United States
  Environmental Protection
  Agency
Fish   and  Shellfish  Program
                                                                                 NEWSLETTER
June 2016
EPA-823-N-16-001


In This Issue

Recent Advisory News	1

EPANews	2

Other News	3

Recently Awarded Research	4

Recent Publications	5

Upcoming Meetings
and Conferences....     ,...6
This newsletter provides information
only. This newsletter does not
impose legally binding requirements
on the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), states, tribes, other
regulatory authorities, orthe
regulated community. The Office of
Science and Technology, Office of
Water, U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency has approved this newsletter
for publication. Mention of trade
names, products, or services does
not convey and should not be
interpreted as conveying official EPA
approval, endorsement, or
recommendation for use.

https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech
                        This is the first newsletter in a monthly series that will highlight current information
                        about fish and shellfish. The newsletter provides a snapshot of recent advisories, federal
                        agency activities, publications, awarded research, and future meetings and conferences.
                        Recent Advisory  News
                             ,f
            Texas Advisories

            Texas Fish and Shellfish Consumption Advisory ADV-53
            This advisory is issued as a result of sampling of Lake Livingston and the
Trinity River from U.S. Highway 287 downstream to U.S. Highway 90. Fish samples
collected from Lake Livingston and the Trinity River indicate the presence of dioxins and
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at concentrations exceeding health assessment
guidelines established by the Texas Department of State Health Services. Consumption of
fish from Lake Livingston and the Trinity River from U.S. Highway 287 downstream to
U.S. Highway 90 may pose a threat to human health. This advisory shall remain in effect
until rescinded or modified in writing.

Counties: Anderson, Freestone, Houston, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Polk, San Jacinto,
Trinity, and Walker
Area: The Trinity River and all contiguous waters from the U.S. Highway 287 Bridge
downstream to the U.S. Highway 90 Bridge including Lake Livingston
Contaminants of
Concern
Dioxins and PCBs
Species
Blue catfish
Flathead catfish
Freshwater drum
Gar (all species)
Smallmouth buffalo
Striped bass
White bass
Women of ChildbearingAge
and Children <12
DO NOT EAT
DO NOT EAT
DO NOT EAT
DO NOT EAT
DO NOT EAT
1 meal/month
1 meal/month
Women PastChildbearing
Age and Adult Men
1 meal/month
1 meal/month
2 meals/month
DO NOT EAT
1 meal/month
3 meals/month
3 meals/month
                        For more information: https://dshs.texas.gov/seafood/advisories-bans.aspx

                        Texas Fish and Shellfish Consumption Advisory ADV-54
                        This advisory is issued as a result of sampling of the Arroyo Colorado, Cameron and
                        Hidalgo Counties and revises ADV-34 issued January 31, 2008 for the Arroyo Colorado
                        upstream of the Port of Harlingen. Pesticide concentrations in fish from the Arroyo
                This newsletter provides a monthly summary of news about fish and shellfish

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  Fish and Shellfish Program  NEWSLETTER                  June 2016
Colorado upstream of the Port of Harlingen have decreased to acceptable levels. Longnose gar collected from the
Arroyo Colorado indicates the presence of mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at concentrations
exceeding health assessment guidelines established by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS).
Smallmouth buffalo collected from the Arroyo Colorado indicate the presence of PCBs at concentrations exceeding
health assessment guidelines established by the DSHS. Consumption of longnose gar and smallmouth buffalo from
the Arroyo Colorado may pose a threat to human health. This advisory shall remain in effect until rescinded or
modified in writing.
Counties: Cameron and Hidalgo
Area: Arroyo Colorado, Llano Grande Lake, and the Main Floodway upstream of the Port of Harlingen
Contaminants of Concern
Mercury and PCBs
Species
Longnose gar
Smallmouth buffalo
Women of Childbearing Age and
Children <12
DO NOT EAT
DO NOT EAT
Women Past Childbearing Age and
Adult Men
DO NOT EAT
2 meals/month1
 1A meal is eight ounces of fish
For more information: https://dshs.texas.gov/seafood/advisories-bans.aspx

Texas Fish and Shellfish Consumption Advisory ADV-55
This advisory is issued as a result of sampling of the Houston Ship Channel located in Harris County and revises
ADV-49 issued June 2.6, 2013 for the Houston Ship Channel and the San Jacinto River below the Lake Houston
Dam. Pesticide concentrations in fish from the Houston Ship Channel have decreased to acceptable levels, however,
blue crab and fish samples collected from the Houston Ship Channel continue to indicate the presence of
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs;
dioxins) at concentrations exceeding health assessment guidelines established by the Texas Department of State
Health Services (DSHS). Consumption of blue crab and fish from the Houston Ship Channel and the San Jacinto
River below the Lake Houston Dam may pose a threat to human health. This advisory shall remain in effect until
rescinded or modified in writing.
County: Harris
Area: The Houston Ship Channel and all contiguous waters north of the Fred Hartman Bridge, State Highway 146
including the San Jacinto River below the Lake Houston Dam
Contaminants of Concern
Dioxins and PCBs
Species
All species of fish and blue crab
Women of Childbearing Age and
Children <12
DO NOT EAT
Women Past ChildbearingAge and
Adult Men
1 meal/month1
 1A meal is eight ounces of fish
For more information: https://dshs.texas.gov/seafood/advisories-bans.aspx
EPA News
In February 2016, EPA released the report: Assessment of Mercury in Fish Tissue from Pacific Northwest Lakes.
The report summarizes the results of a mercury assessment of fish in the Pacific Northwest. During the 2012 to

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  Fish  and Shellfish  Program  NEWSLETTER                  June 2016
2014 study, sportfish were collected from 50 fishable lakes in Idaho, Oregon,
and Washington. All of the fish samples had quantifiable levels of mercury that
exceeded the Minimum Reporting Level of 0.0125 mg kg wet weight based on
standard mass of 80 mg wet tissue. EPA's tissue-based water quality criterion
(300 |ig kg-i) was exceeded in 11% of the fishable lakes. A comparison of the
results to other regional fish tissue mercury studies found that generally,
Pacific Northwest lakes have lower fish tissue mercury concentrations. The
EPA report is available at: https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech/assessment-
mercury-fish-tissue-pacific-northwest-lakes.

Other News

NOAA  Fisheries Releases its  Marine

Aquaculture Strategic Plan

NOAA's Plan will guide efforts within NOAA Fisheries to support development
of sustainable marine aquaculture from 2016-2020. The Plan features four
main goals: regulatory efficiency, science tools for sustainable management,
technology development and transfer, and an informed public. Cross-cutting
strategies of the plan include strengthening partnerships, improving external
communications, building infrastructure to support marine aquaculture, and
sound program management. The Plan also establishes a target of expanding
sustainable U.S. marine aquaculture production by at least 50 percent by the
year 2020. The U.S. imports over 90% of its seafood, about half of which is
farmed. While aquaculture globally has grown dramatically over the past 30
years, in the U.S. production has remained low. "As demand for seafood
continues to rise, aquaculture presents  a tremendous opportunity not only to
meet this demand, but also to increase opportunities for the  seafood industry
and job creation," said Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., NOAA administrator.
"Expanding U.S. aquaculture in federal waters complements wild harvest fisheries and supports our efforts to
maintain sustainable fisheries and resilient oceans." Source:
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/aquaculture/homepage stories/26 aquaculture  strategic plan2Oi6.html.
Download the plan:
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/aquaculture/docs/aquaculture docs/noaa fisheries marine  aquaculture strategic
 plan fv  2Oi6-2O2O.pdf.
Marine Aquaculture
Strategic Plan
FY 2016-2020

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  Fish and Shellfish Program  NEWSLETTER                 June 2016
Assessing Emerging Algal Toxin Threat in Washington State Waters

In early June 2016, NOAA and Washington State partners began a four-month long effort to monitor shellfish and
water every week at six locations around Puget Sound and on the Pacific coast. The team plans to measure
concentrations of marine algae and their associated lipophilic (fat soluble) toxins, which can accumulate in shellfish
and cause human illnesses when consumed. Lipophilic shellfish toxins comprise an extensive suite of compounds,
including those associated with the human illnesses known as diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) and azasparacid
shellfish poisoning (AZP). Though research has documented several algal species associated with DSP in
Washington waters, distribution and toxicity data is limited. While little is known about the distribution of algal
species that produce AZP toxins in the U.S., they have been found in Puget Sound water and shellfish.

The research team will map the distribution of toxic algae that produce DSP and AZP toxins and establish and
validate a tiered HAB early warning system using capabilities of the SoundToxins and ORHAB programs.
Ultimately, the research will establish globally accepted protocols for quantifying a suite of lipophilic toxins to
enhance state agency biotoxin monitoring programs. The team is led by the NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science
Center and includes the Washington Department of Health, University of Washington, Washington Sea Grant,
NCCOS, Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Molecular Resources,  LLC, and the
Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany. This is an NCCOS Monitoring and Event Response for Harmful  Algal Bloom
(MERHAB) supported project. For more information, contact Marc.Suddleson(5)noaa.gov.

Source: https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/news/habs/assessing-emerging-algal-toxin-threat-washington-state-
Recently Awarded Research

2016-2017 Monkfish  Research Set-Aside Awards Announced
NOAA Fisheries, in coordination with the New England
and Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Councils,
announced the selection of two cooperative research
proposals submitted to the 2016/2017 Monkfish
Research Set Aside (RSA) Program. Researchers will
work on two projects involving dozens of commercial
                                                     Monkfish (lophius americanus}
fishing vessels, supported by awards valued at
approximately $3.77 million. Both grant recipients
propose to build on previous research in an effort to identify monkfish stock structure through genetic studies and
to estimate growth and movement of juvenile monkfish.

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) will tag juvenile
monkfish to improve monkfish growth estimates, a critical parameter for the model used in the monkfish stock
assessment. A previous monkfish research set-aside grant to this group found that the current approach of

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  Fish and Shellfish Program   NEWSLETTER                     June 2016
estimating monkfish growth is not valid, exposing a gap in the monkfish stock assessment. This two-year project
proposes to fill this gap for juvenile monkfish through this tagging study.


Researchers at Cornell University Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, in cooperation with New York
University School of Medicine, will conduct a two-year study of the fine-scale genetic population structure of
monkfish. The new study will use microsatellite DNA analysis to determine if monkfish constitute a single or
multiple stocks over their coast-wide distribution from Newfoundland to North Carolina, define their spatial
boundaries, and determine if there is migrational mixing between management areas.


Source: http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/coopresearch/news/monkfish-rsa-2Oi6-i7.html.


Recent  Publications



    Journal Articles

    The list below provides a selection of research articles focusing on PCBs.

                                            Fish and Shellfish Health
    > Exposure to sublethal levels of PCB-126 impacts fuel metabolism and swimming performance in rainbow trout
       Bellehumeur, K., D. Lapointe, S.J. Cooke, and T.W. Moon. 2016. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B: Biochemistry
       and Molecular Biology (in press).

    > Variability of PCB burden in 5 fish and sharks species of the French Mediterranean continental slope
       Cresson,  P., M.C. Fabri, P.M. Miralles, J.L Dufour, R. Elleboode, K. Sevin, K. Mahe, and M. Bouchoucha. 2016. Environmental
       Pollution  212:374-381.

    > Re-visiting projections of PCBs in Lower Hudson River fish using model emulation
       Field, L.J., J.W. Kern, and L.B. Rosman. 2016. Science of the Total Environment 557-558:489-501.

    > Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves
       Laitano, M.V., M.F. Silva Barni, P.G. Costa, M. Cledon, G. Fillmann, K.S.B. Miglioranza, and H.O. Panarello. 2016. Marine
       Environmental Research 113:62-69.

    > PCB and OCP accumulation and evidence of hepatic alteration in the Atlantic bluefin tuna, T. thvnnus. from the Mediterranean Sea
       Maisanoa, M., T. Cappello, S. Oliva, A. Natalotto, A. Giannetto, V. Parrino, P. Battaglia, T. Romeo, A. Salvo, N. Spano, and A.
       Mauceri.  2016. Marine Environment Research (in press).

    > Analysis of all 209 polvchlorinated biphenvl (PCB) congeners (with special reference to dioxin-like PCB congeners) in Japanese seabass and
       related species by high-resolution gas chromatographv/high-resolution mass spectrometrv (HRGC/HRMS)
       Matsumoto, R., N.P.C. Tu, S. Haruta,  M. Kawano, and I. Takeuchi. 2016. Regional Studies in Marine Science 3:119-130.

    > Identification of Baltic Sea salmon based on PCB and dioxin profiles
       S0rensen, S., K.H. Lund, T.L Cederberg, and N.Z. Ballin. 2016. Food Control 61:165-171.

    > Persistent organic pollutants in tissues of the white-blooded Antarctic fish ChampsocephalusgunnarianA Chaenocephalusaceratus
       Strobel, L, P. Schmid, H. Segner, P. Burkhardt-Holm, and M. Zennegg. 2016. C/iemosp/iere(in press).

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  Fish and Shellfish  Program   NEWSLETTER                      June 2016
                                             Human Dietary Exposure

       Dietary exposure to polvchlorinated biphenvlsand risk of mvocardial infarction in men -A population-based prospective cohort study
       Bergkvist, C., M. Berglund, A. Glynn, B. Julin, A. Wolk, and A. Akesson. 2016. Environment International 88:9-14.

       PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs in fanned fish produced in Greece: Levels and human population exposure assessment
       Costopoulou, D., I. Vassiliadou, and L Leondiadis. 2016. Chemosphere 146:511-518.

       Polvchlorinated biphenvls and omega-3 fatty acid exposure from fish consumption, and thyroid cancer among New York anglers
       Haslam, A..S.W. Robb, M.R. Bonner, W. Lindblad, J. Allegra, Y. Shen, and J.E. Vena. 2016. Journal of Environmental Sciences
       41:270-277.

       Benefits and risks associated with consumption of Great Lakes fish containing omega-3 fatty acids and polvchlorinated biphenvls (PCBs)
       Paliwoda, R.E., A.M. Newbigging, Z. Wang, and X.C. Le. 2016. Journal of Environmental Sciences 41:1-5.

       Estimated dietary intake and risk assessment of polvchlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polvchlorinated biphenvls
       from fish consumption in the Korean general population
       Shin, E.S., J. Kim, S.-D. Choi, Y.-W. Kang, and Y.-S. Chang. 2016. Chemosphere 146:419-425.

                                                       Other

       Evaluation of the global impacts of mitigation on persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic pollutants in marine fish
       Bonito, L.T., A. Hamdoun, and S.A. Sandin.  2016. PeerJ4:el573.

       Environmental PCBs in Guanica Bay, Puerto Rico: Implications for community health
       Kumar, N., D. Ramirez-Ortiz, H.M. Solo-Gabriele, J.B. Treaster, 0. Carrasquillo, M. Toborek, S. Deo, J. Klaus, L.G. Bachas, D. Whitall,
       S. Daunert, and J. Szapocznik. 2016.  Environmental Science and Pollution Research 23(3):2003-2013.

       Improvements in fish polvchlorinated biphenvl and other contaminant levels in response to remedial actions at Hamilton Harbour. Ontario.
       Canada
       Neff, M.R., S. Stefanoff, and S.P. Bhavsar. 2016. Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management 19(2):161-170.
Upcoming  Meetings  and Conferences
146th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society       18th International Conference on Shellfish Restoration
August 21-25, 2016                                         November 16-19, 2016
Kansas City, Missouri                                         Charleston, South Carolina
Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association 70th Annual       67th Annual Northwest Fish Culture Concepts: A
Shellfish Conference and Tradeshow                           Workshop for Fish Culturists
October 11-14, 2016                                        December 6-8, 2016
Chelan, Washington                                          Centralia, Washington
                                           Additional Information
                   For more information about specific advisories within the state, territory, or tribe, contact the appropriate
        state agency listed on EPA's National Listing of Fish Advisories (NLFA) website athttps://fishadvisorvonline.epa.gov/Contacts.aspx.

                   For more information about this newsletter, contact Sharon Frey (Frev.Sharon@epa.gov, 202-566-1480).

                         Additional information about advisories and fish and shellfish consumption can be found
                                             at https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech.

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