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         American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
              Quarterly Performance Repoit
„•r\ \ U.S. Environmentiil Protection Agency
               FY 2012 Quarter 4
  Cumulative Results as of September 30,2012
             Published October 31,2012
                                        US EPA 190R12004

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                                    Table of Contents
Background and Jobs Created	2

FY 2012 Quarter 4 Highlights	3

Clean Water State Revolving Fund	4

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund	6

Diesel Emissions Reductions	8
Brownfields	
                                                                    ..10
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks	12

Superfund	14

Inspector General	16

Appendix: Recovery Act Performance Measures and Results	17
                                   Funding by Program
        $4.500
        $4.000
        $3.500
        $3.000
     ~t  $2.500
     a
     I  $2.000
        $1,500
        $1.000
          $500
          $-
$4.000
                                   S300
S200
                                                          S100
                 Clean Water   Drinking Water   Superfund
                    SRF        SRF
                                   Diesel     Underground   Brownfields
                                  Ems 5 ions      Storage
                                               Tanks

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                                        Background
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) has been an unprecedented effort
to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and address long-neglected challenges
emerging  in  the  21st century.  The Recovery Act  includes  $7.22  billion  for programs
administered by EPA to protect and promote both green jobs and a healthier environment.

EPA began tracking program performance at the end of Fiscal Year 2009. The following report
provides a summary of the performance EPA and its partners have achieved through September
30, 2012 (Quarter 4, Fiscal Year 2012) in the six  key environmental  programs  funded by the
Recovery Act and efforts by the Office of the Inspector General.  Each section includes general
background information on the program, performance metrics, cumulative results and cumulative
long-term targets, and  examples of progress.  The environmental programs invest in clean water
and drinking water projects, implement diesel emission reduction technologies, clean up leaking
underground  storage tanks,  revitalize  and reuse brownfields, and clean up Superfund sites.  To
learn more about the Recovery Act implementation at EPA, visit www. epa. gov/recovery.

In order to ensure accountability and demonstrate progress toward meeting program goals, EPA
will provide  quarterly performance updates  consistent with the  timing of quarterly recipient
reporting. While this report contains the cumulative results since the Recovery Act began, visit
www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.htmltfreports to review weekly financial and activity reports.
                                         Jobs Report
The Recovery Act has created and retained jobs through its implementation over the past several
years. As the table below demonstrates 1,700 jobs have been funded by ARRA appropriations as
reported by recipients from July 1 to September 30, 2012. l To view EPA recipient reported data
for your state, visit EPA Recipient Reporting on www.recovery.gov.
                           Recipient Reported Jobs Created by EPA Recovery Act Funds
    16,000
    12.000
     8:000
     4.000








3,899

f une C 5 -
Sept. :;;






6.788



Oct. CS-
Dec.09




9.671





. -T1 1 o -
Mar. 10

16,603








Apr.lC-
JunelO

15.856








."ulv 1 C -
Sept. 10



10.629






Oct. 1C -
Dec. 1C






7J63



."m. 1 1 -
Mar. 11






7,170



Apr. 11-
Junell








4.699
	
W! || 1.894 || 1,700
."ulv 11- Oct. 11- Jan. 12- Apr. 12- Jul. 12-
Septll Dec. 11 Mar. 12 June 12 Sept. 12
 Each quarter of jobs data represents a snap-shot in time of the number of jobs funded by Recovery Act for the particular quarter; the results
should not be added cumulatively. Note that the data represented in this chart is the responsibility of the recipients of EPA Recovery Act funds,
and while EPA does conduct a quality check of the data, the primary responsibility for jobs counts resides with the recipients. Also, a continuous
review period for each quarter lasts 75 days, which means the total draft reported jobs numbers presented could change after this report has been
finalized. In the reporting period (April-June 2012), a recipient error overstated the jobs impact for EPA-related awards. The reported number of
jobs in the chart is the accurate reported jobs number for the April-June 2012 reporting cycle.

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      FY 2012 Quarter 4 Highlights
        As of September 30, 2012

Clean Water State Revolving Fund
•   1,870 projects started construction and 1,287 projects completed
    construction
•   93 Tribal projects started construction and 49 completed
    construction

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
•   1,338 projects started construction and 861 projects completed
    construction
•   64 Tribal projects started and 54 projects completed construction
Diesel Emissions Reductions
 •   27,700 old diesel engines retrofitted, replaced, or retired
 •   Reduced lifetime emissions of carbon dioxide
    by over 753,000 tons and particulate matter by 3,500 tons
Brownfields
•  825 properties assessed with 67 properties cleaned up
•  201 properties totaling 963 acres are ready for reuse
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
•   1,651 site assessments initiated and 2,410 completed
•   2,260 cleanups initiated and 2,449 completed
•   51 of the 54 states and territories that received ARRA money
    completed their work

Superfund
•   30 remedial action projects have expended 100% of their
    obligated funds
•   96.5% of total remedial obligations have been expended

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                            Clean Water State Revolving Fund
The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF), in place since 1987, provides funds to states
to capitalize state loan revolving funds  that finance infrastructure improvements for public
wastewater  systems and  other water  quality projects.  The EPA provides direct grants to
Washington, DC and the territories for similar purposes.

The EPA received $4 billion for the CWSRF that includes funds for water quality management
planning grants with up to 1% reserved  for federal  management and oversight and 1.5% for
Tribes. EPA awarded grants to states and Puerto Rico for their state revolving  fund programs,
from which  assistance is provided to finance eligible high priority water infrastructure projects.

The states play a critical role by selecting projects, dispersing funds, and overseeing spending.
Projects  were  selected based on public  health  and  environmental factors,  and readiness to
proceed with construction  capability. In addition, states were also required to provide at least
20% of their grants for green projects (i.e., green infrastructure, energy or water efficiency
improvements,  and environmentally  innovative activities). States had the option to retain up to
4% of available  funds for program administration.  Visit www.epa.gov/water/eparecovery to
learn more about the CWSRF.

                      Program Results as of September 30, 2012

States certified  that all project funding was under contract by the February 17, 2010 deadline and
at least 20% of their funds went to green projects.  Collectively,  states far surpassed the 20%
requirement, providing a national total of $1.13 billion, or 30% of all funds.
                                 Amount of CWSRF Projects
                         Starting and Com pie dug Construction (non-tribal)
                                                                     Target
                                                                     Starting
                                                                     Completing

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                                          Amount of CAYSKF Projects
                                  Starting and Com pled us Construction (tribal)
                   60-
                !2  40
                                      Despite  significant  wastewater  needs,  there are  few  financial
                                      resources available to small, rural communities. The Lincoln County
                                      Commission, in West Virginia, used a $718,626 Recovery Act loan,
                                      all of which  was provided in the form of principal forgiveness, to
                                      fund the construction of on-site wastewater systems for 19 residences
                                      in the community of Alkol, in the Left Fork watershed of the Mud
                                      River.  The systems use innovative peat filters that pre-treat  septic
                                      system  effluent,  removing  high concentrations  of nutrients  and
                                      producing high quality effluent with less biological oxygen demand,
                                      fewer total suspended  solids, and reduced fecal  coliform bacteria.
                                      These  on-site systems replaced direct discharges from  homes or
                                      failing septic systems  and reduced pollutants  that were  negatively
                                      impacting surface  and ground water in the watershed, helping to
                                      protect the environment and public health.
The city of Lennox, in South Dakota used to treat wastewater through
aerated ponds. However, a change in beneficial use classifications for
Long Creek resulted in  a revision of effluent limits beyond the level
the old facility.  As  a result,  Lennox  invested in the construction of
new technology which lowered ammonia in the wastewater stream to
acceptable levels. The system also utilizes ultraviolet disinfection of
effluent prior to discharge,  which allowed Lennox  to  avoid the
increased costs and risks associated with chemical  treatment options.
This  up-front investment  had  lower  life-cycle  costs  than  other
alternative  treatment technologies. Nevertheless,  taking  on  a  $4
million loan was a huge commitment for a community of only 2,843.
The Recovery Act made this  investment affordable to Lennox with
more  than $1.5 million in principal forgiveness and 30 year extended
financing terms.  The project enabled Lennox  to protect water quality
in Long Creek over the long  term while also keeping sanitary sewer
rates affordable for the public.	

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                         Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
The  Safe  Drinking Water Act, as amended in 1996, established the Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund (DWSRF)  to  make  funds  available to drinking water  systems  to  finance
infrastructure improvements.  Under the Recovery Act, EPA received $2 billion for the DWSRF
with up to 1% of fund reserved for federal management and oversight and 1.5% for Tribes.

The program emphasizes the  provision of funds to small and disadvantaged communities and to
programs that encourage pollution  prevention as a tool for ensuring safe drinking  water. The
DWSRF  provides  funds  to states  to  establish  state  loan revolving funds  that  finance
infrastructure improvements for public and private Community Water Systems and not-for-profit
Non-Community Water Systems and direct grants to Washington, DC and the territories.

The DWSRF consists of 51 state financing programs (includes Puerto Rico) which comply with
federal statute and regulations. States must provide at least 20% of their grants for green projects
(i.e., green  infrastructure, energy  or water efficiency  improvements, and environmentally
innovative activities) and may retain up to 4% of available funds for program administration. To
learn  more   about   the  DWSRF   implementation   of   the   Recovery   Act,   visit
www. epa. gov/water/eparecovery.

                      Program Results as of September 30, 2012

Over a thousand projects have initiated construction that will bring safe drinking water to many
people across the country. Like the CWSRF, the states  certified that all project funding was
under contract by the February  17, 2010 deadline and at least 20% of their funds went to green
projects. Many  states surpassed the 20% minimum with  the average amount of green reserve
totaling $500 million or 29%  of all funds.
                              Amount of DAVSRF Projects
                     Starting and Com pie ting Construction (no n-tribal)
                                                                       Target
                                                                       Starting
                                                                       Completing

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               30 -
                                 AmountofDWSKF Projects
                         Starting and Completing Construction (tribal)
                                                                   Target
                                                                   Starting
                                                                   Completing
                                    Q4
                                   FYlfJ
 Q4
FYll
 Q4
FY12
                             The Central Shoshone County Water District used their
                             low-interest American Recovery Act loan to help correct a
                             long-standing problem with a local  drinking water source.
                             The Enaville well near Kellogg,  Idaho requires filtration
                             under the 1993 Surface Water Treatment Rule, and the loan
                             helped  pay for the installation of  a microfiltration plant to
                             treat  drinking   water  and  install  residential   meters.
                             Inadequate treatment of surface  water that is used  for
                             drinking water can lead to ingestion of harmful parasites,
                             such as  cryptosporidium.  Installation  of filtration  will
                             provide approximately 5,800  people with  cleaner,  safer
                             drinking water,  and installation of metering will allow the
                             water system to become more sustainable.	
The community of Whiteriver, Arizona, in the heart of the
Fort  Apache  Indian   Reservation,   has   experienced
significant population growth over the past decade (61%).
The community's source of drinking water, the Miner Flat
well field, has had its production reduced  by 40% in the
past few years while  consumption  has  increased.  To
ameliorate the situation, the EPA,  Indian  Health  Service
(MS),  Department  of Housing and Urban Development,
and the White Mountain Apache Tribe have collaborated in
the planning,  design, and construction of an innovative
surface  diversion   and  treatment  system that  will be
completed this year.

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                                Diesel Emission Reductions
Diesel engines emit large amounts of air pollutants which  contribute to serious public health
problems including asthma, lung cancer and various other cardiac and respiratory diseases. With
funds dispersed through four programs, regional, state and local governments, tribal agencies,
and non-profit organizations received approximately $300 million in grants and loans to support
the implementation of verified and certified diesel emission reduction technologies.

The program aims to accelerate emission reductions from older diesel  engines to provide more
immediate air quality benefits and improve public health while using Recovery Act funds to
maximize job preservation and creation in order to promote economic  recovery.

The Diesel Emission Reductions Act (DERA) awards grants, via the  Recovery Act, through the
National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program, the State Clean  Diesel Grant Program, the
Clean Diesel Emerging  Technologies Funding Assistance Program,  and the SmartWay Clean
Diesel Finance Program. Of the $300 million,  $6 million has been reserved  for federal
management and oversight. To learn more about the Diesel Emissions Reductions  Program
implementation of the Recovery Act, visit www.epa.gov/otaq/eparecovery/index.htm.
Diesel Emissions Reductions Act (DERA)
Clean Diesel Funding Programs2
National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program
State Clean Diesel Grant Program3
Clean Diesel Emerging Technologies Funding Assistance Program
SmartWay Clean Diesel Finance Program
Total
Number of
ARRA Grants
90
51
14
5
160
Total Funds
($ Millions)
$156
$88
$20
$30
$294
                         Program Results as of September 30, 2012
            30,000
                             Number of Existing Heavy Duty Diesel Engines
                         (Including School Buses) Retrofitted, Replaced, or Retired
 As indicated in the program plans, projects should be completed for the National, State, and Emerging Technology Funding
Assistance programs by the end of December 2010. SmartWay projects have until the end of December 2012 to complete.
 The State Clean Diesel Grant Program allocates grants to all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

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    12.000
c
u
:_
r
X
=
^
     9:000
     6.000
     3.000
                          Lifetime Reductions of Carbon Monoxide
                                     (CO) Emissions
                                   The San Diego County Air Pollution Control District
                                   received grant funding to replace, repower, and retrofit
                                   125 older school buses. With three major international
                                   and interstate transportation corridors  in San Diego
                                   County, vehicular traffic has a big impact on air quality
                                   in the area. Forty-one public schools in the county are
                                   located  within  1,500  feet  of  one  of  these major
                                   highways. Using Recovery Act funding, San Diego
                                   County  cleaned up the dirtiest school buses in its fleet.
                                   These  upgrades  will  significantly  reduce  negative
                                   impacts on human health as well as smog by reducing
                                   emissions of particulate  matter  (PM)  and nitrogen
                                   oxide (NOX).
Partnership played an important role in the success
of the Kentucky Clean Diesel Construction Project
to reduce diesel emissions throughout the state. The
Associated  General   Contractors   of  Kentucky
worked closely with its members to replace engines
on 36 pieces of equipment and add diesel particulate
filters  (DPFs)  to  18  pieces of  equipment. Idle
reduction   is   also  being   promoted   on   100
construction sites  across  Kentucky.  The  resulting
reduction in particulate matter (PM) is equivalent to
removing 110 long haul trucks from the road.

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                                      Brownfields
A brownfield is a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated
by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. Under
the Recovery Act, EPA received $100 million for the Brownfields Program.

The  funds  provide  awards  for  brownfields  assessment, cleanup,  new and  supplemental
Revolving Loan Fund  (RLF) and job training cooperative agreements  through a competitive
process. Communities  receive technical assistance and targeted brownfields  assessments via
regional contracts and  Interagency Agreements (IA). Activities to be performed under these
cooperative agreements include, but are not limited to:

   •   assessments to identify the contaminants at properties and initiate cleanup planning;
   •   direct cleanup of brownfield properties;
   •   community involvement activities for property selection, cleanup and reuse planning; and
   •   training of participants in the  handling and removal of hazardous substances, including
       training for  environmental jobs  (including,  environmental  sampling, analysis,  and
       remediation techniques).

EPA awarded $87.3 million to communities for assessments and  cleanups of contaminated land
through cooperative agreements. An  additional $9.2 million  was distributed by EPA regional
offices for targeted  brownfields assessments in communities  with the remaining  $3.5 million
used for federal management and oversight. To learn  more  about the Brownfields  Program
implementation of the Recovery Act, visit www.epa.gov/brownfields/eparecovery/.

                       Program Results as of September 30, 2012
                            Number of Broimfield Assessments
                                 Initiated and Completed
          1,400

          1:200

          1:000

         | 800
         | 600

           400

           200
 Target
•Initiated
•Completed
                                           10

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                                   Number of Brownfield Cleanups
                                      Initiated and Completed
              140
              120

              100
 Target
•Initiated
•Completed
                                  A grand opening ceremony for the home  of the  new
                                  Mattapan  Community  Health  Center  took  place  on
                                  September  10,  2012.   The Mattapan Community  Health
                                  Center,  established  in  1975,  had  outgrown  its  old
                                  facility. The new building provides state of the art medical
                                  services to this underserved community and also contains
                                  the first pharmacy in  Mattapan  Square in 30 years. A
                                  Recovery  Act  grant helped  remediate the  parcels  in
                                  preparation for the new construction. The project created
                                  600 jobs in  construction and operation of the new health
                                  center.  The new health center will provide for clinical,
                                  dental  and laboratory  services for its  patients  and will
                                  double the number of residents it can serve.
Utilizing a Brownfields Recovery  Act grant,  the city  of
Vista, California collaborated with the state's environmental
regulatory  agency,   California  Department  of  Toxic
Substances Control (DTSC) to achieve the ultimate goal of
the Brownfields program - make properties available for
redevelopment  quickly  and efficiently  to  allow  cities  to
implement their redevelopment plans. The  city  and DTSC
developed  and  implemented  a   carefully   considered
Supplemental Site Investigation. The city was able to obtain
DTSC's concurrence that the chemicals  of concern did not
present  an unacceptable risk to  human  health or  the
environment and no further action was issued. This strategy
saved the city up to 500 thousand dollars. This project is an
excellent example of how EPA's Brownfields program can
result  in  significant  savings  to   cities  and   provide
opportunities for expedited redevelopment.
                                            11

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                         Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Across the country, approximately 85,000 releases from underground storage tanks remain to be
cleaned up. Under the Recovery Act, EPA received $200 million from the Leaking Underground
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund for assessing and cleaning up releases of contamination from
federally-regulated underground storage tanks (USTs). The LUST program helps create jobs and
protect the environment and human health through:

    •   emergency response and initial site hazard mitigation;
    •   site investigations and assessments;
    •   petroleum contamination release cleanups;
    •   soil and groundwater monitoring;
    •   enforcement actions and recovery of costs from liable tank owners and operators; and
    •   public or community involvement activities.

EPA uses the money to assess and clean up contaminated LUST sites, which creates and retains
jobs and  provides many economic and  environmental benefits. EPA provided $190.7 million to
state and territorial UST programs through cooperative agreements, all of which were awarded
by  December  31, 2009. As of September 30,  2012,  51  of the  54 states and territories  that
received  LUST Recovery  Act money  completed their work. EPA's regional  UST  programs
manage $6.3 million to clean up  tank  releases in Indian country. The remaining $3 million is
used for federal management and  oversight. To learn more about EPA's  Office of Underground
Storage     Tanks'      implementation      of     the      Recovery      Act,      visit
www. epa. gov/oust/eparecovery/index.htm.

                       Program Results as of September 30, 2012

In addition to the results below, Recovery Act funds have contributed to other assessment and
cleanup activities at a total  of 4,031 sites, which did not begin as Recovery Act projects.
                          Number of L DC!erground Storage Tank Site
                             Assessments Initiated and Completed
                                                                   Target
                                                                   Initiated
                                                                   Completed
                                                                          Q4
                                                                         FY12
                                          12

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                                Number of Underground Storage Tank Site
                                     Cleanups Initiated aiid Completed
2.449
                                                                             Target
                                                                             Initiated
                                                                             Completed
                                                                                 Q4
                                                                                FY12
                                        In  1949, Dutch's Tackle and Marina established operations
                                        on the Clam River where it enters Torch Lake on Michigan's
                                        northwest  Lower Peninsula. In 1965, the marina installed
                                        gasoline underground storage tanks (USTs), which in 1989
                                        contaminated  two neighborhood residential drinking  wells
                                        with gasoline. In 2010, Michigan used Recovery Act funds to
                                        implement  a  plan,  which  included  protecting  the on-site
                                        building and providing excavation support in order to remove
                                        contamination;  treating  and discharging  over  13  million
                                        gallons  of  groundwater;  removing highly-contaminated
                                        source soil; and removing  and  disposing of almost 11,000
                                        cubic yards of contaminated soil. As a result, the Clam River
                                        and Torch Lake,  both sensitive  environmental  areas,  are
                                        protected.  Because  residents and businesses in the area use
                                        the  drinking  water aquifer,  this  work  is  protecting  the
                                        public's health, safety, and welfare.
The Fisherville Mill is located between the Blackstone River, which
is an American Heritage River, and the historic Blackstone Canal in
Grafton, Massachusetts. Intermittently from  1831 to 1986, the mill
manufactured textiles, tool and die parts, machine tool stamps, lawn
furniture,  foam  rubber,  and  fabrics  for  car  seats.  In  1987,
contamination from a diesel  fuel underground storage tank,  along
with heavier oils  already in the ground, migrated to the Blackstone
Canal. Beginning in 2009, Massachusetts used Recovery Act funds
to install a containment structure, which limited oil infiltration into
the canal; excavate and dispose  of oil-contaminated sediments and
debris; and re-grade and stabilize parts of the canal bank disturbed
when excavating  canal sediment. The Fisherville Mill is part of a
streetscape project, which is restoring parts of South Grafton while
embracing its history as an industrial region.
                                                13

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                                       Superfund
The  overall objectives for using the $600  million provided to Superfund are to  initiate and
accelerate cleanup at National Priority List (NPL) sites, maximize job creation and retention, and
provide environmental and economic benefits. Of the funds provided to EPA, $18  million was
allocated for federal management and oversight.  These objectives are being achieved by starting
new  cleanup projects,  accelerating cleanups at projects already underway, increasing the number
of workers and activities at cleanup projects,  and  returning affected sites to more productive use.

The  Recovery Act funds provide immediate short and longer-term health,  environmental, and
economic benefits at both new and ongoing Superfund remedial projects through the following:

   •  treatment or removal of organic compound contamination;
   •  treatment or removal of heavy metal contamination;
   •  beginning or accelerating work to treat drinking water to meet standards;
   •  provision of alternate residential drinking  water supplies; and
   •  mitigation of damage to wildlife habitat and ecosystems and beginning of restoration

The job sectors benefiting from the Superfund Recovery Act funds include, but are not limited
to: cleanup  operation and management,  laboratory sampling  and analysis, hazardous waste
disposal  and management,  construction  and monitoring equipment  rental,  water  and soil
treatment, and environmental engineering and  management. To learn more about Superfund
implementation of ARRA, visit www.epa.gov/superfund/eparecovery/index.html.

                        Program Results as of September 30, 2012

The  Superfund program has allocated funding to  51 sites and 61 projects. Of these projects, 26 of
them  are   on   new   sites   across  the   country.   For   more  information,   visit:
http://www.epa.gov/superfund/eparecovery/sites.html.
                       Number of Superfund Projects Achieving
                                    Completion
                                 Q4
                                FY10
 Q4
FY11
 Q4
FY12
                                           14

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                          Number of Superfund Sites Achieving
                            Human Exposure Under Control
                                Q4
                               FY10
 Q4
FY11
 Q4
FY12
                                Changes to the cleanup remedy for the Silresim Chemical
                                site in Lowell, Massachusetts called  for replacing the
                                existing interim cap with a Final Cap, and implementing
                                a  thermally-enhanced  soil  vapor  extraction  (SVE)
                                technology referred to  as Electrical Resistive Heating
                                (ERH). With the help of Recovery Act funds, EPA was
                                able  to  complete   construction  on  both   remedy
                                modifications. Groundwater sampling continued with the
                                final round in August 2012. The ERH system removed
                                soil vapor contaminants  in the range of 40,000 to  80,000
                                pounds, including 3,480  pounds of pure waste product.
Recovery  Act funding for the Atlantic Wood
Industries   site in  Portsmouth,  Virginia  has
allowed the cleanup to start one year earlier than
originally  planned.  EPA has spent over  $3
million  of the $3.7  million  in  Recovery  Act
funds that were allocated for cleanup activities.
The EPA  used funds to excavate contaminated
soils,  build part of a landfill berm, and build
another  berm  along the banks of the Southern
Branch  of the Elizabeth  River  that will  help
contain dredged sediments.
                                          15

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                                   Inspector General
The Recovery Act provides the EPA Office of Inspector General (OIG) with $20 million through
December 31, 2012 for  oversight and review. The  OIG will assess whether EPA  uses the
Recovery Act funds in accordance with its requirements and meets the accountability obj ectives
as defined by OMB. The OIG will utilize the funds to determine whether:

   •   funds are awarded and distributed in a prompt, fair, and reasonable manner;
   •   recipients and uses of funds are transparent to the public, and the public benefits of these
       funds are reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner;
   •   funds are used for authorized purposes and fraud, waste, error, and abuse are mitigated;
   •   projects funded under the Recovery Act avoid unnecessary delays and cost overruns;
   •   program goals are achieved, including specific program outcomes and improved results
       on broader economic indicators.

                          Program Results as of September 30, 2012

To ensure accountability the OIG has provided outreach and training to numerous groups and has
identified  a  number of actions for improvement. Additionally, the  OIG identified over $3.4
million in cost efficiencies/savings as funds to be put to better use.
                Return on the annual dollar investment as a percentage of the OIG
                            budget from audits and investigations
         200
         100
                                                                           152
o 4
  Q4
FYOP
                                 /
                                                                SZS.j miHion in
                                                                  cumulative
                                 Q4
                               FY10
FY11
 Q4
FY12
                                           16

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Appendix: Recovery Act Performance Measures and Cumulative Results
Program
Clean Water
State
Revolving
Fund
Drinking
Water
State
Revolving
Fund
Diesel
Emissions
Reductions
Performance Measures
Amount ($) of projects that are under contract (non -tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have started construction (non -tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have completed construction (non-
tribal)
States that have awarded all of their green project reserve
Amount ($) of projects that have started construction (tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have completed construction (tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that are under contract (non -tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have started construction (non -tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have completed construction (non-
tribal)
States that have awarded all of their green project reserve
Amount ($) of projects that have started construction (tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have completed construction (tribal)
Projects implemented that promote diesel emissions reductions
Existing heavy duty diesel engines (including school bus engines)
that have been retrofitted, replaced, or retired
Lifetime reductions of NOX emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of PM emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of HC emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of CO emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of CO2 emissions (tons)
Q4
FY09
$.61 B
$.73 B
$.003 B
12
$9M
$.54 M
$.16 B
$.20 B
$.01 B
8
$1.7 M
$.54 M
160
415
1,402
53
109
553
11,083
Q4
FY10
$3.8B
$3.8B
$.20 B
51
$35 M
$3.0 M
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.10B
51
$23 M
$4.4 M
160
12,934
42,149
1,588
4,800
5,675
351,332
Q4
FY11
$3.8B
$3.8B
$.78 B
51
$57 M
$13 M
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.45 B
51
$29 M
$12 M
160
24,700
81,100
3,100
9,300
11,000
672,400
Q4
FY12
$3.8B
$3.8B
$1.6B
51
$59 M
$26 M
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.81 B
51
$30 M
$22 M
160
27,700
91,000
3,500
10,600
12,300
753,000
Target
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
51
$60 M
$60 M
$1.8 B
$1.8 B
$1.8 B
51
$30 M
$30 M
160
30,000
100,000
4,000
12,000
13,000
850,000
                          17

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Program
Brownfields
Leaking
Underground
Storage Tanks
Superfund
Inspector
General
Performance Measures
Brownfield assessments initiated
Brownfield assessments completed
Brownfields properties assessed
Brownfield cleanups initiated
Brownfield cleanups completed
Acres of Brownfields made ready for reuse
Millions of dollars of cleanup and redevelopment funds leveraged
Jobs leveraged from Brownfield's activities
Percentage of participants trained obtaining employment
Revolving Loan Fund loans/sub grants
Site assessments initiated
Site assessments completed
Site cleanups initiated
Site cleanups completed
Projects in receipt of Recovery Act funding
Sites in receipt of Recovery Act funding
Sites achieving construction completion
Sites achieving human exposures under control
Sites with new construction
Projects with new construction
Projects achieving completion
Convictions, indictments, civil and administrative actions, and
allegations disproved from OIG investigations
Awareness briefings, outreach briefings, and training sessions held
Recovery Act complaints received
Whistleblower reprisal allegations
Return on the annual dollar investment as a percentage of the OIG
budget from audits and investigations
Q4
FY09
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
180
34
57
9
60
50
1
2
25
25
0
2
63
13
0
0
Q4
FY10
499
398
322
19
13
30
$42 M
161
54%
12
780
642
709
592
61
51
4
4
26
26
1
26
128
52
0
0
Q4
FY11
1,004
881
637
61
36
548
$183 M
1,186
58%
41
1,319
1,660
1,659
1,617
61
51
9
5
26
26
19
41
163
71
0
52%
Q4
FY12
1,324
1,190
825
125
67
963
$309 M
1,791
70%
99
1,651
2,410
2,260
2,449
61
51
11
10
26
26
33
70
175
91
0
152%
Target
500
500
500
30
30
500
$450 M
500
65%
45
2,000
2,000
1,000
1,000
60
50
5
5
25
25
16
44
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
18

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