&EPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency

Fish and Shellfish Program
NEWSLETTER
September 2016
EPA 823-N-16-004
In This Issue
Recent Advisory News			1
EPA News	4
Other News	5
Recent Publications	7
Upcoming Meetings
and Conferences	8
This newsletter provides information
only. This newsletter does not
impose legally binding requirements
on the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), states, tribes, other
regulatoiy authorities, orthe
regulated community. The Office of
Science and Technology, Office of
Water, U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency has approved this newsletter
for publication. Mention of trade
names, products, or sen/ices does
not convey and should not be
interpreted as conveying official EPA
approval, endorsement, or
recommendation for use.
https://www.ena.gov/fish-tech
This edition of the Fish and Shellfish Program Newsletter generally focuses on
microplastics.
Recent Advisory News
Michigan's Subsistence Fish
Consumption Education
Program
*
One priority of the Michigan Department of Health and
Human Services' (MDHHS) Division of Environmental Health
is to educate subsistence-level anglers in both urban and rural
Michigan about ways to choose fish that are lower in
contaminants and safer to eat from the waterbodies that they
are fishing.
FREE LOCAL FISHING MAP
& MDHHS Eat Safe Fish Guidelines
eat
safe
fish
.. — Mino
WiifirTidda!
www.michigan.gov/eatsafefish
Rather than relying on people seeking out the information MDHHS brings the
information to the shoreline anglers through the River Walker program by posting
informative signs that use plain language and attractive design at popular fishing access
points, distributing materials (developed with the goal of educating individuals with low
literacy rates) to locations frequented by anglers, and by bringing the outreach materials
directly to the individuals who are fishing.
The River Walker program uses two community members—ideally experienced anglers
themselves—who visit pre-determined shoreline fishing locations throughout the spring
and summer. They explain, one-on-one, the fish consumption guidelines and the reasons
for the guidelines, and provide the anglers with outreach materials.
MDHHS also works with communities in more rural parts of Michigan, including the
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Collaborating
with stakeholders from KBIC Tribal Health and KBIC Natural Resources, MDHHS
developed area-specific brochures for the Torch Lake Area of Concern, incorporating the
language of the Anishinaabe, Ojibwe, and cultural and historical information on the
Tribal Fishing legacy. These brochures are distributed by trusted community entities
including the Tribal Health Clinic, the KBIC Natural Resources Department, and at
special events like the annual summer KBIC Kids' Fishing Derby held in Baraga,
Michigan. For more information, visit: www.mic.higan.gov/eatsafefish.
This newsletter provides a monthly summary of news about fish and shellfish
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
Puget Sound, Washington, Dungeness Crab and Spot Prawn
Consumption Advisory
In July 2016, the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) issued the Puget Sound Dungeness Crab and
Spot Prawn Consumption Advisory. In 2011 and 2012, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) conducted an assessment of toxic chemical contaminants in Puget Sound Dungeness crab and spot prawn.
Sampling was conducted in nine WDFW Marine Areas and three urban embayments. The contaminants
investigated were persistent organic pollutants which included polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl
ethers, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and organochlorine pesticides as well as six metals (mercury, arsenic,
cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc). WDFW evaluated how much of these contaminants were in Dungeness crab
muscle (meat), hepatopancreas (crab butter), spot prawn muscle (tail), and head tissue. Washington State DOH
used this information to determine if they were safe to eat. Results of the analysis are available at
http://\v\v\v.doh.\va.go\/Portals/i/Documents/Pubs/°,0,4-°,78.pdf. The table below displays the Dungeness crab
and spot prawn consumption guidance for each Puget Sound Recreational Marine Area and three urbanized
embayments.
Marine Area/Location
Dungeness Crab
Avoid Dungeness crab butter
Spot Prawn
Avoid spot prawn heads
Crab Meat
Consumption
Guidance
Crab Butter
Consumption Guidance
Spot Prawn Meat
Consumption
Guidance
Spot Prawn Heads
Consumption Guidance
6 East Juan de Fuca Strait
Unrestricted*
4 servings per month
Unrestricted*
8 servings with heads
per month
Exception: Port Angeles Harbor
4 servings per month
Do not eat crab butter
N/A
N/A
7 San Juan Islands
Unrestricted
4 servings per month
Unrestricted
Unrestricted
8.1 Deception Pass, Hope Island &
Skagit
Unrestricted
4 servings per month
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
8.2 Port Susan/Port Gardner
Unrestricted
1 serving per month
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
9 Admiralty Inlet
Unrestricted
2 servings per month
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
10 Seattle-Bremerton
8 servings per month
Do not eat crab butter
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
Exception: Elliott Bay
2 servings per month
Do not eat crab butter
8 servings per month
Do not eat heads
Exception: Sinclair Inlet
2 servings per month
Do not eat crab butter
8 servings per month
Do not eat heads
11 Tacoma-Vashon
Unrestricted
2 servings per month
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
Exception: Commencement Bay
4 servings per month
2 servings per month
4 servings per month
Do not eat heads
12 Hood Canal
Unrestricted
2 servings per month
Unrestricted
8 servings with heads
per month
13 South Puget Sound (South of the
Tacoma Narrows)
Unrestricted
1 serving per month
Unrestricted
Do not eat heads
Consumption is unlimited.
N/A: not applicable
Note: A serving is 8 ounces uncooked seafood for a 160 pound adult. If you weigh more or less than 160 pounds, add or subtract one ounce for every
20-pound difference in body weight.
If you eat the recommended amount from an area that has restrictions, no other seafood should be eaten that week or month.
Source: http://\v\v\v.doh.\va.go\/Portals/i/Documents/Pubs/°,0,4-400.pdf.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
to New Jersey Guide to Health Advisories for Eating Fish and Crab
J New Jersey updated its fish consumption advisories in 2016 using the results of a study involving the analysis
' of 149 samples of 12 fish species collected from 11 lakes, rivers, ponds, and reservoirs that flow into the upper
and lower portions of the Raritan River. The table below only includes new, revised, or updated 2016 fish
advisories. For a full list of the fish consumption guidelines, access the link provided below.
Type of
Waterbody
County/ Location
Waterbody
Species
General Population- Eat
No More Than: i2> i3>
High Risk Population-I1)
Eat No More Than: <2> i3>
New, Revised,
or Updated
Advisory i4>
Estuarine
and Marine
Includes the
Raritan Bay, tidal
Raritan River (up
to the Rt. 1
bridge), and all
tidal tributaries)
Raritan Bay Complex
Striped Bass
One meal per month
Do not eat
Updated
Redbreast Sunfish
One meal per week
One meal per month
New
Channel Catfish
One meal per month
Do not eat
New
Freshwater
Statewide
Applies to all except
Pinelands Region
and waterbody
specific advisories
Common Carp
One meal per month
Do not eat
New
Mercer County
Carnegie Lake at
Princeton
Largemouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per month
Updated
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Revised
Common Carp
One meal per month
One meal per month
New
Middlesex County
Davidsons Mill Pond
at Deans
Largemouth Bass
One meal per week
One meal per month
Updated
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Yellow Bullhead
No restrictions
One meal per week
New
Farrington Lake at
Milltown
Largemouth Bass
Four meals per year
Do not eat
Revised
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Common Carp
One meal per month
One meal per month
New
Manalapan Lake at
Jamesburg
Largemouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per week
Revised
Yellow Perch
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Brown Bullhead
One meal per week
One meal per week
New
Weston Mill Pond at
New Brunswick
Largemouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per month
Revised
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Brown Bullhead
One meal per week
One meal per month
Updated
Somerset County
Millstone River at
Manville
Largemouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per month
Revised
Chain Pickerel
No restrictions
One meal per week
New
Channel Catfish
One meal per week
One meal per month
New
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Common Carp
One meal per month
One meal per month
Revised
Raritan River-
Confluence of the
Millstone River at
Millstone
Smallmouth Bass
One meal per week
One meal per month
Revised
Redbreast Sunfish
One meal per month
One meal per month
Revised
Channel Catfish
One meal per month
Do not eat
Updated
Mercer County
Peddie Lake at
Hightstown
Largemouth Bass
One meal per week
One meal per month
Updated
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
Brown Bullhead
One meal per week
One meal per week
New
Rosedale Lake at
Pennington
Largemouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per week
Revised
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
No restrictions
Updated
Common Carp
One meal per week
One meal per month
Updated
Hunterdon County
Round Valley
Reservoir at
Lebanon
Smallmouth Bass
No restrictions
One meal per week
New
Bluegill Sunfish
No restrictions
One meal per week
Updated
American Eel
One meal per month
One meal per month
New
w High risk individuals include infants, children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and women of childbearing age.
<2>0ne meal is defined as an eight-ounce serving.
<3> Eat only the fillet portions of the fish. Use proper trimming techniques to remove fat, and cooking methods that allow juices to drain from the fish
(e.g., baking, broiling, frying, grilling, and steaming). See text for full description.
O) New indicates new advisory; revised indicates an advisory changed; updated indicates new data-no change in advisory.
Source: http://www.ni.gov/dep/dsr/fishadvisories/2016-fish-advisories.pdf.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
EPA News
EPA Studying Microplastics Occurrence in Great Lakes Sport Fish
Microplastics (plastics < 5 mm in size in any
dimension) have been found to be ubiquitous in
freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems
around the world. Primary microplastics, such
as the microbeads used in cosmetic products,
are intended for product use, while secondary
microplastics form in the environment from the
breakdown of larger plastic items such as
grocery bags. Recent global reports of
microplastics in a variety of fish and shellfish
species have raised concerns about their
potential human health and ecological impacts.
The Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds (OWOW) and the Office of Science and Technology (OST), both
within EPA's Office of Water, are working with EPA's Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) to assess the
occurrence of microplastics in the stomachs of Great Lakes sport fish. The study is being funded and managed by
the Trash Free Waters program in OWOW.
Microplastics have been found in the Great Lakes in both water and sediment. Fish in the Lakes may ingest
microplastics either directly during feeding, or indirectly by ingesting smaller fish that have ingested microplastics.
Fish for the microplastics study were collected in 2015 as part of the joint OST/GLNPO Great Lakes Human Health
Fish Fillet Tissue Study conducted under EPA's 2015 National Coastal Condition Assessment. The fish stomachs
were not used for the OST/GLNPO human health fish tissue study but were provided for the microplastics analysis.
Analysis of the fish stomachs for microplastics will be conducted by a laboratory at the California Department of
Public Health in collaboration with colleagues in EPA Region 9. The analysis will determine the amount of plastics
in the fish stomachs down to very small particle sizes, as well as the types of plastics present. The results of this
study will improve the current understanding of microplastics distribution in the Great Lakes and their occurrence
in fish.
Sources: http://-www.lakescientist.com/microplastics-pollution-great-lakes-ecosvstem-summarv-presentations-
iaglr-2014/: http://-www.gesamp.org/work-programme/workgroups/working-group-40/wg-40-brochiire.
For more information, contact Bob Benson rBenson.Robert@epa.gov') or Leanne Stahl CStahl.Leanne@epa.gov').
Microplastics seen during a marine debris removal mission. (Image courtesy of
NOAA)
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
Other News
Vancouver Island University Study Looks at Effects of Microplastics
on Shellfish
A team of researchers collected 2,000 oysters and 1,000 clams from Baynes Sound and moved them to 22 different
beaches on Vancouver Island and the northern Sunshine Coast. Half of the tagged shellfish are at fish farms.
Research team leader Garth Covernton says tests of the shellfish for microplastic levels were done prior to being
moved. The plan is to leave them for the summer and then collect them in the fall to look at levels in microplastics,
to see if there are regional differences or differences between wild sites and fish farm sites. "I have sites up in
Quadra where there's less human development and ones in Baynes Sound, near Denman, where there's high
concentrations of human activity," said Covernton. "So it's really comparing the effects that might have on the
microplastic that shellfish are ingesting."
Covernton says the long-term effects that microplastics have on shellfish are unclear, but there is a growing case
that says the tiny pieces of plastic are harming shellfish. "For instance, for oysters, which could be a concern for the
shellfish aquaculture industry, there has been recent work showing that oyster reproductive output actually
decreases when they've been fed microplastics [sic]."
Source: http://nanaimonewsnow.com/article/c;040o,4/viu-studv-looks-effects-microplastics-shellfish.
Bellies Full of Microplastic Rob Baby Fish of Their Basic Instincts
When exposed to microplastics, baby fish stop eating natural food and prefer consuming the pollutant, according to
a report from ecologists at Uppsala University in Sweden. The dietary switch derails the basic instincts of the fish,
the researchers found, elevating the likelihood of being caught by predators. The findings may explain why
populations of European perch (Perca fluviatilis)—the main species analyzed in the study—have declined in the
Baltic Sea. "Perch are common and popular recreational fish in Sweden," said Oona Lonnstedt, an Uppsala ecologist
and the project's leader. "But they have seen continuous and rapid declines in density and abundance since the mid-
1990s in the Baltic Sea." The trend is especially true for young perch, and the cause remains unknown. Some
experts blame habitat destruction, while others cite too much salty runoff from land due to climate change. But two
years ago, Lonnstedt and her colleagues set their sights on microplastics as a leading factor.
Recent estimates suggest up to 236,000 metric tons of microplastics wash into the oceans each year. That's
equivalent to the weight of 1,300 blue whales, and it may represent just one percent of the total contained in oceans.
The Baltic Sea carries about 25 to 40 plastic particles per gallon of water—or 229 quadrillion pieces across its entire
volume. Lonnstedt's study examined how microplastics influence every stage of European perch development. The
team started with eggs collected from the Baltic Sea. They raised 60 of these embryos in three tanks carrying either
no microplastics, an average amount observed in parts of the Baltic Sea (40 particles per gallon) or an extreme level
(300 particles per gallon). Sans pollution, the eggs hatched about 96 percent of the time, but birth rates fell with
both average (89 percent) and extreme (81 percent) quantities of microplastics.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
The researchers raised European perch for 10 days in regular
water with the perch's favorite food, brine shrimp, and then
added microplastics to the tanks. "The biggest surprise in
this study was the fact that larvae preferentially ate
microplastic particles," said Lonnstedt. "They literally stuffed
themselves with the microbeads and ignored their natural
food source." Larval fish exposed to microplastics also
became lethargic, spent more time in a motionless state and
swam shorter distances across their aquarium.
One way baby perch survive their vulnerable youth is by
smelling predators. Predators exude repulsive scents that the
baby fish can sniff and avoid. When the team squirted drops of these chemical alarms into the tanks, they found fish
with microplastics were less likely to flee. The microplastics impaired the perch's olfactory reflexes. There could be
two potential reasons for this. Either the plastic particles exude toxic chemicals that interfere with nerve
development, effectively altering their behaviors and olfactory responses," Lonnstedt said. "Alternatively, the fish
are lacking so much energy, due to plastic-filled stomachs, that they simply have no energy...and consequently
ignore the chemical threat cues of predators."
In a separate experiment, the team added a perch predator—Northern pike (Esox lucius) and then monitored
survival for 24 hours. Without microplastics, 46 percent of baby perch survived the night. Average microplastic
levels cut 24-hour survival by another 20 percent. None survived against predators with high levels of microplastics.
Perch may not be suffering alone. Since completing this study, Lonnstedt and her colleagues have recorded similar
(unpublished) patterns in other species of larval fish, both tropical (coral reef damselfish) and temperate (pike and
flounder). "In this way, the plastic contaminants are transferred from the small prey fish to the larger predatory
pike and are likely to bioaccumulate in the food chain," Lonnstedt said. "If this process takes place in the marine
ecosystem, plastics can affect the health of food webs, which include humans as an apex predator."
The next step in the project will be examining the process in nature. They've found European perch in the Baltic Sea
with bellies filled with plastic, but this needs to be studied more in depth, according to Lonnstedt. The other open
question is whether all types of plastic cause these problems. This study used polystyrene, a common and
inexpensive polymer found in fishing floats, buoys, packaging and insulation, toys, kitchen appliances, lids, bottles,
and disposable cutlery.
Lonnstedt, O.M., and P. Eklov. 2016. En vironmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic particles influence
larval fish ecology. Science 352(6290):i2i3-i2i6.
Source: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/microplastics-rob-babv-fish-of-their-basic-fear-instincts/.
Tiny microplastics that can be ingested by a range of freshwater life.
(Photo by Chesapeake Bay Program, CC BY-NC 2.0\
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
Recent Publications
Journal Articles
The list below provides a selection of research articles focusing on microplastics.
Accumulation in Fish and Shellfish
~	Transfer of benzofalpvrene from microplastics to Artemianam\\\ and further to zebrafish via a trophic food web experiment: CYP1A induction
and visual tracking of persistent organic pollutants
Batel.A., F. Linti, M.Scherer, L. Erdinger, andT. Braunbeck. 2016. Transfer of benzo[a]pyrene from microplastics to Artemia
nauplii and further to zebrafish via a trophic food web experiment: CYP1A induction and visual tracking of persistent organic
pollutants. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 35(7):1656-1666.
~	Ingestion of microplastics by demersal fish from the Spanish Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts
Bellas, J., J. Martfnez-Armental, A. Martfnez-Camara, V. Besada, and C. Martinez-Gomez. 2016. Ingestion of microplastics by
demersal fish from the Spanish Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts. Marine Pollution Bulletin 109(l):55-60.
~	Plastic ingestion by fish in the Southern Hemisphere: A baseline study and review of methods
Cannon, S.M.E., J.L. Lavers, and B. Figueiredo. 2016. Plastic ingestion by fish in the Southern Hemisphere: A baseline study and
review of methods. Marine Pollution Bulletin 107(1):286-291.
~	Microplastic ingestion bvwild and cultured manila clams (Veneruois ohiliooinanirrh from Bavnes Sound. British Columbia
Davidson, K., andS.E. Dudas. 2016. Microplastic ingestion by wild and cultured manila clams (Venerupis phiiippinarum) from
Baynes Sound, British Columbia. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 71(2): 147-156.
~	Microplastics in mussels along the coastal waters of China
Li, J., X. Qu, L. Su, W. Zhang, D. Yang, P. Kolandhasamy, D. Li, and H. Shi. 2016. Microplastics in mussels along the coastal waters
of China. Environmental Pollution 214:177-184.
~	Microplastic interactions with North Atlantic mesopelagicfish
Lusher, A.L., C. O'Donnell, R. Officer, and I. O'Connor. 2016. Microplastic interactions with North Atlantic mesopelagicfish. ICES
Journal of Marine Science 73(4):1214-1225.
~	High levels of microplastic ingestion by the semipelagic fish bogue Boops boopsiL) around the Balearic Islands
Nadal, M.A., C. Alomar, and S. Deudero. 2016. High levels of microplastic ingestion by the semipelagic fish bogue Boops boops (L.)
around the Balearic Islands. Environmental Pollution 214:517-523.
~	Plastic ingestion bvestuarine mullet Muei!ceohalus(Mugilidae) in an urban harbour. KwaZulu-Natal. South Africa
Naidoo, T., A.J. Smit, and D. Glassom. 2016. Plastic ingestion by estuarine mullet Mugil cephalus (Mugilidae) in an urban harbour,
KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. African Journal of Marine Science 38(1):145-149.
~	Plastic ingestion bv pelagic and demersal fish from the North Sea and Baltic Sea
Rummel, C.D., M.G.J. Loder, N.F. Fricke, T. Lang, E.M. Griebeler, M. Janke, and G. Gerdts. 2016. Plastic ingestion by pelagic and
demersal fish from the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Marine Pollution Bulletin 102(1):134-141.
~	Microplastic contamination in natural mussel beds from a Brazilian urbanized coastal region: Rapid evaluation through bioassessment
Santana, M.F.M., L.G. Ascer, M.R. Custodio, F.T. Moreira, and A. Turra. 2016. Microplastic contamination in natural mussel beds
from a Brazilian urbanized coastal region: Rapid evaluation through bioassessment. Marine Pollution Bulletin 106(1-2):183-189.
~	Chemical pollutants sorbed to ingested microbeads from personal care products accumulate in fish
Wardrop, P., J. Shimeta, D. Nugegoda, P.D. Morrison, A. Miranda, M. Tang, and B.O. Clarke. 2016. Chemical pollutants sorbed to
ingested microbeads from personal care products accumulate in fish. Environmental Science & Technology 50(7):4037-4044.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
September 2016
Fish and Shellfish Health
~	Uptake and accumulation of polystyrene microplastics in zebrafish (Dartiorerid and toxic effects in liver
Lu, Y., Y. Zhang, Y. Deng, W. Jiang, Y. Zhao, J. Geng, L. Ding, and H. Ren. 2016. Uptake and accumulation of polystyrene
microplastics in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and toxic effects in liver. Environmental Science & Technology 50(7):4054-4060.
~	Intestinal alterations in European sea bass Dicentrarchus lab rax (Linnaeus. 1758) exposed to microplastics: Preliminary results
Peda, C., L. Caccamo, M.C. Fossi, F. Gai, F. Andaloro, L. Genovese, A. Perdichizzi, T. Romeo, and G. Maricchiolo. 2016. Intestinal
alterations in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758) exposed to microplastics: Preliminary results.
Environmental Pollution 212:251-256.
~	Ovster reproduction is affected bv exposure to polystyrene microplastics
Sussarellu, R., M. Suquet, Y. Thomas, C. Lambert, C. Fabioux, M.E.J. Pernet, N.L. Goic, V. Quillien, C. Mingant, Y. Epelboin, C.
Corporeau, J. Guyomarch, J. Robbens, I. Paul-Pont, P. Soudant, and A. Huvet. 2016. Oyster reproduction is affected by exposure to
polystyrene microplastics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 113(9):2430-2435.
~	Effect of microplastic on the gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas
Watts, A.J.R., M.A. Urbina, R. Goodhead, J. Moger, C. Lewis, and T.S. Galloway 2016. Effect of microplastic on the gills of the shore
crab Carcinus maenas. Environmental Science & Technology 50(10):5364-5369.
~	First evidence of microplastics in the African Great Lakes: Recovery from Lake Victoria Nile perch and Nile tilapia
Biginagwa, F.J., B.S. Mayoma, Y. Shashoua, K. Syberg, and F.R. Khan. 2016. First evidence of microplastics in the African Great
Lakes: Recovery from Lake Victoria Nile perch and Nile tilapia. Journal of Great Lakes Research 42(1):146-149.
~	Are we eating plastic-ingesting fish?
Miranda, D.D.A., and G.F. de Carvalho-Souza. 2016. Are we eating plastic-ingesting fish? Marine Pollution Bulletin 103(1-2):109-
Other
114.
Upcoming Meetings and Conferences
IX Brazilian Crustacean Congress
November 6-9, 2016
Crato, Brazil
18th International Conference on Shellfish
Restoration
November 16-19, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
67th Annual Northwest Fish Culture Concepts: A
Workshop for Fish Culturists
December 6-8, 2016
Centralia, Washington
109th Annual Meeting of the National Shellfisheries
Association
March 26-30, 2017
Knoxville, Tennessee
Additional Information
This monthly newsletter highlights current information about fish and shellfish.
For more information about specific advisories within the state, territory, or tribe, contact the appropriate
state agency listed on EPA's National Listing of Fish Advisories website at https://fishadvisorvonline.epa.gov/Contacts.aspx.
For more information about this newsletter, contact Sharon Frey (Frev.Sharon@epa.gov. 202-566-1480).
Additional information about advisories and fish and shellfish consumption can be found at https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech.
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