federal  Docket
Management  System  (FDMS) is the agency-
side  of Regulations.gov  and  enables the
various   agencies to   administer  public
submissions regarding  regulatory and other
documents  posted by the agencies on the
Regulations.gov   website.  The   increased
public  access to the agencies'  regulatory
process enables a more informed public to
provide supporting technical/legal/economic
analyses   to   strengthen  the   agencies'
rulemaking   vehicles.   The    Program
Management  Office (PMO) coordinates the
operations  of the  eRulemaking Program
through  its 38  partner  Departments  and
Independent agencies (comprising more than
165  agencies,  boards,  commissions,  and
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offices).   This   coordination  is   realized
through the administrative boards that work
with the  PMO  on day-to-day operations,
ongoing   enhancements,   and  long-range
planning for  program development. These
administrative   boards    (the   Executive
Committee and the Advisory  Board) have
representative members  from  each partner
agency  and  deal  with  contracts,  budget,
website  improvements,   improved  public
access, records  management, and a host of
other regulatory concerns that were formally
only   agency-specific   in   nature.   The
coordination  with  the   partner  agencies
allows for a  more uniform  and consistent
rulemaking process across government. This
coordination  is  further realized by  the fact
that more than 90 percent of all federal rules
promulgated  annually are managed through
the eRulemaking Program.

The National Environmental  Information
Exchange  Network (EN):  The EN  is  a
partnership among  states, tribes, and  the
EPA. It is revolutionizing the exchange of
environmental  information   by  allowing
these partners to share data  efficiently and
securely  over the Internet. This approach is
providing real-time access to higher quality
data while saving time and resources, for all
of the partners.  Leadership  for the EN is
provided   by  the  Exchange   Network
Leadership Council (ENLC), which is co-
chaired  by OEI and a  state  partner.  The
ENLC works with representatives from the
EPA,  state  environmental  agencies,  and
tribal organizations to manage the Exchange
Network. FY  2013 will be a critical year for
the  Exchange  Network   to  complete its
current strategic plan to flow data across the
spectrum of the EPA's programs.

Automated                  Commercial
Environment/International   Trade  Data
System (ACE/ITDS): ACE is the system
being  built  by  Customs    and  Border
Protection (CBP) to ensure that its customs
agents have the information  they need to
decide   how   to   handle    goods   and
merchandise being shipped into, or out of,
the United States. ITDS is the organizational
framework  by   which   all   government
agencies with import/export responsibilities
participate in the  development of the ACE
system. ACE will be  a single, electronic
point of entry for importers and exporters to
report   required    information   to   the
appropriate agencies. It also will be the way
those   agencies    provide    CBP   with
information about potential imports/exports.
ACE eliminates the need,  burden, and cost
of paper reporting. It also allows  importers
and exporters to report the  same information
to multiple federal  agencies with  a single
submission.

The  EPA has the responsibility and legal
authority  to  make   sure  pesticides, toxic
chemicals,  vehicles  and  engines,  ozone-
depleting substances, and other commodities
entering    the     country    meet    our
environmental,  human  health,  and safety
standards. The EPA's ongoing collaboration
with  CBP  on  the ACE/ITDS project will
greatly   improve   information   exchange
between  the EPA and  CBP.  As a result,
Customs officers at our nation's borders will
have  the  information they need  to admit
products  that  meet  our  environmental
regulations,  and  to  interdict  goods  or
products that  do  not  comply  with  the
Agency's regulations.

The  EPA's work  on ACE/ITDS builds on
the  technical  leadership  in  using Web
services to exchange data  developed by the
Central  Data   Exchange   and  Exchange
Network (CDX/EN). As  a result  of  our
advocacy  and   the  interest  of  other
participating federal  agencies,  CBP  will be
using Web services to exchange data  with
the agencies participating in ACE/ITDS. In
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FY 2013, the EPA  expects to implement
pilot  data  exchanges  between five  EPA
programs   and   Customs   and    Border
Protection at selected Ports of Entry so that
full-scale   development   of   the   data
exchanges can occur. The Agency will share
the  results  with  the   other  participating
federal agencies participating in this project
and  offer the  EPA's Web services model
those  agencies  interested in  using this
option. The EPA has developed an installer
for our data exchange  software which will
make it easy for other agencies to install it in
their environments.  Alternatively,  the  EPA
could provide  its data exchange technology
to interested agencies on  a fee for service
basis.  Sharing and  reusing data  exchange
technology across  the  federal government
for ACE/ITDS implementation will  save
money and create efficiencies by eliminating
redundancies  in infrastructure  spending  by
each  agency  that needs to exchange data
with CBP.
The  EPA also will  be collaborating  with
CBP and other interested agencies on using
ACE/ITDS to automate checks of import
documentation.   Automating    document
review is absolutely  critical  for  agencies
such as the EPA that have limited staff at the
ports, providing a "virtual presence" at the
more than 300 ports nation-wide.

Federal       Information       Security
Management  Act (FISMA) Support: The
EPA's Automated  Security Self-Evaluation
and  Reporting Tool  (ASSERT)  provides
federal   managers  with   some   of  the
information they need,  from  an enterprise
perspective, to make timely and  informed
decisions  regarding  the level  of security
implemented on their information resources.
It helps agencies understand and assess their
security risks, monitor corrective actions,
and  provide   standardized and automated
FISMA reports. Federal agencies  using the
EPA's FISMA  Reporting  Solution,  and
ASSERT, include: the EPA,  and Pension
Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).

Geospatial Information:  The EPA  works
extensively   with   DOI,   NOAA   U.S.
Geological Survey  (USGS), the National
Aeronautics  and   Space   Administration
(NASA),  the  USDA, and  the  DHS  on
developing  and  implementing  geospatial
approaches  to  support  various business
areas.  It  also  works  with  25  additional
federal agencies through the activities of the
federal    Geographic  Data   Committee
(FGDC)  and  the OMB Geospatial Line of
Business  (GeoLoB)  for whom  OEI leads
several key initiatives. The EPA is one of
only  two  agencies  (the  other  being  the
National   Geospatial  Intelligence Agency)
that  participate  in the FGDC Coordinating
Committee,   Steering  Committee,   and
Executive Steering Committees,  as well as
on   the   Federal   Geospatial   Advisory
Committee, a Federal Advisory Committee
(FACA)  to the  DOI. A key component of
this  work is  developing and implementing
the  National  Spatial  Data  Infrastructure
(NSDI). The key objective for the NDSI is
to make  a comprehensive  array of national
spatial data -  data  that  portray features
associated with a location or which is tagged
with  geographic  information  and can  be
attached to and  portrayed on maps ,- easily
accessible to both governmental  and  public
stakeholders.  Use of this  data,  in tandem
with analytical applications, supports several
key  EPA  and  government-wide business
areas. These  include: ensuring that human
health and  environmental  conditions  are
represented in the appropriate contexts for
targeting and decision making, enabling the
assessment, protection, and  remediation of
environmental   conditions,   and   aiding
emergency  first   responders   and  other
homeland  security   activities.   Through
efforts such as the, National  Environmental
Information Exchange Network, National
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Environmental Policy Act  (NEPA) Assist,
EPA  Metadata Editor,  Facilities  Registry
System   (FRS)  Web  Services,  and  My
Environment. OEI also works closely with
its state, Tribal,  and international partners.
This   collaboration  enables   consistent
implementation  of  data  acquisition  and
development,  standards,  and  technologies
supporting  the efficient and  cost effective
sharing and use of geographically based data
and services.

Global   Earth  Observation  System  of
Systems (GEOSS):  The OEI  works with
the Office of the Science Advisor (OSA) to
support   the  EPA's  involvement  in  the
GEOSS  initiative.  Other  partners  in  this
initiative are:  the  U.S.  Group  on Earth
Observations (USGEO),  and a  significant
number  of other  federal  agencies, including
NASA,   NOAA,   USGS,   HHS,   the
Department of Energy (DoE), DoD, USD A,
the  Smithsonian,  the  National   Science
Foundation (NSF), USDA,  State, and the
Department of Transportation (DOT). Under
the ten-year strategic plan published by the
Office of Science and  Technology Policy
(OSTP)  in 2005, the OEI and the OSA are
leading   the  EPA's development  of the
environmental  component of the Integrated
Earth Observation  System  (IEOS), which
will be the U.S.  federal contribution to the
international    GEOSS    effort.    Earth
observation  data,  models,  and  decision-
support  systems  will play  an increasingly
important role  in  finding  solutions for
complex problems, including adaptation to
climate  change.  The OEI also  coordinates
with the OMB and OSTP to connect the
interagency  GEOSS work  with our Open
Government and Data.gov activities.

Chesapeake   Bay  Program:   Operating
under Executive  Order No.  13508, the EPA
is  working to  help restore  the  Chesapeake
Bay. Federal Partners in this initiative are:
the   NOAA;   the   Natural   Resources
Conservation Service;  the U.S. Fish  and
Wildlife  Service;  the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers;  the  USGS;  the U.S.  Forest
Service; the National Park Service; and the
U.S. Navy  (representing the  Department of
Defense).  The  States  of New York, New
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware,  Maryland,
West Virginia, Virginia, and the  District of
Columbia,  also  are  participating  in  the
effort. Using the Exchange Network (the
EPA's existing network  facilitating  data
sharing among  and with  the  states  and
tribes), the OEI will continue to facilitate
data exchange for the agencies working on
the Chesapeake Bay.  Additionally,  OEI is
leading the design of a comprehensive data
management  system  to  be  used  by  all
partners in the Chesapeake Bay Program.

Office of the Inspector General (OIG)

The EPA Inspector General is a member of
the  Council  of Inspectors General   on
Integrity   and   Efficiency  (CIGIE),   an
organization    comprised    of    Federal
Inspectors  General  (IG), GAO, and  the
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The
CIGIE coordinates and improves the way
IGs   conduct  audits,  investigations,   and
internal  operations.   The   CIGIE  also
promotes joint projects of government-wide
interest and reports annually to the President
on  the collective performance  of the  IG
community. The EPA  OIG coordinates
criminal  investigative activities with other
law enforcement  organizations such as the
FBI,  Secret Service,  and Department  of
Justice. In addition, the  OIG participates
with   various   inter-governmental   audit
forums  and  professional associations  to
exchange information, share best practices,
and obtain/provide training.  The OIG also
promotes  collaboration  among  the  EPA's
partners and stakeholders in  the application
of technology,  information,  resources,  and
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law enforcement efforts through its outreach
activities. Further,  the  EPA OIG  initiates
and  participates  in  collaborative  audits,
program evaluations, and investigations with
OIGs of agencies  with an  environmental
mission  such  as the DOT  and  USDA,  and
with  other  federal, state,  and  local  law
enforcement agencies as prescribed by the
IG Act,  as amended. The OIG, as required
by  the   IG Act,  coordinates  and  shares
information with the GAO. Additionally, the
OIG serves as the Inspector General of the
U.S.   Chemical    Safety   and   Hazard
Investigations  Board.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
MAJOR MANAGEMENT
CHALLENGES

Introduction

The  Reports Consolidation Act  of 2000
requires the Inspector General to identify the
most serious management challenges facing
the  EPA,   briefly   assess  the  agency's
progress in addressing them,  and report
annually.

The EPA has established a mechanism for
identifying    and   addressing   its   key
management  challenges.  As  part  of  its
Federal  Management Financial Integrity Act
process,  EPA  senior  managers meet  with
representatives  from the EPA's Office  of
Inspector    General,    the    Government
Accountability  Office, and  the Office  of
Management and Budget to hear their views
on the EPA's key management challenges.
EPA managers also use audits, reviews, and
program evaluations  conducted internally
and by OIG,  GAO,  and  OMB to assess
program effectiveness and identify potential
management  issues.  The  EPA recognizes
that   management   challenges,   if   not
addressed  adequately,  may prevent  the
agency from effectively meeting its mission.
The EPA remains committed to addressing
all management issues in a timely manner
and will address them to the fullest extent of
its authority.

The  discussion  that  follows   summarizes
each  of the management  challenges  the
EPA's OIG and GAO have identified and
presents the agency's response.
1.   Addressing    Emerging    Climate
     Change Issues

Summary of Challenge:  GAO notes that
while climate change poses management
challenges for  the federal government at
large, for the EPA, climate-change-related
challenges    pertain    to   legal   and
administrative  barriers.   These   include
ongoing efforts to reduce carbon emissions;
difficulties    in   coordinating   activities
involving  numerous  other  agencies and
other levels of government; and efforts to
account for and manage data on greenhouse
gas emissions.

Agency Response:  Over  the  past several
years, the EPA has taken several important
actions to address climate change. Currently,
the EPA plays a key role in developing and
implementing President Obama's ambitious
climate  change agenda. For instance, the
agency   is   participating  in   strategic
discussions and providing technical advice
and analysis  on the full range of domestic
climate policies and technologies.

Additionally, the  EPA is taking regulatory
actions  to   address  climate  change.  In
December 2010, the EPA issued a series of
rules  that  put  the   necessary regulatory
framework   in  place  to  ensure  that  1)
industrial facilities can get Clean Air Act
permits   covering their  greenhouse  gas
emissions when  needed and  2)  facilities
emitting  GHGs  at  levels below  those
established in the Tailoring Rule do not need
to obtain Clean Air Act permits. The EPA
continues responding  to the 2007 Supreme
Court decision  in Massachusetts  v.  EPA.
The EPA leads the development of multiple
mobile source programs to address  GHG
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
emissions   from    light-duty    passenger
vehicles, heavy-duty vehicles, ocean-going
vessels, and aircraft. In addition, the EPA
has  deferred  permitting  requirements  for
biogenic carbon dioxide emissions and  has
engaged the scientific  community to  study
how to treat these emissions in the context
of Clean Air Act permitting. With regard to
stationary sources, the EPA is proceeding
with  analyses  of  GHG  emissions   and
potential measures to reduce them as part of
its  obligations to  review and  revise new
source  performance standards,   consistent
with the requirements of the Clean Air Act.

Recognizing that climate change cuts across
many  programs  and  offices  within  the
agency, senior leadership  is taking steps to
expand and  improve  communication  and
coordination  on emerging climate change
issues. These processes will ensure that  the
agency   receives  information  and  input,
draws   effectively  on  its  resources,   and
provides   useful    information   to    its
stakeholders around the country.

Finally, the EPA continues to deliver on all
commitments  under  its ongoing  voluntary
partnership  programs  to  reduce  GHGs,
focused on energy efficiency, transportation,
and    other   sectors.    Experience    and
knowledge gained through these  programs
are also informing the EPA's input into  the
broader climate policy discussion.

2.   Reducing  Pollution in the Nation's
     Waters

Summary of Challenge: According to GAO,
among  the nation's most pressing water
quality problems with which EPA  and other
stakeholders struggle are the considerations
of  diffuse,   or  "non-point"  sources  of
pollution  and the  challenges posed  by
deterioration   in   the   nation's  premier
watersheds,  such  as the Chesapeake Bay
and Great Lakes. GAO believes multi-billion
liabilities associated with  replacing and
upgrading   the   nation's   aging   water
infrastructure are  a looming issue,  that if
not sufficiently addressed, will impact water
quality.

Agency Response: The EPA  partners with
federal, state, and local  agencies and with
others to reduce pollution  in  the nation's
waters, but  many  pollution  sources  are
difficult to monitor and regulate.

The   National     Pollutant    Discharge
Elimination    System    regulations    for
Concentrated  Animal  Feeding  Operations
require the  EPA  and  authorized  states  to
issue permits  for  an expanded universe  of
CAFOs (compared to those covered by the
1974 regulations) that discharge or propose
to discharge to U.S. waters. In 2002, about
4,000 CAFOs were permitted  out of a total
of   12,800   CAFOs.   Today,  the   EPA
estimates that approximately 14,500 of the
total 19,300 CAFOs may need permits, yet
only 8,300  of these CAFOs have NPDES
permits to date. In addition,  inspections will
require  substantial  effort   to determine
whether  CAFOs will discharge and are  in
compliance    with  their  new  nutrient
management plans.

The EPA estimated that the NPDES  CAFO
rule revisions in   2003  and  2008  could
potentially  result  in an  annual  pollutant
reduction  of  56  million   pounds   of
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phosphorus, 110 million pounds of nitrogen,
and 2 billion pounds of sediment. To realize
these pollutant reductions, states must adopt
the provisions of the  new  regulations and
then  issue  permits  consistent  with those
rules.  Additional  agency   resources  are
needed to assist states in developing revised
legislation,  regulations,  and/or permits to
reflect the new regulations and to oversee
state review of NMPs. States need additional
resources to revise their programs, to review
NMPs for every permitted CAFO, and to
increase enforcement and compliance efforts
to ensure that all CAFOs that discharge seek
permit  coverage  and  carry  out  proper
operation and maintenance.

The  EPA is continuing to take the lead in
working  across the federal government and
the  water   sector  to  close  the  water
infrastructure  gap and move  the nation's
water infrastructure  to a more sustainable
footing.  In  October  of 2010,  the  EPA
released its Clean Water and Drinking Water
Sustainability Policy,  which  focuses  on
efforts to  effect  change  and  reduce the
infrastructure  gap. The Policy emphasizes:
1) the need for robust and effective planning
for   water   infrastructure;   2)   capacity
development    and     effective    utility
management to enhance the sustainability of
all aspects of water sector systems; and 3)
integrating water  infrastructure into cross-
sector  planning  efforts   to   foster  the
sustainability of our communities. The EPA
is actively pursuing a suite of programs and
activities in each  of these areas,  including
efforts to encourage  and  work  with  state
SRFs  as  they  incorporate  sustainability
considerations into their programs.
Through the  Drinking  Water  and  Clean
Watersheds  Needs  Surveys,   the   EPA
provides a systematic assessment of national
water   infrastructure  needs.   These  are
reported to  Congress every four years and
clearly  show that needs  are very large and
increasing.

The  EPA's efforts to coordinate with  other
federal   agencies   are   extensive   and
expanding.  The agency  has  an  MOU with
the  Federal  Highway  Administration  to
promote asset management across the water
and  transportation sectors. We are actively
engaged with the Departments  of Housing
and Urban  Development and Transportation
in a partnership  to  promote  sustainable
communities.  Through the  EPA's  efforts,
water  infrastructure was  included as  an
element in  the $100M  of HUD  regional
planning grants that were awarded last year -
and  that aspect of the program's goals will
be strengthened for the $70M in  grants to be
awarded this year.

In concert  with these  regional planning
grants,  the  EPA has worked with HUD to
include water infrastructure as one of several
areas for which capacity building grants will
be awarded this year.  The awardee in this
area  will be charged with assisting planning
grant recipients to  better integrate  water
infrastructure  considerations into  regional
plans.

The  EPA's efforts  to  work  with states  on
water infrastructure span numerous  areas.
The  capacity  development  and  operator
certification programs have an active set of
work groups working  on enhancing efforts
in targeted  areas, such as system partnering
and  managerial capacity.  Sustainability  is
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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becoming an  important part of the  SRF
programs  as   more   states  incorporate
incentives  for  asset  management,  green
infrastructure,  energy efficient projects  and
numerous  other areas  which  will  help
communities recognize  and address their
individual infrastructure needs. Through the
EPA's leadership, aspects  of infrastructure
planning are being incorporated into NPDES
permit programs in some states and are also
receiving greater emphasis in enforcement
actions.

The  EPA  will  also  shortly launch   an
enhanced set   of web  pages to  support
communities as  they  seek to close their
individual  infrastructure gaps. The  pages
will  include a new area  with  resources
specifically  for local elected officials who
are   often   key   players   in   making
infrastructure investment decisions.

The  sum of the EPA's efforts represents a
strong   and concerted  effort  to  provide
support   and    leadership   that    helps
communities organize  resources  to meet
their water infrastructure needs.

To restore clean water in the Chesapeake
Bay, streams,  creeks, and  rivers, the EPA
established  the  Chesapeake  Bay  Total
Maximum   Daily Load,  a  historic   and
comprehensive   "pollution   diet"  with
rigorous  accountability   measures.  The
TMDL is required under  federal  law  and
responds to  consent decrees in Virginia  and
the District of Columbia dating back to the
late  1990s.  The TMDL—the largest  ever
developed   by  EPA—includes  pollution
limits to meet water quality standards in the
Bay  and its tidal  rivers.  The  TMDL is
designed to  ensure that  all  pollution control
measures  to  fully restore  the Bay and its
tidal rivers are in place by 2025. The EPA
expects controls, practices and actions in
place by 2017 that would achieve 60 percent
of the necessary reduction. The TMDL is
supported   by   rigorous   accountability
measures  to  ensure cleanup  commitments
are  met,   including   short-and  long-term
benchmarks,   a  tracking  and  accounting
system for jurisdiction  activities, and federal
contingency actions that can be employed if
necessary to spur progress. The Chesapeake
Bay Program Office is playing a significant
role through outreach activities that will help
the  overall  restoration effort.  Chesapeake
Bay jurisdictions are  currently  developing
Phase II Watershed Implementation  Plans;
final  versions,  which  should  detail how
jurisdictions will meet TMDL expectations
and set forth local implementation strategies,
are due in FY  2012.  The TMDL directly
addresses   the   management  challenges
identified by OIG.

The EPA is leading implementation  of the
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to restore
the  Great  Lakes  ecosystem  through  a
coordinated interagency  process. Activities
include implementing practices to reduce the
export of nutrients and soils  to near-shore
waters and  establishing  and implementing
TMDLs  and  Watershed Action Plans for
phosphorus and other  non-toxic pollutants.
The agencies  will focus primarily on three
geographic watersheds highlighted  in the
Great Lakes Restoration  Initiative Action
Plan:   Maumee   River,   Lower    Fox
River/Green Bay, and Saginaw River.
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3.   Safe Reuse of Contaminated Sites

Summary  of Challenge: The  EPA places
increasing  emphasis  on  the  reuse  of
contaminated    or     once-contaminated
properties  and has a performance measure
to define a population of contaminated sites
that are ready for reuse.  OIG acknowledges
the improvements and efforts  the EPA has
made in ensuring  the long-term safety  of
contaminated sites. However,  OIG  believes
that the EPA needs improved oversight and
management for  long-term  stewardship  of
contaminated sites, and new strategies that
take the agency beyond merely encouraging
non-EPA parties  to ensure long-term safety
and reused sites.

Agency     Response:     Cleaning    up
contaminated sites  and ensuring  their safe
reuse over the   long  term is an  agency
priority and  central  to the EPA's mission.
The EPA  and  state  and  tribal response
programs continue our progress in cleaning
sites  to  protect  public health  and  the
environment and  support the  safe use  of
cleaned  and stabilized properties.   The
agency believes that it is communicating site
risks and remedies and information needed
to ensure protectiveness.

Whenever  waste  is left in place at  sites on
the   National    Priorities   List,    the
Comprehensive  Environmental Response,
Compensation and  Liability  Act  requires
that the remedy at the  site  be reviewed at
least  once every  five years to ensure its
continued   protectiveness.    The  EPA's
national  Superfund Program reviews  Five-
Year  Reports at all sites and tracks any
recommendations for needed further action
to ensure implementation.
The EPA  and  our  state and  tribal  co-
implementers   may   select   institutional
controls  to  control land and  resource  use
where  residual  contamination remains  in
place.  Institutional  controls help minimize
the potential for exposure to contamination
and/or protect the  integrity  of  engineered
components. As remedial  actions, ICs  are
subject to five-year reviews as well as other
periodic   monitoring.   The   agency   has
developed     cross-program     guidance,
Institutional Controls: A Guide to Planning,
Implementing,  Maintaining and Enforcing
Institutional  Controls   at  Contaminated
Waste Sites,  which stresses the need for EPA
site managers and  attorneys to coordinate
with tribes, state  and local  governments,
communities,  and  other  stakeholders  to
ensure that  ICs  are properly  implemented,
maintained and enforced  over their lifetime.
The agency will continue to encourage State
and Tribal  Response Program funding  of
tracking  and management systems for land
use and institutional controls.

The EPA will also  continue to develop and
maintain    information    systems    like
"Cleanups     in    My     Community,"
(http://www.epa.gov/cimc), to educate and
inform the public regarding federally funded
contaminated site  assessment and cleanup
activities.   Promoting    reuse    involves
communities   in   cleanup   and    reuse
discussions.  The  EPA  will  continue  to
explore  new tools to  ensure appropriate
reuse and enhance long-term protectiveness,
including:
    •   Ready for  Reuse Determinations -
       environmental  status reports on  site
       reuse.
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    •  Comfort and Status Letters - convey
       status  of the site  remediation  and
       liability issues.
    •  EPA Funded Reuse Planning
    •  Site  Reuse Fact Sheets  -  highlight
       critical   remedial  components  in
       place,     long-term    maintenance
       activities, and institutional controls.

4.   Pace of Cleanup at Superfund and
     other Hazardous Waste Sites

Summary of Challenge: According to GAO,
the  EPA continues to  make progress in
identifying hazardous waste  sites requiring
cleanup.  However,  recent  GAO  reports
indicate that not only will cleanup  costs be
substantial,  but problems with the accuracy
and completeness of data prevent the agency
from estimating future cleanup costs. GAO
recommends that  the  agency  assess  the
comprehensiveness and reliability of the
data the agency  collects and, if necessary,
improve  the data to  provide  aggregated
information.

Agency Response: Since  the  Superfund
Program's inception, the EPA has provided
a mix of site-specific and aggregate data to
Congress through the annual  budget process
and  other  avenues  to  facilitate  annual
Superfund  appropriation  decisions.  The
aggregate    information    that     GAO
recommended the EPA provide to Congress
is only one among a myriad of data  points
that Congress  considers to make informed
decisions. As a result, these  data alone are
not determinative in congressional decision-
making.
In  its response  to GAO's  draft  report,
Litigation Has  Decreased and EPA Needs
Better Information on Site Cleanup and Cost
Issues to Estimate Future Program Funding
Requirements   (GAO-09-656),  the  EPA
recognized the importance of informing and
educating partners  and stakeholders  about
the EPA's  commitment to  and  progress
toward  environmental  cleanup.  The EPA
noted, as did the GAO report, that there are
challenges   in   concisely  describing  the
multiple facets of the Superfund Program to
assist decision  makers.  In  a subsequent
investigation  on  remaining  construction
funding needs, (EPA's Estimated  Costs  to
Remediate  Existing Sites Exceed  Current
Funding  Levels,   and  More  Sites  Are
Expected  to Be  Added to the  National
Priorities    List    (GAO-10-380),    GAO
discovered  that many sites face significant
uncertainty  regarding  future  site  cleanup
requirements. Numerous factors contribute
to this uncertainty, including the type and
extent of contamination at the site, questions
about   the  effectiveness   of   remedial
technologies, shifting cleanup standards, the
viability and cooperativeness of responsible
parties, states' ability to  provide statutorily
required    cost   share  assurances,   and
community    acceptance   of   proposed
remedies.

Multiplying the  risks  posed  by  these
uncertainties by the more than  500 NPL
sites  which   have   not   yet   achieved
construction completion yields a very large
range of possible  outcomes.  As  a result,
aggregate  estimates of  future  costs and
performance, especially on an annual basis,
are bounded by large ranges. This limits the
precision with which this information can be
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used to contribute to annual appropriation
decisions.

The agency will continue to explore options
for sharing with  Congress and the public
information  about  cleanup  progress  and
plans for future work at sites. In this regard,
through  the Integrated  Cleanup  Initiative
which began in 2010, the EPA committed to
identify and develop measures to depict the
broader scope of activities that take place
throughout the Superfund  cleanup pipeline.
Under  the ICI,  the  Superfund Remedial
Program introduced a new remedial action
project  completion measure that  directly
responds  to  GAO's recommendation  to
provide  more  data  on  Superfund   site
progress.  This measure  provides greater
program   transparency   by   describing
construction progress at  a  project  level,
which   conforms   more  closely  to   field
activities that  can  resonate  better with  a
community's understanding of our cleanup
efforts. In addition, the program is exploring
the possibility of establishing formal project
baselines to better understand and track site
progress.

*  EPA's Estimated  Costs  to  Remediate
Existing Sites  Exceed  Current  Funding
Levels, and More  Sites Are Expected to
Be Added  to  the National Priorities List
(GAO-10-380)

5.  EPA's Framework for Assessing and
    Managing    Chemical   Risks   /
    Transforming EPA's  Processes for
    Assessing  and  Controlling  Toxic
    Chemicals

Summary of  Challenge:  OIG and  GAO
believe  that  the  EPA's  effectiveness  in
assessing and managing chemical risks is
hampered in part  by  limitations on the
agency's  authority  to regulate  chemicals
under  the Toxic Substances  Control Act
(TSCA) and other statutes.  GAO notes that
EPA 's Integrated Risk Information System
(IRIS) viability is at risk because the agency
had been unable to  complete timely  and
credible  chemical assessments. OIG states
that as  the  agency  implements  steps to
improve its management of chemical risks, it
must have a clear strategy that formalizes
intra-agency coordination and priority.

Agency  Response:  GAO continues  to
identify "Transforming EPA's Processes for
Assessing and Controlling Chemicals" as a
high-risk area, and OIG continues to identify
"EPA's  Framework  for  Assessing  and
Managing    Chemical   Risks"    as   a
management challenge. In October 2009, the
EPA acknowledged  "Streamlining  Chemical
Assessments  Under IRIS"  as an agency-
level weakness  under the Federal  Financial
Managers' Integrity  Act  and has  made
progress in  addressing concerns raised by
both oversight organizations.

Improving IRIS. In May 2009, the agency
released a new IRIS process for completing
health  assessments.  The  goals of the new
process   are   to   strengthen   program
management,  increase  transparency  and
expedite   the    timeliness   of   health
assessments.  Since  then,  the   agency's
National   Center    for   Environmental
Assessment   has   completed   over   20
assessments,  more  than  the  number  of
assessments  completed in the previous five
years.  Key  major  assessments   recently
posted   include   trichloroethylene    and
di chl or om ethane.
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Additionally,   the   agency   is  making
significant   progress   on  health  hazard
assessments  of  numerous  high  priority
chemicals       (e.g.,       formaldehyde,
perchloroethylene,              methanol,
benzo[a]pyrene   and   Libby   asbestos),
including    finalizing    and   completing
milestones    for   interagency   science
consultation,  or  external review  for the
others. Progress  on these and other IRIS
assessments      is      available       at
http ://www. epa.gov/IRIS/.  EPA   is   also
developing assessments of health effects for
chemicals found in environmental mixtures,
including  PAHs, dioxins,  phthalates  and
PCBs. These  cumulative assessments  will
increase the number of chemicals that are
addressed by  the IRIS  Program  and are
based  upon  the  expressed  needs  of the
agency. The EPA's Human Health  Risk
Assessment Program will continue to lead
innovation  in risk assessment science based
on expanding scientific knowledge.

The EPA recently unveiled a new database
that facilitates public access to the scientific
studies that underpin key agency decisions.
The  Health and Environmental  Research
Online database contains the key studies that
the EPA uses to develop environmental risk
assessments and makes them available to the
public.  It  includes  references  and  data
supporting   the  IRIS   Program,   which
supports critical agency policymaking.  The
HERO  database  is  publicly  accessible so
anyone  can review  the  scientific literature
behind the  EPA's science assessments.  The
HERO     database     strengthens    the
transparency  of  the  science   supporting
agency decisions.
In July 2011, the EPA announced additional
measures to strengthen the scientific quality
of IRIS  assessments  based on comments
from  the National Academy of Sciences.1
The    EPA   agrees    with   the    NAS
recommendations for developing draft IRIS
assessments and is fully implementing them
consistent  with  the  NAS'  "Roadmap  for
Revision,"    which    viewed   the   full
implementation of their recommendations as
a  multiyear  process.  Initiatives  that  are
underway include a new document structure,
establishment  of  a   dedicated  Chemical
Assessment Advisory Committee, early peer
consultation,  and  an  improved weight of
evidence framework.

Assessing  and  Managing Chemical  Risks.
The  EPA  has announced its principles to
strengthen  US chemical management laws,
initiated a  comprehensive effort to enhance
the agency's current chemicals management
program  within  the  limits   of  existing
authorities, and is proposing expansions of
that  effort  in  the FY 2013  President's
Budget.  (A  listing of the  principles  are
available                              at
http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/
pubs/principles.html).   This  new  approach
was  introduced in the EPA's  FY 2011 -
2015  Strategic Plan  and further developed
and implemented during FY 2010 and FY
2011. FY 2013  represents a  crucial stage in
furthering   implementation    of    EPA's
strengthened   approach.   The  agency's
President's Budget request will allow EPA
to sustain  its  success  in  managing  the
potential risks  of new chemicals  entering
commerce   and   to   continue   making
substantial   progress   in   assessing  and
ensuring the safety of existing chemicals.
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Existing   Chemicals  Program  Activities:
EPA is requesting resources in FY 2013 to
continue  long-overdue progress in ensuring
the  safety   of  existing   chemicals  by
supporting three key activity areas:

       Obtaining, Managing, and  Making
       Public     Chemical    Information:
       Continue  developing  a  sustainable
       chemical safety information pipeline
       to support future  assessments  and
       risk management actions.

       Screening and Assessing Chemical
       Risks: Continue assessing the  risks
       of existing chemicals to inform and
       support      development      and
       implementation of risk management
       actions, as appropriate.

       Reducing Chemical Risks: Advance
       consideration and  implementation of
       risk management actions initiated in
       FY 2011 and continued through FY
       2012 and consider initiating new risk
       management actions in FY 2013

New Chemicals Program: In FY 2013, the
EPA will continue preventing the entry into
the U.S.  market of  chemicals  that  pose
unreasonable risks to human health or the
environment. Each  year,  the EPA's  New
Chemicals Program reviews and manages
the potential risks from approximately 1,000
new chemicals, products  of biotechnology,
and new  chemical nanoscale materials  prior
to their entry into the marketplace.

Management  of   Endocrine  Disrupting
Chemicals: The complexity of the scientific
and regulatory  process associated with the
full implementation of the EDSP warrant the
designation of the program as a management
challenge. However, the EDSP continues to
progress  towards full  implementation  with
the  on-going  evaluation  of  chemicals,
prioritization  of the universe of chemicals
and issuance  of test orders. An important
step was the September 30, 2011 EDSP 21
work                                plan
http ://www. epa.gov/endo/pub s/edsp21 work
_plan_summary%20_overvi ew_final.pdf,
which outlined the  steps necessary to move
the screening  program from its current  state
into a new form that is less reliant on whole
animal based assays and uses computational
models and higher throughput/shorter  time
in vitro methods to  screen for the potential
for endocrine disruption. This work plan is
an important first step in the development of
a Comprehensive EDSP Management  Plan
to be completed in 2012.

6.  Ensuring  Consistent Environmental
    Enforcement Compliance

Summary of Challenge: GAO reports that
while the EPA has improved its oversight of
state     enforcement     programs    by
implementing the State Review Framework
(SRF),  the agency  still  needs  to  address
significant      non-compliance      and
unacceptable  low   levels of  enforcement
activities.

Agency Response: The EPA is responsible
for establishing performance  expectations
and   conducting  oversight   of   federal
environmental  programs that  have  been
authorized or delegated  to states. The  EPA
has  utilized   a  number   of  different
management  controls   designed  to  ensure
appropriate program implementation, which
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vary across regions and states.  The SRF is
one of those management controls.  While
the  SRF is  an  important  and  regular
systematic look at performance, the EPA's
oversight of state enforcement  programs is
built on  four components, each playing an
important   part    in   building    strong
performance:

•  Clear expectations set in foundational
   program    documents,   policy    and
   guidance:
       -   Memoranda    of   Agreement,
          delegation   agreements,   state
          implementation           plans,
          enforcement         agreements,
          regulations, policy and guidance
          can  all set standards for state
          performance.
•  Annual      regional/state    integrated
   planning that includes both permitting
   and  enforcement  and results in clear,
   agreed-upon   commitments  based  on
   foundational documents:
       -   Work    plans    and    grant
          commitments  can  be  used to
          ensure that limited resources are
          used   to   address   the   most
          important              sources,
          noncompliance and performance
          issues.
•  Regular   and  periodic   review   of
   performance  that  identifies corrective
   actions  to  fix  problems  and ensures
   program improvements:
       -   The  SRF  looks  at inspection
          coverage,    identification    of
          violations, timely  and appropriate
          enforcement,    penalties    and
          accurate  and complete  reported
          data.      It      results     in
          recommendations   to   address
          deficiencies  and   tracks  their
          implementation.  The agency  is
          developing an escalation policy
          to help  regions  address  long-
          standing   performance   issues,
          including EPA action when states
          do  not actively  enforce all  or
          portions  of their  authorized  or
          delegated programs.
•  Transparent display of performance data
   to the public that  allows comparison  of
   performance across states:
          The  EPA  has publicly released
          the SRF metrics  and reports,  as
          well as  dashboards  and maps,
          which  have provided the public
          with  the  ability  to  compare
          across  states  and apply pressure
          to states to improve both their
          data and their performance.

These  components form the basis for the
continuous    improvement    of    state
performance and  consistency across states.
For example, one regional office has taken
action  to  address  both  permitting  and
enforcement issues in the State of Illinois
that  go  well  beyond  the  analyses  and
recommendations under SRF. These actions
have already yielded  significant results and
meaningful   improvements   to   Illinois'
program  and  are a  direct  result of the
region's active engagement with the state.

In the future, the EPA will be taking a more
holistic approach to oversight under the SRF
with the  inclusion  of Clean  Water Act
Memoranda  of  Agreement  reviews  and
permits as an  integral part of the review
process. Commensurate with commitments
established in the Clean Water Act Action
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Plan, the EPA is integrating the evaluation
of permitting and  enforcement to identify
how well permits and enforcement support
improving water quality and public health.

7.   Oversight of Delegation to States

Summary of Challenge: OIG  believes the
effectiveness  of  the EPA's  oversight  of
programs delegated to states has a number
of limitations, mostly  due  to  inadequate
oversight and differences between state and
federal policies,  interpretations,  strategies,
and priorities.  While the EPA has improved
its oversight, particularly in priority setting
and enforcement planning with states,  the
agency must address the limitations in the
availability,  quality,  and  robustness  of
program       implementation       across
environmental statues.  Additionally,  GAO
notes concerns about the EPA 's oversight of
state programs and the implications if states
are   unable   to   fulfill   core   program
requirements given budgetary issues.

Agency Response: The EPA acknowledges
that  state oversight  is a very complex and
fluid  arena.   Through   federal   statutes,
implementing  regulations,  and  program
design, states are allowed flexibility in how
they manage and implement environmental
programs.   Within   the  EPA,   national
program managers are  directly  responsible
for state  oversight of individual programs.
The  agency has committees, workgroups,
special   projects   and   initiatives    to
continuously  improve   agency   programs
delegated  to  states.  Below  are a  few
examples of these programs  and the efforts
made to enhance oversight or correct issues
with state delegation.
Improving Oversight through Better Data
Quality.  As  OIG and  GAO have  noted,
having  adequate  data is  important  to  the
EPA's  ability  to  understand and  oversee
state  programs. The agency and its state
partners   continually look   for  ways   to
improve public health protection and data
management  and  quality. EPA is reviewing
the  State Drinking  Water  Information
System/FED   and  State  Drinking  Water
Information  System/State  to develop  the
next generation of SDWIS,  which is a key
management  tool for the  drinking  water
program.  In  addition, the EPA  is working
with   state  representatives  to  develop
standard   definitions   for   source  type
utilization-codes in SDWIS,  update standard
operating procedures, and improve oversight
of  emergency  wells  through  enhanced
monitoring of emergency sources.

Strengthening State-EPA Implementation of
Water Programs.  EPA and  the states work
together through the Partnership Council of
the Office of Water and  States to  engage
states   in   planning,    budgeting,   and
implementation activities  for the national
water program. Since its  creation in 2008,
the  PCOWS  has   engaged  regularly  to
discuss  strategic  priorities—to ensure that
core and  key program  activities are given
appropriate priority  in  budget decisions—
and  to  identify opportunities to maximize
resources and reduce barriers in support of
key joint priorities. For example, in response
to   the   President's    February   2011
Memorandum on  Administrative Flexibility,
the PCOWS recently identified opportunities
to  streamline  and  reduce  administrative
burden. In FY 2012, the PCOWS moved to
quarterly  meetings,  thereby  increasing  the
frequency of EPA collaboration with states.
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NPDES Program Withdrawal Requests. The
EPA  currently  has  21  pending  National
Pollutant  Discharge  Elimination  System
authority   withdrawal   petitions   in   16
different states, 3 of which have been filed
since  January  1, 2011. The petitions can be
broad reaching or focused on narrow issues.
Eight regions have at least one petition filed
within their respective states. Resolution of
the last petition occurred  in July  2009.
Recently, the EPA has redoubled efforts at
the national level to  address the  concerns
cited  in withdrawal  petitions, increasing
withdrawal petition specific discussions with
regions,  corresponding  states,  and  other
EPA offices and senior managers. The EPA
is confident that these recent efforts will
increase resolution of petitions.

Improving State  Oversight Data Limitations
in Our Cleanup Programs. In response to
the OIG's findings that the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania did not collect ground water
monitoring data  at the Bruin Lagoon site as
required by the terms of the Superfund State
Contract,  EPA  Region  3  developed new
documentation procedures to address  any
future instances of  noncompliance.  The
procedures,  as documented in an  October
2010  memorandum from  the Director of the
Office  of  Superfund  Site   Remediation,
include consulting with  Regional  Counsel
and documenting the  noncompliance in a
letter  to the state. In instances of continued
noncompliance,  the issue will be  elevated
within the EPA and the  state,  and counsel
will determine necessary  actions to  ensure a
state carries out its obligations.

The Resource Conservation  and  Recovery
Act Program provides adequate oversight of
state programs through several means. For
instance, the EPA sets national baselines and
state commitments for grant funding and
monitors progress  toward these goals under
the Government Performance and Results
Act and through our Annual Commitment
System,  discussions  with  regions  (which
meet directly with  states to  assess progress),
and frequent interaction with  Association of
State    and    Territorial   Solid   Waste
Management Officials. The RCRA program
works   closely  with   ASTSWMO  at  the
board-level  as well  as  in  subgroups  for
particular topics (e.g.,  corrective action and
permitting).  In  addition, the EPA works
closely  with   states  to issue  rules  and
guidance to address issues of concern and
provide implementation assistance for state
programs.

In terms of addressing data limitations, the
agency   agrees   with  the   OIG  audit
recommendation    as    far   as   making
suggestions  and  recommendations  to  the
states regarding the importance of document
retention.  Each state creates its own policy,
and the EPA will continue  to stress this
during  our  national  conferences,  training
sessions and outreach activity.

Improving State-EPA Collaboration through
National   Environmental    Performance
Partnership System. Through the National
Environmental   Performance  Partnership
System,  the  EPA  and  the states have
developed  a  strategic,  performance-based
working relationship  based  on  a  clearer
understanding of mutual issues and priorities
and  improved  allocation   of   resources.
Building  on  this  successful  platform,  the
EPA and the states are working together to
share  the workload  more efficiently and
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effectively to  achieve  environmental  and
public health outcomes. In FY  2011, the
EPA  and  states  collaborated to  identify
opportunities for enhanced worksharing and
resource  and  workload   flexibility  to
maintain the effectiveness of core programs,
particularly  in light of widespread  state
budget  reductions  due  to the  economic
downturn. The EPA established a task force
with states and identified program activities
where worksharing  can be  more  broadly
applied  and   areas   where   statutes  or
regulations  prohibit  worksharing.  In  FY
2012,  the task  force  will  identify  and
promote   worksharing   best   practices,
investigate  ways   to  make  the  EPA's
expertise  more available to  states  through
IP As  and digital/electronic resources,  and
target  opportunities  to  expand  mutually
beneficial joint training opportunities.  Also
in FY 2012, EPA will establish a workgroup
of national program managers, regions, and
key   support   offices  to   collect   the
information needed to define,  describe, and
assess the EPA's  processes, practices,  and
tools  for  overseeing state delegations.  The
workgroup will report  its  findings to the
EPA's Deputy Administrator and  propose
options for next steps as needed to ensure
the agency is carrying out  its oversight
responsibilities in a coordinated, transparent,
and accountable manner.
8.
Need for a Greater Coordination of
Environmental  Efforts/Coordinating
with   Other  Agencies  to   More
     Effectively
               Leverage
Limited
     Resources

Summary of Challenge: According to OIG
and GAO, the EPA  needs to improve  its
coordination with federal and state partners.
Specifically,  OIG  states  that  a  national
environmental policy is needed to  help the
EPA   improve  coordination  with  other
federal    agencies   and    ensure    a
comprehensive  approach  to  addressing
environmental problems  (OIG cites climate
change,  water  infrastructure,  Chesapeake
Bay,  and Mexico  Border as some specific
examples of programs which would benefit
from  a coordinated federal approach.) GAO
notes  that  the  agency  needs to  improve
coordination  with  its federal  and  state
partners to reduce administrative  burdens,
redundant activities, and inefficient uses of
federal resources.

Agency  Response: The EPA  maintains the
position  it stated originally in its April 20,
2010 response to the Draft Special Report:
National   Environmental   Policy    and
Quadrennial Review Needed, that a national
environmental policy exists in the  form of
authorizing statutory goals and mandates in
the  National Environmental  Policy Act.
Further,  the EPA and other federal  agencies
are already coordinating on high  priority,
complex issues.

For   example,    the    agency   routinely
coordinates with  federal, state  and  local
funding partners to facilitate the delivery of
often  first  time  drinking   water  and
wastewater services to small  communities,
while minimizing  administrative  burden.
Coordination, collaboration and  leveraging
resources in concert with program  partners
are key aspects  of all phases of US-Mexico
Border   Water   Infrastructure    Program
implementation.  In coordination  with  its
partners,  the  agency  uses  a  risk-based
prioritization process to identify and fund
border water infrastructure projects  that will
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have   the   greatest   public   health   and
environmental  benefits.  Also,  the  EPA
ensures that its resources are used efficiently
through a program policy which stipulates
EPA construction  grants be used only as a
last resort  after all other possible  funding
sources  have  been  explored,  and  EPA
funding  is  deemed  essential  to  make
affordable  high   priority  projects  which
otherwise  could   not  be  implemented  in
communities   with   limited   institutional
capacity. In doing so, the EPA ensures that
project funding is necessary, directed toward
the  neediest  communities,   coordinated
across  agencies,  and not  duplicative. The
EPA will  continue to  partner, coordinate,
and leverage  resources as it implements the
US-Mexico  Border  Water  Infrastructure
Program to address the  significant public
health  and environmental  needs along the
border.

Additionally, the EPA continues to  take the
lead  in   working   across   the   federal
government and water sector  to close the
water  infrastructure  gap  and move  the
nation's  water infrastructure  to  a more
sustainable footing.  In October  2010, the
EPA released  its Clean Water and Drinking
Water  Sustainability  Policy.  The  policy
represents the agency's efforts to bring to
define the focal points for affecting change
to reduce the infrastructure gap. The policy
emphasizes:  1)  the need for robust  and
effective planning for water infrastructure;
2) capacity development and effective utility
management to enhance the sustainability of
all aspects  of water sector systems; and 3)
integrating  water  infrastructure into cross-
sector   planning   efforts  to   foster  the
sustainability of our communities. The EPA
is actively pursuing a suite of programs and
activities in each  of these areas,  including
efforts to  encourage and  work with state
SRFs  as  they  incorporate  sustainability
considerations into their programs.

The  Chesapeake   Bay   Program   is   a
partnership of federal agencies, states, local
governments,             nongovernmental
organizations,  academic  institutions,  and
other interested stakeholders.
President  Obama's  May  2009  Executive
Order  on  Chesapeake Bay Protection and
Restoration has brought the federal agencies
interested in the Bay and its watershed to a
new level  of interagency coordination and
cooperation.    The    Executive    Order
established   the   Federal    Leadership
Committee for the Chesapeake Bay,  which
is  chaired by  the  EPA  and  includes
Secretary-      and     Administrator-level
executives of  the  U.S.   Departments  of
Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Homeland
Security, Interior,  and Transportation. FLC
members  are  represented  in  more  regular
meetings   of the  FLC  Designees,   which
include Assistant  Secretary  and  Assistant
Administrator-level    executives.    Daily
development  of  deliverables  under  the
Executive Order is conducted by the Federal
Office Directors'  group. Working together,
the FLC  agencies released  a coordinated
implementation strategy on May  12, 2010.
These  agencies   also  coordinate  on  the
development of an annual action  plan and
annual  progress   report  required  by  the
Executive Order.

The EPA's efforts to protect and restore the
Bay   and  its    watershed   are   closely
coordinated with  those of the  watershed
jurisdictions  through the  Chesapeake Bay
Program   partnership.  Elected   officials,
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agency leadership,  and staff members from
Delaware,   the  District   of   Columbia,
Maryland,    New   York,    Pennsylvania,
Virginia, and West  Virginia participate in all
levels    of   program   leadership.   The
jurisdictions also are partners in the science
and  monitoring  efforts  that support  the
program. The support and partnership of the
jurisdictions  are essential in the success of
the Chesapeake Bay Program.

The  EPA  will  continue   its   efforts  to
coordinate environmental issues across the
federal government and with state and local
partners.
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9.   Incorporating	Protection
of
     Children's Health:

Summary   of   Challenge:   The  EPA's
Strategic Plan reflects the agency's priority
for   children's    environmental   health.
However, recent  GAO reports find that the
agency's  leadership  needs  to   look  for
additional opportunities to  coordinate and
collaborate on  the priorities in  a more
concrete and actionable way.

Agency Response: Recent GAO reports and
testimonies indicated that the EPA needs to
reinvigorate   its   leadership   focus   on
children's  health. The EPA currently  has
management controls in place to  coordinate
children's health  across the agency. As part
of its FY 2011 - 2015 Strategic Plan, the
EPA  developed   an  agency-wide   cross-
cutting fundamental strategy for children's
health that  includes specific actions to  be
taken  by program and regional  offices37.
The agency's Office of Children's Health
and Protection has also developed a strategic
plan which increases senior management's
focus on children's health protection issues.
 10.  Limited Capability  to Respond  to
     Cyber Security Attacks

 Summary of Challenge. OIG believes that
 the EPA has limited capacity to effectively
 respond to external network threats and that
 actions  taken  by  the  agency do  not
 demonstrate a comprehensive or systematic
 approach to network security. The agency
 needs  to aggressively  enhance its  cyber
 security capabilities and address security
weaknesses to strengthen its ability to detect
and respond to network attacks.

Agency Response: The EPA acknowledges
that  advanced  persistent  threats  pose  a
significant challenge for the agency, as well
as  for  all  federal  agencies.  The  EPA
continues to make  significant progress in
enhancing situational awareness across the
agency  and  increasing   invisibility  into
network    activities.   To   address    this
challenge, the EPA has identified  specific
automated tools to  address cyber  security
concerns  that are  being implemented  in a
secure  manner.   The  agency  has  fully
deployed  a Security Information and Event
Management  Tool   to   facilitate  greater
vigilance   in  log  reviews  and  activity
monitoring.   The   agency's   Computer
Security Incident Response Capability office
is working to build stronger relationships
with  external  organizations,  such  as  the
Department of Homeland Security, for threat
intelligence sharing.

11.  Addressing Workforce Planning

Summary of Challenge.  OIG and GAO
continue  to raise concerns about agency
efforts to address  workload and workforce
planning.  GAO believes the EPA continues
to face challenges in identifying its human
resource  needs,  and that  it has   not
comprehensively analyzed its workload and
workforce  to  determine   the   optimal
workload and staff allocation.  OIG notes
that the EPA does not have controls and a
defined   methodology   for   determining
workforce levels based upon the workload of
the  agency.   Without data on  workload
levels, it is difficult for the agency to define
http://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/strategicplan.html
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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and justify resource  levels  necessary to
carry out the agency's mission.

Agency  Response: As  part  of  ongoing
resource management  efforts, the EPA has
explored and  continues  to  review how to
maximize the productivity of its limited staff
and  other resources. As part of its annual
budget process, the EPA tracks in detail the
use of resources by program (or media), by
program project, by year, by appropriation,
and by object class (type of spending).  The
EPA also tracks and reports  the results of its
programs   by  strategic  plan  goals  and
objectives.  Each year, the EPA uses these
data to review the relative  allocation of
resources and staffing and funding for all its
programs as well  as specific activities  and
initiatives.

The   EPA   is    complementing   these
management and planning efforts and data
by  strengthening both workforce planning
(the type of staff and skills needed)  and
workload   analytics  (the  capabilities  to
calculate the level of staffing  needed for
particular tasks).
Workforce  Planning.  The agency currently
acknowledges Workforce  Planning  as  an
internal control weakness under the Federal
Managers'   Financial   Integrity  Act.   In
conjunction with the agency's annual budget
process, the EPA's Office of Administration
and  Resource  Management  is  leading  a
collaborative workforce  planning initiative
to identify  the critical  occupations required
to  meet the  EPA's  current  and  future
mission  objectives. Program and  regional
offices identified current mission critical and
other occupations  and  considered  office-
specific  retirement   eligibility   data   to
estimate potential attrition  and  identify
anticipated  shifts  in  their   occupational
profiles over  FY 2012-2015.  The  agency
will  continue annual workforce planning in
conjunction with  its budget cycle to achieve
greater strategic visioning at the national and
office levels,  identify new occupations or
gaps   in   existing   occupations,   focus
recruitment  and   outreach   efforts,   and
strengthen succession planning.

Workload   Analytics.   The    EPA   has
undertaken  three   major  initiatives  to
strengthen its ability to understand the level
of resources needed for specific functions or
tasks. These initiatives  address  GAO  and
OIG  concerns  about both  the  agency's
ability to capture and evaluate workload data
and  to  develop  capabilities  for  using
workload  data to  analyze specific  tasks.
First, with contractor  support  the  EPA
conducted  a survey to capture over 1,000
frontline managers'  best estimates of FTE
devoted to six critical functions:  scientific
research,    environmental    monitoring,
regulatory     development,     permitting,
enforcement,  and  financial  management.
The  survey also  captured  estimates of the
workload   of   major  tasks  within  each
function, as well  as major work drivers and
work products. Second, the agency reviewed
workload   analytical  efforts  of 23  other
federal  agencies  regarding their workload
planning overall  and in  specific functional
areas they shared with  the EPA,  such as
science  and regulatory development. Third,
the EPA's regional offices  piloted efforts to
assess some specific regional tasks and how
some major variables could  affect these
tasks' workload.

The  EPA is examining the results  of these
initiatives to develop practical  next steps for
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EPA organizations and programs to follow
in collecting and analyzing workload data on
key project activities. The goal is to develop
analytic tools which can provide common
formats to help structure and inform high-
level workload estimates. The EPA will rely
on subject matter experts'  knowledge and
experience   to  develop   the   analytical
framework,  plan how best  to  collect and
verify relevant workload data in their  areas
of  expertise,   and   efficiently   produce
analyses to inform  the  agency's resource
decision-making processes.
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
EPA USER FEE PROGRAM

In FY 2013, EPA will have several user fee
programs  in  operation.  These  user  fee
programs and proposals are as follows:

Current Fees: Pesticides

Fees authorized  by the Federal Insecticide,
Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1988, as
amended by Public Law 110-94, will expire
on September 30,2012. Legislative language
will be proposed to reauthorize and increase
these  fees  to cover  a  greater  portion  of
EPA's  costs  of  administering  Pesticides
registration and reregi strati on programs.

•  Pesticides Maintenance Fee

The Maintenance Fee provides funding for
the Reregi strati on  and Registration Review
programs and a certain percentage supports
the processing  of applications  involving
inert ingredients.

•  Enhanced Registration Services

Entities seeking to register pesticides for use
in the United States pay a fee at the time the
registration  action request is  submitted to
EPA   specifically   for   the   accelerated
pesticide registration decision  service.  This
process has introduced new pesticides to the
market more quickly.

Current Fees: Other

•  Pre-Manufacturing Notification Fee

The Pre-Manufacturing Notification (PMN)
Fee  is  collected  for  the   review   and
processing    of   new   chemical    pre-
manufacturing  notifications  submitted  to
EPA by the chemical industry.  These fees
are paid at  the time  of submission  of the
PMN for review by EPA's Toxic Substances
program. PMN fees are authorized by the
Toxic Substances Control Act and contain a
cap on the amount the Agency may charge
for a PMN review.  EPA is authorized to
collect up to $1.8 million in PMN fees in FY
2013 under current law.

•  Lead Accreditation and Certification
   Fee

The Toxic Substances Control Act, Title IV,
Section     402(a)(3),     mandates     the
development of  a   schedule of  fees  for
persons  operating lead training programs
accredited under the  402/404 rule and for
lead-based  paint contractors certified under
this rule. The training programs ensure that
lead  paint  abatement is done  safely. Fees
collected for this activity are deposited in
the U.S. Treasury.  EPA estimates that $1
million will be deposited in FY 2013.
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•  Motor    Vehicle     and    Engine
   Compliance Program Fee

This fee is authorized by the Clean Air Act
of 1990 and is administered by the Air and
Radiation Program. Fee collections began in
August 1992. Initially, this fee was imposed
on  manufacturers  of light-duty  vehicles,
light-   and   heavy-duty   trucks,    and
motorcycles.  The fees cover EPA's cost of
certifying new  engines  and  vehicles  and
monitoring compliance of in-use  engines
and vehicles. In 2004, EPA promulgated a
rule   that  updated   existing  fees   and
established fees for newly-regulated vehicles
and engines.  The  fees established for new
compliance programs are also imposed on
manufacturers of  heavy-duty,  in-use,  and
non-road  vehicles  and engines, including
large    diesel    and    gas   equipment
(earthmovers,       tractors,       forklifts,
compressors,   etc),   handheld  and   non-
handheld  utility  engines (chainsaws, weed-
whackers, leaf-blowers, lawnmowers, tillers,
etc.),  marine (boat motors, watercraft, jet-
skis), locomotive,  aircraft and recreational
vehicles  (off-road  motorcycles,  all-terrain
vehicles, snowmobiles). In 2009, EPA added
fees  for evaporative requirements for  non-
road   engines.  EPA  intends  to   apply
certification  fees   to   additional  industry
sectors as new programs  are developed. In
FY   2013,   EPA   expects  to   collect
approximately $21.4  million from  this fee
program.

By FY 2014,  EPA plans to have updated the
fees rule to collect an additional $7 million
annually  compared to  FY 2011. This  $7
million reflects  new  costs that  EPA  will
incur due to vehicle and fuels data systems
and  lab  modernization.  To  offset  these
increases,  EPA will  update  its  existing
Motor  Vehicle  and   Engine  Compliance
(MVEC)  fee program and propose a new
Fuels Fee Program that will increase Agency
fee  collections  by   approximately  $7.0
million annually.38 This includes:

   •   Initiating a rulemaking to establish a
       new Fuels Program Fee to recover
       eligible costs  associated  with  the
       implementation    of   the    new
       Renewable Fuels  program  and other
       core   Fuels    program    activities,
       including   the   registration   and
       reporting on fuels and fuel  additives.
       This action is estimated to increase
       fee collections by about $2.0  million
       annually.
   •   Updating the existing MVEC fee to
       capture expanded  cost-recoverable
       activities   associated    with   the
       development,     operation,     and
       maintenance of the  Agency's engine
       and vehicle compliance information
       system. This action is  estimated to
       increase  fee  collections  by  about
       $2.0 million annually.
   •   Updating  the  existing  MVEC  Fee
       Rule  to  recover  costs  of the Lab
       Modernization   Project   currently
       being  funded with  Agency  funds.
       This action is estimated to increase
       fee collections by about $3.0  million
       annually.

Fee Proposals: Other

•  Enhanced Registration Service Fee

Fees  are  paid by industry for   expedited
processing of certain  registration petitions
and   the   associated   establishment   of
tolerances for pesticides to be used in or on
food  and  animal  feed.   These  Pesticide
Registration Service fees are authorized by
Section  33  of  the  Federal  Insecticide,
38 Note that this estimated increased fee revenue is
contingent upon the lab receiving funding identified
to date.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
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Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1988, as
amended    by   Public   Law    110-94.
Accordingly,  during  2013,  the  level  of
registration  service fees payable under this
section  shall be reduced 40 percent below
the level in effect on September 30,  2012.
Legislative  language  will  be proposed  to
reauthorize and increase these fees to cover
a  greater   portion   of  EPA's  program
operating   costs.  Currently,  those   who
directly benefit  from  EPA's registration
services cover only a fraction of the costs to
operate  the program,  leaving the general
taxpayer to shoulder the remaining burden.

•  Pesticides Maintenance Fee

Legislative  language  will be  submitted  to
authorize  the collection of  fees  to  more
closely  align fee collections  with program
costs. Maintenance fees  are  paid by  the
industry  to  offset  the costs  of  pesticide
reregi strati on,   registration   review,   and
reassessment  of  tolerances for  pesticides
used in  or  on  food  and  animal  feed  as
required by law.  This fee  is  authorized in
Section  4  of   the  Federal  Insecticide,
Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act of 1972, as
amended    by   Public   Law    110-94.
Authorization to  collect the fee  will expire
on   September   30th,  2012.   Legislative
language will be proposed to reauthorize and
increase these fees to cover a greater portion
of program  operating  costs.  This proposal
relieves the  burden on the general taxpayer
and  finances  a  portion  of  the  costs  of
operating the  Reregi strati on program from
those who  directly  benefit  from  EPA's
reregi strati on activities.

•  Pre-Manufacturing Notification Fee

Under the current fee  structure, the Agency
would  collect  $1.8  million  in  FY  2013.
Legislative  language  will be  submitted  to
remove the statutory  cap in  the  Toxic
Substances    Control   Act   on    Pre-
Manufacturing Notification Fees. Under this
legislative proposal, EPA expects to collect
an  additional  $4  million in FY  2013  by
removing the statutory cap.

•   Energy Star Fees

The President's Budget  proposes  to begin
collecting   user   fees   from    product
manufacturers  who  seek   to  label  their
products under EPA's Energy Star program.
Since 1992, the Energy Star label has served
as an indicator of energy efficiency, helping
consumers and businesses select qualifying
products  and, increasingly,  Energy  Star
products have qualified for  special rebates,
tax exemptions or credits, and procurement
preferences.  Fee  collection  would start in
fiscal year 2014  after EPA undertakes a
rulemaking process to determine products to
be covered by fees and the level of fees, and
to  ensure that  a fee  system would  not
discourage manufacturers from participating
in  the  program   or  result  in  a  loss  of
environmental benefits. Below is a copy of
the legislative proposal language for the fee,
also  included  in  the President's Budget
Appendix.

Energy Star User Fees.

(a) Schedule of Energy Star  User fees. The
Administrator   of   the   Environmental
Protection  Agency  may  prescribe   by
regulation, for application in fiscal  year
2014 and in subsequent fiscal  years,  a
schedule   of  Energy   Star  fees   for
manufacturers of products that display the
ENERGY STAR label. The  regulation will
ensure  that   the  fee  imposed   on  each
manufacturer  will approximate, as  closely
as  possible,   its  proportional  share  of
ENERGY   STAR   products    program
administration costs.  The  Administrator
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shall amend this regulation periodically so
as to ensure
that the schedule of fees covers such costs.

(b)     Collection     Procedures.      The
Administrator shall prescribe procedures to
collect               the              fees.

(c) Collection, Deposit, and Use:
       (1) there is hereby established in the
       Treasury  of  the  United States  an
       "Energy Star User Fee " account;
       (2) fees collected under this section
       shall be deposited in the Energy Star
       User Fee account;
       (3) such fees  shall be collected and
       available   for   ENERGY   STAR
       products  program   administration
       functions performed by the Agency in
       an amount and to the extent provided
       in advance in appropriations acts.

•   Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest

A legislative proposal will be submitted to
authorize the  collection  of user fees  to
support the  development  of an electronic
manifest   system    for   generators    and
transporters   of   hazardous   waste.   The
Resource Conservation and Recovery  Act
(RCRA) requires transporters of hazardous
waste  to  document  information  on  the
waste's generator, destination, quantity,  and
route.  The  current  tracking  system relies
upon  paper  manifests.   An  electronic
manifest     system    would     increase
transparency  and  public  safety,  making
information on hazardous waste movement
more accessible to the EPA, states, and the
public. As part of the Administrator's  goal
to reduce the burden on  regulated entities,
where feasible, the Agency plans to continue
to  work  on   developing  an  electronic
hazardous waste  manifest system to reduce
the time and cost associated with complying
with      regulations     governing     the
transportation of hazardous substances.  If
fully  implemented,  an electronic  manifest
system is estimated to reduce the reporting
burden for firms regulated under  RCRA's
hazardous waste provisions by $76 to $124
million annually.  9
39 See EPA's "Improving Our Regulations: Final Plan
for Periodic Retrospective Reviews of Existing
Regulations," p. 17.
http://www.epa.gov/improvingregulations/documents
/eparetroreviewplan-aug2011 .pdf.
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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
WORKING CAPITAL FUND

In  FY  2013,  the  Agency  begins  its
seventeenth   year   of  operation  of  the
Working  Capital  Fund  (WCF).  It  is  a
revolving fund, authorized by law to finance
a cycle of operations, where  the  costs of
goods and services provided are charged to
users on a fee-for-service basis. The funds
received are available without fiscal year
limitation, to  continue  operations and to
replace  capital equipment. EPA's WCF was
implemented under the authority of Section
403  of  the   Government   Management
Reform Act of 1994  and EPA's FY 1997
Appropriations  Act.   Permanent   WCF
authority was contained in the Agency's FY
1998 Appropriations Act.

The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) initiated
the WCF in  FY 1997 as part of an effort to:
(1) be  accountable  to Agency offices, the
Office of Management and Budget, and the
Congress; (2)  increase the efficiency  of the
administrative services provided to program
offices;  and (3) increase customer  service
and responsiveness. The Agency has a WCF
Board which provides policy and planning
oversight and advises the CFO regarding the
WCF financial position.  The Board, chaired
by the Associate Chief Financial Officer, is
composed   of  twenty-three   permanent
members  from the program and  regional
offices.

Six Agency  activities, provided in FY 2012,
will continue  into FY 2013. These are the
Agency's  information   technology   and
telecommunications operations,  managed by
the Office of Environmental  Information,
Agency  postage  costs  and   background
investigations, managed  by the Office of
Administration and Resources Management,
and the Agency's  core  accounting system,
relocation  services  and  travel  services,
which are both managed by the Office of the
Chief Financial Officer.

The  Agency's FY  2013  budget  request
includes resources for these six activities in
each    National    Program    Manager's
submission,  totaling  approximately  $200
million. These estimated resources may be
increased  to  incorporate  program office's
additional service needs during the operating
year. To the extent  that these  increases are
subject  to  Congressional reprogramming
notifications, the  Agency will  comply with
all applicable requirements. In FY 2013, the
Agency  will   continue  to   market  its
information   technology   and  relocation
services  to  other Federal agencies  in  an
effort  to deliver  high  quality  services
external to EPA,  which  will result in lower
costs to EPA customers.
                                          258

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan

                                                                            Acronyms
Environmental Protection Agency
List of Acronyms

AA       Assistant Administrator

ACE/ITDS Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data System

ADR     Alternative Dispute Resolution

AGO     America's Great Outdoors

APEC     Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

ARA     Assistant Regional Administrator

ARRA    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

AT SDR   Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

B&F      Buildings and Facilities

CAA     Clean Air Act

CAFO     Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

CAIR     Clean Air Interstate Rule

CAP      Clean Air Partnership Fund

CARE     Community Action for a Renewed Environment

CASTNet Clean Air Status and Trends Network

CBEP     Community-Based Environmental Protection

CBP      Customs and Border Protection

CCAP     Climate Change Action Plan

CCS      Carbon Capture and Storage

CCTI     Climate Change Technology Initiative

CEIS     Center for Environmental Information and Statistics

CENRS   Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and  Sustainability


                                        259

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                           Acronyms
CERCLA  Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

CG       Categorical Grant

CSI       Common Sense Initiative

CSO      Combined Sewer Overflows

CWA     Clean Water Act

CWAP    Clean Water Action Plan

DBF      Disinfection Byproducts

DFAS     Defense Finance and Accounting System

DfE       Design for the Environment

EISA     Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

EJ        Environmental Justice

ELP       Environmental Leadership Project

EN       Enacted (Budget)

EPAct     Energy Policy Act of 2005

EPCRA   Emergency Preparedness and Community Right-to-Know Act

EPM      Environmental Programs and Management

ERRS     Emergency Rapid Response Services

ESC       Executive Steering  Committee

ETI       Environmental Technology Initiative

ETV      Environmental Technology Verification

EU       European Union

FAN      Fixed Account Numbers

FASAB   Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board
                                       260

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                             Acronyms
FCO      Funds Certifying Officer




FIFRA    Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act




FLC      Federal Leadership Committee




FMFIA    Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act




FQPA     Food Quality Protection Act




FRP      Facility Response Plan




FSMA    Food Safety Modernization Act




FSMP     Financial System Modernization Project




FTE      Full-Time Equivalent




FUDS     Formerly Used Defense Sites




GAPG    General Assistance Program Grants




GHG     Greenhouse Gas




GPRA    Government Performance and Results Act




HHRA    Human Health Risk Assessment




HPV      High Production Volume




HS       Homeland Security




HSWA    Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984




HWIR    Hazardous Waste Identification Media and Process Rules




IAG      Interagency Agreements




ICR      Information Collection Rule




IFMS     Integrated Financial Management System




IPCC     Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change




IRIS      Integrated Risk Information System
                                        261

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                            Acronyms
IRM      Information Resource Management

ISTEA    Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act

ITMRA   Information Technology Management Reform Act of 1995-AKA Clinger/Cohen Act

LEPC     Local Emergency Planning Committee

LUST     Leaking Underground Storage Tanks

M&O     Management and Oversight

MACT    Maximum Achievable Control Technology

MTM     Mountaintop Mining

NAAEC   North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation

NAAQs   National Ambient Air Quality Standards

NAFTA   North American Free Trade Agreement

NAPA    National Academy of Public Administration

NAS      National Academy of Sciences

NATA    National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment

NCDC    National Clean Diesel Campaign

NCEA    National Center for Environmental Assessment

NEA      Nuclear Energy Agency

NDPD    National Data Processing Division

NEP      National Estuary Program

NEPPS    National Environmental Performance Partnership System

NESHAP  National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

NIPP      National Infrastructure Protection Plan

NOA      New Obligation Authority
                                        262

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                            Acronyms
NPDES   National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System




NPDWRs National Primary Drinking Water Regulations




NPL      National Priority List




NPM     National Program Manager




NPR      National Performance Review




NFS      Nonpoint Source




NVFEL   National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory




OA       Office of the Administrator




OAM     Office of Acquisition Management




OAR     Office of Air and Radiation




OARM   Office of Administration and Resources Management




OCFO    Office of the Chief Financial Officer




OCHP    Office of Children's Health Protection




OECA    Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance




OEI      Office of Environmental Information




OEM     Office of Emergency Management




OFA      Other Federal Agencies




OFPP     Office of Federal Procurement Policy




OGC      Office of General Counsel




OIG      Office of Inspector General




OMTR   Open Market Trading Rule




OP A      Oil Pollution Act of 1990




OPAA    Office of Planning, Analysis and Accountability
                                        263

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                             Acronyms
ORD      Office of Research and Development




OSRTI    Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation




OSWER  Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response




OTAG    Ozone Transport Advisory Group




OW      Office of Water




PB       President's Budget




PBTs      Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins




PCB      Polychlorinated Biphenyls




PC&B    Personnel, Compensation and Benefits




PESP      Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program




PG       Priority Goal




PIRT      Pesticide Inspector Residential Program




P2        Pollution Prevention




PM       Particulate Matter




PNGV    Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles




POTWs   Publicly Owned Treatment Works




PPG      Performance Partnership Grants




PRC      Program Results Code




PREP     Pesticide Regulatory Education Program




PRIA      Pesticide Registration Improvement Act




PRIRA    Pesticide Registration Improvement Renewal Act




PWSS    Public Water System Supervision




RC       Responsibility Center
                                         264

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                                                            Acronyms
RCRA    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976

RGI      Regional Geographic Initiative

RMP     Risk Management Plan

RPIO     Responsible Planning Implementation Office

RR       Reprogramming Request

RRP      Renovation, Repair and Painting

RWTA    Rural Water Technical Assistance

S&T      Science and Technology

SALC     Sub-allocation (level)

SARA    Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986

SBIR     Small Business Innovation Research

SBEAPs   Small Business Environmental Assistance Program

SBO      Senior Budget Officer

SBREFA  Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

SDWA    Safe Drinking Water Act

SDWIS    Safe Drinking Water Information System

SERC     State Emergency Response Commission

SIP       State Implementation Plan

SITE     Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation

SLC      Senior Leadership Council

SPCC     Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure

SRF      State Revolving Fund

SRO      Senior Resource Official
                                        265

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                         FY 2013 Annual Plan
SSWR    Safe and Sustainable Water Resources
STAG    State and Tribal Assistance Grants
STAR
Science to Achieve Results
STEM    Science, Technology, Engineering and Math




STORS   Sludge-to-Oil-Reactor




SWP      Source Water Protection




SWTR    Surface Water Treatment Rule




TMDL    Total Maximum Daily Load




TRI      Toxic Release Inventory




TSCA    Toxic Substances Control Act




UIC      Underground Injection Control




USGCRP  U.S. Global Change Research Program




UST      Underground Storage Tanks




WCF      Working Capital Fund




WIF      Water Infrastructure Funds




WIPP     Waste Isolation Pilot Proj ect




WSI      Water Security Initiative




WTO     World Trade Organization
                                                                               Acronyms
                                         266

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                  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                                    STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS

                                         Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                                               (Dollars in Thousands)
STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
Grant Title




Water
Pollution
Control
(Section
106)



Nonpoint
Source
(NFS
Section
319)




Statutory
Authorities



FWPCA,
as
amended,
Section
106; TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
FWPCA,
as
amended,
Section
319(h);
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
Eligible
Recipients



States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia,
Interstate
Agencies


States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia





Eligible Uses




Develop and carry out
surface and ground water
pollution control
programs, including
NPDES permits, TMDLs,
WQ standards,
monitoring, and NPS
control activities.
Implement EPA-approved
State and Tribal nonpoint
source management
programs and fund priority
projects, as selected by the
State.



FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$238,786.0







$175,505.0








FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$238,403.0







$164,493.0








FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 2,
Obj. 2






Goal 2,
Obj. 2







FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$265,264.0







$164,757.0








                                                        267

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title




Wetlands
Program
Developme
nt








Public
Water
System
Supervision
(PWSS)



Statutory
Authorities



FWPCA,
as
amended,
Section
104 (b)(3);
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.



SDWA,
Section
1443 (a);
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.

Eligible
Recipients



States,
Local
Governmen
ts, Tribes,
Interstate
Organizatio
ns,
Intertribal
Consortia,
Non-Profit
Organizatio
ns
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia




Eligible Uses




To develop new wetland
programs or enhance
existing programs for the
protection, management,
and restoration of wetland
resources.






Assistance to implement
and enforce National
Primary Drinking Water
Regulations to ensure the
safety of the Nation's
drinking water resources
and to protect public
health.
FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$16,796.0











$105,489.0







FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$15,143.0











$105,320.0







FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 2,
Obj. 2










Goal 2,
Obj. 1






FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$15,167.0











$109,700.0







                                       268

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title




Undergroun
d Injection
Control
(UIC)



Beaches
Protection






Statutory
Authorities



SDWA,
Section
1443(b);
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
BEACH
Act of
2000; TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.


Eligible
Recipients



States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia



States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia,
Local
Governmen
ts

Eligible Uses




Implement and enforce
regulations that protect
underground sources of
drinking water by
controlling Class I-V
underground injection
wells.
Develop and implement
programs for monitoring
and notification of
conditions for coastal
recreation waters adjacent
to beaches or similar
points of access that are
used by the public.
FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$10,869.0






$9,880.0







FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$10,852.0






$9,864.0







FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 2,
Obj. 1





N/A







FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$11,109.0






$0.0







                                       269

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Hazardous
Waste
Financial
Assistance









Statutory
Authorities
RCRA,
Section
3011;
FY 1999
Appropriati
ons Act
(PL 105-
276); TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.



Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia









Eligible Uses
Development &
Implementation of
Hazardous Waste
Programs









FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$103,139.0











FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
Obj.2
$94,102.0





Obj.3
$8,872.0

Total
$102,974.0
FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 3,
Obj.2






Goal 3,
Obj.3


FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
Obj.2
$73,508.0





Obj.3
$29,904.0

Total
$103,412.0
                                       270

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Brownfield
s















Statutory
Authorities
CERCLA,
as
amended
by the
Small
Business
Liability
Relief and
Brownfield
s
Revitalizati
on Act
(P.L. 107-
118);
GMRA
(1990);
FGCAA.
Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia













Eligible Uses
Build and support
Brownfields programs
which will assess
contaminated properties,
oversee private party
cleanups, provide cleanup
support through low
interest loans, and provide
certainty for liability
related issues.







FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$49,396.0
















FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$49,317.0
















FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 3,
Obj. 1















FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$47,572.0
















                                       271

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Undergroun
d Storage
Tanks
(UST)
























Statutory
Authorities
SWDA, as
amended
by the
Superfund
Reauthoriz
ation
Amendmen
ts of 1986
(Subtitle I),
Section
2007(f), 42
U.S.C.
6916(f)(2);
EPAct of
2005, Title
XV
Ethanol
and Motor
Fuels,
Subtitle B
Undergrou
nd Storage
Tank
Complianc
e, Sections
1521-1533,
P.L. 109-
58 47
Eligible
Recipients
States



























Eligible Uses
Provide funding for
States' underground
storage tanks and to
support direct UST
implementation programs.



















272



FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$2,495.0



























FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$1,548.0



























FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 3,
Obj. 2


























FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$1,490.0




























-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Pesticides
Program
Implementa
tion










Statutory
Authorities
FIFRA,
Sections 20
and 23; the
FY 1999
Appropriati
ons Act
(PL 105-
276); FY
2000
Appropriati
ons Act
(P.L. 106-
74); TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia










Eligible Uses
Implement the following
programs through grants
to States, Tribes, partners,
and supporters:
Certification and Training
(C&T) / Worker
Protection,
Endangered Species
Protection Program
(ESPP) Field Activities,
Pesticides in Water,
Tribal Program, and
Pesticide Environmental
Stewardship Program.

FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$11,424.0
States formula



$2,069.0

HQ Programs:
- Tribal
-PREP
-PESP
-EJ

Total:
$13,493.0

FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$11,423.0 -
States
formula



$1,696.0

HQ
Programs:
- Tribal
-PREP
-PESP
-EJ
Total:
$13,119.0
FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 4,
Obj. 1












FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$11,423.0 -
States formula



$1,717.0
HQ Programs:
- Tribal
-PREP
-PESP
-EJ


Total:
$13,140.0

                                       273

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Lead















Statutory
Authorities
TSCA,
Sections 10
and 404
(g); FY
2000
Appropriati
ons Act
(P.L. 106-
74); TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.






Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia












Eligible Uses
Implement the lead-based
paint activities in the
Training and Certification
program through EPA-
authorized State, territorial
and Tribal programs and,
in areas without
authorization, through
direct implementation by
the Agency. Activities
conducted as part of this
program include issuing
grants for the training and
certification of individuals
and firms engaged in lead-
based paint abatement and
inspection activities and
the accreditation of
qualified training
providers.
FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$14,535.0















FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$11,113.9

A r\ A f \
404(g)
State/ Tribal
Certification


$3,398.1
404(g)
T\" j-
Direct
Implementat
ion
Total:
$14,512.0



FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 4,
Obj. 1














FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$11,376.6
404(g) State/
Tribal
Certification


$3,478.4
404(g) Direct
Implementatio
n

Total:
$14,855.0




                                       274

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title




Toxic
Substances
Compliance






Statutory
Authorities



TSCA,
Sections
28(a) and
404 (eY
~f\J-f V&/5
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.




Eligible
Recipients



States,
Territories,
Federally
recognized
Indian
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia,
and
Territories
of the U.S.

Eligible Uses




Assist in developing,
maintaining and
implementing compliance
monitoring programs for
PCBs, asbestos, and Lead
Based Paint. In addition,
enforcement actions by :1)
the Lead Based Paint
program, and 2) States that
obtained a "waiver" under
the Asbestos program.

FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$5,089.0







FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$ 1,783.0
Lead


$ 3,298 .0
PCB/Asbest
OS

Total:
$5,081.0
FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 5,
Obj. 1






FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$1,801.0
Lead


$3,400.0
PCB/Asbestos


Total:
$5,201.0

                                       275

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title




Pesticide
Enforcemen
t







Statutory
Authorities



FIFRA
§ 23(a)(l);
FY 2000
Appropriati
ons Act
(P.L. 106-
74); TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
Eligible
Recipients



States,
Territories,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia





Eligible Uses




Assist in implementing
cooperative pesticide
enforcement programs.







FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$18,674.0









FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$18,644.0









FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 5,
Obj. 1








FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$19,085.0









                                       276

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
National
Environme
ntal
Information
Exchange
Network
(NEIEN,
aka "the
Exchange
Network")



















Statutory
Authorities
As
appropriate
CAA,
Section
103; CWA,
Section
104;
RCRA,
Section
8001;
FIFRA,
Section 20;
TSCA,
Sections 10
and 28;
MPRSA,
Section
203;
SDWA,
Section
1442;
Indian
Environme
ntal
General
Assistance
Program
Act of
1QQ9 a«
Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Interstate
Agencies,
Tribal
Consortium
Other
Agencies
with
Related
Environme
ntal
Informatio
n
Activities.














Eligible Uses
Helps States, territories,
Tribes, and intertribal
consortia develop the
information management
and technology (EVI/IT)
capabilities they need to
participate in the
Exchange Network, to
continue and expand data-
sharing programs, and to
improve access to
environmental
information. These grants
supplement the Exchange
Network investments
already being made by
States and Tribes.








277



FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$9,980.0




























FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$9,964.0




























FY2013
Goal/
Objective
N/A




























FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$15,200.0





























-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title
Pollution
Prevention
















Statutory
Authorities
Pollution
Prevention
Act of
1990,
Section
6605;
TSCA
Section 10;
FY 2000
Appropriati
ons Act
(P.L. 106-
74); TCA
in annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.


Eligible
Recipients
States,
Tribes,
Intertribal
Consortia














Eligible Uses
Provides assistance to
States and State entities
(i.e., colleges and
universities) and
Federally-recognized
Tribes and intertribal
consortia in order to
deliver pollution
prevention technical
assistance to small and
medium-sized businesses.
A goal of the program is to
assist businesses and
industries with identifying
improved environmental
strategies and solutions for
reducing waste at the
source.
FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)
$4,930.0

















FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)
$4,922.0

















FY2013
Goal/
Objective
Goal 4,
Obj. 2
















FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$5,039.0

















                                       278

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
                  STAG CATEGORICAL PROGRAM GRANTS
                       Statutory Authority and Eligible Uses
                              (Dollars in Thousands)
Grant Title




Tribal
General
Assistance
Program









Statutory
Authorities



Indian
Environme
ntal
General
Assistance
Program
Act (42
u.s.c.
4368b);
TCA in
annual
Appropriati
ons Acts.
Eligible
Recipients



Tribal
Governmen
ts,
Intertribal
Consortia








Eligible Uses




Plan and develop Tribal
environmental protection
programs.










FY 2011
Enacted
(XI 000)


$67,739.0












FY 2012
Enacted
Dollars
(XI 000)

$67,631.0












FY2013
Goal/
Objective


Goal 3,
Obj. 4











FY 2013
President's
Request
Dollars
(XI 000)
$96,375.0












                                       279

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification

PROGRAM PROJECTS BY PROGRAM AREA
(Dollars in Thousands)

Science & Technology
Clean Air and Climate
Clean Air Allowance Trading
Programs
Climate Protection Program
Federal Support for Air Quality
Management
Federal Support for Air Toxics
Program
Federal Vehicle and Fuels Standards
and Certification
Subtotal, Clean Air and Climate
Indoor Air and Radiation
Indoor Air: Radon Program
Reduce Risks from Indoor Air
Radiation: Protection
Radiation: Response Preparedness
Subtotal, Indoor Air and Radiation
Enforcement
Forensics Support
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Critical
Infrastructure Protection
FY2011
Actuals


$9,934.0
$18,487.9
$11,054.0
$2,540.1
$100,691.6
$142,707.6

$446.1
$809.8
$2,275.4
$4,181.9
$7,713.2

$16,354.3


FY 2012
Enacted


$9,082.0
$16,319.0
$7,091.0
$0.0
$91,886.0
$124,378.0

$210.0
$370.0
$2,094.0
$4,076.0
$6,750.0

$15,269.0


FY 2013
Pres
Budget


$9,797.0
$7,760.0
$7,622.0
$0.0
$101,929.0
$127,108.0

$0.0
$379.0
$2,126.0
$4,156.0
$6,661.0

$15,593.0


2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted


$715.0
($8,559.0)
$531.0
$0.0
$10,043.0
$2,730.0

($210.0)
$9.0
$32.0
$80.0
($89.0)

$324.0


                                       280

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Water Security Initiative
Homeland Security: Critical
Infrastructure Protection (other
activities)
Subtotal, Homeland Security:
Critical Infrastructure Protection
Homeland Security: Preparedness,
Response, and Recovery
Decontamination
Laboratory Preparedness and
Response
Safe Building
Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery (other activities)
Subtotal, Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery
Homeland Security: Protection of
EPA Personnel and Infrastructure
Subtotal, Homeland Security
IT / Data Management / Security
IT / Data Management
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Rent
Utilities
Security
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations (other activities)
FY2011
Actuals
$12,097.2
$6,401.5
$18,498.7

$23,537.6
$100.1
$791.5
$17,107.6
$41,536.8
$592.0
$60,627.5

$3,483.7


$30,251.9
$20,159.3
$9,300.6
$9,724.3
FY 2012
Enacted
$8,606.0
$2,755.0
$11,361.0

$17,356.0
$0.0
$0.0
$12,678.0
$30,034.0
$578.0
$41,973.0

$3,652.0


$35,605.0
$20,162.0
$10,696.0
$5,556.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$7,023.0
$2,756.0
$9,779.0

$17,185.0
$0.0
$0.0
$12,523.0
$29,708.0
$579.0
$40,066.0

$4,047.0


$34,899.0
$20,202.0
$11,066.0
$9,318.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
($1,583.0)
$1.0
($1,582.0)

($171.0)
$0.0
$0.0
($155.0)
($326.0)
$1.0
($1,907.0)

$395.0


($706.0)
$40.0
$370.0
$3,762.0
                                            281

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Subtotal, Facilities Infrastructure
and Operations
Subtotal, Operations and
Administration
Pesticides Licensing
Pesticides: Protect Human Health
from Pesticide Risk
Pesticides: Protect the Environment
from Pesticide Risk
Pesticides: Realize the Value of
Pesticide Availability
Subtotal, Pesticides Licensing
Research: Air, Climate and Energy
Research: Air, Climate and Energy
Global Change
Clean Air
Research: Air, Climate and
Energy (other activities)
Subtotal, Research: Air, Climate
and Energy
Subtotal, Research: Air, Climate and
Energy
Research: Safe and Sustainable Water
Resources
Research: Safe and Sustainable Water
Resources
Drinking Water
Water Quality
FY2011
Actuals
$69,436.1
$69,436.1

$4,118.8
$1,995.2
$522.8
$6,636.8


$19,416.9
$91,122.7
$9,126.4
$119,756.0
$119,756.0


$50,885.3
$66,573.0
FY 2012
Enacted
$72,019.0
$72,019.0

$3,757.0
$2,289.0
$517.0
$6,563.0


$18,276.0
$78,526.0
$2,043.0
$98,845.0
$98,845.0


$50,152.0
$63,274.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$75,485.0
$75,485.0

$3,919.0
$2,604.0
$575.0
$7,098.0


$20,281.0
$82,853.0
$2,760.0
$105,894.0
$105,894.0


$51,606.0
$69,532.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$3,466.0
$3,466.0

$162.0
$315.0
$58.0
$535.0


$2,005.0
$4,327.0
$717.0
$7,049.0
$7,049.0


$1,454.0
$6,258.0
                                            282

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Research: Safe and Sustainable
Water Resources (other
activities)
Subtotal, Research: Safe and
Sustainable Water Resources
Subtotal, Research: Safe and
Sustainable Water Resources
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Healthy
Communities
Human Health
Ecosystems
Research: Sustainable and
Healthy Communities (other
activities)
Subtotal, Research: Sustainable and
Healthy Communities
Subtotal, Research: Sustainable
Communities
Research: Chemical Safety and
Sustainability
Human Health Risk Assessment
Research: Chemical Safety and
Sustainability
Endocrine Disruptors
Computational Toxicology
Research: Chemical Safety and
Sustainability (other activities)
Subtotal, Research: Chemical Safety
and Sustainability
FY2011
Actuals
$0.0
$117,458.3
$117,458.3


$52,904.5
$68,740.8
$70,790.8
$192,436.1
$192,436.1

$46,140.1

$10,708.8
$22,412.4
$52,092.4
$85,213.6
FY 2012
Enacted
$50.0
$113,476.0
$113,476.0


$45,318.0
$60,806.0
$64,617.0
$170,741.0
$170,741.0

$39,553.0

$16,861.0
$21,177.0
$53,697.0
$91,735.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$52.0
$121,190.0
$121,190.0


$44,500.0
$60,180.0
$61,050.0
$165,730.0
$165,730.0

$40,505.0

$16,253.0
$21,267.0
$56,721.0
$94,241.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$2.0
$7,714.0
$7,714.0


($818.0)
($626.0)
($3,567.0)
($5,011.0)
($5,011.0)

$952.0

($608.0)
$90.0
$3,024.0
$2,506.0
                                            283

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Subtotal, Research: Chemical Safety
and Sustainability
Water: Human Health Protection
Drinking Water Programs
Congressional Priorities
Congressionally Mandated Projects
Water Quality Research and Support
Grants
Subtotal, Congressional Priorities
Total, Science & Technology
Environmental Program &
Management
Clean Air and Climate
Clean Air Allowance Trading
Programs
Climate Protection Program
Energy STAR
Methane to markets
Greenhouse Gas Reporting
Registry
Climate Protection Program
(other activities)
Subtotal, Climate Protection
Program
Federal Stationary Source
Regulations
Federal Support for Air Quality
Management
FY2011
Actuals
$131,353.7

$3,724.2

$5,582.0
$0.0
$5,582.0
$877,269.5


$20,877.3

$52,306.0
$4,863.0
$18,357.6
$40,808.6
$116,335.2
$31,296.0
$106,081.2
FY 2012
Enacted
$131,288.0

$3,782.0

$0.0
$4,992.0
$4,992.0
$793,728.0


$20,811.0

$49,668.0
$5,013.0
$15,757.0
$29,043.0
$99,481.0
$27,298.0
$123,469.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$134,746.0

$3,639.0

$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$807,257.0


$20,888.0

$53,872.0
$4,927.0
$18,694.0
$30,498.0
$107,991.0
$34,142.0
$134,841.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$3,458.0

($143.0)

$0.0
($4,992.0)
($4,992.0)
$13,529.0


$77.0

$4,204.0
($86.0)
$2,937.0
$1,455.0
$8,510.0
$6,844.0
$11,372.0
                                            284

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Federal Support for Air Toxics
Program
Stratospheric Ozone: Domestic
Programs
Stratospheric Ozone: Multilateral
Fund
Subtotal, Clean Air and Climate
Indoor Air and Radiation
Indoor Air: Radon Program
Reduce Risks from Indoor Air
Radiation: Protection
Radiation: Response Preparedness
Subtotal, Indoor Air and Radiation
Brownfields
Brownfields
Compliance
Compliance Assistance and Centers
Compliance Incentives
Compliance Monitoring
Subtotal, Compliance
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
Criminal Enforcement
Enforcement Training
Environmental Justice
NEPA Implementation
FY2011
Actuals
$24,005.5
$5,157.6
$9,690.0
$313,442.8

$5,318.5
$21,503.0
$11,156.0
$3,439.8
$41,417.3

$24,443.8

$671.8
$667.3
$109,266.9
$110,606.0

$179,391.2
$51,623.3
$410.3
$8,407.0
$17,105.0
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$5,570.0
$9,479.0
$286,108.0

$3,895.0
$17,168.0
$9,616.0
$3,038.0
$33,717.0

$23,642.0

$0.0
$0.0
$106,707.0
$106,707.0

$177,290.0
$48,123.0
$0.0
$6,848.0
$17,298.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$0.0
$5,643.0
$9,690.0
$313,195.0

$2,198.0
$17,393.0
$9,760.0
$3,083.0
$32,434.0

$25,685.0

$0.0
$0.0
$125,209.0
$125,209.0

$188,957.0
$51,900.0
$0.0
$7,161.0
$17,424.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$73.0
$211.0
$27,087.0

($1,697.0)
$225.0
$144.0
$45.0
($1,283.0)

$2,043.0

$0.0
$0.0
$18,502.0
$18,502.0

$11,667.0
$3,777.0
$0.0
$313.0
$126.0
                                            285

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Subtotal, Enforcement
Geographic Programs
Great Lakes Restoration
Geographic Program: Chesapeake
Bay
Geographic Program: San Francisco
Bay
Geographic Program: Puget Sound
Geographic Program: South Florida
Geographic Program: Long Island
Sound
Geographic Program: Gulf of Mexico
Geographic Program: Lake
Champlain
Geographic Program: Other
Northwest Forest
Lake Pontchartrain
Community Action for a
Renewed Environment (CARE)
Geographic Program: Other
(other activities)
Subtotal, Geographic Program:
Other
Subtotal, Geographic Programs
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Communication
and Information
Homeland Security: Critical
Infrastructure Protection
FY2011
Actuals
$256,936.8

$329,215.5
$42,414.3
$4,357.2
$38,113.8
$1,643.8
$6,154.3
$4,881.6
$6,732.1

$1,246.8
$2,598.0
$2,697.5
$33,965.0
$40,507.3
$474,019.9

$4,215.9
$2,411.5
FY 2012
Enacted
$249,559.0

$299,520.0
$57,299.0
$5,838.0
$29,952.0
$2,058.0
$3,956.0
$5,455.0
$2,395.0

$1,294.0
$1,952.0
$0.0
$0.0
$3,246.0
$409,719.0

$4,249.0
$1,063.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$265,442.0

$300,000.0
$72,618.0
$4,857.0
$19,289.0
$1,700.0
$2,962.0
$4,436.0
$1,399.0

$1,417.0
$955.0
$2,069.0
$0.0
$4,441.0
$411,702.0

$4,217.0
$2,087.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$15,883.0

$480.0
$15,319.0
($981.0)
($10,663.0)
($358.0)
($994.0)
($1,019.0)
($996.0)

$123.0
($997.0)
$2,069.0
$0.0
$1,195.0
$1,983.0

($32.0)
$1,024.0
                                            286

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Homeland Security: Preparedness,
Response, and Recovery
Decontamination
Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery (other activities)
Subtotal, Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery
Homeland Security: Protection of
EPA Personnel and Infrastructure
Subtotal, Homeland Security
Information Exchange / Outreach
Children and Other Sensitive
Populations: Agency Coordination
Environmental Education
Congressional, Intergovernmental,
External Relations
Exchange Network
Small Business Ombudsman
Small Minority Business Assistance
State and Local Prevention and
Preparedness
TRI / Right to Know
Tribal - Capacity Building
Subtotal, Information Exchange /
Outreach
International Programs
US Mexico Border
International Sources of Pollution
FY2011
Actuals

$791.5
$481.3
$1,272.8
$6,497.0
$14,397.2

$8,790.8
$6,962.2
$53,544.3
$17,816.6
$3,106.9
$2,277.5
$13,063.2
$16,634.5
$13,892.7
$136,088.7

$4,872.0
$8,731.0
FY 2012
Enacted

$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$5,966.0
$11,278.0

$7,481.0
$9,699.0
$47,638.0
$17,724.0
$2,693.0
$2,079.0
$13,320.0
$16,322.0
$13,736.0
$130,692.0

$4,313.0
$7,659.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget

$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$5,999.0
$12,303.0

$10,923.0
$0.0
$52,896.0
$23,008.0
$3,018.0
$2,291.0
$14,852.0
$17,354.0
$15,062.0
$139,404.0

$4,490.0
$8,466.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted

$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$33.0
$1,025.0

$3,442.0
($9,699.0)
$5,258.0
$5,284.0
$325.0
$212.0
$1,532.0
$1,032.0
$1,326.0
$8,712.0

$177.0
$807.0
                                            287

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Trade and Governance
Subtotal, International Programs
IT / Data Management / Security
Information Security
IT / Data Management
Subtotal, IT / Data Management /
Security
Legal / Science / Regulatory /
Economic Review
Administrative Law
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Civil Rights / Title VI Compliance
Legal Advice: Environmental
Program
Legal Advice: Support Program
Regional Science and Technology
Integrated Environmental Strategies
Regul atory/Economi c-Management
and Analysis
Science Advisory Board
Subtotal, Legal / Science / Regulatory
/ Economic Review
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Rent
Utilities
Security
FY2011
Actuals
$6,230.1
$19,833.1

$7,831.2
$96,614.1
$104,445.3

$5,260.3
$1,271.2
$11,740.4
$42,286.6
$15,692.6
$3,178.6
$17,908.7
$20,329.8
$6,074.9
$123,743.1


$161,589.3
$12,566.5
$27,991.8
FY 2012
Enacted
$5,632.0
$17,604.0

$6,786.0
$87,939.0
$94,725.0

$5,198.0
$1,194.0
$11,618.0
$40,746.0
$14,260.0
$2,591.0
$14,754.0
$15,256.0
$5,135.0
$110,752.0


$170,529.0
$11,205.0
$29,216.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$6,178.0
$19,134.0

$6,868.0
$88,893.0
$95,761.0

$5,392.0
$1,477.0
$13,974.0
$45,840.0
$16,064.0
$3,307.0
$16,326.0
$23,345.0
$6,727.0
$132,452.0


$171,152.0
$10,660.0
$31,486.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$546.0
$1,530.0

$82.0
$954.0
$1,036.0

$194.0
$283.0
$2,356.0
$5,094.0
$1,804.0
$716.0
$1,572.0
$8,089.0
$1,592.0
$21,700.0


$623.0
($545.0)
$2,270.0
                                            288

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations (other activities)
Subtotal, Facilities Infrastructure
and Operations
Central Planning, Budgeting, and
Finance
Acquisition Management
Financial Assistance Grants / TAG
Management
Human Resources Management
Subtotal, Operations and
Administration
Pesticides Licensing
Pesticides: Protect Human Health
from Pesticide Risk
Pesticides: Protect the Environment
from Pesticide Risk
Pesticides: Realize the Value of
Pesticide Availability
Science Policy and Biotechnology
Subtotal, Pesticides Licensing
Resource Conservation and Recovery
Act (RCRA)
RCRA: Waste Management
eManifest
RCRA: Waste Management
(other activities)
Subtotal, RCRA: Waste
Management
RCRA: Corrective Action
FY2011
Actuals
$118,392.6
$320,540.2
$85,541.1
$30,688.2
$26,770.6
$46,839.9
$510,380.0

$61,686.0
$41,265.6
$13,065.8
$1,672.9
$117,690.3


$0.0
$67,520.1
$67,520.1
$37,156.3
FY 2012
Enacted
$108,827.0
$319,777.0
$72,290.0
$33,175.0
$24,002.0
$37,839.0
$487,083.0

$58,208.0
$37,854.0
$12,532.0
$1,754.0
$110,348.0


$0.0
$63,500.0
$63,500.0
$39,422.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$118,018.0
$331,316.0
$78,817.0
$35,727.0
$25,910.0
$39,428.0
$511,198.0

$58,971.0
$37,960.0
$12,306.0
$1,770.0
$111,007.0


$2,000.0
$65,385.0
$67,385.0
$40,265.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$9,191.0
$11,539.0
$6,527.0
$2,552.0
$1,908.0
$1,589.0
$24,115.0

$763.0
$106.0
($226.0)
$16.0
$659.0


$2,000.0
$1,885.0
$3,885.0
$843.0
                                            289

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

RCRA: Waste Minimization &
Recycling
Subtotal, Resource Conservation and
Recovery Act (RCRA)
Toxics Risk Review and Prevention
Endocrine Disrupters
Toxic Substances: Chemical Risk
Review and Reduction
Pollution Prevention Program
Toxic Substances: Chemical Risk
Management
Toxic Substances: Lead Risk
Reduction Program
Subtotal, Toxics Risk Review and
Prevention
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST /
UST)
LUST / UST
Water: Ecosystems
National Estuary Program / Coastal
Waterways
Wetlands
Subtotal, Water: Ecosystems
Water: Human Health Protection
Beach / Fish Programs
Drinking Water Programs
Subtotal, Water: Human Health
Protection
FY2011
Actuals
$12,589.6
$117,266.0

$9,624.6
$59,752.2
$15,994.6
$6,868.6
$14,140.9
$106,380.9

$11,622.7

$31,528.9
$28,297.6
$59,826.5

$2,896.2
$104,689.8
$107,586.0
FY 2012
Enacted
$9,547.0
$112,469.0

$8,255.0
$56,497.0
$15,389.0
$6,032.0
$13,798.0
$99,971.0

$12,846.0

$27,014.0
$21,160.0
$48,174.0

$2,552.0
$98,547.0
$101,099.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$9,648.0
$117,298.0

$7,238.0
$67,644.0
$15,888.0
$3,739.0
$14,698.0
$109,207.0

$12,283.0

$27,304.0
$27,685.0
$54,989.0

$702.0
$104,613.0
$105,315.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$101.0
$4,829.0

($1,017.0)
$11,147.0
$499.0
($2,293.0)
$900.0
$9,236.0

($563.0)

$290.0
$6,525.0
$6,815.0

($1,850.0)
$6,066.0
$4,216.0
                                            290

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Water Quality Protection
Marine Pollution
Surface Water Protection
Subtotal, Water Quality Protection
Congressional Priorities
Congressionally Mandated Projects
Water Quality Research and Support
Grants
Subtotal, Congressional Priorities
Total, Environmental Program &
Management
Inspector General
Audits, Evaluations, and
Investigations
Audits, Evaluations, and
Investigations
Total, Inspector General
Building and Facilities
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Protection of
EPA Personnel and Infrastructure
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Total, Building and Facilities
FY2011
Actuals

$15,570.5
$217,119.1
$232,689.6

$750.0
$0.0
$750.0
$2,883,566.
0


$46,627.9
$46,627.9


$8,269.1

$30,254.7
$38,523.8
FY 2012
Enacted

$12,898.0
$203,856.0
$216,754.0

$0.0
$14,975.0
$14,975.0
$2,678,222.
0


$41,933.0
$41,933.0


$7,044.0

$29,326.0
$36,370.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget

$11,587.0
$211,574.0
$223,161.0

$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$2,817,179.
0


$48,273.0
$48,273.0


$8,038.0

$33,931.0
$41,969.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted

($1,311.0)
$7,718.0
$6,407.0

$0.0
($14,975.0)
($14,975.0)
$138,957.0


$6,340.0
$6,340.0


$994.0

$4,605.0
$5,599.0
                                            291

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Hazardous Substance Superfund
Indoor Air and Radiation
Radiation: Protection
Audits, Evaluations, and
Investigations
Audits, Evaluations, and
Investigations
Compliance
Compliance Incentives
Compliance Monitoring
Subtotal, Compliance
Enforcement
Environmental Justice
Superfund: Enforcement
Superfund: Federal Facilities
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
Criminal Enforcement
Enforcement Training
Forensics Support
Subtotal, Enforcement
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Critical
Infrastructure Protection
Homeland Security: Preparedness,
Response, and Recovery
Decontamination
FY2011
Actuals


$2,478.4

$8,943.7

$5.6
$1,192.5
$1,198.1

$1,128.7
$179,163.7
$9,271.8
$4.4
$7,845.9
$20.6
$2,456.2
$199,891.3

$9.1

$6,557.0
FY 2012
Enacted


$2,468.0

$9,939.0

$0.0
$1,221.0
$1,221.0

$583.0
$165,534.0
$10,296.0
$0.0
$7,903.0
$0.0
$2,419.0
$186,735.0

$0.0

$5,898.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget


$2,637.0

$10,864.0

$0.0
$1,223.0
$1,223.0

$613.0
$166,309.0
$8,592.0
$0.0
$7,680.0
$0.0
$1,214.0
$184,408.0

$0.0

$5,868.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted


$169.0

$925.0

$0.0
$2.0
$2.0

$30.0
$775.0
($1,704.0)
$0.0
($223.0)
$0.0
($1,205.0)
($2,327.0)

$0.0

($30.0)
                                            292

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Laboratory Preparedness and
Response
Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery (other activities)
Subtotal, Homeland Security:
Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery
Homeland Security: Protection of
EPA Personnel and Infrastructure
Subtotal, Homeland Security
Information Exchange / Outreach
Congressional, Intergovernmental,
External Relations
Exchange Network
Subtotal, Information Exchange /
Outreach
IT / Data Management / Security
Information Security
IT / Data Management
Subtotal, IT / Data Management /
Security
Legal / Science / Regulatory /
Economic Review
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Legal Advice: Environmental
Program
Subtotal, Legal / Science / Regulatory
/ Economic Review
FY2011
Actuals
$5,710.4
$32,036.8
$44,304.2
$669.1
$44,982.4

$2.1
$1,431.0
$1,433.1

$847.2
$17,640.0
$18,487.2

$814.9
$711.9
$1,526.8
FY 2012
Enacted
$5,626.0
$29,075.0
$40,599.0
$1,170.0
$41,769.0

$0.0
$1,431.0
$1,431.0

$728.0
$15,339.0
$16,067.0

$844.0
$682.0
$1,526.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$5,644.0
$29,257.0
$40,769.0
$1,172.0
$41,941.0

$0.0
$1,433.0
$1,433.0

$728.0
$14,855.0
$15,583.0

$877.0
$755.0
$1,632.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
$18.0
$182.0
$170.0
$2.0
$172.0

$0.0
$2.0
$2.0

$0.0
($484.0)
($484.0)

$33.0
$73.0
$106.0
                                            293

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Rent
Utilities
Security
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations (other activities)
Subtotal, Facilities Infrastructure
and Operations
Financial Assistance Grants / IAG
Management
Acquisition Management
Human Resources Management
Central Planning, Budgeting, and
Finance
Subtotal, Operations and
Administration
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Healthy
Communities
Research: Chemical Safety and
Sustainability
Human Health Risk Assessment
Superfund Cleanup
Superfund: Emergency Response and
Removal
Superfund: EPA Emergency
Preparedness
Superfund: Federal Facilities
FY2011
Actuals


$43,776.9
$3,320.8
$7,034.5
$25,924.0
$80,056.2
$3,322.3
$23,672.0
$8,924.4
$30,349.3
$146,324.2

$21,347.9

$3,737.6

$242,375.9
$10,473.9
$32,555.5
FY 2012
Enacted


$47,032.0
$3,760.0
$8,269.0
$21,480.0
$80,541.0
$3,128.0
$24,111.0
$6,346.0
$21,632.0
$135,758.0

$17,677.0

$3,337.0

$189,590.0
$9,244.0
$26,199.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget


$46,005.0
$3,455.0
$8,594.0
$21,568.0
$79,622.0
$3,174.0
$25,961.0
$7,558.0
$24,066.0
$140,381.0

$17,798.0

$3,316.0

$188,500.0
$8,179.0
$26,765.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted


($1,027.0)
($305.0)
$325.0
$88.0
($919.0)
$46.0
$1,850.0
$1,212.0
$2,434.0
$4,623.0

$121.0

($21.0)

($1,090.0)
($1,065.0)
$566.0
                                            294

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Superfund: Remedial
Superfund: Support to Other Federal
Agencies
Brownfields Projects
Subtotal, Superfund Cleanup
Total, Hazardous Substance
Superfund40
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
Compliance
Compliance Assistance and Centers
IT / Data Management / Security
IT / Data Management
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Rent
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations (other activities)
Subtotal, Facilities Infrastructure
and Operations
Acquisition Management
Central Planning, Budgeting, and
Finance
FY2011
Actuals
$707,200.8
$5,908.0
$1,403.5
$999,917.6
$1,450,268.
3


$644.0

$32.9

$47.7


$695.0
$208.0
$903.0
$148.2
$1,093.7
FY 2012
Enacted
$564,998.0
$5,849.0
$0.0
$795,880.0
$1,213,808.
0


$789.0

$0.0

$0.0


$695.0
$220.0
$915.0
$163.0
$512.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$531,771.0
$0.0
$0.0
$755,215.0
$1,176,431.
0


$792.0

$0.0

$0.0


$636.0
$207.0
$843.0
$161.0
$509.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
($33,227.0)
($5,849.0)
$0.0
($40,665.0)
($37,377.0)


$3.0

$0.0

$0.0


($59.0)
($13.0)
($72.0)
($2.0)
($3.0)
  For ease of comparison, Superfund transfer resources for the audit and research functions are shown in the
Superfund account.
                                                295

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Subtotal, Operations and
Administration
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST /
UST)
LUST / UST
LUST Cooperative Agreements
LUST Prevention
Subtotal, Underground Storage Tanks
(LUST / UST)
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Healthy
Communities
Total, Leaking Underground Storage
Tanks
Oil Spill Response
Compliance
Compliance Assistance and Centers
Compliance Monitoring
Subtotal, Compliance
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
Oil
Oil Spill: Prevention, Preparedness
and Response
Operations and Administration
FY2011
Actuals
$2,144.9

$13,926.8
$64,459.5
$37,093.9
$115,480.2

$501.6
$118,851.3


$5.4
$111.2
$116.6

$2,209.6

$15,630.7

FY 2012
Enacted
$1,590.0

$11,962.0
$58,956.0
$30,449.0
$101,367.0

$396.0
$104,142.0


$0.0
$138.0
$138.0

$2,286.0

$14,673.0

FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$1,513.0

$11,490.0
$57,402.0
$32,430.0
$101,322.0

$490.0
$104,117.0


$0.0
$142.0
$142.0

$2,968.0

$19,290.0

2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
($77.0)

($472.0)
($1,554.0)
$1,981.0
($45.0)

$94.0
($25.0)


$0.0
$4.0
$4.0

$682.0

$4,617.0

                                            296

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations
Rent
Facilities Infrastructure and
Operations (other activities)
Subtotal, Facilities Infrastructure
and Operations
Subtotal, Operations and
Administration
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Healthy
Communities
Total, Oil Spill Response
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
(STAG)
Infrastructure Assistance: Clean
Water SRF
Infrastructure Assistance: Drinking
Water SRF
Infrastructure Assistance: Alaska
Native Villages
Brownfields Projects
Clean School Bus Initiative
Diesel Emissions Reduction Grant
Program
Targeted Airshed Grants
Infrastructure Assistance: Mexico
Border
FY2011
Actuals

$437.0
$82.5
$519.5
$519.5

$1,204.3
$19,680.7


$1,936,433.
5
$1,101,827.
8
$10,327.2
$106,685.8
$35.2
$53,586.9
$10,000.0
$14,669.1
FY 2012
Enacted

$437.0
$98.0
$535.0
$535.0

$613.0
$18,245.0


$1,466,456.
0
$917,892.0
$9,984.0
$94,848.0
$0.0
$29,952.0
$0.0
$4,992.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget

$426.0
$87.0
$513.0
$513.0

$618.0
$23,531.0


$1,175,000.
0
$850,000.0
$10,000.0
$93,291.0
$0.0
$15,000.0
$0.0
$10,000.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted

($11.0)
($11.0)
($22.0)
($22.0)

$5.0
$5,286.0


($291,456.0
)
($67,892.0)
$16.0
($1,557.0)
$0.0
($14,952.0)
$0.0
$5,008.0
                                            297

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Subtotal, State and Tribal Assistance
Grants (STAG)
Categorical Grants
Categorical Grant: Beaches
Protection
Categorical Grant: Brownfields
Categorical Grant: Environmental
Information
Categorical Grant: Hazardous Waste
Financial Assistance
Categorical Grant: Homeland
Security
Categorical Grant: Lead
Categorical Grant: Local Govt
Climate Change
Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source
(Sec. 319)
Categorical Grant: Pesticides
Enforcement
Categorical Grant: Pesticides
Program Implementation
Categorical Grant: Pollution Control
(Sec. 106)
Monitoring Grants
Categorical Grant: Pollution
Control (Sec. 106) (other
activities)
Subtotal, Categorical Grant:
Pollution Control (Sec. 106)
Categorical Grant: Pollution
Prevention
Categorical Grant: Public Water
System Supervision (PWSS)
FY2011
Actuals
$3,233,565.
5

$11,001.3
$51,185.5
$9,950.4
$111,206.3
$637.1
$15,599.4
$10,499.5
$201,615.8
$19,930.9
$13,807.8

$15,402.5
$237,114.3
$252,516.8
$5,685.0
$109,387.1
FY 2012
Enacted
$2,524,124.
0

$9,864.0
$49,317.0
$9,964.0
$102,974.0
$0.0
$14,512.0
$0.0
$164,493.0
$18,644.0
$13,119.0

$18,433.0
$219,970.0
$238,403.0
$4,922.0
$105,320.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$2,153,291.
0

$0.0
$47,572.0
$15,200.0
$103,412.0
$0.0
$14,855.0
$0.0
$164,757.0
$19,085.0
$13,140.0

$18,500.0
$246,764.0
$265,264.0
$5,039.0
$109,700.0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
($370,833.0
)

($9,864.0)
($1,745.0)
$5,236.0
$438.0
$0.0
$343.0
$0.0
$264.0
$441.0
$21.0

$67.0
$26,794.0
$26,861.0
$117.0
$4,380.0
                                            298

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

Categorical Grant: Radon
Categorical Grant: State and Local
Air Quality Management
Categorical Grant: Sector Program
Categorical Grant: Targeted
Watersheds
Categorical Grant: Toxics Substances
Compliance
Categorical Grant: Tribal Air Quality
Management
Categorical Grant: Tribal General
Assistance Program
Categorical Grant: Underground
Injection Control (UIC)
Categorical Grant: Underground
Storage Tanks
Categorical Grant: Water Quality
Cooperative Agreements
Categorical Grant: Wetlands Program
Development
Subtotal, Categorical Grants
Congressional Priorities
Congressionally Mandated Projects
Total, State and Tribal Assistance
Grants
Rescission of Prior Year Funds
TOTAL, EPA
FY2011
Actuals
$8,720.0
$249,061.4
$1,879.2
$780.3
$5,551.7
$14,365.8
$69,331.2
$11,844.3
$2,759.8
$1,335.5
$26,138.1
$1,204,790.
2

$117,641.8
$4,555,997.
5
$0.0
$9,990,7
85.0
FY 2012
Enacted
$8,045.0
$235,729.0
$0.0
$0.0
$5,081.0
$13,252.0
$67,631.0
$10,852.0
$1,548.0
$0.0
$15,143.0
$1,088,813.
0

$0.0
$3,612,937.
0
($50,000.0)
$8,449,385.
0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$0.0
$301,500.0
$0.0
$0.0
$5,201.0
$13,566.0
$96,375.0
$11,109.0
$1,490.0
$0.0
$15,167.0
$1,202,432.
0

$0.0
$3,355,723.
0
($30,000.0)
$8,344,480.
0
2013 Pres
Budget
vs. 2012
Enacted
($8,045.0)
$65,771.0
$0.0
$0.0
$120.0
$314.0
$28,744.0
$257.0
($58.0)
$0.0
$24.0
$113,619.0

$0.0
($257,214.0
)
$20,000.0
($104,905.0
)
                                            299

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                          DISCONTINUED PROGRAMS
                                        300

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                        FY 2013 Annual Plan
Clean School Bus Initiative
Program Area: State and Tribal Assistance Grants
Goal: Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
Objective(s): Improve Air Quality
(Dollars in Thousands)
                              FY2011
                              Actuals
                            FY 2013 Pres
                            Budget v.
FY2012      FY2013      FY      2012
Enacted      Pres Budget   Enacted
 $tate and Tribal Assistance
Grants                        $35.2
Total  Budget  Authority  /
Obligations                    $35.2
Total Workyears               0.0

Program Project Description:
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
This program included the development, implementation, and evaluation of a competitive grant
program to equip school buses with diesel retrofit technology or to replace older school buses in
order to reduce toxic air emissions. Because school buses often remain in service for 20 years or
more, this program helped equip  our nation's school bus fleet with low-emission technologies
and practices sooner than would  otherwise occur through normal turnover of the bus fleet to
newer vehicles meeting more stringent emission standards.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

The Diesel Emissions  Reduction  Act (DERA) Grant Program has assumed all responsibilities
formerly associated with the Clean School Bus Grants Program.

Performance Targets:

There are no FY 2013 performance targets associated with this program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

    •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

Clean Air Act Amendments,  Title 1  (NAAQS); Clean Air Act Amendments,  Title III (Air
Toxics); Clean Air Act, Sections 103, 105, and 106 (Grants).
                                         301

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Federal Support for Air Toxics Program
Program Area: Clean Air and Climate
Goal: Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
Objective(s): Improve Air Quality

(Dollars in Thousands)

Environmental Program &
Management
Science & Technology
Total Budget Authority /
Obligations
Total Workyears
FY 2011
Actuals
$24,005.5
$2,540.1
$26,545.6
139.2
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
FY 2013 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
Program Project Description:

The Federal Support for Air Toxics Program was eliminated in FY 2012 as part of a conversion
to a sector-based, multi-pollutant approach.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

All activities in this program were assumed by the Federal Support for Air Quality Management
Program and the Federal Vehicle and Fuels Standards and Certification Program to support the
conversion to a sector-based, multi-pollutant approach to air quality management.

Performance Targets:

There are no FY 2013 performance targets associated with this program because the funds were
transferred to the Federal Support for Air Quality Management Program and the Federal Vehicle
and Fuels Standards and Certification Program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

CAA (42 U.S.C. 7401-7661f).
                                         302

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Local Government Climate Change Grants
Program Area: Clean Air and Climate
Goal: Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
Objective(s): Address Climate Change

(Dollars in Thousands)



State and Tribal Assistance
Grants
Total Budget Authority /
Obligations
Total Workyears

FY 2011
Actuals
$10,499.5
$10,499.5
0.0

FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
0.0

FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
FY 2013 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
Program Project Description:

This program was to implement a competitive grant program to assist local communities in
establishing and implementing their own climate  change initiatives. The goal of this program
was  to implement  programs,  projects,  and  approaches  that  demonstrated  documentable
reductions in greenhouse gases (GHGs) and were replicable elsewhere.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

There are no FY 2013 performance targets associated with this program because the resources
are eliminated.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

CAA (42 U.S.C. 7401-7661f).
                                         303

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Targeted Airshed Grants
Program Area: Clean Air and Climate
Goal: Taking Action on Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
Objective(s): Improve Air Quality

(Dollars in Thousands)



State and Tribal Assistance
Grants
Total Budget Authority /
Obligations
Total Workyears

FY 2011
Actuals

$10,000.0
$10,000.0
0.0

FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
0.0

FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
FY 2013 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
Program Project Description:

This was an unrequested program provided by Congress in the FY 2010 Enacted Budget.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

There are no FY 2013 performance targets associated with this program because the resources
are eliminated.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

    •  No change  in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

CAA (42 U.S.C. 7401-7661f).
                                         304

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                        FY 2013 Annual Plan
       Categorical Grant: Water Quality Cooperative Agreements
Program Area: Categorical Grants
Goal: Protecting America's Waters
Objective(s): Protect and Restore Watersheds and Aquatic Ecosystems
(Dollars in Thousands)
                               FY2011
                               Actuals
 $tate and  Tribal  Assistance
Grants                         $1,335.5
Total  Budget   Authority   /
Obligations                     $1,335.5
Total Workyears                0.0

Program Project Description:
                            FY 2013  Pres
                            Budget v.
FY     2012  FY2013      FY       2012
Enacted      Pres Budget  Enacted
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0
0.0
Under authority of Section  104(b)(3) of the Clean Water Act, the EPA made grants to a wide
variety of recipients, including states, tribes, state water pollution control agencies,  interstate
agencies,  and other nonprofit  institutions,  organizations,  and individuals  to promote  the
coordination of environmentally beneficial activities. This competitive funding vehicle was used
by the EPA's partners  to further the Agency's goals of providing clean and safe water. The
program was designed to fund a broad range of projects, including: innovative water efficiency
programs,  research,  training  and  education,  demonstration,  best  management practices,
stormwater management planning, and innovative permitting programs and studies related to the
causes, effects, extent, and prevention of pollution.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

There are no current performance measures for this program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •  No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

CWA Section 104(b)(3).
                                          305

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Categorical Grant: Targeted Watersheds
Program Area: Categorical Grants
Goal: Protecting America's Waters
Objective(s): Protect and Restore Watersheds and Aquatic Ecosystems
(Dollars in Thousands)
                              FY2011
                              Actuals
                            FY  2013 Pres
                            Budget v.
FY     2012  FY2013      FY       2012
Enacted      Pres Budget   Enacted
State and  Tribal  Assistance
Grants                        $780.3
Total  Budget  Authority  /
Obligations                    $780.3
Total Workyears               0.0

Program Project Description:
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
The  Targeted Watersheds  Grant Program focused  on community-based approaches  and
management techniques to protect and restore the nation's waters.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

There are no current performance measures for this program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

Department  of the Interior,  Environment,  and  Related  Agencies Appropriations Act, 2006;
Public Law 109-54.
                                         306

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Categorical Grant: Homeland Security
Program Area: Categorical Grants
Goal: Protecting America's Waters
Objective(s): Protect Human Health

(Dollars in Thousands)
                              FY2011
                              Actuals
                            FY 2013 Pres
                            Budget v.
FY     2012  FY2013      FY      2012
Enacted      Pres Budget   Enacted
 $tate and  Tribal  Assistance
Grants                        $637.1
Total  Budget   Authority   /
Obligations                    $637.1
Total Workyears               0.0

Program Project Description:
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0
$0.0
0.0
The Homeland Security Grant program focused on supporting states with coordination activities
for critical water infrastructure security efforts, including coordinating and providing technical
assistance, training, and education within the state or territory on homeland security issues.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

There are no performance measures for this program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

SDWA; CWA; Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Emergency and Response Act of 2002.
                                         307

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Homeland Security: Critical Infrastructure Protection
Program Area: Homeland Security
 Goal: Enforcing Environmental Laws
Objective(s): Enforce Environmental Laws

(Dollars in Thousands)

Environmental Program &
Management
Science & Technology
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Total Budget Authority /
Obligations
Total Workyears
FY 2011
Actuals
$2,411.5
$18,498.7
$9.1
$20,919.3
28.7
FY 2012
Enacted
$1,063.0
$11,361.0
$0.0
$12,424.0
24.8
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
$2,087.0
$9,779.0
$0.0
$11,866.0
24.4
FY 2013 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012
Enacted
$1,024.0
-$1,582.0
$0.0
-$558.0
-0.4
Program Project Description:

This program included Superfund activities that coordinated  and supported protection of the
nation's critical  public  infrastructure from  terrorist threats.  EPA provided  subject matter
expertise and training support for terrorism-related environmental investigations to support
responses authorized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act (CERCLA).  The  program  coordinated the agency's  law enforcement/crisis
management  activities  and  had  direct  responsibilities pursuant to the National Response
Framework (NRF),  Emergency Support Functions 10 and 13,  and the Oil  and Hazardous
Materials Annex.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Consistent with the FY 2012 Enacted Budget, there is no request for this program in FY 2013 out
of the Hazardous Substance Superfund appropriation.

Performance Targets:

Work under this program supports multiple strategic objectives.  There  are no  performance
measures for this specific program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

    •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:
                                         308

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
CERCLA, as amended; Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Emergency and Response Act
of2002.
                                         309

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Homeland Security: Preparedness, Response, and Recovery
Program Area: Homeland Security
Goal: Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution
Objective(s): Ensure Chemical Safety

(Dollars in Thousands)

Environmental
Management

Program &
Science & Technology
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Total Budget
Obligations
Total Workyears
Authority /

FY2011
Actuals
$1,272.8
$41,536.8
$44,304.2
$87,113.8
177.8
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$30,034.0
$40,599.0
$70,633.0
176.4
FY 2013
Pres
Budget
C/i n
$29,708.0
$40,769.0
$70,477.0
176.8
Budget
FY
Enacte<
$0.0
-$326.0
$170.0
-$156.0
0.4
                                                                      FY  2013  Pres

                                                                                2012
Program Project Description:

EPA plays a lead role in protecting U.S. citizens and the environment from the effects of attacks
that release chemical, biological, and radiological agents. EPA's Homeland Security Emergency
Preparedness and Response program  develops and maintains an  Agency-wide  capability to
prepare for and respond to large-scale catastrophic incidents with emphasis on those that may
involve chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) agents. EPA continues to increase the state
of preparedness for homeland security incidents. The response to chemical agents is different
from the response to biological agents, but for both, the goals are to facilitate preparedness, guide
the appropriate response  by first responders, ensure  safe re-occupancy of buildings or other
locations, and protect  the production of crops,  livestock, and food in the U.S. In the case of
chemical agents,  EPA develops  new information  to  assist  emergency planners  and first
responders in assessing immediate hazards.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Consistent with the FY 2012 Enacted Budget, there is no request for this program in FY 2013 out
of the Environmental Programs and Management appropriation.

Performance Targets:

There are no performance  measures for this program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
Statutory Authority:

Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Emergency and Response Act  of 2002; CERCLA;
SARA; TSCA; Oil Pollution Act; Pollution Prevention Act; RCRA; EPCRA; SOW A; CWA;
CAA; FIFRA; FFDCA; FQPA; Ocean Dumping Act; Public Health Service Act, as amended; 42
U.S.C. 201 et seq.; Executive Order 10831 (1970); Public Law 86-373; PRIA.
                                        311

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Categorical Grant: Sector Program
Program Area: Categorical Grants
Goal: Compliance and Environmental Stewardship
Objective(s): Achieve Environmental Protection through Improved Compliance
(Dollars in Thousands)
                                 FY2011
                                 Actuals
FY 2012
Enacted
                                                         FY 2013
                                                         Pres
                                                         Budget
FY   2013   Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012 Enacted
                                                          $0.0

                                                          $0.0
                                                          0.0
                        $0.0
                        0.0
 State  and  Tribal  Assistance
 Grants                          $1,879.2     $0.0
 Total   Budget    Authority    /
 Obligations                     $1,879.2     $0.0
 Total Workyears                 0.0          0.0

Program Project Description:

Sector program grants built environmental partnerships with states and tribes to strengthen their
ability to  address  environmental and public  health threats,  including contaminated drinking
water, pollution caused by wet weather events,  pesticides in food, toxic substances, and  air
pollution. These capacity building grants supported state and Tribal agencies that are responsible
for implementing authorized, delegated, or approved environmental programs.41

The EPA has used this grant to support states  and tribes in their efforts to build, implement, or
improve compliance capacity for authorized, delegated, or approved environmental programs.
Specific activities have included:  1) improving  compliance data  collection  and quality,  2)
modernizing data systems, 3) improving public access to enforcement and  compliance data, and,
4) providing compliance training to states and tribes to enhance their compliance monitoring
capacity.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Program was discontinued in FY 2011. There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

Currently, there are no performance measures for this specific program.

FY 2013 Change  from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in  Thousands):

   •  No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:
41 For more information, refer to: www.epa.gov/compliance/state/grants/stag/index.html

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
RLBPHRA; RCRA; CWA;  SOW A;  CAA;  TSCA; EPCRA; FIFRA; ODA; NAAEC; LPA-
US/MX-BR; NEPA; MPRSA.

Compliance Assistance and Centers
Program Area: Compliance
Goal: Compliance and Environmental Stewardship
Objective(s): Achieve Environmental Protection through Improved Compliance

(Dollars in Thousands)

Environmental Program &
Management
Leaking Underground Storage
Tanks
Oil Spill Response
Total Budget Authority /
Obligations
Total Workyears
FY2011
Actuals
$671.8
$32.9
$5.4
$710.1
0.7
FY 2012
Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
FY 2013
Pres Bud
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
FY 2013 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012 Enacted
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
Program Project Description:

The EPA's Compliance  Assistance program provides information to millions of regulated
entities and Federal agencies to help them understand and meet their environmental obligations.
This information  lets regulated  entities  know  of their  legal obligations under  Federal
environmental laws. Compliance assistance resources  include Web  sites, compliance guides,
emission calculators, and training materials aimed at specific business communities or industry
sectors. Additionally, onsite compliance assistance and information is sometimes provided by the
EPA's inspectors during an inspection.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Program was discontinued in FY 2012. There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •  No change in program funding

Statutory Authority:

RCRA;  CWA; SOW A; CAA; TSCA; EPCRA; RLBPHRA; FIFRA; ODA; NEPA; NAAEC;
LPA-US/MX-BR.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                FY 2013 Annual Plan
Compliance Incentives
Program Area: Compliance
Goal: Compliance and Environmental Stewardship
Objective(s): Achieve Environmental Protection through Improved Compliance

(Dollars in Thousands)
                                 FY2011
                                 Actuals
 Environmental    Program    &
 Management
 Hazardous Substance Superfund
 Total    Budget    Authority   /
 Obligations
 Total Workyears

Program Project Description:
$667.3
$5.6
FY 2012
Enacted

$0.0
$0 n
 FY 2013
 Pres Bud
HI
 $0.0
 $0 ft
                                     FY     2013
                                     Pres Budget
                                     v.
                                     FY     2012
                                     Enacted
$672.9
1.6
$0.0
0.0
 $0.0
 0.0
$0.0
$0.0

$0.0
0.0

The EPA's Compliance Incentives program encourages regulated entities to monitor and quickly
correct environmental violations, reduce pollution, and make improvements in regulated entities'
environmental management practices. The EPA uses  a variety  of approaches to encourage
entities to self-disclose environmental violations under various environmental statues.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Program was discontinued in FY 2012. There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 President's Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •   No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

RCRA; CWA; SOW A;  CAA;  TSCA; EPCRA; RLBPHRA; FIFRA; ODA; NEPA; NAAEC;
LPA-US/MX-BR.
                                        314

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
           FY 2013 Annual Plan
Enforcement Training
Program Area: Enforcement
Goal: Compliance and Environmental Stewardship
Objective(s): Achieve Environmental Protection through Improved Compliance
(Dollars in Thousands)
                                   FY
                                   2011     FY2012
                                   Actuals  Enacted
FY 2013
Pres Bud
FY   2013   Pres
Budget v.
FY 2012 Enacted
 Environmental   Program    and
 Management                      $410.3   $0.0
 Hazardous SubstanceSuperfund    $20.6    $0.0
 Total Budget Authority / Obligations  $430.9   $0.0
 Total Workyears                   0.6      0.0

Program Project Description:
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
0.0
The  EPA is required by the Pollution Prosecution  Act of 1990 to provide environmental
compliance and enforcement training  nationwide through the National Enforcement Training
Institute (NETI). The Enforcement Training program oversees the design and delivery of core
and specialized enforcement courses, through NETI42, that sustain a well-trained workforce to
carry out the Agency's enforcement and compliance  goals.  Courses are provided to lawyers,
inspectors, civil and criminal investigators, and technical experts at all levels of government.

FY 2013 Activities and Performance Plan:

Program was discontinued in FY 2011.  There is no request for this program in FY 2013.

Performance Targets:

Currently, there are no performance measures for this specific program.

FY 2013 Change from FY 2012 Enacted Budget (Dollars in Thousands):

   •  No change in program funding.

Statutory Authority:

PPA; RLBPHRA; RCRA;  CWA;  SDWA;  CAA; TSCA;  EPCRA;  TSCA;  FIFRA;  ODA;
NAAEC: LPA-US/MX-BR: NEPA.
 1 For more information, refer to: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/training/neti/index.html

                                         315

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
EXPECTED   BENEFITS   OF    THE
PRESIDENT'S       E-GOVERNMENT
INITIATIVES

Grants.gov
The  Grants.gov initiative benefits the EPA
and its grant programs by providing a single
location to publish grant opportunities and
application packages,  and  by providing a
single site for the grants community to apply
for grants using common forms,  processes
and  systems.  The  EPA believes  that the
central site raises the visibility of our grants
opportunities  to   a  wider   diversity  of
applicants. Grants.gov  also has allowed the
EPA  to  discontinue  support  for  its own
electronic grant application system,  saving
operational,     training,
management costs.
and
account
The grants community benefits from savings
in  postal  costs,  paper   and  envelopes.
Applicants   save  time  in  searching  for
Agency grant opportunities and in learning
the application systems of various agencies.
At the request of the state environmental
agencies,  the  EPA  has  begun to  offer
Grants.gov   application   packages    for
mandatory    grants    (i.e.,    Continuing
Environmental   Program   Grants).   States
requested that the  Agency extend usage to
mandatory  programs to  streamline  their
application process.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-04-00-04-0 1 60-24
020-00-04-00-04-0 1 60-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$428.0
$380.0
Integrated Acquisition Environment
The  Integrated  Acquisition  Environment
(IAE)  is  currently  comprised  of  nine
government-wide  automated  applications
and/or databases that have contributed to
streamlining the acquisition business process
across the government. Beginning in FY12,
GSA will begin the process of consolidating
the systems into one  central  repository
called the System for Award  Management
(SAM). Until the consolidation is complete,
the EPA continues to leverage the usefulness
of some  of these  systems via electronic
linkages  between the  EPA's  acquisition
system and  the IAE shared systems. Other
IAE  systems are not linked directly to the
EPA's acquisition system, but benefit the
Agency's  contracting  staff  and  vendor
community as stand-alone resources.

The  EPA's  acquisition system  uses data
provided by the Central  Contractor Registry
(CCR)  to  replace  internally maintained
vendor   data.  Contracting  officers  can
download  vendor-provided  representation
and certification information  electronically,
via   the   Online   Representations   and
Certifications  (ORCA)  database,   which
allows vendors to submit  this  information
once,   rather  than  separately   for  every
contract proposal.  Contracting  officers are
able to access the  Excluded Parties  List
System  (EPLS),  via links in  the EPA's
acquisition system, to identify vendors that
are debarred from receiving contract awards.

Contracting officers  also can  link to the
Wage  Determination Online  (WDOL) to
obtain  information  required  under  the
Service Contract Act and the Davis-Bacon
Act. The EPA's acquisition system link to
the Federal Procurement Data  System for
submission of contract actions at the time of
award.  FPDS provides  public access to
government-wide contract information. The
Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
(eSRS)  supports  vendor   submission   of
subcontracting data for contracts identified
as  requiring this information.  The  EPA
submits    synopses    of    procurement
opportunities over $25,000  to  the  Federal
Business  Opportunities   (FBO)   website,
where  the information is  accessible to the
public. Vendors use this website to  identify
business opportunities in federal contracting.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-04-0230-24
020-00-01-16-04-0230-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$133.0
$120.0
Integrated   Acquisition    Environment
Loans and Grants
The Federal Funding Accountability and
Transparency  Act  (FFATA)  requires the
agencies to unambiguously identify contract,
grant,  and  loan  recipients  and  determine
parent/child      relationship,      address
information,  etc.  The  FFATA  taskforce
determined  that using both  the  Dun and
Bradstreet (D&B) DUNS Number (standard
identifier for all business lines) and Central
Contractor Registration (CCR), the single
point  of  entry  for  data collection  and
dissemination, is the most appropriate way
to accomplish this. This fee will pay for the
EPA's  use of this  service in  the  course of
reporting  grants and/or loans.  Funds may
also be used to consolidate disparate systems
in   the   new   SAM   consolidation   of
Acquisition and grants applications.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-02-4300-24
020-00-01-16-02-4300-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$90.0
$90.0
Enterprise Human Resource Integration
The    Enterprise    Human    Resource
Integration's  (EHRI)  Electronic  Official
Personnel  Folder  (eOPF)  is designed  to
provide  a  consolidated  repository  that
digitally documents the employment actions
and history of individuals employed  by the
federal government. The EPA has completed
migration to the federal eOPF system. This
initiative  will   benefit  the  Agency  by
reducing file room maintenance costs and
improve customer service for employees and
productivity for HR  specialists. Customer
service  will improve for employees  since
they will have 24/7 access to view and print
their official personnel documents  and HR
specialists  will no longer be  required to
manually  file,  retrieve  or mail personnel
actions   to  employees   thus   improving
productivity.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-03-1219-24
020-00-01-16-03-1219-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$403.0
$407.0
Recruitment One-Stop
Recruitment One-Stop  (ROS) simplifies the
process of locating and applying for federal
jobs.   USAJOBS   is   a  standard  job
announcement and resume builder website.
It is the one-stop for federal job seekers to
search for  and apply to positions on-line.
This integrated process benefits citizens by
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
providing a more efficient process to locate
and  apply for  jobs,  and  assists  federal
agencies in hiring top talent in a competitive
marketplace.  The  Recruitment  One-Stop
initiative   has   increased  job   seeker
satisfaction with the federal job application
process and is helping the Agency to locate
highly-qualified   candidates  and  improve
response times to applicants.

By integrating with ROS,  the Agency has
eliminated the   need   for  applicants   to
maintain  multiple  user  IDs to  apply  for
federal jobs through various systems. The
vacancy  announcement  format  has  been
improved for easier readability. The system
can  maintain  up  to  five  resumes   per
applicant, which allows them to create and
store resumes tailored to specific skills —
this is  an improvement from  our previous
system that only allowed one resume  per
applicant.   In   addition,   ROS   has  a
notification  feature  that  keeps  applicants
updated  on the  current  status  of  the
application,  and  provides  a  link to  the
agency  website for  detailed  information.
This self-help ROS feature allows applicants
to obtain  up-to-date  information  on  the
status of their application upon request.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-04-1218-24
020-00-01-16-04-1218-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$111.0
$109.0
eTraining
This   initiative   encourages    electronic
learning to improve training, efficiency and
financial performance.  The EPA recently
exercised  its option to renew the current
Interagency Agreement with OPM-GoLearn
that provides licenses to  online training for
employees.  The  EPA   purchased  17,000
licenses  to  prevent  any  interruption
service to current users.
in
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-03-1217-24
020-00-01-16-03-1217-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$125.0
$125.0
Human Resources Line of Business
The  Human  Resources  Line of Business
(HR LoB) provides the federal government
the  infrastructure   to  support  pay-for-
performance   systems,  modernized  HR
systems,   and   the   core   functionality
necessary for  the strategic management  of
human capital.
The HR LoB offers common solutions that
will enable federal departments and agencies
to work  more  effectively,  and it  provides
managers  and executives across the federal
government  improved  means   to  meet
strategic objectives. The EPA will benefit by
supporting    an     effective     program
management    activity   which   evaluates
provider performance, customer satisfaction,
and compliance with  program goals, on an
ongoing basis.
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
In May 2011, the EPA signed an MOU with
the  DOI's  National  Business  Center to
provide integrated human  resources, time
and attendance and payroll  services. In so
doing, the EPA  will  provide managers and
staff one efficient and cost effective system
that  offers  additional  functionalities for
integrated  recruitment,  entry  on   duty,
learning management, absence management,
workforce     tracking    and     position
management.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-04-1200-24
020-00-01-16-04-1200-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$66.0
$66.0
Grants Management Line of Business
The EPA manages 106 grant programs that
disburse approximately $4 billion annually.
The EPA anticipates the key benefits to the
Agency and its customers will include the
simplification  of grants business  processes
and more  timely reporting and delivery of
services.  The  Grants Management Line of
Business automated business processes will
improve consistency across EPA locations
and   throughout   government,   reducing
unique  local  business requirements  and
making it  easier  for customers  to  do
business across a wide range of agencies.
Consortium   lead   agencies   will  spread
operations and maintenance (O&M) costs,
and   development,   modernization,   and
enhancement (DME) costs  across agencies,
decreasing the burden that any one agency
must bear.
In FY 2010, the EPA  completed detailed
Fit/Gap analyses of HHS' Grants Solutions
system and the Compusearch product Prism
Grants. In addition, the Agency completed a
cost benefit  and  alternatives analysis to
determine the better Grants Management
Line of Business (GM LoB) solution. Based
on the size of the gaps and the projected cost
of  implementation,  senior   management
decided to postpone selection of a GM LoB
alternative until the Agency  reexamined its
grants  process  through business process
transformation in  FY2012 and  until  GM
LoB implementation  could  be  sequenced
appropriately    within     the    Agency
administrative system overhaul including the
contracts,  finance,  human  resource  and
grants systems.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-04-00-04- 1 3 00-24
020-00-04-00-04- 1 3 00-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$60.0
$59.0
Business Gateway
By creating a single entry-point for business
information, such  as  the  e-Forms catalog,
Business  Gateway  directly   benefits  the
EPA's  regulated  communities,   many  of
whom are subject  to complex  regulatory
requirements across multiple agencies. This
initiative  also  benefits   the  EPA   by
centralizing  OMB  reporting requirements
under the Small Business Paperwork Relief
Act  of  2002.  The EPA has  over  100
initiatives, activities, and services directed at
small  business   needs.  Many  of those
initiatives   are   highlighted    to   small
businesses  through  periodic  features  in
Business.gov. This  allows special focus to
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
be brought to bear at critical times to the
intended audiences for those initiatives.  In
addition,   with   the   launch   of   the
Business.gov  Community, small  business
users are able to interact on-line where they
can discuss, share and ask questions of other
business owners  as well as industry and
government  experts.  Business.gov   also
continues to provide a one-stop compliance
tool enabling small and emerging businesses
access to compliance information, forms and
tools   across  the   federal   government.
Business Gateway supports the EPA's small
business activities function by providing the
following benefits:
   •   a single point of access for electronic
       regulatory forms;
   •   "plain     English"     compliance
       guidance,  fact  sheets and links  to
       checklists for small businesses; and
   •   an extensive Web site with numerous
       links to other internal and external
       assistance sources.

Beginning  in  FY  2009,   the  Business
Gateway program has been fully funded by
the Small Business  Administration (SBA),
the managing partner.  The EPA plans  to
continue  its  partnership  with  Business
Gateway program, however, there is no EPA
contribution required.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-04-0100-24
020-00-01-16-04-0100-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$0.0
$0.0
Geospatial Line of Business
The Geospatial Line of Business (Geo LoB)
is  an  intergovernmental project to improve
the ability of the public and government to
use geospatial information to  support  the
business  of  government  and   facilitate
decision-making.  This initiative will  reduce
EPA  costs and improve our operations in
several areas.

Currently, EPA's  Geo LoB activities include
the initiation of  an operational Geospatial
Platform,  which  benefits  the  EPA  by
providing opportunities for cost savings  and
avoidance. By FY 2013, a Managing Partner
organization will be established to support
the implementation of two key  components
of the Geo  LoB: the OMB Circular A-16
Supplemental     Guidance     and     the
Government-wide Geospatial Platform will
move   from   the  planning   into   the
implementation  stage.  Both  efforts  will
increase access  to  geospatial data   and
analytical services  for Federal Agencies,
their partners, and stakeholders.  Over time,
the EPA intends to  use the  Geospatial
Platform for internal analytical purposes as
well   as  to   facilitate   outward-facing
geospatial capabilities to the public.

The EPA continues  to  be  a  leader  in
developing the vision and operational plans
for  the  implementation  of  the   A-16
Supplemental Guidance and the Geospatial
Platform.  Throughout  FY 2012, the EPA
will be  working to  provide  technology
artifacts and lessons learned from our own
activities for  the  benefit of our  partners in
the Geo LoB as well as colleagues in state,
local and tribal government organizations. In
FY 2013, we expect to continue this effort
and  our  leadership role  in  shaping  the
direction  of  these  important  efforts.  The
EPA also anticipates working through the
Geo LoB  to help  reduce costs  by providing
an  opportunity  for the  EPA  and  other
agencies   to    share    approaches   on
procurement   consolidation   that   other
                                          320

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
agencies can follow. In early FY 2010, the
first of these acquisitions became available
to  the  federal  community through  the
SmartBUY program managed by our Geo
LoB partners at GSA.
EPA benefits from Geo LoB in FY 2013 are
anticipated to be the same as in prior years.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-04-3100-24
020-00-01-16-04-3100-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$42.0
$42.0
eRulemaking
The  eRulemaking  program is designed to
enhance public access and participation in
the regulatory  process  through electronic
systems; reduce the burden on citizens and
businesses  in finding  relevant regulations
and  commenting  on  proposed rulemaking
actions;   consolidate   redundant   docket
systems;  and improve  agency  regulatory
processes  and the  timeliness  of regulatory
decisions.

The eRulemaking program's Federal Docket
Management  System   (FDMS)  currently
supports  174 Federal entities including all
Cabinet-level Departments and independent
rulemaking   agencies  which   collectively
promulgate over 90  percent of all Federal
regulations each year. FDMS has simplified
the public's participation in the rulemaking
process and  made  the  EPA's rulemaking
business processes more  accessible as well
as transparent.  FDMS  provides the EPA's
approximately 2,200 registered users with a
secure,  centralized electronic repository for
managing   the   Agency's   rulemaking
development via distributed management of
data and robust role-based user access. The
EPA  posts  regulatory  and  non-regulatory
documents in  Regulations.gov for public
viewing, downloading,  bookmarking, email
notification  and commenting. In FY 2011,
the EPA posted 1,112 rules and  proposed
rules, 896 Federal Register  notices,  and
78,657      public     submissions     in
Regulations.gov. EPA  also  posted  18,086
documents that consisted of supporting and
related  materials  associated  with  other
postings. Overall, the EPA provides public
access   to    623,000   documents    in
Regulations.gov.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-16-01-0060-24
020-00-01-16-01-0060-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$1,000.0
$1,000.0
                                          321

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                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
E-Travel

E-Travel provides the EPA with  efficient
and  effective travel  management services,
with cost savings from cross-government
purchasing   agreements  and  improved
functionality  through   streamlined  travel
policies and  processes,  strict  security  and
privacy controls,  and  enhanced   agency
oversight and audit capabilities.
EPA employees also will benefit from the
integrated travel planning provided through
E-Travel.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-01-03-0220-24
020-00-01-01-03-0220-24
EPA Service Fee (in
thousands)
$1,106.0
$1,314.0
Financial Management Line of Business
The Financial Management Line of Business
(FM LoB)  is a multi-agency effort whose
goals    include:    achieving    process
improvements and  cost  savings in  the
acquisition,  development, implementation,
and  operation  of  financial  management
systems.  By incorporating  the  same  FM
LoB-standard processes as  those used  by
central agency  systems,  interfaces  among
financial systems will be streamlined and the
quality   of  information   available  for
decision-making  will   be  improved.  In
addition,  the   EPA  expects  to  achieve
operational savings  in future years because
of the use of the shared service provider for
operations  and  maintenance of  the new
system.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
020-00-01-01-04-1100-24
020-00-01-01-04-1100-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$45.0
$45.0
Budget Formulation and Execution Line
of Business
The  Budget Formulation  and  Execution
Lines of Business (BFE LoB) allow the EPA
and other agencies to access budget-related
benefits and services. The Agency has the
option  to implement  LoB sponsored tools
and services.

The EPA has benefited from the BFE LoB
by sharing valuable information on what has
or hasn't worked on the use of different
budget systems and software. This effort has
created  a government only capability for
electronic collaboration (Wiki)  in which the
Budget Community website allows the EPA
to share budget information with OMB (and
other federal agencies). The LoB is working
on giving the  EPA and other agencies the
capability to have secure, virtual  on-line
meetings where  participants  can  not only
hear what's been said by conference calling
into  the meeting,  but  also  view budget-
related  presentations directly  from  their
workspace. The LoB has provided budget-
related training to EPA budget employees on
OMB's   MAX budget  system,  and  on
Treasury's FACTS II statements explaining
how it ties to the budget process.
                                          322

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Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
010-00-01-01-04-3200-24
010-00-01-01-04-3200-24
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$105.0
$75.0
Performance   Management   Line   of
Business
Following the passage of the Government
Performance  and Results Act  (GPRA) in
1993, agencies developed a strategic plan,
an annual performance plan, and an annual
performance   report.  While  we   have
improved the content of these plans, reports,
and underlying performance measures over
the past twenty years, they are still produced
primarily as static printed documents. This
traditional printed format, and even the PDF
version  of it,  limits the  usefulness  of the
performance  information contained  in the
report, for  people both within  and outside
the agency. For example, the format does
not make it easy  to see what other Federal
agencies  sharing  similar  objectives  or
working with  the same  community are
doing, learn from each others'  experience,
allow  for  frequent updates,  or  support
analysis of the data to find relationships and
patterns.

In December  2010,  Congress  enacted the
GPRA Modernization Act,  signed  into law
on    January   4,   2011.    The   GPRA
Modernization Act shifts the  focus  of its
predecessor from  the  production  of plans
and reports to the active use of goals and
performance  data to  improve  outcomes.
Among  other  changes,  it   strengthens
leadership engagement in setting ambitious
goals,   reviewing  progress,   and  clearly
communicating    results.   The    GPRA
Modernization  Act  also  requires  greater
Congressional  consultation  as   agencies
establish their goals.
One of the key  changes in the law  also
included required modernizing the Federal
government's   nearly   two-decade   old
performance      reporting     framework.
Specifically, the Act requires the following
by the end of 2012:
  1.  Development  of  a  single Federal
     website   which  provides  progress
     updates on Federal and agency Priority
     Goals, including quarterly  measures
     and milestones;
  2.  Development of a consolidated list of
     Federal  government  programs  for
     inclusion on the site; and
  3.  The   consolidation   of   all  agency
     strategic   plans,  annual  performance
     plans, and annual performance reports
     on this website  in a  "searchable and
     machine readable format".

To  meet these  requirements, the  EPA will
participate in the Performance Management
Line of Business (PM LoB), an interagency
effort  managed  by  GSA  to  develop
government-wide performance management
capabilities  and  meet  the  transparency
requirements of the GPRA Modernization
Act.   Beginning   in  FY   2013,   our
performance information will  be reported
through a Federal website which includes
advanced   data  display   and  reporting
capabilities, the ability to  extract raw data,
and,  over  time,  will    integrate   other
government-wide data,  such  as  program,
human  capital, and  spending information.
All information currently provided publicly
will be updated more frequently and will be
provided in user-friendly  formats that the
public can more easily access and analyze.
                                          323

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
We  also expect  these new  capabilities to
improve  Agency   decision-making   and
enhance external  visibility  into  EPA's
performance and the public's understanding
of what the EPA is trying to accomplish, the
challenges faced, results achieved, and areas
needing  improvement.  Just  as important,
pursuing this effort through an inter-agency
collaboration will result in government-wide
efficiencies by not requiring each agency to
build this capability on its  own,  but instead
by leveraging shared technologies and those
developed on a government-wide basis.
Fiscal Year
2012
2013
Account Code
New E-Gov Initiative
New E-Gov Initiative
EPA Contribution
(in thousands)
$0.0
$39.0
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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
SUPERFUND SPECIAL ACCOUNTS43

Section  122(b)(3)  of the  Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and
Liability Act (CERCLA) authorizes the EPA
to retain and use funds received pursuant to
an agreement with a Potentially Responsible
Party (PRP) to carry out the purpose of that
agreement. The EPA retains such funds in
special accounts, which are  sub-accounts in
the Superfund Trust Fund. Pursuant to the
specific agreements, which typically take the
form of an Administrative Order on Consent
or Consent  Decree, the EPA  uses  special
account   funds   to  finance   site-specific
CERCLA response actions  at  the  site for
which the account was established. Through
the use of special accounts, the EPA pursues
its "enforcement  first" policy - ensuring
responsible parties pay for cleanup - so that
appropriated resources from the  Superfund
Trust Fund are conserved for sites where no
viable or liable PRPs can be  identified.  Both
special  account resources and  appropriated
resources are critical  to  the  Superfund
program.

Special  account  funds are used to  conduct
many   different    site-specific   CERCLA
response actions,  including,  but not limited
to, investigations to determine the extent of
contamination  and  appropriate  remedy
needed, construction and implementation of
the  remedy,  enforcement  activities,   and
post-construction  activities.  The  EPA  also
may provide special account funds to a PRP
who  agrees   to  perform work  under an
agreement, as  an incentive (in the form of a
reimbursement) to perform additional work
beyond  the PRP's fair share  at the   site,
43 House Report 111-180 of the FY 2010 Department
of the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies
Appropriation Bill directs the Agency to include in
its annual budget justification a plan for using special
account funds expeditiously.  This information is
being provided in response to this request.
which  the EPA  might otherwise have to
conduct   using   appropriated   resources.
Because  response actions  may  take  many
years, the full use of special account funds
also may  take many years. Pursuant to the
agreement,  once  site-specific  work  is
complete  and  site risks are  addressed, the
EPA  may use  special  account funds to
reimburse the EPA for  site-specific costs
incurred using appropriated resources (e.g.,
reclassification),    allowing    the    latter
resources  to be allocated to other sites. Any
remaining   special   account   funds   are
generally transferred to the Superfund Trust
Fund, where they are available for future
appropriation by Congress to further support
cleanup at other sites.

Since  the inception   of  special  accounts
through the end of FY 2011, the EPA has
collected  approximately  $3.7 billion from
PRPs  and  earned  approximately  $391.4
million in interest. In  addition, the EPA has
transferred  over  $19.2  million  to  the
Superfund Trust Fund. As of the end of FY
2011, over $1.9 billion has been disbursed to
finance  site response actions  and  over
$287.0 million has been obligated  but not
yet disbursed, which is more than 54 percent
of the cumulative funds available in special
accounts.  In  FY  2011,  EPA disbursed
$230.6 million  from  special  accounts for
response work at more than 550 sites, which
increased   disbursements   by   almost  24
percent  ($44.6  million)  from  FY  2010
(excluding reclassifications).  The EPA is
carefully managing more  than $1.8  billion
that was available as of October  1, 2011 and
has developed multi-year plans to use these
funds  as  expeditiously  as  possible.   The
majority of open accounts (62 percent) have
an  available balance of  less  than  $500
thousand,  while  3  percent of open accounts
have approximately 57 percent  of the total
resources  available.  The  following  table
illustrates  the cumulative status of open and
                                           325

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
closed accounts for FY 2010 and FY 2011
program activity as well  as  planned multi-
year uses of the available balance.

The Agency appreciates the  Committee's
understanding that special account funds are
dedicated to specific sites where remediation
strategies may need to be developed.44 As of
the end of  FY 2011, the EPA developed
multi-year  plans   to  utilize  the  available
balance and will continue to fully plan  100
percent of the  funds  received to conduct
site-specific response activities, or reclassify
and/or   transfer   excess  funds   to   the
Superfund  Trust   Fund  for  use  at  other
Superfund sites. Current plans indicate that
the Agency will  utilize  approximately 49
percent of the remaining available special
account resources  over the next five years.
The time frame for use  of special account
funds at a  specific site depends on several
factors, including the specific requirements
for fund use set forth in the agreement the
funds were collected under, the stage of site
cleanup, the viability  of other responsible
parties  to   conduct site   cleanup,  and  the
nature  of  the  site contamination,  among
other things.

Through its enforcement efforts, the Agency
continues to receive  site-specific settlement
funds  that  are  placed in  special  accounts
each year, so progress on  actual obligation
and  disbursement  of funds  may  not  be
apparent   upon  review  solely  of  the
cumulative available  balance,   as  current
special account balances  are  used  while
additional  funds may be deposited.  In FY
2010 and FY 2011, the EPA received over
$723  million  and  over  $352  million,
respectively, for site-specific response work;
however,  most  of these funds were for site
response work to occur over multiple years.
EPA will  continue to monitor the  use of
special account funds  to ensure we  are
conducting   cleanups   as   quickly   and
efficiently as possible.
   House Report 2055  Conference Report  of the
Military  Construction  and Veterans  Affairs,  and
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2012  directs
the EPA to follow the language in House Report 112-
151  with  respect  to  managing  the unobligated
balances  in the Superfund special  accounts.  House
Report 112-151 states "The Committee continues to
have concerns about the large unobligated balances in
the 939  special accounts, which hold site-specific
settlement  funds  from  responsible parties.  The
Committee similarly understands that funds in these
accounts may be dedicated to  specific sites where
remediation strategies may still need to be developed.
Nonetheless,  the  Committee  expects EPA  will
accelerate the obligation of funds within these  special
accounts  in  2012  to   address  risks posed  by
contamination at these sites."
                                             326

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Special Accounts:
FY 2011 Program Actuals and Future Multi-Year Program Resource Plan
Account Status1
Cumulative Open
Cumulative Closed
FY 2011 Inputs and Outputs to 2010 End Of Fiscal Year (EOFY)
Available Balance










2010 EOFY Available Balance
FY2011 Activities
+ Receipts
- Transfers to Superfund Trust Fund (Receipt Adjustment)
+ Interest Earned
- Net Change in Unliquidated Obligations
- Disbursements - For EPA Incurred Costs
- Disbursements - For Work Party Reimbursements under
Final Settlements
- Reclassifications
201 1 EOFY Available Balance2
Multi-Year Plans for EOFY 2010 Available Balance






201 1 EOFY Available Balance
- Estimates for Future EPA Site Activities3
- Estimates for Potential Disbursement to Work Parties
Identified in Final Settlements4
- Estimates for Reclassifications for FYs 201 1-201 35
- Estimates for Transfers to Trust Fund for FYs 201 1-201 35
- Available Balance To Be Assigned6
Number of
Accounts
992
137
$ in Thousands
$1,795,206.4

$352,278.2
($5,130.2)
$12,816.8
($40,496.3)
($219,403.3)
($11,20:
($72,539.5)
$1,811,528.9
$ in Thousands
$1,811,528.9
$1,708,630.2
$51,243.4
$41,635.2
$6,235.8
$3,784.2
1 FY 2011 data is as of 10/01/2011. The 2010 End of Fiscal Year (EOFY) Available Balance is
as of 10/01/2010.
2 Numbers may not add due to rounding.
3 "Estimates for EPA Future Site Activities" includes all response actions that EPA may conduct
or oversee in the future, such as removal, remedial, enforcement, post-construction activities as
well as allocation of funds to facilitate a settlement to encourage PRPs to perform the cleanup.
Planning data are multi-year and cannot be used for annual comparisons.
4 "Estimates for Potential Disbursements to Work Parties Identified in Finalized Settlements"
includes those funds that have already been designated in a settlement document, such as a
Consent Decree or Administrative Order on Consent, to be available to a PRP for
reimbursements but that have not yet been obligated.
5 "Reclassifications" and "Transfers to the Trust Fund" are estimated for three FYs only.
                                         327

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 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan


 Planning data were recorded in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation,
and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) as of 10/20/2011 in reference to special account
available balances as of 10/01/2011. Receipts incurred in the last quarter of the fiscal year may
not have been  fully planned for use in CERCLIS at the time of data entry and are reflected in
"Available Balance To Be Assigned."	
                                         328

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
FY 2012-2013 EPA PRIORITY GOALS
Below are EPA's FY 2012-2013  Priority
Goals. Additional  information  on  Priority
Goals can be found on Performance.gov
    1.  Taking Action on Climate Change
       and Improving Air Quality Reduce
       greenhouse gas emissions from cars
       and trucks. Through  September 30,
       2013,  EPA in  coordination  with
       DOT's   fuel   economy   standards
       program   will   be   implementing
       vehicle and truck  greenhouse  gas
       standards that are proj ected to reduce
       GHG emissions by 1.2 billion metric
       tons and  reduce oil consumption by
       about  98  billion  gallons  over the
       lifetime of the  affected  vehicles and
       trucks.

    2.  Protecting  America's    Waters
       Improve public health protection for
       persons  served by  small  drinking
       water  systems  by strengthening the
       technical,  managerial, and financial
       capacity   of  those  systems.  By
       September  30,  2013,   EPA  will
       engage with twenty states to improve
       small    drinking   water    system
       capability   through    two    EPA
       programs, the Optimization Program
       and/or  the Capacity Development
       Program.
3.  Protecting   America's   Waters
   Improve, restore, or maintain water
   quality   by   enhancing   nonpoint
   source   program   accountability,
   incentives,   and  effectiveness.   By
   September  30,  2013,  50% of  the
   states  will  revise  their  nonpoint
   source program  according to new
   Section 319 grant  guidelines  that
   EPA will release in November 2012.

4  Cleaning   up   Communities  and
   Advancing             Sustainable
   Development        Clean       up
   contaminated sites  and make them
   ready  for  use.  By  September  30,
   2013, an additional 22,100  sites will
   be ready for anticipated use.

5.  Cross-Programs          Increase
   transparency  and  reduce  burden
   through e-Reporting. By September
   30, 2013, develop a plan to convert
   existing paper reports into electronic
   reporting,     establish     electronic
   reporting  in   at  least  four  key
   programs,  and  adopt  a policy  for
   including electronic reporting in new
   rules.
                                         329

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                   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Budget Status Update
As of February 5, 2012 (Dollars in Thousands)
Approp
STAG
STAG
STAG
STAG
Program Project Description
Clean Water SRF
Drinking Water SRF
Diesel Emissions Grants
Brownfields
Subtotal, STAG
EPM
IG
LUST
SF
Management and Oversight
Audits, Evaluations, &
Investigations
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Superfund: Remedial
Agency Total
Original
Appropriation
$3,969,000.0
$1,980,000.0
$294,000.0
$96,500.0
$6,339,500.0
$81,500.0
$20,000.0
$197,000.0
$582,000.0
$7,220,000.0
Current
Budget (2)
$4,003,006.1
$1,945,838.8
$283,479.2
$95,271.3
$6,327,595.4
$66,908.3
$20,000.0
$187,651.2
$575,249.1
$7,177,403.9
Obligations
(3)
$4,003,006.1
$1,945,838.8
$283,479.2
$95,271.3
$6,327,595.4
$66,908.3
$13,753.2
$187,651.2
$575,249.1
$7,171,157.1
Outlays
$3,650,555.5
$1,811,323.2
$250,971.2
$63,428.2
$5,776,278.0
$59,359.4
$13,464.8
$177,483.6
$553,484.2
$6,580,070.0
Percent
Obligated (3)
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
69%
100%
100%
100%
Percent
Outlayed
91%
93%
89%
67%
91%
89%
67%
95%
96%
92%
   (1) This chart shows the financial status for all the ARRA programs appropriated to EPA.
   (2) The total budgets of EPA's ARRA programs have changed since ARRA passage due to: States ability to shift funds between
       CW and DW SRF projects, rescissions, and de-obligations of expired funds.
   (3) Only the IG may obligate additional funds - the obligation deadlines for all  other EPA ARRA programs have passed. The
       current budgets for all other programs are equal to the funds obligated to date.
                                                          330

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan

OCF
O










OCSP
P






OEC
A










OEI



EPA Budget by National Program
Manager and Major Office
Immediate Office
Center for Environmental Finance
Office of Budget
Office of Planning, Analysis and
Accountability
Office of Financial Management
Office of Technology Solutions
Office of Financial Services
Office of Resource and Information
Management
Regional Resources


Immediate Office
Office of Pesticide Programs
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics
Office of Science Coordination and Policy
Regional Resources


Immediate Office
Office of Civil Enforcement
Office of Criminal Enforcement, Forensics,
and Training
Office of Compliance
Office of Environmental Justice
Office of Federal Activities
Federal Facilities Enforcement Office
Office of Site Remediation Enforcement
Regional Resources


Immediate Office
EPA Quality Management Program
Office of Planning, Resources, and
Outreach
Office of Information Collection

$2,603.0
$1,023.0
$7,482.0
$5,775.0
$7,267.0
$6,781.0
$15,923.0
$1,630.0
$28,993.0
$77,477.0

$7,650.0
$80,239.0
$47,713.0
$4,212.0
$21,674.0
$161,488.0

$7,112.0
$25,876.0
$60,380.0
$23,751.0
$2,654.0
$4,445.0
$2,888.0
$11,477.0
$329,050.0
$467,633.0

$2,284.0
$2,497.0
$4,201.0
$9,874.0

$164.0
$1,417.0
$6,081.0
$893.0
$577.0
$17,477.0
$9,400.0
$1,785.0
$1,847.0
$39,641.0

$1,752.0
$17,044.0
$47,224.0
$5,841.0
$25,684.0
$97,545.0

$2,958.0
$13,411.0
$12,608.0
$57,131.0
$3,108.0
$1,449.0
$550.0
$30,127.0
$26,909.0
$148,251.0

$6,216.0
$953.0
$3,386.0
$41,866.0

13.9
6.5
51.4
36.5
54.7
40.5
141.1
10.6
235.4
590.6

49.6
552.0
316.2
25.5
166.7
1,110.0

48.1
155.7
367.3
150.2
18.9
31.2
16.8
75.8
2,409.6
3,273.6

15.6
16.1
28.7
66.3
                                            331

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan





OGC










OIG









OITA









Office of Technology Operations and
Planning
Office of Information Analysis and Access
Regional Resources


Immediate Office
Air and Radiation Law Office
Pesticides and Toxic Substances Law
Office
Solid Waste and Emergency Response Law
Office
Water Law Office
Other Legal Support*
Regional Resources

$12,436.0
$12,970.0
$22,298.0
$66,560.0

$4,667.1
$7,187.4
$3,955.2
$2,615.0
$3,798.9
$12,716.4
$24,246.0
$59,186.0
$15,892.0
$20,247.0
$22,053.0
$110,613.0

$4,332.3
$47.0
$35.0
$151.0
$29.0
$1,101.7
$574.0
$6,270.0
84.5
90.6
174.3
476.1

28.5
41.7
23.0
15.0
22.5
75.3
142.5
348.5
*Other Legal Support includes resources for Alternative Dispute Resolution, Civil
Rights and Finance Law, Cross-Cutting Issues, and General Law support.

Immediate Office
Office of Audit
Office of Congressional, Public Affairs and
Management
Office of Counsel
Office of Cyber Investigations and
Homeland Security
Office of Investigations
Office of Mission Systems
Office of Program Evaluation


Immediate Office
Office of Regional and Bilateral Affairs
Office of Global Affairs and Policy
Office of Management and International
Services
American Indian Environmental Office
Regional Resources





$2,931.0
$11,797.0
$2,946.0
$2,440.0
$0.0
$11,607.0
$6,988.0
$11,813.0
$50,522.0

$1,062.1
$3,728.8
$3,318.3
$2,356.0
$2,646.8
$10,330.0
$23,442.0




$3,230.0
$645.0
$173.0
$86.0
$0.0
$2,390.0
$1,551.0
$540.0
$8,615.0

$143.1
$4,030.9
$473.6
$1,333.6
$2,102.8
$99,045.0
$107,129.0




17.7
95.9
19.7
16.5
0.0
69.7
53.2
93.1
365.8

6.3
24.7
20.9
16.5
17.9
81.5
167.8



                                            332

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                   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                    FY 2013 Annual Plan
Fiscal Year 2013: Consolidations, Realignments, or Other Transfers of Resources
This table shows consolidations, realignments or other transfers of resources and personnel from one program project to another in
order to clearly illustrate a transfer of FY 2013 resources.
Program
Project


EPM
Total
Funding
Transferred
From:
F8: ($834.0)
                            Payroll       FTE         Funding     Payroll      FTE         Program
                            Transferred   Transferred  Transferred  Transferred  Transferred  Project
                            From:        From:       To:         To:         To:          Total
                            ($834.0)     (6.0)
IT/Data
Management
EPM      D8:
TRI/Right   to
Know
EPM      50:
Compliance
Monitoring


EPM      90:
NEPA
Implementation
                                     $834.0      $834.0      6.0
                                                                          $88,893.0
$17,354.0
($133.0)     ($133.0)     (1.0)
$125,209
                                     $133.0      $133.0       1.0
$17,424
                                                                                      Purpose
This  change is a
realignment     of
resources from  the
IT/Data
Management
program   to   the
Toxics     Release
Inventory    (TRI)
program to reflect
            efforts
        performed
current
being
for TRI.
This       change
reflects  a  transfer
from           the
Compliance
Monitoring
program   to   the
National
Environmental
Policy        Act
Implementation
program
supporting  reviews
of         energy
                                                          333

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                   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                                          FY 2013 Annual Plan
Program
Project
EPM 44:
Civil
Enforcement
     Total
     Funding
     Transferred
     From:
Payroll
Transferred
From:
FTE
Transferred
From:
Funding
Transferred
To:
Payroll
Transferred
To:
FTE
Transferred
To:
Program
Project
Total
     ($140.0)     ($140.0)     (1.0)
EPM
Criminal
Enforcement
52:
                         $140.0
                         $140.0
                         1.0
                                                               $188,957.0
                         $51,900.0
Purpose
                         development
                         projects  occurring
                         in  the  Regional
                         Offices.
                         This       change
                         reflects  a  transfer
                         from   the   civil
                         enforcement
                         program   to   the
                         criminal
                         enforcement
                         program to support
                         the current regional
                         legal workload.
                                                           334

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2013 Annual Plan
Physicians' Comparability Allowance (PCA) Worksheet for PY 2011

[The United States Environmental Protection Agency]
Table 1

1) Number of Physicians Receiving PC As
2) Number of Physicians with One- Year PCA Agreements
3) Number of Physicians with Multi-Year PCA Agreements
4) Average Annual PCA Physician Pay (without PCA
payment)
5) Average Annual PCA Payment
6) Number of
Physicians Receiving
PCAs by Category
(non-add)
Category I Clinical Position
Category II Research Position
Category III Occupational Health
Category IV-A Disability
Evaluation
Category IV-B Health and Medical
Admin.
PY 2011
(Actual)
8
0
8
$122,68
O
$21,540

7
1


CY 2012
(Estimat
es)
8
0
8
$123,123
$21,540

7
1


BY 2013*
(Estimate
s)
8
0
8
$123,683
$21,540

7
1


       *FY 2013 data will be approved during the FY 2014 Budget cycle.

   7)  If applicable, list and  explain the necessity of any additional physician categories
       designated by your agency (for categories other than I through IV-B). Provide the number
       of PCA agreements per additional category for the PY, CY and BY.	
 EPA expects no additional categories to be applicable in the foreseeable future.
   8)  Provide the maximum annual PCA amount paid to each category of physician in your
       agency and explain the reasoning for these amounts by category.	
 The maximum allowance being paid to a Category II Research Position is $24,382.  The sum
 represents the allowance necessary to prevent the employee from seeking employment with the
 private sector, or at another Federal agency, and in accordance with the criteria contained in the
 EPA PCA Plan, the allowance is deemed to represent a sum commensurate with the value of the
 physician to the agency.

 The maximum allowance being paid to a Category III Occupational Heath Position is $1,648.
 This is a unique position in EPA, and this modest allowance represents the sum necessary to
 offset a competing job offer of interest to the employee.
   9)  Explain the recruitment and retention problem(s) for each category of physician in your
       agency (this should demonstrate that a current need continues to persist).	
 (Please include any staffing data to support your explanation, such as number and duration of
 unfilled positions and number of accessions and separations per fiscal year.)	
                                         335

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 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
Historically, the small number  of EPA Research  Physicians experiences modest turnover.
Essentially, use  of the allowance  by EPA is  necessary to support the stability in its small
Research Physician population and, therefore, it is regarded primarily  as  a retention tool,
although we have  been informed by our most recent Research Physician hires and  our  sole
emergency response  team Physician that the EPA  job offer would not  have been accepted
without inclusion of the allowance.
   10) Explain the degree to which recruitment and retention problems were alleviated in your
      agency through the use of PC As in the prior fiscal year.	
(Please include any staffing data to support your explanation, such as number and duration of
unfilled positions and number of accessions and separations per fiscal year.)
Internal EPA survey consistently confirms that all of our allowance-receiving physicians  are
motivated to work at EPA by the mission of the agency, in preference to private practice or
employment at another Federal  agency. Nevertheless, we are also consistently told that  our
willingness to pay some level of allowance is usually the difference between the employee's
willingness to remain with EPA in light of the altruism and the lure of greater remuneration in
other directions.
   11) Provide any additional information that may be useful in planning PCA staffing levels
      and amounts in your agency.	
We are well aware that the Office of Personnel Management has predicated its policies in the
direction of discouraging Federal agencies from using incentive authorities to compete with each
other or to raid each other. We are convinced that without the availability of the PCA, despite
our low turnover rate, we would have difficulty  in retaining our small number of Research
Physicians, not so much to the private sector, but to other Federal agencies with significantly
more positions that are also paying the allowance. Simply put, we are frequently told by our
Research Physicians that without the PCA, family pressure would compel transfer from EPA as
long as the Physician wished to stay with Federal employment.
                                         336

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Guidance   and   Instructions   for   PCA
Worksheet

These instructions cover all agencies using
or    intending    to   use    Physicians'
Comparability Allowance  (PCA) payments.
Eligibility  for PCA is defined in 5 U.S.C.
5948 and 5 CFR part 595. All data should be
submitted in the PCA Worksheet. Data for
each question should be supplied for prior
fiscal year (PY), current  fiscal year (CY),
and budget fiscal year (BY).
For    more   information   on    PCA:
http ://www. opm. gov/oca/pay/html/pca. asp.
Definitions-General
Government Physician: Section  5948(g)(l)
of title  5, United  States  Code,  defines
"Government physician" as any individual
employed as a physician  or dentist who is
paid under: the General Schedule; the Senior
Executive Service; section 5371, relating to
certain  health  care  positions;  Tennessee
Valley Authority Act; Foreign Service  Act;
Central  Intelligence Agency  Act;  section
1202  of the Panama  Canal  Act of 1979;
section  2  of the National Security Act of
May  29,   1959;  section  5376  of title 5
relating to certain  senior-level positions;
section  5377 of title 5 relating to critical
positions;  or subchapter IX of chapter 53 of
title  5  relating  to  special  occupational pay
systems.
Definitions-Worksheet Data
1) Number of Physicians Receiving PCAs:
The  total  number  of agency  physicians
receiving a PCA.
2-3) Number of Physicians with 1-Year and
Multi-Year PCA Service Agreements: Under
the PCA program, physicians may elect to
sign a  1-year  or  multi-year PCA  service
agreement. Please provide the number of
physicians   under  1-year  and  multi-year
agreements in rows 2 and 3.
4) Average Annual  PCA Physician  Pay
(without PCA  payment):  Average annual
compensation  per  physician receiving a
PCA. These amounts should exclude  the
PCA payment, but include base pay and all
other   bonuses,    incentives   (such   as
recruitment,   relocation,   and   retention
incentives) and awards.
5)  Average  Annual  PCA Payment:  The
average annual PCA paid per physician.
6) Category of Physicians Receiving PCAs:
The number of physicians  receiving PCAs
broken out by category. Detailed physician
category  definitions  can  be found  here:
http ://www. opm. gov/oca/pav/html/pca. asp.
7) List Any Additional Physician Categories
Designated by Your Agency:  Pursuant to 5
CFR 595.107,  any additional category of
physician receiving a  PCA, not covered by
categories I through IV-B,  should be listed
and accompanied by  an explanation  as to
why  these  categories  are  necessary.  In
addition,   the   number    of   physician
agreements  under these categories, broken
out by category, should be provided.

8)  Explanation of  the Allowance Amount
Paid to  Each  Category  of  Physician:
Provide  reasoning  for the amount of  the
allowances  assigned   to   each   physician
category.

9) Explanation of Recruitment and Retention
Problem(s): Factors  contributing to  your
agency's physician recruitment and retention
problems   should    be   provided.   The
explanation should include  staffing  data,
such as accessions,  separations and  number
and duration  of  unfilled  positions,  as
support.    Where    applicable,    provide
information by physician category.

10)  Explanation   of the  Degree  PCA
Alleviates   Recruitment   and   Retention
Problem(s): Provide an explanation of  the
extent that providing PCAs has prevented or
lessened recruitment and retention problems.
The explanation  should  include  staffing
data,  such  as accessions,  separations and
                                          337

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
number and duration of unfilled positions, as
support.

11) Additional  Information:  Provide  any
additional, relevant information.
                                           338

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Proposed   FY   2013   Administrative
Provisions
Balanced Budget  and  Emergency Deficit
Control Act of 1985, as amended.
To further clarify proposed Administrative
Provisions that involve more than a simple
annual extension, were not included in P.L.
112-74,  or propose a modification  to  an
existing     provision,     the    following
information is provided.

Community  Action   for  a  Renewed
Environment
Under    terms   established   by    the
Administrator,  and  in  addition  to  funds
otherwise available in other appropriation
accounts for specific grant programs, the
Agency may expend funds appropriated in
the    Environmental     Program    and
Management account for competitive grants
to  communities to implement  Community
Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE)
projects.

CARE is a competitive  grant and technical
assistance program that offers an innovative
way for under-served and other communities
to  take  action to  reduce toxic pollution.
Through CARE,  communities create  local
collaborative partnerships  that  implement
local solutions to minimize exposure to toxic
pollutants  and  reduce their release. In FY
2013, EPA is requesting new grant authority
to  continue  this  program  beyond  the
demonstration phase.

Cancellation of Unobligated Balances
From  unobligated balances available  to
carry  out projects and  activities funded
through  the State  and  Tribal  Assistance
Grants account,  $30,000,000 are  hereby
permanently cancelled:  Provided,  That  no
amounts may be cancelled from amounts
that were designated by the Congress as an
emergency  requirement  pursuant  to the
Concurrent Resolution on the Budget or the
EPA is proposing to cancel $30 million from
STAG unobligated balances  provided  that
they were not designated as  an emergency
requirement.

Program Funds for Facilities Activities
The Science and Technology, Environmental
Programs  and Management,   Office  of
Inspector General,  Hazardous  Substance
Superfund,   and  Leaking  Underground
Storage   Tank    Trust   Fund   Program
Accounts, are available for the construction,
alteration,   repair,   rehabilitation,   and
renovation of facilities provided that the cost
does not exceed $150,000 per project.

The  Building  and Facilities  threshold  was
last increased from $75  to $85 thousand in
FY  2004.  During the   2004   to   2011
timeframe,  costs for construction, material,
and  labor increased ranging from  5 to  9
percent per year. EPA is proposing to reflect
these cost increases by raising  the  per
project   threshold  from  $85  to   $150
thousand.

The  $150 thousand threshold will  apply to
the S&T, EPM, OIG, Superfund,  and LUST
appropriations and will  allow the programs
to proceed  effectively  and  efficiently to
address immediate, urgent and smaller-scale
facility  improvements and will enable the
Agency  to maintain  adequate operations,
further   mission-critical   activities   and
implement conservation goals.
Title 42 Hiring Authority
The  fourth paragraph under the heading
Administrative  Provisions  of  title  II of
Public Law 109-54, as amended by the fifth
paragraph under such heading of title II of
                                          339

-------
   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
division E of Public Law 111-8 and the third
paragraph under such heading of the title II
of Public Law 111-88, is further amended by
striking  "up to thirty persons at any one
time " and inserting "persons".

The  current  proviso   states   that  the
Administrator may,  after  consultation with
the  Office  of  Personnel  Management,
employ up to thirty persons at any one time
in the Office of Research  and Development
under the  authority  provided in 42 U.S.C.
209.  The  change  proposed in  FY  2013
would remove the ceiling of thirty persons at
any one time.
Oil Spill Transfer Authority
Notwithstanding   section   104   of  the
Comprehensive  Environmental  Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act (42 U.S.C.
9604), the Administrator may authorize the
expenditure or transfer of up to $10,000,000
from any appropriation  in  this  title,  in
addition  to  the  amounts  included in the
"Inland Oil Spill Programs" account, for
removal activities related to actual oil spills
[5 days after notifying the House and Senate
Committees  on  Appropriations   of  the
intention to expend or transfer such funds]:
Provided, That no funds shall be expended
or transferred under this authority until the
Administrator  determines  that  amounts
made  available  for expenditure  in  the
"Inland Oil Spill Programs" account will be
exhausted within 30 days: Provided further,
That such funds shall be replenished to the
appropriation that  was the source of the
expenditure or  transfer,  following EPA's
receipt of reimbursement from the Oil Spill
Liability Trust Fund pursuant  to  the  Oil
Pollution Act of 1990.

This  provision, enacted  in P.L.  112-74,
allows the Administrator to quickly deploy
necessary resources in response to oil  spills
by allowing transfers of up to  $10 million
from  other available sources within  EPA.
The  change  to the  language  removes  the
requirement for a 5-day notification period
to the House and  Senate Committees  on
Appropriations,   which   is  left   to   the
Committee's discretion.
                                           340

-------
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                EPA Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Performance Report:
                        Overview of FY 2011 Performance
                                      342

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                           FY 2013 Annual Plan
EPA    Fiscal    Year
Performance Report:

Introduction
2011    Annual

  Overview of FY
The EPA's FY 2011 Annual Performance
Report presents environmental and program
performance results  achieved in  FY 2011
under the goals established in its FY 2011-
2015           Strategic           Plan
(http://www.epa.gov/ocfo/plan/plan.htm)
and  against the performance measures  and
targets established in the agency's FY 2011
Annual  Performance  Plan  and  Budget
(http://www.epa.gov/budget/index.htm.)

This report is  one of three complementary
documents the EPA has produced to report
its   FY   2011  financial   and  program
performance results, in compliance with the
Government Performance  and Results  Act
Modernization Act of 2010 and the Office of
Management   and  Budget implementing
guidance. In addition to the FY 2011 APR
provided  here  as  part  of its  FY 2013
Congressional Budget Justification, the EPA
has  also issued  an FY  2011  Agency
Financial  Report   and   an   FY  2011
Highlights,.   The   FY  2011  Highlights
presents  key  financial  and performance
information from both the APR and APR in
a brief, nontechnical, user-friendly  format.
These   three  reports  are  available   at
http://www.epa.gOv/planandbudget/results.h
tml.

Approach to Performance Reporting

The EPA strives to more closely connect the
results it has achieved with its direction for
the future. Toward  this end, the  agency
worked to integrate its annual performance
    report     and    Congressional    Budget
    Justification more fully and meaningfully. In
lOllafidrtfonmtaicthe  "Overview  of FY 2011
    Performance" provided in this section, the
    EPA   has  woven   performance  results
    information  and  addressed   performance
    reporting  requirements throughout its  FY
    2013 CJ:

           •  The  Introduction and  Overview
              section presents  EPA's mission
              statement   and   organizational
              structure;
           •  The    Goal   and    Objective
              Overview  section  includes  FY
              2011  performance  results where
              helpful to support  discussion of
              future directions;
           •  Appropriation  Program/Project
              Fact  Sheets  include  FY 2011
              performance  results and  trend
              data   to  provide   context  for
              budget decisions; and
           •  The  Program  Performance  and
              Assessment  section  presents  a
              detailed,    8-year    array    of
              performance data—displayed by
              strategic  goal and  objective—
              which  provides results for  each
              measure   established   in   the
              agency's   FY  2011   Annual
              Performance Plan and  includes
              explanations   for   missed   or
              exceeded targets.

    Integrating performance  and  budgeting in
    this manner advances the agency's strategic
    planning and provides context and support
    for its FY 2013 budget decisions.
                                          343

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                     FY 2013 Annual Plan
Performance Management in FY 2011

         EPA's  Performance Management  System



                                Strategic Planning
                              • FY 2011-2015 Strategic Plan
                              * Futures Work
    Results Measurement,
  Reporting, and Evaluation
       (Accountability)
   * Annual Performance Report
   * Program Evaluation
   * Annual Cross-Cutting Fundamental
     Strategy Progress Reports
                                   Operations
                                  and Execution
                               National Program Manager
                               Guidance
                               Regional Performance
                               Commitments
                               Regional and State Performance
                               Partnership Agreements (PPAs)
               Annual Planning
                and Budgeting
             EPA Annual Plan and Budget
             Priority Goals
             Annual Cross-Cutting Fundamental
             Strategy Action Plans
To  support achievement  of the long-term
goals and objectives outlined in its Strategic
Plan,   the   EPA  prepares  an  Annual
Performance  Plan  and  Budget,  which
commits  the agency to a suite of annual
performance measures.  The EPA reports its
results  against these annual performance
measures and discusses progress toward its
longer  term  strategic goals in its Annual
Performance  Report,  which  the  agency
includes  in  its  Congressional Budget
Justification.

FY 2011 marks the first year of the EPA's
implementation of its new FY 2011-2015
Strategic                          Plan
                                       344

-------
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
(http://www.epa.gov/ocfo/plan/plan.httn),
released  in  September  2010.  The  plan
establishes   five  goals  that  support  the
agency's mission to protect human health
and the environment, as well as supporting
objectives.  The plan also presents a set of
five cross-cutting strategies that stem from
the  Administrator's  priorities  and  are
designed to fundamentally change how the
agency   works,   both   internally    and
externally, to achieve the mission outcomes
articulated under its five strategic goals. The
EPA  is  implementing  these   strategies
through annual action plans, which focus its
efforts and  promote tangible,  measurable
actions  that  transform  its   delivery  of
environmental and human  health protection.
The EPA's FY 2011 Action Plan Progress
Reports       are      available      at
http://www.epa.gOv/planandbudget/results.h
tml.
THE EPA'S STRATEGIC GOALS
Taking Action on Climate Change and
 Improving Air Quality

Protecting America's Waters
Cleaning Up Communities and Advancing Sustainable Development
Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution
Enforcing Environmental Laws

THE EPA's CROSS-CUTTING FUNDAMENTAL STRATEGIES
Expanding the Conversation on Environmentalism
Working for Environmental Justice and Children's Health
Advancing Science, Research and Technological Innovation
Strengthening State, Tribal, and International Partnerships
Strengthening EPA's Workforce and Capabilities

To focus attention on advancing its FY 2011-2015 Strategic Plan, in FY 2011 the EPA instituted
new practices that promote the use of simpler and more meaningful performance information in
managing programs and provide cross-agency dialogue to inform decision-making. For example,
in FY  2011 the Deputy Administrator initiated quarterly meetings with senior leadership to
discuss progress on agency priority goals, and at midyear and the end of the year, on a broader
set of performance measures for each of the agency's strategic goals. Similarly, agency managers
prepare and discuss action plans for carrying out the cross-cutting fundamental strategies which
shape how the EPA carries out its work. These meetings encourage transparency and discussion
among national program managers and regions on program results and challenges.

The EPA's Priority Goals

The EPA also  reports on Priority Goals, a new component of the Administration's performance
management framework. The  EPA's Priority Goals are specific,  measurable, near-term (18- to
24-month) targets, which align with the agency's long-term  and annual performance measures
and communicate the performance improvements the agency will accomplish using its  existing
legislative authority and resources. The EPA's FY 2010-2011 Priority Goals include controlling
                                          345

-------
   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
 greenhouse  gas  emissions,  improving  water  quality  and  protecting  and   developing
 communities. Results the agency achieved for its FY 2010-2011 Priority Goals are highlighted in
 the goal-by-goal discussions which follow.

 The American Recovery and Reinvestment       ARRA-funded environmental programs that
 Act of 2009                                     invest in clean  water and  drinking water
                                                projects,   implement   diesel    emission
 During FY  2011, the EPA  continued to       reduction technologies,  clean  up  leaking
 make significant progress  in implementing       underground storage  tanks, revitalize and
 its  responsibilities   under  the  American       reuse brownfields, and clean up Superfund

 The EPA's FY 2010-2011 Priority Goals

 I  EPA will improve  the country's ability  to measure and control Green House  Gas (GHG)
 emissions. Building a foundation for action is essential.
    •   By June 15, 2011, EPA will make publically available 100 percent of facility-level GHG
        emissions data submitted to EPA in  accordance with the GHG Reporting Rule,  compliant
        with policies protecting Confidential Business Information (CBI.)
    •   In 2011, EPA, working with DOT, will begin implementation of regulations designed to
        reduce the GHG emissions from light duty vehicles sold in the US starting with model
	year 2012.	
 II.     Clean water is essential for our quality of life and the health of our communities. EPA will
 take actions over the next two years to improve water quality.
    •   Chesapeake Bay watershed states (including the District of Columbia) will  develop and
        submit Phase I watershed implementation plans by the end of CY 2010 and Phase II plans
        by the end of CY 2011 in support of EPA's final  Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily
        Load (TMDL) and consistent with the expectations and schedule described in EPA's
        letters of November 4 and December 29, 2009 and June 11, 2010.
    •   Increase pollutant reducing enforcement actions in waters that don't meet water quality
        standards, and post results and analysis on the web.
    •   Over the next two years, EPA will initiate review/revision  of at least 4 drinking water
	standards to strengthen public health protection.	
 III. EPA will ensure that environmental health and protection is delivered to our communities.
    •   By 2012 EPA will have initiated 20 enhanced Brownfields community level  projects that
        will include a new area-wide  planning effort to  benefit under-served and economically
        disadvantaged communities. This will allow those communities to assess and address a
        single large or multiple Brownfields  sites within their boundaries, thereby advancing area-
        wide planning to enable redevelopment of Brownfields properties on a broader scale. EPA
        will provide  technical  assistance,  coordinate its  enforcement,  water  and air quality
        programs, and work with other Federal agencies, states,  tribes and local governments to
        implement  associated   targeted  environmental   improvements  identified  in  each
        community's area-wide plan.

 Recovery  and  Reinvestment Act of 2009.       sites.  FY 2011 realized a significant amount
 Since the end of FY  2009, the EPA  has       of activity as a result of ARRA funding. An
 tracked program performance  for  six  key       overview  of the  number  and types  of

                                          346

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
projects  completed with  ARRA funds  in
2011 demonstrates further progress made to
advance  environmental  protection. To date
the agency  has  reported  on the following
accompli shments:

    •   More than 660  projects have been
       funded  to  improve  or maintain
       wastewater treatment works  serving
       an estimated 79 million Americans,
       and  more than 265  drinking  water
       systems  have  been  brought  into
       compliance, serving over 7.4 million
       Americans.

    •   Almost 30,000 diesel engines have
       been retrofitted, replaced or retired.

    •   Hundreds of contaminated sites have
       been   cleaned   up,  including   92
       brownfield properties,  more  than
       1,300 underground storage tanks and
       nine  Superfund  sites.  Additionally,
       more  than   50  Superfund   site
       cleanups have been accelerated.

To ensure accountability and  demonstrate
progress  toward meeting ARRA goals,  the
EPA provides quarterly ARRA performance
updates                                at
http://www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.htmltfqu
arterly.

The EPA's Human Capital Strategy

A component of the EPA's FY 2011-2015
EPA   Strategic   Plan,    Cross-Cutting
Fundamental  Strategy  5,  "Strengthening
EPA's Workforce and Capabilities," focuses
on  human  capital priorities,  as well  as
internal  business  processes.   Under  this
cross-cutting  fundamental   strategy,   the
agency seeks to continuously  improve  its
internal management,  encourage innovation
and creativity in all aspects of its work, and
ensure  that  the  EPA  is  an  excellent
workplace   that  attracts  and  retains   a
topnotch,  diverse workforce, positioned  to
meet   and   address   the   environmental
challenges of the 21st century. To achieve
this goal, the EPA focused on six areas:
recruiting,   developing,  and  retaining   a
diverse and creative workforce; cultivating a
workplace that values a  high quality work
life;    practicing   outstanding    resource
stewardship;   enhancing   communication;
integrating    energy    efficiency    and
environmental considerations into our work
practices;  and improving the effectiveness
and efficiency  of the agency's  acquisition
function.

During  FY  2011, the agency carried out
several targeted actions to achieve the goals
of this  crosscutting  fundamental  strategy.
These included reforming the EPA's hiring
process  to make  it  easier for applicants  to
apply for jobs, as  well as increasing the pool
of   qualified    candidates;   completing
standardized  recruitment  packages for  10
occupations;    launching    a    Diversity
Dashboard;   and  conducting  training  for
hiring officials across the EPA on targeted
outreach strategies.

More information on  the Strengthening the
EPA's Workforce and Capacities  can  be
found in  the Cross  Cutting  Fundamental
Strategy section which follows.

Program Evaluations

To  improve  program  effectiveness  and
efficiency,  the Administration  emphasized
the importance of using program evaluation
to  provide   the  evidence   needed   to
demonstrate that the agency's programs are
meeting   their   intended   outcomes.  By
assessing how  well a program is working
and why,  program evaluation can help the
EPA  identify  where activities  have the
greatest impact on protecting human health
                                          347

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
and the environment, provide the road map       of those  program evaluations completed
needed    to   replicate   successes,    and       during  FY  2011  are  available  on  the
conversely    identify    areas    needing       following                        website:
improvement. This is particularly important       http://www.epa.gOv/planandbudget/results.h
as  the   EPA  meets  its  obligations  for       tml.
transparency  and accountability. A summary
                                           348

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Summary of FY 2011 Performance Results
                            Reliability of the EPA's Performance Data

  Data used to report performance results are reliable and as complete as possible. Because improvements in human
  health and the environment may not become immediately apparent, there might be delays between the actions we
  have taken and results we can measure. Additionally, we cannot provide results data for several of our
  performance measures for this reporting year. When possible, however, we have portrayed trend data to illustrate
  progress over time. We also report final performance results for prior years that became available in FY 2011.
                                        Administrator
                                       Lisa P. Jackson
                                                              f
  Lisa P. Jackson
  Administrator
          7  7
         Date
In its FY 2011 Annual Performance Plan
and Budget, the  EPA  committed  to 238
annual performance measures, 178 of which
had  validated measurement  data as  of the
publication date of this report. In FY2011,
the agency  met 127 of these performance
measures, 71 percent of the performance
measures for which data were available. The
EPA significantly exceeded its targets for
several   of  its   FY  2011   performance
measures.    In   some   cases,    a    new
collaborative effort or a new approach to the
performance measures allowed the EPA to
accomplish more than it had planned.

The EPA also faced a number of difficult
challenges and obstacles to success. Despite
the agency's best efforts, 51 performance
measures were not met. There are a number
of reasons for  missed targets,  including an
unexpected  demand   for  resources  or
competing priorities; the  effect of budget
cuts on the agency's state, tribal, and local
government partners; and factors outside the
agency's   control,   such   as   weather,
technological   challenges,  or   population
growth and land use patterns.

The EPA is using performance  measures to
look at FY 2011  results in terms of long-
term   performance.   The   agency   has
highlighted key  performance  trends  and
challenges related to specific  performance
measures   under   each   of   its   five
programmatic  goals.   These   trends  and
challenges are  described in this document,
along with actions the agency is taking as  a
result of the data.
                                           349

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
The EPA will carefully consider its FY 2011
results and  adjust program strategies and
approaches  accordingly.  The  8-year  array
included in  the Program Performance and

Data Not Available

Because  final end-of-year data  for  some
measures  were  not  available when  this
report went to press, the EPA is not yet able
to  report  on 60 of  its  238  performance
measures. Environmental  results  may not
become apparent within a fiscal  year, and
assessing    environmental   improvements
often  requires  multiyear  information.  In
some  cases,  additional time is needed  to
understand  and  assess  factors  such  as
exposure and the resulting impact  on human
health.

In many cases,  reporting cycles—including
some  that are  legislatively mandated—do
not correspond  with  the federal fiscal  year
on which this report is based. Data reported
biennially, for example, are not available for
this report  but  will  be  provided in  next
year's Annual Performance Report.

Extensive quality assurance/quality control
processes   to   ensure the  reliability   of
performance data can also delay  reporting.
The EPA relies heavily on performance data
obtained  from   state,  tribal  and   local
agencies, all of which require time to collect
information  and review it for quality. If the
EPA is unable  to obtain  complete end-of-
year information from all sources in time for
this report, FY 2011 results will be available
in the Performance and Assessment section
of the FY 2014 Congressional Justification,
published in February 2013.
Data Now Available

The EPA is now able to report data from FY
2010  that became  available  in  FY2011.
Assessment section of the CJ provides more
detailed   explanations  for  missed  and
significantly exceeded targets and discusses
the   agency's  plans   to  meet   these
performance measures in the future.

These FY 2010 results are reflected in the 8-
year  array  provided  in  the  Program
Performance and Assessment section of the
FY 2013  CJ.  (Note that the agency's  FY
2010 performance measures were developed
under the goal structure of its 2006-2011
Strategic  Plan; thus, where  appropriate,
some FY 2010 measures are realigned in the
8-year  array  to  correspond to  the goal
structure of the agency's current FY 2011-
2015  Strategic Plan.) In  summary, final
performance results became available for 41
of the 60  FY 2010 measures (out of a total
211  FY 2010  performance measures)  for
which data were unavailable at the  end of
FY  2010.   Of  these  41   performance
measures, the EPA met 31 targets.

A  Guide  to this  "Overview of  FY 2011
Performance" Section

The  pages which  follow  highlight  a few
selected FY 2011 regional accomplishments
and   provide   performance  results  and
information on the agency's progress toward
achieving  the five  strategic  goals  and
implementing   the   five  cross-cutting
fundamental strategies established in its FY
2011-2015 Strategic Plan.

For each of the EPA's five strategic goals,
the report provides a brief overview,  lists
key programs or  offices that contribute to
the goal,  summarizes measures  met and
missed  by objective,  notes significant  FY
2011   highlights   and  challenges,  and
discusses results achieved for Priority Goals
which support the strategic goal. In addition,
the agency  analyzes  selected performance
measures  and trends  which represent key
                                          350

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
initiatives or activities toward achieving the       an  overview  of FY  2011  activity  and
long-term strategic goal.                          presents bulleted highlights and challenges
                                                 for FY 2011.
For  each of the  EPA's five  cross-cutting
fundamental strategies,  the report provides
                                            351

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            Highlights    of    Environmental
Region 10 Restoring the Puget Sound Ecosystem

The EPA awarded $3S. 1 million in grants to facilitate the ecosystem
restoration and protection of Puget Sound, the nation's second-
largest estuary. Funded projects include reducing toxic and bacterial
pollution and protecting at-risk watersheds such as the Duwamish
River, an urban waterway in Puget Sound that is currently under
Superfund cleanup. The Port of Seattle and City of Seattle have
committed S33 million to clean up contaminated marine sediment
and soil. Tribes have used the Puget Sound funding to support the
elimination of invasive species and to monitor salmon movement
during the Elwha River Dam removal, the largest project of its kind
in U.S. history.
http://w\vw.epa.gov/pugctsound/
Region 9 Undertaking Uranium Cleanup in Navajo Nation

To address health and environmental impacts of uranium contami-
nation in Navajo Nation, the EPA and Navajo EPA screened 683
structures for potential contamination, completed the demolition
and excavation of 34 structures and 12 residential yards, assessed
452 mines, and started cleanup on the four highest priority mines.
Additionally, the EPA tested 240 wells for ground water contamina-
tion and partnered with Indian Health Services and U.S. Housing
and Urban Development to invest S24.S million in new water lines
serving drinking water to 300 homes. Marking a major accomplish-
ment, the EPA and the Navajo Nation reached agreement on a plan
to clean up the Northeast Church Rock United Nuclear Corporation
mine—the largest mine on the reservation—starting in 2012.
http://w\vw.cpa.gov/rcgion09/NavajoUranium
Region 7 Responding to Joplin, Missouri, Tornado Aftermath

On May 22, 2011, tragedy struck Joplin, Missouri, after an F-5
tornado damaged approximately 8,000 structures in its wake. In
the aftermath of the tornado, the EPA has worked with the Mis-
souri Department of Natural Resources and the Federal Emergency
Management Agency, as well as other state and local partner agencies
and nongovernmental entities, to reuse and recycle more than 156
tons of electronic equipment. 104.000 containers, and 257 tons of
white goods, such as housing materials and propane cylinders. In
addition, the EPA coordinated with partner agencies to conduct rapid
needs assessments, air monitoring for asbestos and particulates, and
household ha/ardous waste operations, as well as provide long-
term community recovery support. The EPA has  maintained public
outreach efforts throughout the response, conducting more than 70
news media interviews that resulted in several hundred news stories
mentioning the agency's cfrbrts.
http://www.epa.gov/joplin/
Region 8 Treating Contaminated Mining Drainage in Colorado

Using S17 million in hazardous waste cleanup funding from the Ameri-
can Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the EPA and the Colorado
Department of Public Health and Environment constructed a 1,600-gallon-
per-minute water treatment plant at the Summitville Mine Superfund site
to remove heavy metal contaminants from mine drainage before the water
leaves the site and enters the headwaters of the Alamosa River, a tributary
of the Rio Grande River. The project has supported job creation in various
building trades, including mechanics, heavy equipment operators and
truck drivers. In addition, the EPA and the CDPHE installed a micro-
hydropowcr plant at the site, providing 15 to 20 percent of the site's energy
needs and resulting in significant cost savings.
http://w\v\v.epa.gov/regionS/superfund/co/summitville/indcx.html
Region 6 Ensuring Environmental Justice and Public Health in Texas

The EPA finalized approval of a community-based Supplemental Environ-
mental Project to build a SI million health clinic to serve the residents of
Port Arthur, Texas. The clinic is part of the EPA's Environmental Justice
Showcase Community Project, a grassroots program in which the EPA
works with city officials, industry, and state and federal partners to achieve
measurable progress in some of America's most environmentally distressed
communities. In addition, the EPA has helped establish six multi-stakeholder
workgroups designed to improve environmental conditions, health care,
housing, jobs training, energy efficiency and urban redevelopment projects in
the region.
http://www.epa.gov/region06/6dra/oejta/ej/index.html

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Accomplishments,    EPA    Regions
      Region 5 Advancing Northeast Ohio's Water Infrastructure
      and Economy

      In July 2011, the EPA reached a Combined Sewer Overflow1 Consent
      Decree with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sc\ver District, mandating a $3
      billion effort to reduce the annual volume of raw sewage discharged from
      4.5 billion gallons to 494 million gallons, including a minimum of S42
      million for large-scale green infrastructure projects spanning the next 25
      years. Green infrastructure management approaches and technologies
      include infiltration, cvapotranspiration, and the capture and reuse of
      stormwater to maintain or restore natural hydrologies. Collectively, the
      implemented control measures will result in the treatment of more than
      98 percent of the wet weather flows in the sewer system.
      http://wuw.epa.gov/compliance/resources/cases/civil/cwa/neorsd.htinl
   Region 4 Improving Air Quality in the Southeast Through Clean Air
   Act Settlement

   In April 2011, the EPA provided a new benchmark for clean power generation in
   the United States through a Clean Air Act settlement with the Tennessee Valley
   Authority that requires the TVA to spend S350 million on environmental mitiga-
   tion projects, including energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Once
   fully implemented, the pollution controls could reduce emissions of nitrogen
   oxide by 69 percent and sulfur dioxide by 67 percent from the TVA's 2008 emis-
   sion levels. The settlement will also significantly reduce participate matter and
   carbon dioxide emissions, leading to estimated annual monetized health benefits
   ranging from SI I billion  to $27 billion.
   http://wuw.epa.gov/compliance/resources/cases/civil/caa/tvacoal-fired.htinl
Region 1 Providing Training To Prevent Lead
Exposure in New England

As part of an extensive outreach and assistance effort
reaching more than 125,000 people in the New England
region, the EPA accredited 64 training providers, over a
two-year period, to teach more than 134 courses under
the federal lead renovation, repair and painting rule. The
rule requires that firms performing renovation, repair and
painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in pre-1978
homes, childcare facilities and schools be certified by the
EPA and use certified renovators trained to follow lead-safe
work practices. To date, 12,664 New England firms have
been certified, and almost 2,500 courses have been offered,
providing invaluable training to an estimated 75,000
people. Continuing the EPA's effort to achieve compli-
ance and reduce risks. Region 1 issued the first renovation,
repair and painting rule enforcement action in the nation
resulting from a social media video tip.
http://epa.gov/regionl/cnforcement/leadpaint
                                                                           Region 2 Cleaning Up the Hudson River

                                                                           Region 2 marked an important milestone in the cleanup
                                                                           of the Hudson River with the start of the second and final
                                                                           phase of dredging in spring 2011. Over the next five to
                                                                           seven years, General Electric will remove about 2.4 million
                                                                           cubic yards of polychlormated biphenyls contaminated
                                                                           sediment from a 40-mile section of the Upper Hudson
                                                                           River between Fort Edward and Troy, NY. An estimated
                                                                           1.3 million pounds of PCBs were discharged into the
                                                                           river from two General Electric capacitor manufactur-
                                                                           ing plants located in Fort Edward and Hudson Falls over
                                                                           the course of 30 years. General Electric is conducting the
                                                                           dredging project, with EPA oversight, under the terms of a
                                                                           November 2006 legal agreement. Approximately 500 jobs
                                                                           have been created by the cleanup project, and more than
                                                                           550,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment has already
                                                                           been removed.
                                                                           http://www.epa,gov/hudson/
Region 3 Establishing a "Pollution Diet" for the
Chesapeake Bay

In December 2010, the EPA established the Chesapeake
Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, the nation's most rigor-
ous "pollution diet" for meeting water quality standards
in the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries, many of
which are a source of drinking water. The Chesapeake Bay
TMDL sets pollution limits that represent a 25-percent
reduction in nitrogen, 24-percent reduction m phospho-
rus and 20-percent reduction in sediment. The TMDL is
designed to ensure that all control measures needed to
meet the jurisdictions' Chesapeake Bay water quality stan-
dards are in place by 2025, with 60 percent of the actions
completed by 2017. The pollution controls could signifi-
cantly improve water quality in streams, creeks and rivers
throughout the region, as well as benefit local economies
through increased use of watershed activities, including
fishing, swimming and boating.
http://wu-w.epa.gOV/reg3wapd/t:rndl/ChesapeakeBay/
indcx.html

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
Strategic Goal 1: Taking Action of Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
                                           354

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                FY 2013 Annual Plan
                            Strategic Goal 1ata Glance:
     TAKING ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND IMPROVING AIR QUALITY

       Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and develop adaptation strategies
           to address climate change and protect and improve air quality.
                         FY2011  Performance Measures
               Met = 4 Not Met = 0 Data Unavailable = 29 (Total Measures = 33)

                FY 2010 Performance Measures (see chart below)
               Met = 27 Not Met = 4 Data Unavailable = 2 (Total Measures = 33)
           Objectives

        Address Climate
        Change
        Improve Air Quality
        Restore the Ozone
        Layer
        Reduce Unnecessary
        Exposure to Radiation
25


20


15


10
                                            FY 2010 Goal 1 Performance Measures
                                                    (Total Measures: 33)
    Objective 1:     Objective 2:
     Address      Improve
   Climate Change   Air Quality
                                                             Objective 3:    Objective 4:
                                                             Restore the Reduce Unnecessary
                                                             Ozone Layer Exposure to Radiation
                         FY 2010 - FY 2011 Priority Goals
  By June 15, 2011, EPA will make publicly available 100 percent of facility-level GHG emissions data submitted
  to EPA in accordance with the GHG Reporting Rule, compliant with policies protecting Confidential Business
  Information (CBI).
  In 2011, EPA, working with DOT, will begin implementation of regulations designed to reduce the GHG emis-
  sions from light duty vehicles sold in the US starting with model year 2012.
                               Key Accomplishments
  Establishing GHG reporting registry.
  Reducing SO2, a precursor to acid rain deposition.
  Monitoring radiation levels after Japan power plant disaster.
  Testing for clean cookstoves.
                                  Key Challenges
  Reducing days of unhealthy air quality.
  Reducing toxic air emissions.
                                         355

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Goal 1 Purpose

The EPA manages a number of programs
related  to climate  change,  outdoor  and
indoor air quality, stratospheric ozone, and
radiation, each of which plays a vital role in
protecting   human    health    and    the
environment.  Under  these  programs,  the
agency   and   its  partners   have  made
substantial progress in improving air quality
and  continue  to take  steps  to  reduce
greenhouse gas emissions;  however, much
work remains.

For  example,   although   nationwide   air
quality  has improved  significantly  since
passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments
in  1990,  in   2008,   about   127  million
Americans lived  in  counties that did  not
meet air quality standards  for at least one
pollutant.  To support its clean air goals,  the
EPA  continues  striving to meet  strategic
targets  outlined   in  its   FY  2011-2015
Strategic Plan,  such as reducing  emissions
of particulate matter and ozone. The agency
is  also   working  with   the  electricity-
generating power  industry  through a cap-
and-trade  program to reduce sulfur dioxide
and  nitrogen  oxides,  precursors of fine
particulate matter, ozone and acid rain.

Similarly,  the   agency and  its  partners
continue to face challenges  in  addressing
climate  change. To  better understand  the
changing  climate,  the  EPA  instituted a
Priority Goal to ensure that  the nearly 7,000
facilities that emit greenhouse gases report
their  data through  the new  Electronic-
Greenhouse Gas  Reporting Tool  (EGRT.)
Programs  under Goal  1 continue to  work
through   voluntary    partnerships    and
implement other cost-effective solutions to
ensure that private industry complies with
standards    and   creates    a   healthier
environment.

Under these climate change and air quality
objectives,  the  EPA committed to  33 FY
2011  performance measures. Of these  33
measures, the EPA met 5  measures. The
agency  collects air and climate data on a
calendar year basis that has  a year-long data
lag, which means the EPA will report 27 of
the 2011 performance measures in 2012.

In FY  2010,  the EPA  committed  to  33
performance measures. The agency met  [or
exceeded] 87 percent  and did not meet 13
percent  of the measures for which data were
available for this report. (Data were not yet
available for two FY  2010 measures.) The
full suite of the EPA's FY 2011 measures,
including   targets,  results,   and  detailed
explanations  for variances,  is available in
the Performance and Assessment Section of
the FY 2013 Congressional Justification.

EPA  Contributing Programs:  Acid Rain
Program; AirNow; Air Toxics;  Clean Air
Allowance  Trading Programs;  Clean Air
Research;  Indoor Air  Quality; National
Ambient     Air     Quality    Standards
Development and  Implementation;  Mobile
Sources; New  Source  Review;  Regional
Haze; Stratospheric Ozone Layer Protection
Program;    Radiation   Programs;    and
Voluntary Climate Programs.

Priority Goals

In FY  2010,  the EPA  established two
Priority  Goals to advance the Strategic Plan
objective to address  climate change  and
reduce greenhouse emissions.
GHG Emissions: Mandatory Reporting Rule
                                          356

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
By June 15, 2011, EPA will make publicly available 100 percent of facility-level GHG emissions
data submitted to EPA in accordance with the GHG Reporting Rule, compliant with policies
protecting Confidential Business Information.
Results:  On October  30,  2009, the EPA
published a rule requiring large  greenhouse
gas emissions sources in the United States to
report their annual emissions to the EPA.
The first emissions reports (for 2010) were
due  on March 31, 2011,  and the EPA set a
goal  to  make  the reported data publicly
available  by June  15,  2011.   However,
following conversations  with industry and
other  external   stakeholders,  and  in  the
interest of providing high-quality data to the
public,  the  EPA  extended the  March 31
reporting  deadline to  September 30 and
extended  the date  for  making the  data
publicly available to December 31, 2011. On
September 30, 2011, the EPA successfully
completed  the first reporting period under
the  EPA's Greenhouse  Gas  Mandatory
Reporting Rule  (40  CFR Part 98.)  Never
before has  the  agency  had  facility-level
GHG data that  can  be used to guide  the
development of policies and  programs to
reduce  GHG  emissions nationwide.  The
success of this  data collection effort  was
made possible through a cross-office effort
within   the   agency   to   develop   a
comprehensive,  user-friendly,  Web-based
electronic reporting tool that nearly 7,000
facilities and suppliers  used to submit their
data to the EPA.
GHG Emissions: Light Duty Vehicles
In 2011, EPA, working with the U.S. Department of Transportation, will begin implementation of
regulations designed to reduce the GHG emissions from light duty vehicles sold in the U.S.,
starting with model year 2012.
Results:  Since establishing the first  GHG
emissions standards for cars and light-duty
trucks in April 2010, the  EPA has been
working   to   ensure   their   effective
implementation,  beginning  with  vehicle
model year 2012. The EPA's primary role is
to   review   applications   from   vehicle
manufacturers   and   perform   tests  on
prototype   vehicles   and   engines   to
determine/certify compliance with the GHG
emissions standards. As of September  30,
2011,  the  EPA had issued just over 450
certificates   of  conformity;   this  total
represents approximately 90 percent of the
certificates anticipated for model year 2012.

In addition to determining compliance,  the
EPA is also  developing the data system to
support the  emissions averaging, banking
and    trading    program    that    allows
manufacturers different pathways to comply
with the fleetwide average GHG emissions
standards.  The  data  system  is  being
developed  in  two  phases:  Phase  1   for
information  collection  and  certificate of
conformity generation, and Phase 2 for end
of model year calculations. Phase 1 is being
deployed throughout 2011  in a series of four
releases. As of September 30, 2011, the EPA
had  deployed  three releases:   1)  system
design  and   requirements  analysis,   2)
changes  to the  certificate of conformity
template (to  add GHG language)  and  the
manufacturers' request for certificate dataset,
and   3)  changes   to   the   certification,
confirmatory  test, fuel economy label  and
manufacturer in-use  verification  program
datasets. The remaining  release,  covering
changes to the  model year 2011 and 2012
Corporate  Average Fuel  Economy/GHG
datasets  was deployed in October 2011.
Included   in   this   deployment  were
                                          357

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                   FY 2013 Annual Plan
infrastructure changes originally planned for
Phase 2. These changes allow for all of the
calculations  (including  GHG footprint and
Key Performance Results
Greenhouse
  Gas
Emissions
The  EPA  administers voluntary,  public-
private partnerships, like  ENERGY STAR
and   SmartWay,  to  help  avoid   GHG
emissions. The  ENERGY  STAR  program
focuses on energy efficiency in building and
industry sectors, while SmartWay promotes
cost-saving     technologies     in    the
transportation   sector.  Along  with  the
beneficial   impacts  to  the   environment,
road-load  information) to be  released in
Phase 2. The schedule change allowed more
efficient use of resources.

through the more than 126,000 new homes
and  6,200  buildings  constructed  to  meet
ENERGY   STAR   2010   guidelines-
representing over 25 percent of new home
starts and  6,200  buildings.  In  addition,
SMARTWAY   helped   promote    new
technologies  and    efficiencies   in  the
transportation    sector    that    avoided
approximately 16.5  MMTCC^e.
                             Acid Rain Deposition
           Performance Measure: Million metric tons of carbon
           equivalent (MMTCO2e) of greenhouse gas reductions in the
           building, transportation and industry sectors (cumulative)
                            2006-2013 Performance Trends
         o
         o
            700 r
            600
            500
            400
            300
                                                                     618.5
— 364.5
                  311.3
                  FY06   FY07   FY08    FY09   FY10   FY11*   FY12    FY13
                                                              'Data available 12/2012
thousands of businesses have reduced costs
through increased  energy  efficiencies and
fuel savings.
Analysis: The EPA exceeded its 2010 target
by  helping the  business,  industry  and
transportation    sectors    avoid    533.8
MMTCO26. The agency met part of this goal
                             The Acid Rain Program, established under
                             Title IV of  the  1990  Clean  Air Act
                             Amendments,   requires  major  emission
                             reductions of sulfur dioxide (802),  one  of
                             the primary precursors of acid rain, from the
                             power sector. The program sets a permanent
                             cap on the total amount of 862 that may  be
                             emitted by electric  generating  units in the
                             United States.
                                         358

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
        Performance Measure : Annual Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide
        from Electric Power Generation Sources
                        2006-2013 Performance Trends
    12
g   10
W    8
09
£    «
S    4
            0
               u'°     QQ
              -•9.3
                               7.6
                                      5.7
                                           8.5
                                                  6.0     6.0     6.0
                                             5.2
               CY06   CY07   CY08   CY09   CY10   CY11*   CY12   CY13
                                                         •Data available 12/2012
                                     359

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Analysis: Through a cap and trade program,
industry has significantly reduced emissions
of  SC>2  from  electric  generating  power
plants. The EPA has met its target set by the
Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 to cut
emissions approximately  in half from 1980
levels   (17.4   million   tons)   and  keep
emissions below the permanent statutory cap
of 8.95 million tons. The target for 2011
reflects implementation  of  the  Clean  Air
Interstate Rule, which will further reduce
SC>2 emissions from these sources in eastern
states  and  Washington,  DC,   to  control
interstate transport of fine particle pollution.
The target  for  2012 incorporates expected
reductions from these sources in 23 states in
the eastern,  central and southern United
States  from implementation  of  the  Cross-
State  Air Pollution Rule (which replaces
CAIR beginning January 1, 2012.)

Note:  By statute and regulation, the targets
and actuals are based on calendar years, not
fiscal years.

Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant Disaster

The EPA  led  the agency's  Emergency
Operations   Center (EOC)  response   to
radioactive releases from the  Fukushima
Daiichi Power Plant disaster,  which was
caused by  an  earthquake and  subsequent
tsunami.  An  EOC  team  of  agency experts
analyzed data on domestic radiation levels
and provided technical  support for guidance
on  such  issues as  cargo  container entries,
sampling frequency, restricted zone re-entry,
and food safety related to radiation releases
cause by the disaster. The agency's RadNet
system   was  used  to   monitor    air,
precipitation, drinking  water and milk for
the presence of radioactive materials across
the United  States; very low   levels  of
radioactive material—far below levels  of
public health concern—were found. Data
made available to the public on the EPA's
Japan 2011  website provided assurances to
the  American  public that  any  radiation
migrating to the  United  States from Japan
was below levels of concern.

Emissions Testing for Clean Cookstoves

As part of its work with the Partnership for
Clean  Indoor Air, the EPA joined federal
and private sector partners in announcing the
U.N.   Foundation's  Global  Alliance  for
Clean  Cookstoves (GACC). This public-
private alliance will address a major public
health concern in developing countries—the
high exposures to smoke from indoor fires
and   inefficient   cookstoves   that   are
associated with nearly 2 million deaths each
year, primarily  young children and women.
In support  of  the GACC,  the  EPA  has
completed  the  most  extensive testing  of
cookstove  emissions  to  date.  Forty-four
combinations of stoves,  fuels and operating
conditions  were  tested  for  fuel efficiency
and  emissions  of pollutants  that affect
human health and global climate. Results are
being  used by  GACC partners to select
stoves for field  trials and  by the GACC
Working Group on Standards and Testing to
improve cookstove testing methods.

Key Challenges

Ground-Level Ozone

Ground-level ozone (smog) is  not emitted
directly  into the air, but  is  created  by
chemical  reactions   between   oxides   of
nitrogen  (NOx)  and   volatile   organic
compounds   (VOCs)  in the  presence  of
sunlight with most smog forming during the
summer  season. Emissions from industrial
facilities and electric utilities, motor vehicle
                                          360

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                         FY 2013 Annual Plan
exhaust,  gasoline  vapors,  and  chemical
solvents are some of the major sources of
NOx and VOCs. Breathing ozone, a primary
component of smog, can trigger a variety of
health   problems   including  chest   pain,
coughing, throat irritation, and congestion. It
                   can  worsen  bronchitis,  emphysema,  and
                   asthma. Ground-level ozone also can reduce
                   lung function and inflame the linings of the
                   lungs. Under the Clean Air Act, the EPA has
                   set protective  health-based  standards for
                   ozone    in    the    air    we    breathe.
          Performance Measure: Cumulative percentage reduction in the
          average number of days during the ozone season that the ozone
          standard is exceeded in non-attainment areas, weighted by population.
             60
         .2  50
         "§  40
          0)
             30
             20
             10
2006-2013 Performance Trends
                     56

                  CY06   CY07   CY08   CY09   CY10   CY11*  CY12   CY13

                                                              'Data available 12/2012
Analysis  A  significant  reduction  in the
number of days  with ozone exceedances
during the ozone season in non-attainment
areas (56% since 2003) has been achieved
through strong partnerships with state, tribal
and   local governments  to  ensure  that
facilities comply  with national air quality
standards    and   that   vehicles    have
incorporated   the    most   cost-effective
technologies  to  reduce  emissions.  Much
work still remains  to  further reduce  air
pollution.   Achieving  results  may  be
complicated by a changing climate. As the
climate  becomes  warmer, the number of
days with higher ozone levels will increase;
                   this relationship will make for greater future
                   challenges in controlling air pollution.

                   Air Toxics Emissions

                   The  toxicity-weighted emission  inventory
                   utilizes the National Emissions Inventory for
                   air   toxics,  along   with  the   agency's
                   compendium of  cancer  and  non-cancer
                   health risk  criteria to  develop a risk metric
                   that can be tabulated on an annual basis. Air
                   toxics emission data are revised every three
                   years, with intervening years (the  two  years
                   after  the   inventory   year)  interpolated
                   utilizing inventory projection models.
                                          361

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
         Performance Measure: Cumulative Percentage Reduction in
         Tons of Toxicity-Weighted (for Cancer Risk) Emissions of Air
         Toxics From 1993 Baseline
                           2006-2013 Performance Trends
         o
         0
        DC
            45
            40
            35
            30
                 FY06   FY07   FY08    FY09   FY10   FY11*   FY12   FY13
                                                             •Data available 12/2014
Analysis:  The EPA, along with  its state,
tribal and local partners, has helped reduce
the emissions of toxic  air pollutants like
benzene,  mercury,  chromium  and  other
cancer-causing  toxics dramatically.  Since
1993  a  40-percent reduction  has been
achieved through strong national  standards
that  require  facilities to  implement cost-
effective technologies to mitigate toxic air
emissions.   The  reductions   have  been
particularly beneficial to individuals in low-
income,  disadvantaged  communities often
living the closest to the facilities. Through
2010, the  major reductions  from the air
toxics  program  were associated  with the
Maximum  Achievable Control Technology
standards  promulgated  as  part of the first
round of standards, which were completed
in 2004.  The agency has just begun the next
phase of the air toxic program to review the
technology  standards  and  residual  health
risks, which could potentially lead to greater
reductions in the future.
                                         362

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	FY 2013 Annual Plan
                       Strategic Goal 2: Protecting America's Waters
                                            363

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 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
                              Strategic Goat 2 at a Glance:

                          PROTECTING AMERICA'S WATERS

     Protect and restore our waters to ensure that drinking water is safe, and that
          aquatic ecosystems  sustain fish, plants and wildlife, and economic,
                         recreational, and subsistence activities.
                           FY2011 Performance Measures

                Met = 50 Not Met = 25 Data Unavailable = 14 (Total Measures = 89)
            Objectives

      •  Protect Human Health
      •  Protect and Restore
         Watersheds and
         Aquatic Ecosystems
70

60

50

40

30

20

10

 0
                                                  Goal 2 Performance Measures
                                                       (Total Measures: 89)
                                                Objective 1:
                                             Protect Human Health
                                Objective 2:
                          Protect and Restore Watersheds
                             and Aquatic Ecosystems
                           FY 2010 - FY 2011 Priority Goals
•  Chesapeake Bay watershed states (including the District of Columbia) will develop and submit Phase I
   watershed implementation plans by the end of CY 2010 and Phase II plans by the end of CY 2011 in support
   of EPA's final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and consistent with the expectations and
   schedule described in EPA's letters of November 4 and December 29, 2009 and June 11, 2010.
•  Over the next two years, EPA will initiate review/revision of at least 4 drinking water standards to strengthen
   public health protection.
                                 Key Accomplishments
•  Complying with drinking water standards for populations served by community water systems.
•  Meeting standards for formerly impaired water bodies.
•  Meeting water restoration goals for established or approved TMDLs.
•  Progressing toward implementing innovative green infrastructure.
                                     Key Challenges
   Complying with drinking water standards for tribal water systems.
   Protecting or restoring National Estuary Program habitat acres.
   Impacting nonpoint source pollution in Puget Sound shellfish areas.

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Goal 2 Purpose

The  EPA is committed to protecting and
restoring America's waters. In coordination
with  its partners,  the  EPA  ensures  that
drinking water  is  safe and  that  aquatic
ecosystems    sustain    economic    and
recreational  activities and  provide  healthy
habitat  for fish,  plants,  and wildlife.  The
Agency's efforts  are  driven  by two main
objectives established in its FY 2011-2015
Strategic Plan: protecting human health and
protecting  and  restoring  watersheds  and
aquatic ecosystems.
To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the
Agency  sets  limits  for  drinking  water
contaminants,  helps to  sustain and  finance
the network of pipes and treatment facilities
that    constitute    the   nation's   water
infrastructure, and works with water systems
to comply with  and  implement  drinking
water standards.

The EPA works with state and local partners
to implement source water protection plans
for  the areas  surrounding drinking water
sources. To protect surface  waters, the EPA
works with  state  and  tribal  partners  to
implement  core  clean  water  programs  to
protect waters nationwide by strengthening
water quality  standards, improving water
quality   monitoring   and    assessment,
implementing  total maximum  daily loads
(TMDLs) and other watershed-related plans,
strengthening   the   National   Pollutant
Discharge   Elimination   System   permit
program,  and  implementing  practices  to
reduce pollution from nonpoint sources. The
EPA has also achieved its Priority Goals for
improving water  quality and strengthening
public health protection by revising drinking
water   standards  and   developing  state
watershed implementation plans in  support
of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL.
In  this  section,   the  EPA  discusses
accomplishments   and    challenges    in
addressing    water    quality    issues—
strengthening and improving drinking water
standards, maintaining safe water quality in
Indian Country,  restoring impaired water
bodies,   developing  TMDLs   to   reduce
pollutants, and protecting National  Estuary
Program habitat acres. While  the  EPA is
making progress  toward  clean and  safe
water, it continues to face challenges such as
improving drinking water systems in Indian
Country and meeting water quality standards
in systems increasingly  stressed by aging
infrastructure.

To further its  objectives under Goal 2, the
EPA committed to 89 performance measures
for FY  2011 (this total includes efficiency
and  long-term  measures  with FY  2011
targets.) The Agency  met or exceeded 67
percent and  did not meet 33  percent of the
measures  for which data were available for
this report. Data were not yet available for
14 measures under Goal 2. The full suite of
the  EPA's FY 2011  measures, including
targets, results, and detailed explanations for
variances, is available in the Performance
and Assessment Section  of  the FY 2013
Congressional  Justification.

EPA  Contributing  Programs: Analytical
Methods;  Beach  Program;   Coastal  and
Ocean  Programs;  Clean   Water  State
Revolving Fund;  Cooling Water  Intakes;
Drinking   Water   and   Ground   Water
Protection Programs;  Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund; Drinking Water Research;
Effluent   Guidelines;  Fish   Consumption
Advisories;  National  Pollutant Discharge
Elimination    System;   Nonpoint    Source
Pollution    Control;    Pollutant    Load
Allocation;   Surface   Water   Protection
Program;     Sustainable    Infrastructure
Program;  Total Maximum  Daily  Loads;
Underground  Injection  Control Program;
                                          365

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
Wastewater Management, Water Efficiency,
Water  Quality   Standards  and   Criteria;
Watershed Management, Water Monitoring,
and   Water   Quality  Research;   Marine
Pollution; National Estuary Program/Coastal
Waterways;  Chesapeake  Bay;  Children's
Health Protection; Columbia River Estuary
Partnership; Commission for Environmental
Cooperation; Great Lakes; Gulf of Mexico;
Puget Sound; Human Health and Ecosystem
Protection  Research;  Human  Health Risk
Assessment;  Long Island  Sound; Mercury
Research;     National     Environmental
Monitoring  Initiative;  Other  Geographic
Programs (including Lake Pontchartrain and
Northwest Forest), Lake  Champlain,  San
Francisco  Bay,  South  Florida, Persistent
Organic Pollutants;  Trade and Governance,
U.S.-Mexico Border; and Wetlands.

Priority Goals

In  FY  2010,  the  EPA established  two
Priority
Goals  to  advance  the  Strategic  Plan
objectives  to reduce human  exposure to
contaminants in  drinking water, fish and
shellfish, and recreational waters; including
protecting source waters  and protecting the
quality  of  rivers,  lakes,  streams,  and
wetlands   on  a  watershed  basis;  and
protecting urban, coastal, and ocean waters.
Improving the Quality of the Chesapeake Bay: Chesapeake Bay watershed states (including the
District of Columbia) will develop and submit Phase I watershed implementation plans by the
end of CY 2010 and Phase II plans by the end of CY 2011 in support of EPA 's final plan to
restore water quality, the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load and consistent with the
expectations and schedule described in EPA's letters of November 4 and December 29, 2009 and
June 11, 2010.
Results: Portions of the goal related to Phase
I watershed implementation plans and the
Chesapeake   Bay   TMDL   have   been
achieved. Chesapeake Bay watershed states,
including   the   District   of   Columbia,
submitted final Phase I plans in November
and December 2010. Based in large part on
these plans, the EPA established the TMDL
on  December 29, 2010.  Chesapeake Bay
jurisdictions  are  on  track for  developing
Phase   II   WIPs  consistent   with  the
expectations  and schedule released  in the
EPA's   March   31,   2011   Guide  for
Chesapeake  Bay  Jurisdictions  for  the
Development  of  Phase  II   Watershed
Implementation Plans, as amended  in the
EPA's August 1, 2011, letter. Draft Phase II
plans are due to  the EPA by the end  of CY
2011, and  final  Phase II plans are due by
March 30, 2012.
Strengthen Public Health Protection: Drinking Water Standards:  Over the next two years,
EPA will initiate review/revision of at least four drinking water standards to strengthen public
health protection.
Results: The EPA significantly modified its
implementation  strategy  for  its  goal  to
initiate  review/revision  of at  least four
drinking  water  standards  to  strengthen
public health protection during FY 2010 and
2011. The regulatory action has been tiered
and a workgroup initiated. Note: the initial
step   in   the   Agency's   rule   action
development    process,     selection    or
assignment  of  the  appropriate  Agency
review  process,  or  "tiering,"  has  been
completed.  The  EPA  is  developing  a
national primary  drinking water regulation
for a group of carcinogenic volatile organic
                                          366

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
compounds   (cVOCs).  The  preliminary
group of cVOCs being considered includes
the regulated cVOCs,  tetrachloroethylene
and trichloroethylene and may include other
regulated and unregulated cVOCs.

These goals will be closed out in FY 2011.
Key Performance Results:

"Percent of Population" receiving drinking
water which meets all  applicable health-
based drinking standards
          Performance Measure: Percent of the population served by
          CWSs that receive DW that meets all applicable health-based
          drinking water standards through effective treatment and
          source water protection.
                           2006-2013 Performance Trends
          o
         CL
         4-J
          c
             100
             90
             80
              70


                           91.5     92     92.1     92
                                                        93.2




                  FY06   FY07    FY08    FY09   FY10    FY11    FY12   FY13
                                                              Data Source: SDWIS
Analysis: The percent of population metric
is  described as the percentage of the U.S.
population  served by  community water
systems that receive  drinking  water  that
meets  all   health-based  drinking  water
standards in  the  most recent four-quarter
period.  This  measure  includes  federally
regulated  contaminants  of  the  following
violation  types:  maximum   contaminant
level, maximum residual  disinfection limit,
and  treatment  technique   violations.   It
includes  any  community   water   system
(CWS) violations that overlap with any part
of the most recent four quarters.
The EPA achieved the FY 2011 goal of 91
percent  and met the previous performance
goal  of  90 percent for each of the previous
three years. This performance improvement
is  attributed to  a  national decrease  in
treatment technique violations that occur at
the largest  water systems, as well  as how
states are  addressing background drinking
water  contaminants  (e.g.,  arsenic)  that
chronically challenge water systems.

This  success reflects the long-term efforts of
the states  and the  EPA  to  minimize any
health-based  violations,   while  building
appropriate   technical,   managerial  and
financial   system   capability   utilizing
                                         367

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                  FY 2013 Annual Plan
necessary infrastructure such that resources
are available and appropriately applied to
             protect  public   health  while  delivering
             drinking water to consumers.
Formerly impaired water bodies now meeting standards
          Performance Measure: Number of water bodies identified in
          2002 as not attaining water quality standards where standards
          are now fully attained (cumulative).
            4,000
            3,500
            2,500
         I,  2,000
           1 ,500
            1,000
             500
                            2006-2013 Performance Trends
              2,909
      2,505
2,165 _^r-

1,550
                                                              3,324
                                                                    57524
                  FY06   FY07*   FY08   FY09   FY10    FY11    FY12   FY13
                                                        "Measure introduced in FY 2007
                                         368

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                          FY 2013 Annual Plan
Analysis: The EPA and the states continue
to  make  strong  progress  in  addressing
impaired waters. By the end of FY 2011, a
total of 3,119 water bodies that were listed
as impaired in 2002 are fully attaining the
Agency's water quality standards, exceeding
the EPA's annual  target of 3,073.  Under
section  303(d) of  the  Clean Water  Act,
states,  territories  and  authorized  tribes are
required to develop lists of impaired waters.
Review of late 303(d) lists and audits  of lists
of impaired waters undertaken by several
regions are factors contributing to the EPA
exceeding  its  target.   By  attaining  water
quality  standards,  waters become safe for

Total Maximum Daily Loads
                                    drinking, fishing and  swimming. The EPA
                                    and state managers have given high priority
                                    to this measure, which has contributed to its
                                    continued success. Some of the challenges
                                    the  Agency  is facing  that will continue to
                                    impact future accomplishments are: reduced
                                    state budgets  are  slowing implementation
                                    activities  required  to  improve  impaired
                                    water bodies;  it is more difficult  to  show
                                    improvements and  address  all impairing
                                    pollutants for a water body segment than for
                                    just one or a few impairing pollutants; and
                                    many of the  remaining impairments  will
                                    take years before the water segment is fully
                                    recovered.
          Performance Measure: Number and national percent of TMDLs
          that are established or approved by the EPA [Total TMDLs] on
          a schedule consistent with national policy.*
        V)
60,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000
                             2006-2013 Performance Trends
                                                                52, 218
                                                                        54,770
                  22,648
                          25,274
                   FY06    FY07   FY08    FY09   FY10    FY11    FY12    FY13

                  •Note: A TMDL is a technical plan for reducing pollutants to attain water quality standards. The terms
                  "approved" and "established" refer to the completion and approval of the TMDL itself.
Analysis:  The development of TMDLs for
an impaired  water  body is a  critical  step
                                    toward  meeting  water  restoration  goals.
                                    TMDLs   focus    on   clearly   defined
                                          369

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
environmental   goals   and   establish   a
pollutant budget, which is then implemented
via permit requirements or a wide variety of
state, local  and federal  programs  (which
may  be  regulatory,   nonregulatory,  or
incentive-based, depending on the program),
as well as  voluntary action by citizens. In
FY 2011,  the EPA and  states developed
2,846  TMDLs,  exceeding  the  agency's
target by 288. A  few  examples of  2011
accomplishments include:

   •   Puerto Rico, with the EPA's support,
       established  118 TMDLs that  were
       not expected until FY 2013.
   •   Rhode Island completed a statewide
       bacteria TMDL.
   •   Missouri   developed  a  significant
       number of  TMDLs (83) to  meet
       Consent Decree requirements.
   •   Kansas developed  106 TMDLs due
       to its rotating basin assessment.
   •   San Diego completed 60 TMDLs for
       its beaches.

While  states should be recognized for these
accomplishments, resource constraints and
technical and legal challenges still exist. For
example,  Alabama,  Kentucky and  South
Carolina had several TMDLs with technical
and/or  legal  issues  that  still need  to be
resolved, and most states continue to suffer
due to budget shortfalls. There has also been
a notable  shift toward the development of
more difficult TMDLs that take more time
and  resources.   Additionally,   states   are
balancing   the  tradeoffs  between  TMDL
implementation  and TMDL development,
and the EPA is  aware  of more emphasis
being placed on implementation.
Innovative green infrastructure reduces cost and improves environmental conditions
The   EPA's  urban  watershed   research
program  develops  novel approaches  and
technologies  to  reduce  water  pollution
caused by  combined  sewer overflows and
storm water  runoff.  EPA  scientists  have
partnered   with   municipalities,   including
Cincinnati;  Kansas  City;  and Louisville,
Kentucky,  to  develop more efficient and
effective approaches to reducing stormwater
runoff and sewer overflows. In Cincinnati,
these improved approaches have resulted in
the city  reaching  compliance  with  CWA
requirements.  These  green  infrastructure
solutions present cost-effective alternatives
to traditional grey approaches for controlling
stormwater runoff.

Key Challenges:

Population  served by  CWSs in  Indian
Country
                                          370

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                         FY 2013 Annual Plan
         Performance Measure: Percent of the population in Indian
         Country served by CWSs that receives drinking water that
         meets all applicable health-based drinking water standards.
         c
         o
         Q.
         O
        Q_
         CD
        CL
100
 90
 80
 70
 60
 50
 40
 30
 20
 10
  0
                -  86.6
                          2006-2013 Performance Trends
83     81.2
                                                 87.2
87     87      87
  81.2
                 FY06   FY07    FY08   FY09    FY10   FY11    FY12   FY13
Analysis: This performance measure reflects
the percentage of the population  in Indian
Country  served by CWSs  that  receives
drinking  water that meets all health-based
drinking  water standards regulated by the
Navajo Nation and  the EPA. This measure
mirrors the general population metric, in that
it includes federally regulated contaminants
of  the  following  violation  types: MCL,
MRDL and  treatment technique violations.
It  includes  any violations from  currently
opened and closed CWSs in Indian Country
that overlap with any part of the most recent
four quarters.
There continue to be challenges associated
with  tribal   water  systems  maintaining
compliance with National Primary Drinking
Water Regulations, as shown in the end-of-
year results.  The EPA has failed to meet the
performance target in three of the past five
years. Performance over the years is heavily
influenced by the systems in Region  9, as
that region  has the vast majority of the
                                   national tribal population governed by this
                                   measure. The measure results in FY  2011
                                   were  also  influenced by  data corrections
                                   from  the Navajo Nation, which addressed
                                   reporting    problems    and    inaccurate
                                   compliance determinations for a variety of
                                   contaminants. In  addition, Region 9 tribes
                                   have struggled with meeting the Arsenic and
                                   Total  Chloroform Rule MCL  standards.
                                   Although these challenges remain, Region 9
                                   is  working with affected tribes,  the Indian
                                   Health Service and the U.S.  Department of
                                   Agriculture to better use funds  to  support
                                   infrastructure  and address  arsenic   rule
                                   violations.

                                   Tribes  face   challenges  including  those
                                   common to small systems,  such as aging
                                   infrastructure,     increased     regulatory
                                   requirements,   workforce    shortages/high-
                                   turnover, increasing costs and declining rate
                                   bases.
                                          371

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                FY 2013 Annual Plan
The EPA is undertaking action to improve
how tribes perceive the value of high-quality
drinking water, as well as market potential
resource   availability    for    addressing
infrastructure shortfalls by:

   •   Clarifying the goal and priorities for
       the tribal  infrastructure  set-asides
       from  the  Drinking Water  State
       Revolving Loan Fund—the Drinking
       Water  Infrastructure Grants  Tribal
       Set-Aside program  (DWIG-TSA)—
       with a focus on compliance.
   •   Improving    the    collection   and
       analysis  of  data  to  enhance  the
       transparency      and      strategic
       coordination  of  the  DWIG-TSA
       program.
   •   Enhancing  communication with  all
       partners via the tribal infrastructure
task force and biannual  discussion
with the EPA regions that focuses on
clarification of collected data for use
in     communicating     program
achievements.
Updating  the  tribal drinking water
infrastructure  needs as part of the
EPA    2011     Drinking   Water
Infrastructure Needs Survey.
Completed a formal program review
of  the  Navajo  Nation,   who  have
primacy to implement SDWA, in FY
2012  to  further  evaluate how the
Navajo    Nation    is   determining
compliance   with   the   National
Primary Drinking Water Standards
and also verify if information in the
Navajo Nations files and databases is
consistent  with  publicly  available
data.
                                           372

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                      FY 2013 Annual Plan
National Estuary Program habitat acres protected or restored
          Performance Measure: Working with partners, protect or
          restore additional acres of habitat within the study areas for
          the 28 estuaries that are part of the NEP.
            150000
            120000
          <8  90000
          o
          <
             60000
             30000
                             2006-2013 Performance Trends




   8 K




                    FY06   FY07   FY08    FY09   FY10    FY11    FY12    FY13
Analysis:  The 28 NEPs and their partners
have protected or restored over  1  million
habitat acres within the NEP study areas
since 2002.  In FY 2011, they protected or
restored just over 62,000 acres of habitat—
about 38,000  acres short of the agency's
goal. Several factors made it a challenge to
reach the goal of  protecting or restoring
100,000  acres  of  habitat  this  year.  For
example, the economic downturn has made
it difficult for the NEP partners to come up
with the matching funds for projects, and the
number  of  large  habitat  protection  or
restoration projects has diminished over the
last few years. In addition, several NEPs had
to divert resources  and efforts that  might
have  gone  to  protect  or restore  coastal
wetlands and other habitats  in  order  to
address the  residual  oil spill issues  in the
Gulf of Mexico.  The EPA is working to
determine a more appropriate target for the
future.
                                          373

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  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                                       FY 2013 Annual Plan
Puget Sound shellfish areas increased
          Performance Measure: Improve water quality and enable the
          lifting of harvest restrictions in acres of shellfish-bed growing
          areas impacted by degraded or declining water quality
          (cumulative starting in FY 2006).
         0
8000
7000
6000
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
   0
                             2006-2013 Performance Trends
                                                                      7,758
                                                4,453
                                                               3,878
                                  1,566 1,730

                                  450    60°
                   FY06   FY07   FY08*   FY09
                                    FY10   FY11   FY12    FY13
                                            "Measure introduced in FY 2008
Analysis: In 2010, 4,453 acres (cumulative)
of shellfish-bed growing areas had improved
water quality, resulting  in  the  lifting  of
harvest restrictions. In 2011,  a downgrading
of approximately 4,000 acres in Samish Bay
occurred due to  nonpoint source pollution