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          American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
              Quarterly Performance Repoit
r\ \ U.S. Environmentiil Protection Agency
               FY 2013 Quarter 2
    Cumulative Results as of March 31, 2013
                    May 1,2013
                                         USEPA190R13007

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                                     Table of Contents

Background and Jobs Created	

FY 2013 Quarter 2 Highlights	

Clean Water State Revolving Fund	5

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund	6

Diesel Emissions Reductions	7
Brownfields	
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks	9

Superfund	10

Inspector General	11
                                   Funding by Program
        $4.500
        $4.000
        $3.500
        $3.000
     tT $2.500
     S
     |  $2.000
        $1.500
        $1.000
          $500
          S-
$4.000
            S2.000
                        S600
                                    S300
S200
                                                           S100
                 Clean Water  Drinking Water   Superfimd      Diesel
                    SRF         SRP                   Emissions
                                             Underground   Brownfiekh
                                               Storage
                                               Tanks

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                                       Background
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) has been an unprecedented effort
to jumpstart our economy, create or save millions of jobs, and address long-neglected challenges
emerging in  the 21st  century.  The Recovery  Act  includes $7.22  billion  for  programs
administered by EPA to protect and promote both green jobs and a healthier environment.

EPA began tracking program performance at the end of Fiscal Year 2009.  The following report
provides a summary of the performance EPA and its partners have achieved through March 31,
2013  (Quarter 2, Fiscal  Year 2013) in the  six key environmental programs funded by the
Recovery Act and efforts by the Office of the Inspector General. Each section includes general
background information on the program, performance metrics, cumulative results and cumulative
long-term targets, and examples of progress. The environmental programs  invest in clean water
and drinking water projects, implement diesel emission reduction technologies, clean up leaking
underground storage  tanks, revitalize and reuse  brownfields, and clean up Superfund sites. To
learn more about the Recovery Act implementation at EPA,  visit www.epa.gov/recovery.

In order to ensure accountability and demonstrate progress  toward meeting program goals,  EPA
will provide quarterly performance  updates  consistent with the timing of quarterly recipient
reporting. While this report contains  the cumulative results since the Recovery Act began, visit
www.epa.gov/recovery/plans.htmltfreports to review weekly financial and activity reports.
                                       Jobs Report
The Recovery Act has created and retained jobs through its implementation over the past several
years. As the table below demonstrates, 541.5 jobs have been funded by ARRA appropriations as
reported by recipients from January 1 to March 31, 2013.1 To view EPA recipient reported data
for your state, visit EPA Recipient Reporting on www.recovery.gov.

                    Recipient Reported Jobs Created by EPA Recovery Act Funds
2 i o nnn
o


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      FY 2013 Quarter 2 Highlights
          As of March 31, 2013

Clean Water State Revolving Fund
   1,868 projects started construction and 1,495 projects completed
    construction
   95 Tribal projects started construction and 68 completed
    construction

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
   1,337 projects started construction and 1,010 projects completed
    construction
   64 Tribal projects started and 58 projects completed construction
Diesel Emissions Reductions
    29,00 old diesel engines retrofitted, replaced, or retired
    Reduced lifetime emissions of carbon dioxide
    by over 790,300 tons and particulate matter by 3,670 tons
Brownfields
   1,375 assessments completed with 79 properties cleaned up
   1,605 acres of properties are ready for reuse
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
   1,651 site assessments initiated and 2,420 completed
   2,265 cleanups initiated and 2,448 completed
   54 of the 54 states and territories that received ARRA money
    completed their work

Superfund
   11 sites have achieved construction completion
   35 projects have achieved completion

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                            Clean Water State Revolving Fund
The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF), in place since 1987, provides funds to states
to capitalize state loan revolving funds that finance infrastructure improvements  for public
wastewater  systems and  other water  quality projects. The EPA  provides direct  grants  to
Washington, DC and the territories for similar purposes.

The EPA received $4 billion for the CWSRF that includes funds for water quality management
planning grants with up  to 1% reserved for federal management and oversight and 1.5% for
Tribes. EPA awarded grants to states and Puerto Rico for their state revolving fund programs,
from which  assistance is provided to finance eligible high priority water infrastructure projects.

The states play a critical role by selecting projects, dispersing funds, and overseeing  spending.
Projects  were selected based on  public health and environmental factors, and readiness  to
proceed with construction  capability. In addition,  states were also required to provide at least
20% of their grants for  green projects (i.e.,  green infrastructure, energy or water efficiency
improvements, and environmentally  innovative activities). States had the option to retain up to
4% of available  funds for program administration.  Visit www.epa.gov/water/eparecovery  to
learn more about the CWSRF.

                        Program Results as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Amount ($) of projects that are
under contract (non-tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
started construction (non-tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
completed construction (non-tribal)
States that have awarded all of
their green project reserve
Amount ($) of projects that have
started construction (tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
completed construction (tribal)
Q4
FY09
$.61 B
$.73 B
$.003 B
12
$9.23 M
$0.54 M
Q4
FY10
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$.20 B
51
$35.2 M
$3.0 M
Q4
FY11
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$.78 B
51
$57 M
$12.7 M
Q4
FY12
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$1.6 B
51
$59 M
$26 M
Qi
FY13
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$1.8 B
51
$59 M
$32 M
Q2
FY13
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$2.2 B
51
$60 M
$36 M
Target
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
$3.8 B
51
$60 M
$60 M

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                         Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
The  Safe  Drinking Water Act, as amended in 1996, established the Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund (DWSRF) to make funds  available  to  drinking water  systems  to  finance
infrastructure improvements. Under the Recovery Act, EPA received $2 billion for the DWSRF
with up to 1% of fund reserved for federal management and oversight and 1.5% for Tribes.

The program emphasizes the provision of funds to small and disadvantaged communities and to
programs that encourage pollution  prevention as a tool for ensuring safe drinking water. The
DWSRF  provides  funds  to  states  to  establish  state  loan revolving funds  that  finance
infrastructure improvements for public and private Community Water Systems and not-for-profit
Non-Community Water Systems and direct grants to Washington, DC and the territories.

The DWSRF consists of 51 state financing programs (includes Puerto Rico) which comply with
federal statute and regulations. States must provide at least 20% of their grants for green projects
(i.e., green  infrastructure, energy  or water efficiency improvements,  and  environmentally
innovative activities) and may retain up to 4% of available funds for program administration. To
learn  more   about   the  DWSRF   implementation   of  the   Recovery   Act,   visit
www. epa. gov/water/eparecovery.

                       Program Results as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Amount ($) of projects that are
under contract (non-tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
started construction (non-tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
completed construction (non-tribal)
States that have awarded all of
their green project reserve
Amount ($) of projects that have
started construction (tribal)
Amount ($) of projects that have
completed construction (tribal)
Q4
FY09
$.16B
$.20 B
$.01 B
8
$2M
$.54 M
Q4
FY10
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.1B
51
$23 M
$4M
Q4
FY11
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.5B
51
$29 M
$12 M
Q4
FY12
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.8B
51
$30 M
$22 M
Qi
FY13
$1.8B
$1.8B
$.9B
51
$30 M
$22 M
Q2
FY13
$1.8B
$1.8B
$1.2B
51
$30 M
$26 M
Target
$1.8 B
$1.8 B
$1.8 B
51
$30 M
$30 M

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                                Diesel Emission Reductions
Diesel engines emit large amounts of air pollutants which contribute to  serious public health
problems including asthma, lung cancer and various other cardiac and respiratory diseases. With
funds dispersed through four programs,  regional, state and local governments, tribal agencies,
and non-profit organizations received approximately $300 million in grants and loans to support
the implementation of verified and certified diesel emission reduction technologies. The program
aims to accelerate emission reductions from older diesel engines to provide more immediate air
quality  benefits and improve public  health while using Recovery Act funds  to maximize job
preservation and creation in order to promote economic recovery.

The Diesel Emission Reductions Act (DERA) awards grants, via the Recovery Act, through the
National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program, the State Clean Diesel Grant Program, the
Clean Diesel  Emerging Technologies Funding  Assistance Program, and the SmartWay Clean
Diesel  Finance Program. Of the  $300 million,  $6 million  has  been  reserved for federal
management and  oversight.  To learn more about the Diesel Emissions  Reductions  Program
implementation of the Recovery Act, visit www.epa.gov/otaq/eparecovery/index.htm.
Diesel Emissions Reductions Act (DERA)
Clean Diesel Funding Programs2
National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program
State Clean Diesel Grant Program3
Clean Diesel Emerging Technologies Funding Assistance Program
SmartWay Clean Diesel Finance Program
Total
Number of
ARRA Grants
90
51
14
5
160
Total Funds
($ Millions)
$156
$88
$20
$30
$294
                           Program Results as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Projects implemented that promote diesel
emissions reductions
Existing heavy duty diesel engines (including
school bus engines) that have been retrofitted,
replaced, or retired
Lifetime reductions of NOX emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of PM emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of HC emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of CO emissions (tons)
Lifetime reductions of CO2 emissions (tons)
Q4
FY09
160
415
1,402
53
109
553
11,083
Q4
FY10
160
12,934
42,149
1,588
4,800
5,675
351,332
Q4
FY11
160
24,700
81,100
3,100
9,300
11,000
672,400
Q4
FY12
160
27,700
91,000
3,550
10,600
12,300
753,000
Qi
FY13
160
28,750
94,400
3,650
10,800
12,800
782,000
Q2
FY13
160
29,000
95,300
3,670
10,900
12,950
790,300
Target
160
30,000
100,000
4,000
12,000
13,000
850,000
 As indicated in the program plans, projects should be completed for the National, State, and Emerging Technology Funding
Assistance programs by the end of December 2010. SmartWay projects have until the end of December 2012 to complete.
 The State Clean Diesel Grant Program allocates grants to all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

                                             7

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                                      Brownfields
A brownfield is a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated
by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. Under
the Recovery Act, EPA received $100 million for the Brownfields Program.

The  funds  provide  awards for  brownfields  assessment,  cleanup,  new  and  supplemental
Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) and job training cooperative agreements through a competitive
process. Communities receive  technical  assistance and targeted brownfields assessments via
regional contracts and Interagency Agreements (IA). Activities to be performed under these
cooperative agreements include, but are not limited to:

  assessments to identify the contaminants at properties and initiate cleanup planning;
  direct cleanup of brownfield properties;
  community involvement activities for property selection, cleanup and reuse planning; and
  training  of  participants in  the  handling and removal of hazardous substances, including
   training  for environmental  jobs  (including,  environmental  sampling,  analysis,  and
   remediation techniques).

EPA awarded $87.3 million to  communities for assessments and cleanups of contaminated land
through cooperative agreements. An additional  $9.2 million was distributed by EPA regional
offices for targeted brownfields assessments in communities with  the remaining  $3.5 million
used for federal management  and oversight.  To learn  more about the Brownfields Program
implementation of the Recovery Act, visit www.epa.gov/brownfields/eparecovery/.

                         Program Results as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Brownfield assessments initiated
Brownfield assessments completed
Brownfields properties assessed
Brownfield cleanups initiated
Brownfield cleanups completed
Acres of Brownfields made ready for
reuse
Millions of dollars of cleanup and
redevelopment funds leveraged
Jobs leveraged from Brownfield's
activities
Percentage of participants trained
obtaining employment
Revolving Loan Fund loans/sub grants
Q4
FY09
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Q4
FY10
499
398
322
19
13
30
$42 M
161
54%
12
Q4
FY11
1,004
881
637
61
36
548
$183 M
1,186
58%
41
Q4
FY12
1,289
1,148
802
116
61
929
$308 M
1,789
70%
92
Qi
FY13
1,454
1,332
902
136
74
1,534
$368 M
2,521
71%
108
Q2
FY13
1,499
1,375
926
138
79
1,605
$486 M
2,768
72%
110
Target
500
500
500
30
30
500
$450 M
500
65%
45

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                         Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Across the country, approximately 80,000 releases from underground storage tanks remain to be
cleaned up. Under the Recovery Act, EPA received $200 million from the Leaking Underground
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund for assessing and cleaning up releases of contamination from
federally-regulated underground storage tanks (USTs). The LUST program helps create jobs and
protect the environment and human health through:

   emergency response and initial site hazard mitigation;
   site investigations and assessments;
   petroleum contamination release cleanups;
   soil and groundwater monitoring;
   enforcement actions and recovery of costs from liable tank owners and operators; and
   public or community involvement activities.

EPA uses the money to assess and clean up contaminated LUST sites, which creates and retains
jobs and  provides many  economic and  environmental benefits. EPA provided $190.7 million to
state and territorial UST programs through  cooperative agreements, all of which were awarded
by December 31, 2009. As of March 31, 2013,  54 of the 54  states and territories that received
LUST Recovery Act money completed their work. EPA's regional UST programs manage $6.3
million to clean up tank releases in Indian country. The remaining $3 million is used for federal
management and oversight. To learn more about EPA's Office of Underground Storage Tanks'
implementation of the Recovery Act, visit www.epa.gov/oust/eparecovery/index.htm.

                         Program Results as of March 31, 2013

In addition to the results below, Recovery Act funds have contributed to other assessment and
cleanup activities at a total of 4,030 sites, which did not begin as Recovery Act projects.

All ARRA-funded underground storage tank projects have finalized and no updates will be made
to this section of the report as of March  31, 2013.
Performance Measures
Site assessments initiated
Site assessments completed
Site cleanups initiated
Site cleanups completed
Q4
FY09
180
34
57
9
Q4
FY10
780
642
709
592
Q4
FY11
1,319
1,660
1,659
1,617
Q4
FY12
1,651
2,410
2,260
2,449
Qi
FY13
1,652
2,416
2,263
2,451
Q2
FY13
1,651
2,420
2,265
2,448
Target
2,000
2,000
1,000
1,000

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                                       Superfund
The  overall objectives for using the $600  million provided to Superfund are to  initiate and
accelerate cleanup at National Priority List (NPL) sites, maximize job creation and retention, and
provide environmental and economic benefits. Of the funds provided to EPA, $18  million was
allocated for federal management and oversight.  These objectives are being achieved by starting
new  cleanup projects,  accelerating cleanups at projects already underway, increasing the number
of workers and activities at cleanup projects,  and  returning affected sites to more productive use.

The  Recovery Act funds provide immediate short and longer-term health,  environmental, and
economic benefits at both new and ongoing Superfund remedial projects through the following:

  treatment or removal of organic compound contamination;
  treatment or removal of heavy metal contamination;
  beginning or accelerating work to treat drinking water to meet standards;
  provision of alternate residential drinking water supplies; and
  mitigation of damage to wildlife habitat and ecosystems and beginning of restoration

The job sectors benefiting from the Superfund Recovery Act funds include, but are not limited
to: cleanup  operation and management,  laboratory sampling  and analysis,  hazardous waste
disposal  and management,  construction  and monitoring equipment  rental,  water and  soil
treatment, and environmental engineering  and management. To learn more  about Superfund
implementation of ARRA, visit www.epa.gov/superfund/eparecovery/index.html.

                        Program Results  as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Projects in receipt of Recovery Act funding
Sites in receipt of Recovery Act funding
Sites achieving construction completion
Sites achieving human exposures under control
Sites with new construction
Projects with new construction
Projects achieving completion
Q4
FY09
60
50
1
2
25
25
0
Q4
FY10
61
51
4
4
26
26
1
Q4
FY11
61
51
9
5
26
26
19
Q4
FY12
61
51
10
10
26
26
33
Qi
FY13
61
51
10
8
26
26
34
Q2
FY13
61
51
11
8
26
26
35
Target
60
50
5
5
25
25
16
                                           10

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                                   Inspector General
The Recovery Act provides the EPA Office of Inspector General (OIG) with $20 million for
oversight and review.  The OIG will  assess  whether EPA uses the Recovery Act funds in
accordance with its requirements and meets the accountability objectives as defined by OMB.
The OIG will utilize the funds to determine whether:
       funds are awarded and distributed in a prompt, fair, and reasonable manner;
       recipients and uses of funds are transparent to the public, and the public benefits of these
       funds are reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner;
       funds are used for authorized purposes and fraud, waste, error, and abuse are mitigated;
       projects funded under the Recovery Act avoid unnecessary delays and cost overruns;
       program goals are achieved, including specific program outcomes and improved results
       on broader economic indicators.

                          Program Results as of March 31, 2013
Performance Measures
Convictions, indictments, civil and
administrative actions, and allegations
disproved from OIG investigations
Awareness briefings, outreach briefings, and
training sessions held
Recovery Act complaints received
Whistleblower reprisal allegations
Return on the annual dollar investment as a
percentage of the OIG budget from audits
and investigations
Q4
FY09
2
63
13
0
0
Q4
FY10
26
128
52
0
0
Q4
FY11
41
163
71
0
52%
Q4
FY12
70
175
91
0
152%
Qi
FY13
89
175
92
0
167%
Q2
FY13
94
175
95
0
192%
Target
44
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
                                           11

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