Volume III
4
APPENDIX: State Reports

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"I oc^
UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460
Of >CE OF
SOLiC .va.S'E AND 6I-1EBCENCV RESPONSE
Disclaimer
This report was prepared with the support of the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste under a
cooperative agreement with the Western Governors' Association,
cooperative agreement No. CX-816270-01-0. However, any findings,
conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the
authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of either EPA or
the Western Governors' Association.
Appendices and excerpted pages from other documents are included
in this report, and as a result, page numbers may not be
consecutive.
Printed an Recyc'-eC PapBr

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Alabama
Arkansas
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Mississippi
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Texas
Virginia

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ALABAMA

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STATE OF ALABAMA
DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
STATE PROGRAMS DIVISION
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
NON-FUEL MINERALS
April 1991

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STATE OP ALABAMA
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
DEFINITIONS
INACTIVE OR ABANDONED MINE:
POLLUTED WATER:
MINE DUMPS:
DISTURBED LAND:
HIGHWALLS:
MINE OPENINGS:
SUBSIDENCE PRONE:
HAZARDOUS STRUCTURES:
Pit must have been idle (without a
surface mining permit) for at least one
year with no apparent attempts at
reclamation and no indication that
reclamation will take place.
Underground aquifers or surface
water bodies Impacted by offsite
sedimentation or acid drainage from
exposed minerals or unauthorized
dumps on the mine site. Severity of
erosion not considered.
Include spoil piles, waste materials,
rock dumps, industrial or household
refuse and trash dumps.
All land stripped of vegetation,
covered by stock piles, overburden or
waste material and which has not
revegetated to a similar condition or
returned to a similar use as
surrounding land.
Vertical or nearly vertical final cuts
greater than 6 feet in height.
Any opening (vertical or horizontal) to
an underground mine where human
entrance is possible.
Areas over abandoned underground
mine workings which are subject to
collapse.
Buildings, foundations, processing
plants, abandoned equipment, etc.
which endanger people.

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STATE OF ALABAMA
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(NON-FUEL MINERALS)
DATA SUMMARY
(Attached)
NARRATIVE SUMMARY
A. Background
1.	History of Non-Fuel Mining In Alabama
The mining industry in Alabama had its inception around the turn
of the century, with records on iron ore production dating back to
1880. Then, in the early 1900's, sand, gravel and clays were
mined in modest quantities, with production increasing with demand
for construction materials. Gradually, in the 1920's, limestone and
marble quarries were established in central Alabama, with produc-
tion of other minerals commencing during that decade. Construc-
tion demand Increased from that time forward, resulting in
increased production of all minerals in the state.
Certain minerals mined in the past are subeconomic at present due
to changes in demand resulting from technological advancements
and economic circumstances. Other minerals once thought to be of
little or no economic value could well be considered valuable in the
future. Factors such as improvements in transportation, together
with availability of electrical power or water resources, are likely
to bring about changes in the economic value of various mineral
deposits. Given the variety of non-fuel mineral deposits in
Alabama, increased mining of currently produced minerals, as well
as those once considered subeconomic, is expected.
2.	Current Production and TrendB
In 1989, Alabama ranked twenty-first nationally in value of non-
fuel minerals produced with an estimated value of $483,079,000.
The principal non-fuel minerals produced were limestone, sand,
gravel, dolomite, clay, marble and shale. Continued demand is
anticipated for Industrial non-fuel minerals, especially near urban
areas where the need for construction materials is greatest. Over
1.5 billion tons of these major minerals have been mined in Alabama
since records have been kept. Current trends show increases in
production of dolomite, kaolin, bauxite, clay, shale and granite,
with corresponding decreases in the production of limestone,
chert, building stone, marble and talc.

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There are currently over 400 permitted non-fuel surface mining
operations in the state, with an estimated 20,000+ acres disturbed.
Over 2,000 permitted acres are abandoned each year, based on
recent trends. In addition to permitted sites, an estimated 1,000
pits are being operated by city, county and state road depart-
ments. There are perhaps another 500 operations that are either
exempt from permit and bond requirements or operated illegally.
Consequently, there may be as many as 1,900 active non-fuel
surface mining sites In the state.
Stronger demand is expected for non-fuel minerals with increases
in population and technological advances that continue to improve
the economic feasibility of mining and proceBBing more minerals.
Industrial, commercial and highway construction continue to
demand increasing volumes of construction ores for building
materials. Increased non-fuel surface mining will contribute to the
growing acreage of inactive abandoned mine lands and associated
environmental hazards. A comprehensive on-the-ground inventory
of abandoned non-fuel surface mined lands would be required in
order to fully comprehend the magnitude of hazards associated with
these sites. An aggressive non-fuel surface mining reclamation
program is urgently needed to curtail and correct the hazards
associated with these abandoned mine lands.
B. Existing Legislation
1. Alabama Surface Mining Act of 1969
The need for regulation of mining activities and reclamation
standards first became apparent with the passage of the Alabama
Surface Mining Act of 1969 (Code of Alabama, 1975, Sections
9-16-1 through 9-16-15). This first attempt at regulating surface
mining in the state included all minerals. Then, in 1975, the
regulation of coal mining was separated out by the passage of the
Alabama Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975 (Code of
Alabama, 1975, Sections 9-16-30 through 9-16-53). The Surface
Mining Act of 1969 was simultaneously amended to exempt chert,
limestone, marble, dolomite and coal from ADIR permit and bond
requirements. Also exempted were the activities of city, county
and state road departments, as well as their contractors, incident
to their activities in constructing, repairing and maintaining the
public road system in Alabama. The only other enhancement of
the law came with the passage of rules and regulations in 1988.
Several unsuccessful attempts have been made to revise and
strengthen the Surface Mining Act of 1969, with little support for
tighter environmental controls, increased bonding, or additional
funding for enforcement.
The Surface Mining Act of 1969 is administered by the Department
of Industrial Relations and requires an operator to file an
application with a $250.00 permit fee and proper reclamation bond
coverage in the amount of $150.00 per acre. The permit can be
renewed annually and bonded acreage is increased with the size of
the operation. Bonded acreage may be released if properly
2

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reclaimed in accordance with the law. All reclamation must be
completed within three years of the date of expiration of the
permit. If not, the reclamation bond may be forfeited and
deposited into the Surface Mining Reclamation Fund. These bonds
are earmarked for reclamation of the specific sites to which the
bonds apply. Unfortunately, no reclamation using forfeited bonds
has been carried out to date, mainly because the bonds so desig-
nated are woefully Inadequate to conduct any meaningful amount of
reclamation.
Alabama law requires that an operator "carry on grading of
affected land to reduce peaks and ridges to a rolling topography,
cover the face of any toxic material left exposed by the surface
mining operation and divert water from the mining operation in a
manner designed to reduce erosion, siltation or other damage to
streams and natural watercourses.n Afterwards, the site must be
revegetated by planting with pine trees to establish a minimum of
425 trees per acre one year after planting. In lieu of these
grading and revegetation requirements, the operator may elect to
reclaim the land for range, agricultural or horticultural, homesite,
recreational, industrial or commercial use.
Alabama's permit and bond requirements fall far short of ensuring
that non-fuel surface mine sites are identified and properly
reclaimed after mining. The bond of $150.00 per acre does not
give operators much of an incentive to reclaim sites after mining.
Furthermore, funding has traditionally been scarce to hire the
personnel needed to effectively regulate the mining of non-fuel
minerals statewide. Stronger legislation is needed to regulate
mining and reclamation, supported by funding for personnel to
insure adequate enforcement,
Alabama Water Pollution Control Act (as amended, 1984 and 1988)
This legislation established the Water Improvement Commission to
regulate discharges from mining operations, processing plants and
storage facilities. This act required permitting of discharges from
mining areas and other areas associated with mining wastes.
Alabama Environmental Management Act (as amended, 1984 and 1988)
This legislation established the Alabama Department of Environ-
mental Management and assimilated the personnel and duties of the
Water Improvement Commission into this new agency.
Discharge permit fees currently range from $500.00 for non-coal
operations to $1,200.00 for coal mining operations with an asso-
ciated processing plant. These permits are issued for 5-year
periods and establish certain discharge limitations. Sampling and
analysis of discharges is required twice monthly. When an opera-
tion is terminated, the operator must provide proof that reclama-
tion standards have been met and that discharges do not warrant
treatment over a period of 6 months to one year.

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C. Mining and Milling Methods
The mining of most non-fuel minerals in Alabama is accomplished using
surface mining methods. Years ago, red iron ore was mined by
underground methods in the central portion of the state, leaving
hundreds of open mine portals and shafts as a reminder of that era.
Most limestone is mined by the open quarry method; however, some
limestone has been and continues to be mined by the underground
method.
Surface mining methods involve mining these deposits in their natural
state or exposing them by removing overburden and then mining
directly from the exposed deposits. Sand and gravel are often mined
using a hydraulic dredge designed to pump sand and gravel to a
washer for screening and sorting into various grades. These minerals
are also dry-screened or dumped into a crude hopper and washed to
segregate the sand and gravel.
Bauxite and various clays are mined by removing the overburden and
mining directly from the deposits, which are then stockpiled for later
use. These commodities are then transported to a processing site
where they are crushed, cleaned and heated to produce various
products such as fire clays, refractory clays, pottery clays, bricks
and clay briquettes.
Limestone, marble and dolomite are mined by drilling, blasting and
cutting the stone in open surface quarries as well as underground.
Stone is then crushed on site into various grades of construction
aggregates and agricultural lime. The chalk form of limestone is mined
by removing overburden and mining the mineral using front-end
loaders, pans and bulldozers. Eventually, the chalk is crushed for
use in cement manufacturing.
D. Health Impacts
Non-fuel surface mining activities impact public health in a number of
ways. The most obvious impact is bare, denuded soil that is subject
to erosion and offsite sedimentation. Recent surveys by the U.S.D.A.-
Soil Conservation Service indicate that over 206 tons of soil per acre
per year leave abandoned mine lands in the form of sediment or air-
borne dust. Unless topsoil ia stockpiled and redistributed over the
mined areas, vegetative recovery is very slow, allowing extensive
erosion and offsite movement of sediment and various pollutants from
the site. Polluted mine drainage originates from abandoned sites
containing exposed acidic minerals, and from corroded tanks holding
diesel fuel, gasoline, asphalt and other chemicals.
The most prevalent contamination of water resources is to the surface
waters of the state. Heavy rains cause rapid offsite movement of
exposed soil and other materials directly into streams. Abandoned
mine sites are frequently used as public dumps containing various
household and industrial hazardous wastes. Toxic drainage from these
dumps migrates rapidly into streams during periods of heavy rainfall.
4

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A less dramatic, but more serious form of pollution is the leaching of
toxic materials into underground aquifers. Contamination of these
aquifers can be chronic and extremely hazardous in the immediate
vicinity of abandoned surface mines. A number of private wells and
municipal supplies in Alabama are reportedly affected by this type of
pollution, as toxic chemicals move laterally and rapidly once they have
entered an underground aquifer, thereby resulting in contamination of
areas at considerable distances from abandoned mine sites.
Safety Hazards
Safety hazards of almost every description can be found on Alabama's
abandoned surface mined lands. As in most states, abandoned mines
in Alabama are often situated near residential areas and/or are used
for recreational purposes. The general public is frequently unaware
of the inherent dangers associated with abandoned mines.
Highwalls represent one of the moBt dangerous hazards. Several
deaths have occurred in Alabama as the result of Bmall children end
adults falling from a high wall, or from the collapse of a high wall.
Injuries and fatalities have also occurred as the result of vehicles
running off highwalls.
Hundreds of mine openings and airshafts remain as a result of under-
ground mining of iron ore and limestone In central Alabama. Accidents
and deaths have occurred when children and adults fell into an air-
shaft or mine opening and were killed or drowned. .
Underground and surface mining methods often result in water
impoundments and flooded excavations If left unreclaimed. Both
children and adults are attracted to these areaB for swimming, boating
and fishing. These impoundments are usually very deep and can
contain Bteep dropoffs. More deaths are recorded in Alabama each
year due to drownings in abandoned impoundments and flooded
excavations than any other hazard associated with abandoned mines.
Many hazardous structures remain on abandoned surface mines,
particularly where a processing plant was utilized. Persons attracted
to such sites can be injured or killed should an unstable structure
collapse. Dilapidated equipment often remains at these sites, as well
as old tanks containing contaminated water, diesel fuel, gasoline or
asphalt.
Environmental and Economic Impacts
Mine Bites can degrade the environment indefinitely if left unreclaimed.
Air quality is negatively impacted by fugitive dust blown from denuded
mining sites. This dust can affect offsite flora and fauna, or can be
inhaled by humans. Some abandoned sites contain heavy metals that
can be picked up and transported by the wind for miles. These
metals can then be ingested or Inhaled by fish, wildlife and humans.
This type of problem is prevalent only during dry, windy seasons,
and although not a continual Bource of pollution in Alabama, is an
important consideration.

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Surface and groundwater aquifers can be contaminated by leaching of
toxic chemicals, heavy metals and unauthorized hazardous wastes
dumped into abandoned pits. Heavy rains cause increased sedimenta-
tion of streams and natural watercourses when dissolved metals and
soil particles are discharged from abandoned sites. Critical habitats
for a number of endangered fish and wildlife species are impacted by
long-term offsite discharge of sediment, fuel spills, acid and
oxygen-deficient runoff from Alabama abandoned mines.
Surrounding vegetation at abandoned mine sites is adversely affected
by sedimentation, heavy metals contained in air and water, and toxic
drainage from acidic wastes and unauthorized dumps. The long-term
effects on surrounding vegetation are not easily quantified, but those
areas do tend to require longer recovery periods than other environ-
mental impacts. Bottomland hardwoods are more susceptible to these
pollutants.
ADIR's file review of abandoned non-fuel mine sites indicates that
nearly 100,000 acres would be considered inactive and/or abandoned.
An on-the-ground, comprehensive statewide inventory would be needed
to more accurately document the extent of mine-related damage. In
addition to the health, safety and environmental impacts discussed,
there is also a significant loss of productive land, which must be taxed
at a minimal rate. Unless legislation is passed to more effectively
regulate non-fuel surface mining and address the issue of reclaiming
the ever-growing number of abandoned sites, Alabama's tax base will
continue to erode along with its environment.
Reclamation Efforts
The Surface Mining Act of 1969 provides for the forfeiture of an
operator's reclamation bond for failure to reclaim a site. Forfeited
bonds are deposited into the Surface Mining Reclamation Fund and
earmarked for reclamation of specific siteB covered by those bonds.
However, the bond amount of $150.00 per acre is not nearly enough to
accomplish any meaningful degree of reclamation of these abandoned
sites, and no additional funds have been appropriated for that pur-
pose. Hence, no reclamation of abandoned non-fuel sites has been
initiated with forfeited bond monies since the law was passed.
6

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STATE OF ALABAMA
inactive/abandoned mine lands
DATA SUMMARY REFERENCE GUIDE
1.	Alabama Dept. of Environmental Management
Mining Section
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Steve Foster
Phone: 271-7700
2.	U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Soil Conservation Service
Auburn, A1
Contact: Mr. Jerry Johnson
Phone: 821-8070
3.	U.S. Forest Service
Alabama Supervisor
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Don Kite
Phone: 832-4470
4.	Alabama Geological Survey
Mineral Resources Division
Tuscaloosa, A]
Contact: Mr. Lewis Dean
Phone: 349-2852
5.	Alabama Development Office
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Tom McGuire
Phone: 263-0048
6.	Alabama Highway Department
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Jack Caraway
Phone: 242-6324
7.	Alabama Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources
Game and Fish Division
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Jon Hornsby
Phone: 242-3628
8.	Alabama Dept. of Industrial Relations
State Programs Division
Montgomery, A1
Contact: Mr. Bill Guyette
Phone: 242-8265
9.	Alabama Surface Mining Act of 1969
(Code of Alabama, 1975, Sections 9-16-1 through 9-16-15)

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10.	Minerals in Alabama, 1989 - Information Series 64H
Geological Survey of Alabama
Mineral Resources Division
Lewis S. Dean, Editor
11.	Alabama Dept. of Industrial Relations
Division of Safety & Inspection - 1990 Annual Report
Contact: Mr. Jerry Scharf
Phone: 254-1275
12.	Geology of Alabama - Special Report No. 14
Geological Survey of Alabama, Second Printing 1979
George Adams, Charles Butts, L.W. Stepheson, Wythe Cook

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5
5
AO
15
5
4
10
12
15
10
STATE OF ALABAMA
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#1206	A & B Mineral, Inc.
58-1	302 Dublin Place
Montgomery, A1 36108
#2	Mullite Co. of America
6-2	P.O. Box 556
Eufaula, A1 36027
#2600	Mullite Co. of America
6-11	P.O. Box 556
Eufaula, A1 36027
#2601	Mullite Co. of America
6-15	P.O. Box 556
Eufaula, A1 36027
#3099	Burdette Wood
6-1	Route 1, Box 260
Eufaula, A1 36027
#1	Abbeville Lime Co.
37-1	Abbeville, A1 36310
#1341	Abbeville Lime Co.
37-2	Abbeville, A1 36310
#3710	Harbison-Walker Refractories
37-14	One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pa 15222
#3195	Harbison-Walker Refractories
37-15	One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pa 15222
BONDED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES
Shelby 36 20S IE	1
Subtotal:	1
Barbour 21 9N 27E	35
Barbour 36 10N 27E	15
Barbour 12 9N 26E	5
Barbour 19 9N 28E	2
Henry 13 8N 28E	1
Henry 13 8N 28E	12
Henry 5 8N 28E	10
Henry 3 8N 27E	8
1

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Bauxite
Bauxite
Bauxite
Chert
Chert
Chert
Chert
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3789	Harbison-Walker Refractories
37-16	One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pa 15222
#2347	Harbison-Walker Refractories
37-11	Route 5, Box 58
Eufaula, A1 36027
#3220	Mullite Co. of America
37-1	P.O. Box 556
Eufaula, A1 36027
#2232	Melvln Carroll
31-1	Route 2, Box 37B
Attalla, A1 35954
#1632	John L. Lay
31-1	Star Route, Box 65
Guntersville, A1 35976
#1989	Mrs. L. M. Cox
59-1	Route 2, Box 181 B
Ashville, A1 35953
#1627	W.J.L. Hawkins
59-1	4004 Rainbow Drive
P.O. Box 342
Gadsden, A1 35902
COUNTY
Henry
Henry
Henry
Etowah
SEC. TWP.
8N
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
32
29
St. Clair	20
St. Clair
8N
9N
27E
27E
29E
12S
14S
14S
7E
4E
5E
15
20
10
Subtotal:	110	166
Etowah	33	IIS	5E	1	5
35
10
Subtotal:
55
2

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3909	E.R. Brantley Contracting
5-2	Route 1, Box 1450
Foley, A1 36535
#3910	E.R. Brantley Const. Co.
5-4	P.O. Box 837
Foley, A1 36535
#3973	Brunson Construction Co.
5-2	35 Station Street
P.O. Box 336
Saraland, A1 36571
#2665	Falrhope Clay Products, Inc.
5-1	Route 1, Box 78
Falrhope, A1 36532
#3978	Eugene R. Fell
5-1	33592 Sunset Drive
Elberta, A1 36530
#1032	Gulf Landscaping
5-2	Gulf Shores, A1 36542
#1040	South Alabama Trucking, Inc.
5-1	P.O. Box 200
Atmore, A1 36502
#3147	Spanish Cove Corporation
5-1	Star Route Box 4082
Lillian, A1 36549
#1352	John W. West
5-1	Star Route Box 726
Lillian, A1 36549
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Baldwin
32
6S
3E
Baldwin
28
5S
2E
Baldwin
32
4S
2E
Baldwin
30
6S
3E
Baldwin
22
7S
6E
Baldwin
8S
5E
Baldwin
11
3N
4E
Baldwin
27
7S
6E
20
Baldwin
2S
5E
10
3

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
MINERAL	FILE NO.
Clay	#1746
6-1
Clay	#1798
8-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
McKenzie Construction Co.
P.O. Box 206
Eufaula, A1 36027
Philadelphia Clay Co.
Route 1, Box 580
Warrior, A1 35180
COUNTY	SEC. TWP.
Barbour	24	11N
Blount	31	13S
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
28E	2	4
1W	4	10
Clay
Clay
Clay
#1327
8-1
#3811
8-2
#1
11-1
Tan Yard S & G Co.
Route 3
Altoona, A1 35952
Warrior Clay Co.
Route 1, 9500 Dades Hill Rd.
Warrior, A1 35180
Coosa Clay Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 1366
Anniston, A1 36201
Clay
Clay
#2864
11-4
#1055
11-1
Dixie Clay Co.
P.O. Drawer 909
Jacksonville, A1 36265
Celeste B. Lackey
P.O. Box 55
Munford, A1 36268
Clay
Clay
#1729
13-1
#1819
13-2
St. John Clay Co.
Route 2, Box 130 B
Ragland, A1 35131
St. John Clay Co.
Route 2, Box 130 B
Ragland, A1 35131
Blount
16
US
3E
Blount
33
13S
2W
Calhoun
19
15S
8E
Calhoun
19
15S
8E
20
Calhoun
11
16S
7E
Cherokee
24
11S
1 IE
Cherokee
25
11S
1 IE
15
30

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#2341
1 A 1
#2523
14-2
#3240
14-3
#2426
16-1
#3495
20-1
#1
26-1
#1279
26-1
#3573
26-8
#2950
28-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Jenkins Brick Company
P.O. Box 91
Montgomery, A1 36101
Jenkins Brick Company
P.O. Box 91
Montgomery, A1 36101
Jenkins Brick Company
P.O. Box 91
Montgomery, A1 36101
Butts & Billingsley Const. Co.
P.O. Box U
Chlldersburg, A1 35044
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
United Material & Ship.
P.O. Box 1326
Florence, A1 35631
Bondy's Ford, Inc.
Ross Clark Circle
Dothan, A1 36301
Burns Clay Products
P.O. Box 61
Newton, A1 36352
Couch, Inc.
P.O. Box 7106
Dothan, A1 36303
WBK, Inc.
P.O. Box 967
Ralnsvllle, A1 35986
Inc.
Chilton
Chilton
Chilton
Clarke
Colbert
Dale
Dale
Dale
DeKalb
34
33
23
30
32,33
24
24N
19	23N
3	23N
8N
4S
4N
24E
5N
3S
13E
13E
13E
3E
15W
26E
4N
25E
9E
1
10
1
40
10
5

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY
#3715	Willett Clay Co.	Fayette
32-1	Route 1, Box 706
Empire, A1 35063
#3816	Couch, Inc.	Houston
38-10	1020 Twitchell Rd.
Dothan, A1 36303
#3682	B & B Clay Co.	Jefferson
1-1	1736 Dads Hill Lane
Warrior, A1 35180
SEC. TWP.
24
34
15S
4N
14S
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
10W	5	5
27E
2W
10
10
Clay
Clay
#1664	Birmingham Clay Products Co.
1-1	#20 Office Park Circle-Rm. 101
Birmingham, A1 35223
#3338	Overton Clay Products, Inc.
1-1	234 Brown Marks Bldg.
Birmingham, A1 35203
Jefferson 4,5
Jefferson
19S
18S
3W
1W
17
10
17
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
#3832	Margaret H. Aubrey	Mobile
2-1	1685 Knollwood Dr., #681
Mobile, A1 36609
#3820	Brunson Construction Co.	Mobile
2-3	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
#3821	Brunson Construction Co.	Mobile
2-4	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
#3883	Brunson Construction Co.	Mobile
2-5	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
36
32
24
5S
5S
2S
3S
3W
2W
2W
2W
20
18
17
25
18
17
6

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#3972
2-6
#3698
2-7
#3208
2-1
#2906
2-1
#3850
2-1
#2262
2-1
#3809
2-2
#692
2-2
#1947
2-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY
Brunson ConsCruetIon Co.	Mobile
35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
Brunson Construction Co.	Mobile
35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
Pauline Colquett/Ken Kastorff	Mobile
2208 East Hillvood Drive
Mobile, A1 36605
Couch, Inc.	Mobile
P.O. Box 7106
Dothan, A1 36302
Bill Davis Contractor, Inc.	Mobile
5909 Moffat Road
Mobile, A1 36618
Clarence Dickens	Mobile
4813 Nevius Road
Mobile, A1 36619
Far Construction Company, Inc.	Mobile
4350 Sollie Road
Mobile, A1 36619
Garry Gurley	Mobile
7006 Victor Road
Mobile, A1 36608
Hamilton Trucking & Excavating	Mobile
Route 1, Box 39
Theodore, A1 36582
SEC. TWP.
22	3S
22
17
30
30
24
3S
4S
6S
4S
5S
5S
4S
7S
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
2W	3	3
2W
3W
2W
3W
2W
2W
4W
2W
10
10
1.36	2
7

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#2
2-2
#3286
2-3
#3916
2-4
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
M & D Construction Company
1603 Mill Avenue
Moss Point, Mb 39563
#1886	John H. Maples Hauling Co., Inc.
2-2	Route 11, Box 258-A
Mobile, A1 36693
COUNTY
Mobile
Mobile
BONDED DISTURBED
SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
John H. Maples Hauling Co., Inc. Mobile
Route 20, Box A76
Mobile, A1 36619
John H. Maples Hauling Co., Inc. Mobile
Route 20, Box 76
Mobile, A1 36609
#3221	Gary L. Moore	Mobile
2-1	4813 Nevius Road
Mobile, A1 36619
#3025	M. C. Williams Contracting Co.	Mobile
2-1	1000 Schillingers Road
Mobile, A1 36608
#2368	Yates Construction Company	Mobile
2-1	4350 Sollie Road
Mobile, A1 36619
#3500	Bickerstaff Clay Products	Russell
57-1	P.O. Box 1178
Columbus, Ga 31993
#3627	Cordova Clay	Walker
64-5	P.O. Box 100
Cordova, A1 35550
31
28
25
10
30
19
30
25
6S
4S
4S
4S
5S
4S
5S
17N
15S
3W
3W
3W
3W
2W
2W
2W
30E
6W
1
10
10
10
10
10
50
14.5	20
32
32

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#3560
64-1
#3561
64-2
#3892
64-3
#3560
64-1
#3890
65-3
#3576
66-1
#3519
67-3
#3350
67-1
#3919
64-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Willett Clay Co.
Route 1, Box 706
Empire, A1 35063
Willett Clay Co.
Route 1, Box 706
Empire, A1 35063
Willett Clay Co.
Route 1, Box 706
Empire, A1 35063
Willett Clay Co.
Route 1, Box 706
Empire, A1 35063
Bailey Constr. Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 99
Wagarville, A1 36585
Butts & Billingsley Const. Co.
P.O. Box 1035
Jackson, A1 36545
Southern Clay & Energy
Route 6, Box 104 T2
Haleyvllle, A1 35565
Southern Clay & Energy, Inc.
Route 6, Box 103 T4B
Haleyvllle, A1 35565
Winn Construction Co.
P.O. Box 216
Nauvoo, A1 35578
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Walker
Walker
Walker
Walker
Wilcox
Winston
Winston
Winston
35
19
25
35
Washington 12
34
17
14S
15S
14S
14S
3N
13N
11S
10S
12S
5W
9W
5W
5W
1W
7E
10W
10W
9W
10
10
10
10
60
12
Subtotal:
339
640
9

-------
4
10
10
10
60
7
6
3
4
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#1	E.R. Brantley
5-1	P.O. Box 469
Bay Minette, A1 36507
#1175	Brooksville Sand Co., Inc.
8-1	P.O. Box 338
Arab, A1 35016
#3543	St. John Clay Co., Inc.
11-1	P.O. Box 125
Ohatchee, A1 36271
#2842	St. John Clay Co., Inc.
11-2	P.O. Box 125
Ohatchee, A1 36271
#3824	St. John Clay Co., Inc.
11-3	P.O. Box 125
Ohatchee, A1 36271
#3884	Brun6on Construction Co., Inc.
16-1	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
#3612	Brunson Construction Co., Inc.
16-2	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
#3974	Brunson Construction Co., Inc.
16-3	35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
#1622	J.C. Bartlett & Hlgglns Const.
31-1	Route 3, Box 271
Gadsden, A1 35901
COUNTY	SEC.	TWP.	RANGE
Baldwin	27	2S	3E
Blount	20	10S	2E
Calhoun	11	15S	5E
Calhoun	11	15S	5E
Calhoun	13	15S	5E
Clarke	9	7N	3E
Clarke	14,15	9N	4E
Clarke	14	7N	2E
Etowah	30	11S	6E
10

-------
STUR1
acre;
12
8
10
5
3
152
5
5
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#1461	Fayco, Inc.
40-1	P.O. Box 29
Fayette, A1 35555
#1902	John T. Mixon, Jr.
40-1	Route 3, Box 60
Sulligent, A1 35586
#1896	Fayco, Inc.
49-1	P.O. Box 29
Fayette, A1 35555
#1371	Robert Goggans Gann
49-1	Route 5, Box 262
Hamilton, A1 35570
#3490	Rusty's Const. Co.
64-1	Route 2, Box 236-B
Jasper, A1 35501
#3106	West Blocton Shale & Clay Co.
7-1	P.O. Box 185
West Blocton, A1 35184
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE
Lamar	26	15S	16W
Lamar	11	13S	15W
Marlon	13	13S	12W
Marlon	3	10S	15W
Walker	23	13S	8W
Subtotal:
Bibb	32	21S	5W
Subtotal:
11

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#2
5-2
#2575
5-2
#1223
5-1
#3795
35-1
#4010
38-1
#1099
1-1
#3668
46-5
#3717
48-1
#1147
2-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Carver Mining Company
Route 2
Foley, A1 36535
0. A. Rawson Construction
P.O. Box 312
Foley, A1 36536
H. C. Weaver
P. 0. Box 8
Orange Beach, A1 36561
A. D. Sewell
Route 1, Box 264
Forkland, A1 36470
Lingo Sand Company, Inc.
3400 Lingo Road
Dothan, A1 36303
Industrial Sand Co.
P.O. Box 246
Trussville, A1 35173
U.S. Silica Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 442
Hurtsboro, A1 36860
River City Industries
P.O. Drawer A
Demopolis, A1 36732
COUNTY	SEC. TWP.
Baldwin	17	8S
Baldwin
Baldwin
Greene
Al. Asphalt Paving Co.
Route 6, Box 39
Eight Mile, Al 36613
Inc.
Jefferson
Macon
Marengo
Mobile
38
32
Houston 33,34
14
11
28
22
8S
8S
19N
4N
16S
15N
16N
3S
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
4E
4E
4E
3E
26E
1W
25E
3E
2W
1
1.5
10
10
40
15
10
10
17
15
40
12

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
#3819
2-1
# 17AA
2-1
#3826
2-2
#3419
2-3
Brunson Construction Co.
35 Station Street
Saraland, A1 36571
H.E. Busby Sand & Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 502
Theodore, A1 36582

Dickens Hauling Company
4813 Nevius Road
Mobile, A1 36619
Dickens Hauling Company
4813 Nevius Road
Mobile, A1 36619
Sand
Sand
#1235
2-2
#3429
2-1
Dirt Sales, Inc.
5237 Henry Road
Eight Mile, A1 36613
Dirt Unlimited, Inc.
P.O. Box 439
Semmes, A1 36575
Sand
Sand
Sand
#1313
2-1
#3100
2-1
#3428
2-1
H & J Sand Co., Inc.
Route 3, Box 157D
Grand Bay, A1 36541
K. J. Harris
Route 18, Box 245A
Mobile, A1 36608
Hults Sand Company
P.O. Box 776
Kemah, Tx 77565
COUNTY
SEC. TWP.
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
Mobile
22
3S
2W
Mobile
6S
2W
25
Mobile
31
6S
2W
Mobile
5S
2W
10
Mobile
28
3S
2W
60
Mobile
3S
3W
10
Mobile
7S
3W
20
Mobile
15
4S
3W
Mobile
6S
5W
40
13

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3914	Jackson Creek Sand Company
2-1	Route 2, Box 29
Wllmer, A1 36587
#3781	U.S. Silica Co., Inc.
57-4	P.O. Box 442
Hurtsboro, A1 36860
#3985	U.S. Silica Co., Inc.
57-5	P.O. Box 442
Hurtsboro, A1 36860
#3773	U.S. Silica Co., Inc.
57-8	P.O. Box 442
Hurtsboro, A1 36860
#3738	C & B Ready Mix
(James D. Beech)
P.O. Box 883
Chatom, A1 36518
#2682	E. J. Martin Const.
63-1	P.O. Box 37
Vance, A1 35490
#3046	U.S. Silica Co., Inc.
63-2	Route 4, Box 587
Tuscaloosa, A1 35405
COUNTY
Mobile
Russell
Russell
Russell
SEC. TOP.
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
16
Washington 48,50
6S
15N
15N
15N
6N
Tuscaloosa 17	2 IS
Tuscaloosa 27	2 IS
3W
27E
27E
27E
IE
6W
10W
10
10
10
10
10
120
Subtotal:
106
494
i.-i
14

-------
STUR]
acre:
50
5
6
6
67
AO
85
AO
30
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3602	Scott's Trucking
5-1	HC 75, Box 910
Foley. A1 36526
#1 ,	Smith Construction Company
5-1	Hwy 59 & W. 2nd Avenue
Gulf Shores, A1
#3454	Royal Sand & Clay Co., Inc.
8-1	P.O. Box 612
Snead, A1 35952
#3076	John H. Shank
2-1	Route 9, Box 216UV
Eight Mile, A1 36613
#3438	Coastal Asphalt & Constr. Co.
4-1	1129 Adams Avenue
Montgomery, A1 36104
#990	Dixie Sand & Gravel Co., Inc.
4-1	P.O. Box 1128
Montgomery, A1 36102
#3280	F & M. Gravel Company
4-1	Route 5, Box 103
Wetumpka, A1 36092
#2988	Hunter Station-Russell, Inc.
4-1	P.O. Box 397
Prattville, A1 36067
COUNTY	SEC.	TUP.	RANGE
Baldwin	17	8S	4E
Baldwin	7	8S	4E
Blount	11	11S	IE
Mobile	8	3N	2E
Subtotal:
Autauga	22	19N	16E
Autauga	26	17N	16E
Autauga	2	19N	16E
Autauga	16	17N	14E
15

-------
:sturb
ACRES
4
10
5
15
3
60
120
30
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#1	C. E. Colquett
5-1	2412 Millwood Drive
Mobile. A1 36606
#2145	Frlese Materials, Inc.
5-1	P.O. Box 190B
Daphne, A1
#2532	Norrls Sand & Gravel, Inc.
5-1	Route 1, Box 117
Perdldo, A1 36562
#1	Turner Sand & Gravel
5-1	Route A, Box 60
Atmore, A1 36502
#2863	T & G Sand & Gravel
7-1	2815 10th Court, South
Birmingham, A1 35233
#3843	APAC-Alabama, Inc.
11-1	Hodges Division
P. 0. Box 460
Annlston, A1 36202
#2971	M-Earth of Al., Inc.
11-1	P.O. Box 283
Annlston, Al 36202
#2777	Mohawk Sand & Silica, Inc.
11-1	1624 Forrest Avenue
Gadsden, Al 35901
COUNTY	SEC.	TWP.	RANGE
Baldwin	13	7S	3E
Baldwin	8	2S	2E
Baldwin	4	3N	4E
Baldwin	4	3N	4E
Bibb	12	22S	6W
Calhoun	29	15S	9E
Calhoun	29	15S	5E
%
Calhoun	19	14S	6E
16

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#2176
13-3
Sand, Gravel 13095
1 A 1
Sand, Gravel 13996
16-4
Sand, Gravel #3540
16-1
Sand, Gravel #3792
16-2
Sand, Gravel #3806
16-1
Sand, Gravel #479
16-3
#1242
16-1
#1265
16-2
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
James Ray St. John
P.O. Box 246
Ragland, A1 35131
Southern Silica Company
Route 2, Box 1135
Clanton, A1 35045
Levoyde Bradford
Route 1, Box 133
Dickinson, A1 36436
East Clarke County Gravel Co.
Star Route 3, Box 69
Jackson, A1 36545
East Clarke County Gravel Co.
Star Route 3, Box 69
Jackson, A1 36545
Fuller Gravel
Route 1, Box C1
Whatley, A1 36482
Gulf Coast Gravel Co., Inc.
Route 1, Box 229
Grove Hill, A1 36451
Harden & Harden Sand & Gravel
P.O. Box 417, Pollard Roads
Daphne, A1 36526
Harden & Harden Sand & Gravel
P.O. Box 417
Daphne, A1 36526
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Cherokee
Chilton
Clarke
Clarke
Clarke
Clarke
Clarke
Clarke
Clarke
26
33
24
21
14
22
14
US
10 2 ON
9N
7N
7N
8N
9N
7N
7N
HE
14E
4E
3E
2E
4E
4E
2E
2E
28
10
120
28
20
12
15
C.O
o
17

-------
rim:
;re:
50
10
5
20
30
2
30
10
8
20
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY	SEC. TWF. RANGE
#1	Jackson Sand & Gravel Co.	Clarke	25	7N	2E
16-1	Walker Springs, A1
#149	Jackson Sand & Gravel Co.	Clarke	10,11	8N	2E
16-2	Walker Springs, A1
#2424	King Mines Resorts, Inc.	Cleburne 22,23	17S	9E
18-1	Route 1, Box 128
Delta, A1 36258
#3922	Southland Sand & Gravel, Inc.	Coffee	19	5N	20E
19-1	Route 4, Box 471
Elba, A1 36323
#2400	J. B. Amnions Construction, Inc. Conecuh	4	4N	9E
21-1	P.O. Box 486
Spanish Fort, A1 36527
#1580	Andrews Sand & Gravel	Conecuh	30	5N	9E
21-1	Route 1, Box 181-A
Monroevllle, A1 36460
#3380	Conecuh Gravel, Inc.	Conecuh	33	5N	9E
21-1	Route 1
Repton, A1 36454
#2383	Nolan Cooper	Conecuh	33	5N	3E
21-1	Route 2, Box 308
Robertsdale, A1 36567
#3998	Richard Eady	Conecuh	30	5N	9E
21-1	Star Route, Box 442
Bay Mlnette, A1 36507
#1347	Gulf Coast Gravel Co.	Conecuh	20	4N	7E
21-1	303 S. Carney St.
Atmore, A1 36502
18

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#3175
21-1
Sand, Gravel #2923
21-1
Sand, Gravel #3154
21-1
Sand, Gravel #2922
21-1
Sand, Gravel #389
21-1
Sand, Gravel #1397
21-2
Sand, Gravel #2685
21-1
Sand, Gravel #2925
27-1
Sand, Gravel #3759
27-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Kendrick Sand & Gravel
Route E, Box 151
Evergreen, A1 36401
Mlddleton Dredging & Gravel
P.O. Box 20
Lenox, A1 36454
Ray's Rock Company
P.O. Box 283
Perdldo, A1 36562
Red's Sand & Gravel Co.
Route 1, Box 68-C
Flomaton, A1 36441
Santa Rosa Concrete Co. Group
501 Elmira Street
Milton, F1 32570
Smith-Kelly Supply Company
P.O. Box 1227
Mobile, A1 36601
Southern Material Co., Inc.
Route 1, Box 26(B)
Perdldo, A1 36562
Central Alabama Materials, Inc.
P.O. Box 323
Tyler, A1 36785
Cosby-Carmlchael, Inc.
P.O. Box "97
Selma, A1 16701
COUNTY
Conecuh
Conecuh
Conecuh
Conecuh
Conecuh
Conecuh
Conecuh
SEC.
30
33
24
10
20
30
Dallas	26,27
Dallas
TWP.
5N
5N
4N
5N
4N
RANGE
9E
4N
5N
17N
16N
9E
9E
8E
9E
7E
8E
12E
HE
BONDED DISTURBED
ACRES ACRES
2	8
40
60
15
10
10
40
10
19

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
."5
0
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3775	Co8by-Cannichael, Inc.
27-2	P.O. Box 597
Selma, A1 36701
#2886	Cosby-Carmichael, Inc.
27-3	P.O. Box 597
Selma, A1 36701
#3246	Cosby-Carmichael, Inc.
27-4	P.O. Box 597
Selma, A1 36701
#3687	Hamilton Sand & Gravel, Inc.
27-2	Route 1
Marion Junction, A1 36759
#3863	S & S Materials
27-2	P.O. Box 640
Panama City, F1 32402
#1560	Smith-Kelly Supply Company
27-1	P.O. Box 1227
Mobile, A1 36601
#1	Dixie Mining, Inc.
28-1	Scenic Road, Route 1
Ft. Payne, A1 35967
#3947	Alpine Mining Co., Inc.
29-1	P.O. Box 1710
Montgomery, A1 36103
#3592	D & J Gravel Company, Inc.
29-1	Route 5, Box 270
Wetumpka, A1 36092
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TVTP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
DeKalb
Elmore
Elmore
5,8
34
Dallas	32,31
24
27
24
15
16N
17N
17N
15N
16W
17N
7N
17N
18N
HE
11E
12E
9E
10E
12E
9E
17E
18E
15
10
15
20
20
20
50
10
15
10
20

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#1052
30-2
Sand, Gravel #989
30-1
#1644
30-2
#3865
30-3
Sand, Gravel #3807
30-1
Sand, Gravel #4022
30-2
Sand, Gravel #3753
30-1
#2911
30-1
#1
30-L
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Arnold Sand & Gravel
Route 2, Box 648
Cantonment, F1 32533
Campbell Sand & Gravel Co.
Route 1, Box 242
Flomaton, A1 36441
Campbell Sand & Gravel Co.
Route 1, Box 242
Flomaton, A1 36441
Campbell Sand & Gravel Co.
930 Campbell Road
Century, F1 32535
Clyde's Sand & Gravel Co.
Route 3, Box 46-A
Century, F1 32535
Clyde's Sand & Gravel Co.
Route 3, Box 46A
Century, F1 32535
Conecuh Gravel DBA
Bay Concrete Company
P.O. Box 653
Robertsdale, A1 36567
D & D Gravel
P.O. Box 7142
Pensacola, F1 32514
Escambia Materials
Route 2, Box 370
Cantonment, F1 32533
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
Escambia
12
21
28
13
16
13
28
22
IN
3N
3N
3N
IN
2N
2N
2N
3N
8E
8E
8E
3E
7E
7E
5E
7E
8E
11
25
20
10
20
10
60
72
60
100
20
21

-------
MINERAL
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
Sand, Gravel #2
30-2
Sand, Gravel #3647
30-2
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Escambia Materials
Route 2, Box 370
Cantonment, F1 32533
Frlese Trucking & Materials
P.O. Box 152
Atmore, A1 3650A
COUNTY
Escambia
SEC. TWP.
22
Escambia 31,32
3N
2N
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
8E	A	4
6E
35
Sand, Gravel #3950
30-1
Sand, Gravel #3010
30-1
Roy Parker & Sons Gravel Co.
Route 3, Box 115
Milton, F1 32970
Red's Sand & Gravel Company
Route 1, Box 98
Flomaton, A1 36AA1
Escambia
26
Escambia 13,1A
3N
IN
7E
7E
10
50
Sand, Gravel #1705
30-1
Santa Rosa Concrete Co., Inc.
501 Elmira Street
Milton, F1 32570
Escambia
21
3N
9E
11
15
Sand, Gravel #2
30-2
Santa Rosa Concrete Co., Inc.
501 Elmira Street
Milton, F1 32570
Escambia
20
3N
9E
15
Sand, Gravel #1706
30-3
Santa Rosa Concrete Co., Inc.
501 Elmira Street
Milton, F1 32570
Escambia
13
3N
8E
15
Sand, Gravel
#1
31-1
Akron Sand Company
Aliceville, A1 35AA2
Etowah
1,2
13S
6E
20
Sand, Gravel
#2155	Boozer & Power Const. Co.
31-1	8A2 N. 37th St.
Gadsden, A1 3590A
Etowah
26
lis
6E
3>
22

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#2833
31-1
Sand, Gravel #2705
32-1
Sand, Gravel #4027
32-1
Sand, Gravel #3140
32-1
Sand, Gravel #3969
33-1
Sand, Gravel #2555
33-1
Sand, Gravel #2818
33-1
Sand, Gravel #3108
33-1
Sand, Gravel #3068
35-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY	SEC.
Pollard Sand Co., Inc.	Etowah	12
Route 2, Rox 361-C
Gadsden, A1 35903
David "Chuck" Beasley	Fayette	29
Route 1, Box 407A
Winfield, A1 35594
West Alabama Sand & Gravel, Inc. Fayette	10
P.O. Box 688
Fayette, A1 35555
White Springs Sand & Gravel	Fayette	1
P.O. Box 137
Glen Allen, A1 35559
EDSU, Inc.	Franklin	35
P.O. Box 963
Russellvllle, A1 35653
Rhea Greenwell	Franklin	12
Greenwell Enterprises, Inc.
P.O. Drawer E
Decatur, A1 35602
Spruce Pine Sand & Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 49
Athens, A1 35611
Trapptown Sand Co.
P.O. Box 49
Athens, A1 35611
Forkland Sand & Gravel Co., Inc. Greene
P.O. Box 186
Forkland, A1 36740
Franklin 5,7,8
Franklin
TWP.
11S
13S
15S
14S
7S
7S
8S
8S
19N
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
7E
12W
12W
12W
11W
13W
11W
10W
13W
28
15
113
10
15
35
20
30
113
30
CO
23

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#3562
36-1
Sand, Gravel #3997
36-1
#3441
36-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Alabama Sand & Gravel
P.O. Box 1666
Tuscaloosa, A1 35403
APAC-Alabama, Inc.
P.O. Box 818
Birmingham, A1 35201
Stewart Properties, Inc.
P.O. Box 415
Tuscaloosa, A1 35402
COUNTY
Hale
Hale
Hale
SEC. TWP.
22	23N
29	23N
30	23N
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
4E	2	3
4E
4E
16.5
20
30
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
#3216
40-1
#1
45-1
#1630
45-1
Sand, Gravel #1
46-1
Sand, Gravel #4001
47-1
Sand, Gravel #3798
49-1
Pikeville Sand & Gravel, Inc.
P.O. Box 881
Guin, A1 35563
Central Sand & Gravel
P. 0. Box 54
Stanton, A1 36790
D. T. Gregory
P.O. Box 18
Burkville, A1 36725
Alabama Silica
Box 116
Slippery Rock, Pa 16057
Madison Materials, Inc.
P.O. Box 306
Guntersville, A1 35976
Bobby Boyett, Mine Foreman
Hamilton Sand & Gravel
Route 4, Box 79
Hamilton, A1 35570
Lamar
Lowndes
Lowndes
Macon
Madison
Marion
10
29
15
12S
16N
15N
17N
6S
11S
14U
14E
15E
20E
2E
14U
20
22
16
40
120
24

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
Sand, Gravel #3296
49-1
Sand, Gravel #427
50-1
Sand, Gravel #2893
51-4
Sand, Gravel #3613
51-1
Sand,	Gravel
Sand,	Gravel
Sand,	Gravel
Sand, Gravel
#1697
51-2
#2998
51-3
#3517
51-1
#2806
51-1
Sand, Gravel #2425
51-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY
Bull Mountain Sand & Gravel	Marlon
P.O. Box 465
Sumlton, A1 35148
Alpine Sand & Gravel Co., Inc.	Marshall
P.O. Box 791
Alexander City, A1 35010

Campbell Sand & Gravel Co.	Monroe
Route 1, Box 242
Flomaton, A1 36441
Henry C. Childs Construction Co. Monroe
P.O. Box 66
Frisco City, A1 36445
H & H Gravel Company	Monroe
Repton, A1 36475
H & H Gravel Company	Monroe
Llnox, A1 36454
Norrls Sand & Gravel Co., Inc.	Monroe
Route 1, Box 117
Perdldo, A1 36562
Roy Parker & Sons Gravel Co.	Monroe
Route 3, Box 115
Milton, F1 32570
Sandco Sand & Gravel Co., Inc.	Monroe
P.O. Box 1221
Monroevllle, A1 36461
BONDED DISTURBED
SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
18
23
25
24
11
34
32
34
24
9S
8S
5N
6N
5N
6N
5N
4N
6N
15W
2E
7E
7E
8E
7E
6E
5E
7E
10
20
20
30
10
10
20
25

-------
MINERAL
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
COUNTY
SEC.
TWP.
RANGE
BONDED DISTURBED
ACRES ACRES
Sand, Gravel #3399
51-1
Sand, Gravel #2917
51-2
Sand, Gravel #3381
51-3
Sand, Gravel #2388
3-1
Sand, Gravel #2387
3-2
Sand, Gravel #2386
3-3
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
#3867
3-4
#
3-1
Stacey Construction
Route 1, Box 225-B
Monroeville, A1 36460
Tho-Mac Trucking & Gravel, Inc.
P.O. Box 965
Atmore, A1 36504
Tho-Mac Gravel, Inc.
P.O. Box 965
Atmore, A1 36504
Al. Asphalt Contractors, Inc.
P.O. Box 1003
Montgomery, Al 36102
Al. Asphalt Contractors, Inc.
P.O. Box 1003
458 So. Lawrence St.
Montgomery, Al 36102
Al. Asphalt Contractors, Inc.
P.O. Box 1003
458 So. Lawrence St.
Montgomery, Al 36102
Capital City Asphalt Co.
APAC-Alabama, Inc.
P.O. Box 9126
Montgomery, Al 36108
L. D. Chapman Gravel Co.
Bought by Delta Haulers 3-1
Monroe
Monroe
Monroe
Montgomery
Montgomery
22
33
28
29
Montgomery 35
Montgomery 28
32
Montgomery 3,10
6N
5N
5N
17N
17N
17N
17N
16N
7E
6E
6E
19E
19E
19F.
19E
20E
20
20
20
50
40
50
10
20
20
20
c. o
26

-------
5
40
5
12
4
20
60
15
9
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#3034	Delta Haulers, Inc.
3-1	P.O. Drawer 218
Pike Road, A1 36064
#1145	Dixie Sand & Gravel Co., Inc.
3-1	P.O. Box 1128
Montgomery, A1 36102
#2014	Elrod & Froggy Bottom
3-1	Route 5, Box 332
Montgomery, A1 36117
#3788	Greer Sand & Gravel
3-1	Route 3, Box 340-D
Montgomery, A1 36110
#3956	Hickory Bend Farms
3-1	P.O. Box 17551
Montgomery, A1 36117
#3957	Hickory Bend Farms
3-2	P.O. Box 17551
Montgomery, A1 36117
#3287	Swanner Transfer & Storage Co.
3-2	3445 Aronov Avenue
Montgomery, A1 36108
#2332	Swanner-Shine
3-1	Route 3, Box 514
Montgomery, A1 36110
#3952	Thackston Trucking
3-4	216 Townsend Dr.
Montgomery, A1 36117
COUNTY	SEC.	TUP.	RANGE
Montgomery	3,10	16N	20E
Montgomery	32	16N	17W
Montgomery	32	17N	19E
Montgomery	18	17N	18E
Montgomery	1,2	16N	20E
Montgomery	3	16N	20E
Montgomery	24	17N	18E
Montgomery	19	17N	19E
Montgomery	14	16N	20E
27

-------
MINERAL
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
	w
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/	BONDED DISTURBED
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
#3393	The Concrete Company, Inc.
57-1	P.O. Box 7877
Columbus, Ga 31908
Russell
16N
30E
#360
60-2
#1
60-1
#3318
60-1
#30A3
60-1
#3887
60-2
#3273
63-1
#13A6
63-1
#3570
63-1
Gainesville Sand & Gravel Co.
Box 37
Gainesville, A1 35464
Marengo Concrete Products Co.
P.O. Drawer A
Demopolls, A1 36732
River City Industries
P.O. Drawer A
Demopolls, A1 36732
West Alabama Supply
Route 1, Box 86
Livingston, A1 35A70
W.G. Yates & Sons Construction
P.O. Box A56
Philadelphia, MS 39350
Al-Tenn Sand & Gravel
P.O. Box 266
Peterson, A1 35A78
American Sand & Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 3198, Eastdale Station
Tuscaloosa, A1 35A01
Black Widow Resources, Inc.
P.O. Box 36965
Birmingham, A1 35236
Sumter
Sumter
Sumter
Sumter
Sumter
30
30
16,21
Tuscaloosa 33,3A
2 IN
19N
19N
2 IN
15	23N
2 OS
Tuscaloosa 3A	20S
Tuscaloosa	6
19S
2W
2E
2E
1W
2W
8U
8W
8U
28
63
30
AO
50
28
63
20
15
28

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
COUNTY
SEC.
TWP.
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
Sand, Gravel #3805
63-1
Sand, Gravel #3712
63-1
Sand, Gravel #3621
63-2
Sand, Gravel #179
63-2
Sand, Gravel
Sand, Gravel
#1
63-1
#3387
64-1
Dunn Construction Co.
Route 2, Box 551
Cottondale, A1 35453
Northport Sand and Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 807
Northport, A1 35476
Northport Sand and Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 807
Northport, A1 35476
W. T. Ratllff Co.
P.O. Box 1111
Knoxville, A1 37901
Yazoo Gravel Co.
P.O. Box 2348
Tuscaloosa, A1 35401
Winfield Sand & Gravel
Route 2, Box 172
Empire, A1 35063
Tuscaloosa 27	20S
33,34
Tuscaloosa 17	21S
Tuscaloosa 29	20S
Tuscaloosa 28
Walker
19S
Tuscaloosa , 17	21S
15S
8W
10W
11W
9W
10W
5W
93
40
93
60
40
10
80
Subtotal: 1,052 3,248
i-3
29

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
#2536	H. C. Cobern
63-1	Woodstock, A1 35188
#1621	F & W Co., Inc.
8-1	812 2nd Avenue East
Oneonta, A1 35121
#2638	Arvel E. Hallmark, Pres.
8-2	Hallmark Trucking, Inc.
P.O. Box 87
Locust Fork, A1 35097
#3123	Arvel E. Hallmark, Pres.
8-3	Hallmark Trucking, Inc.
P.O. Box 87
Locust Fork, A1 35097
#3941	Arvel E. Hallmark, Pres.
8-5	Hallmark Trucking, Inc.
P.O. Box 87
Locust Fork, A1 35097
#3713	Stephen Black
28-3	P.O. Box 551
Rainsville, A1 35986
#3714	Stephen Black
28-4	P.O. Box 551
Rainsville, A1 35986
#3818	Stephen Black
28-5	P.O. Box 551
Rainsville, A1 35986
#3127	Moccasin Bend Docks
28-1	P.O. Box 565
Signal Mountain, Tn 37377
COUNTY
SEC. TWP.
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
Bibb, Tusc.	2	20S
Blount
Blount 25, 36
Blount
Blount
DeKalb
DeKalb
DeKalb
34
DeKalb	23,34
26
28
13S
13S
14S
14S
7S
7S
7S
5S
6W
1U
2W
2W
1U
7E
7E
7E
9E
10
12
10
19
15
25
80
15
C.:-j
30

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
None
28-1
#2912
39-1
#2825
39-1
#2898
39-1
#2823
39-1
#3103
39-2
#i
1-1
#3071
1-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Southern Minerals Corp.
Charles E. Botcher
Hold'em, Inc.
P.O. Box 548
Oneonta, A1 35121
Jackson County Shale and Clay
Route 1, Box 80
Flat Rock, A1 35966
Luma, Inc.
P.O. Box 158
Ft. Payne, A1 35967
S & W, Inc.
Route 1, Box 768
Flat Rock, A1 35966
T-Square, Inc.
P.O. Box 745
Ft. Payne, A1 35967
T-Square, Inc.
P.O. Box 745
Ft. Payne, A1 35967
Glen-Gery Corporation
227 North 5th Street
Reading, Pa 19603
Arvel H. Hallmark, Pres.
Hallmark Trucking, Inc.
P.O. Box 87
Locust Fork, A1 35097
COUNTY
DeKalb
BONDED DISTURBED
SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Unknown
11
26
Jefferson	33
Jefferson	22
3S
3S
3W
IS
2S
19S
14S
9E
9E
8E
9E
10E
4W
3W
5.2
37
5.2
37
15.7	20
10
10

31

-------
1
15
34
24
4
7
5
3
3
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
PERMIT/
FILE NO. COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
03379	MDR, Inc.
1-1	P.O. Box 106
Warrior, A1 35180
#4002	U.C. Management
1-1	300 Vestavla Pkwy., Suite 3900
Birmingham, A1 35216
#3244	Northwest Mineral Corp.
49-4	Route 1
Bear Creek, A1 35543
#3248	Black Warrior Const. Co.
49-1	P.O. Box 132
Lynn, A1 35575
#4029	Mega Services, Inc.
49-2	Route 2, Box 284
Carbon Hill, A1 35549
#3215	Northwest Alabama Reclamation
49-1	Route 3, Box 183-A
Nauvoo, A1 35578
#2839	Northwest Mineral
49-1	Route 3, Box 345
Hamilton, A1 35570
#2910	Northwest Mineral
49-2	Route 6, Box 50
Hamilton, A1 35570
#2933	Northwest Mineral
49-3	P.O. Box 191
Bear Creek, A1 35543
COUNTY	SEC.	TWP.	RANGE
Jefferson	19	14S	2W
Jefferson	36	14S .	3W
Lamar	4,5	12S	14W
Marion	27	11S	11W
Marion	26	12S	11W
Marion	33	12S	11W
Marion	18	10S	12W
Marion	19	10S	12W
Marion	18	10S	12W
32

-------
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#3665
59-1
11790
59-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS
Acinar Coal, Inc.
1020 Keller Drive
Moody, A1 35004
K. L. Corbln
Route 1
Steele, A1 35953
BONDED DISTURBED
COUNTY	SEC. TWP. RANGE ACRES ACRES
#3899	Cordova Clay Co., Inc.
64-13	P. 0. Box 100
Cordova, A1 35550
#1	Clay & Shale Shippers
64-1	1405 Heflin Ave., West
Birmingham, A1 35214
#3911	Holliday Hauling & Mining Co.
64-1	P.O. Box 707
Jasper, A1 35501
#4031	Mega Services, Inc.
64-1	Rt. 2, Box 284
Carbon Hill, A1 35549
#3431	Pyramid Products, Inc.
64-1	P.O. Box 344
Sumiton, A1 35148
#3992	Rusty's Const. Co.
642	Route 7, Box 76
Jasper, A1 35501
#3214	W. C. Cumins
67-1	Route 6, Box 2A
Haleyville, A1 35565
St. Clair
Walker
Walker
Walker
Walker
Walker
Walker
Winston
27
27
26
29
33
17
16S
St. Clair	33	13S
14S
14S
14S
14S
14S
14S
10S
IE
3E
6W
7W
8W
7W
8W
5W
10W
14
15
14
20
14
20
15
33

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INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
(PERMITTED CONSTRUCTION/INDUSTRIAL ORES)
MINERAL
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
Shale
PERMIT/
FILE NO.
#1
67-1
04030
67-1
#3199
67-1
#3494
67-2
#2897
67-1
COMPANY NAME & ADDRESS	COUNTY
Lanco Coal Co.	Winston
P.O. Box 97
Nauvoo, A1 35578
Mega Services, Inc.	Winston
Route 2, Box 284
Carbon Hill, A1 35549
Southern Minerals & Development Winston
P.O. Box 182
Bear Creek, A1 35543
Southern Minerals & Development Winston
P.O. Box 91
Delmar, A1 35551
TerraClear, Inc.	Winston
P.O. Box 657
Oak Tree Plaza
Hwy. 5 North
Haleyville, A1 35565
SEC.
17
17
TUP.
12N
12S
10S
10S
10S
BONDED DISTURBED
RANGE ACRES ACRES
9W
10W
10W
10W
10W
15
15
8
15
40
40
40
Subtotal:	347	570
GRAND TOTAL: 2,037 5,402
"-i
34

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STATC OF AIABAHA
MVERTQRY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED HIRE LANDS
DATA SUMMARY TABLE
Mineral Tvue
Mini no Troe
rWiwrshln

METALLIC ORES (#1)
Iron Ore
Mines
N/A
Federal
Private
0
100%
Polluted Hater
N/A

Millsitei N/A
1
Mine Dumps
N/A



Stat#
0
Disturbed Land !n/A (#12)

1


Highwalls
N'/A

|


Hine Openings
N/A

1


Haz. Structures
N/A

1
	|
	
	
Subsidence Prone
N/A




30NSTROCTION ORES
PERMTrED (#2)
Shale
Sand  Clay
Sand  Gravel
;iay & Gravel
Sand
Mines LlC
Federal
0
Polluted Hater
S/A

KillsitesN/A
Private
ICO*
line Dumps
H/A

|
State
0
Disturbed Land
4531 acres
15,858,500
1


Highwalls
N/A

i


iaz. Structures
S/A






















EKDOSTRIAL ORES
Mines ) 75
Federal
0
Polluted Water
S/A

PEHHIfTtl) (2)
J&rite
Bauxite
:iay
Millsltesk/A
1
Private
1CC\

-------
STATE OF ALABAMA
INVENTORY OF INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
DATA SUMMARY TABLE |

i i
Mining Type Ownership Features Units Cost (#11)
CONSTRUCTION b
IMDOSTRIAL ORES
City-County-State
(#5,6)
Mines (630
MillsitesJ q
Federal
Private
__c	
100%
Polluted Water [N/A
Mine Durc-ps Jn/A |

;State
0
Disturbed Land [4,SCO acres (16,800,000
1 i

Highwails (n/A |
1


! !

1


|

. .



I


0
1

UTHQt fffiGULATED
MATERIALS (#7)
Mir.es ' N/A
Federal
Polluted Hater | N/A 1

Killsites; N/A
Private
100%
Mine Du,nps ! N/A |
Barite
Bentonite
Graphite
Mica
Slate
Talc
Tripoli
Stone

State
c
Disturbed Land 1 N/A |
i


Highwails j N/A 1
|


 j
Ha2. Structures 1 N/A ]





(
1
1
i
I
1


1
PRE-LAH MDHHG
(#8)
Mines 1 N/A
federal 
c
Polluted Water 1 N/A

Killsitesi N/A
Private
100%
Kir.e Durros 1 N/A 1
1
State
c
Disfiirhpd land
N/A (#12) 1




Highwails j N/A j
1


Haz. Structures
N'/A

|



t
|



1





1
1
UHREGOLATED
MATERIALS (#9)
Marble
Limestone
Dolomite
Chert
Mines
N/A
federal
0
Polluted Water
N/A 1
Millsites
N/A
'rivate
100%
Mine Duwds 
N/A



state
0
Disturbed Land
N/A (#12)





Highwails
N/A





Haz. Structures .
N/A





Subs idence
N/A















N/A NOT AVAILABLE
Total Disturbed Land 15,494 Acres
Total Estimated Cost to Reclaim $54,229,000
Less Forfeited Reclamation Bonds 	57.219
Net Raclaaation Cost $54,171,701

-------
STATE OF ALABAMA
DATA SUMMARY TABLE
COMMENTS
#1) Widespread iron ore mining occurred in Alabama through the early
1950's. Both underground and surface mines are known to exist. No
information is available on the number of mines, the number of mill sites
or the acreage affected.
#2) From the Inventory of Inactive and Abandoned Mine Lands.
(Construction/Industrial Ores).
#3) Due to understaffing, weak enforcement provisions and lack of funding,
less than 50% of non-fuel surface mine operators have made a practice of
applying for mining permits since Alabama's surface mining law was
enacted in 1970.
#4) Estimated figures from known trends occurring on permitted sites.
#5) Surface mines used for the sole purpose of constructing, repairing or
maintaining city, county or state highways are exempt from permitting
requirements. Consequently, no records exist as to their location,
number or size.
#6) County engineers have estimated at least 630 sites covering more than
4,800 acres which are actively being used in the state for road construc-
tion purposes. From field observations and inquiries about pit origins,
it can be concluded that at least as many abandoned county pits exist as
active ones.
#7) "Other regulated materials" have been mined in Alabama sporadically,
and sometimes intensively in certain areas. With a few exceptions, only
the county of operation is known. Building stone is still being mined,
although no permits are on file and no information is available.
#8) Prior to October 1, 1970, all surface mining in Alabama was completely
unregulated.
#9) Limestone, dolomite, marble and chert pits are exempt from State permit-
ting requirements. No information is available as to acreage disturbed
by the extraction of such minerals in Alabama.
#10) Abandoned underground limestone quarries do exist in Alabama, but
their number and size are unknown.
#11) The average cost to reclaim as abandoned non-fuel surface mine in
Alabama is estimated to be $3500 per disturbed acre. The cost to
reclaim other features listed in the data summary table would be included
in that figure, should they happen to occur on a particular site.
#12) Although no records are available to provide for	an accurate estimate of
disturbed land associated with the mining of	metallic ores, pre-law
mining and the mining of unregulated materials,	thousands of acres are
known to exist across the state.

-------

-------
ARKANSAS

-------

-------
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINE DATA SUMMARY
STATE OF ARKANSAS NARRATIVE SUMMARY
1.0 INTRODUCTION
Commercial mining of noncoal minerals began in Arkansas in the
middle 1800's. A variety of mineral commodities have been mined
since it's beginning, for such minerals as antimony, iron,
manganese, mercury, nickel, silver, zinc, lead, asphalt, diamond,
phosphate, bauxite, barite, clay, gypsum, sand, gravel, limestone,
nepheline syenite, novaculite, quartz, silica sand, slate,
soapstone, and vanadium. Only the latter fourteen are still mined
in Arkansas.
Much of the early mining in Arkansas was done underground. Though
not all sites have been located, more than 500 portals and shafts
have been at least partially documented and the search for more
continues. Many of these began as an open cut mine and then went
underground. The old lead, zinc, and antimony mines are estimated
to have constituted 80% of the underground mining operations. At
present, the only underground mining in Arkansas are the limestone
and silica sand mines in north-central Arkansas.
2.0 MINING AND MILLING METHODS
Mining since the early 1900's has been almost exclusively open cut

-------
mining. Without regulation, open cut mining has left the state
with thousands of acres of unreclaimed open pits, dangerous
highwalls, miles of polluted streams, potentially polluted water
impoundments, decaying mine structures, rusting equipment, exposed
mine faces that contain acid bearing materials, and hundreds of
acres of mine waste dumps.
Beneficiation over the years for some commodities required crushing
and/or sizing, such as sand and gravel. Many of these operations
have left large piles of unsold materials, water filled pits,
deteriorating process equipment, and sedimentation ponds with
eroding levies.
Some commodities like bauxite and barite required crushing,
roasting, and chemical and/or electrolytic processing. These
processes have left large tailings ponds (some fifty or more feet
high) with pH levels at both extremes of the pH scale.
3.0 HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS
Noncoal mining methods have created some of the most severe health
and safety hazards in Arkansas. Physical hazards include
unprotected mine openings, highwalls, flooded excavations, spoil
ridges, deteriorating mine structures, subsidence features, and
shallow ponds with bottoms like quicksand. All of which have a

-------
magnet-like attraction to the public.
In some areas, subsidence is slowly encroaching on adjacent
property, threatening homes, farm facilities, and pasture land.
Worse still is the fact that from 1986 through 1988, six (6) people
drowned in water filled mining excavations. From 1985 through
1990, of the nine (9) people who died from injuries sustained in
falls from cliff, at least two occurred at an abandoned mine site.
Though the potential exists for ground water/water supplies to be
contaminated as a result of acid mine water and disposal of process
waste, sufficient monitoring has not been done to determine the
magnitude of such contamination.
4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Monitoring has confirmed that past extraction and beneficiation of
minerals mined in Arkansas has left many miles of streams either
dead or diminished in quality. In addition, there exists other
streams on which no study has been conducted. There also exists
hundreds of acres of water impoundments with low pH, suspended
solids, sulfates and other pollutants that possess the potential
to cause serious environmental harm to surface waters as well as
ground water. Abandoned underground bauxite mines are also
creating problems. Some of these tunnels have filled with acid

-------
mine water from the open pits. This water is then surfacing
elsewhere and getting into nearby streams. The scope of this
problem is, as yet, unknown.
5.0 LAWS AMD REGULATIONS
Except for human safety requirements for underground mining
operations, no mining regulations existed in the state prior to
1971. In that year, the Arkansas General Assembly passed Act 2 36,
entitled the Arkansas Open Cut Land Reclamation Act. This Act
charged the Department of Pollution Control and Ecology with the
responsibility, of enforcing the new law. In 1977 Act 236 was
replaced with Act 336 which was amended in 1987. In 1991, Act 336
was replaced by Act 827.
Since 1971, noncoal mine operators have been required to comply
with certain mining and reclamation restrictions such as preparing
a reclamation plan and posting a bond to assure completion of the
reclamation. The 1991 changes to the open cut law will eliminate
the bonding exemptions that now exist. The purpose of this law was
to prevent the continued growth in the number of inactive or
abandoned mine sites that are a threat to public safety and the
environment.
4

-------
Currently, no state lavs have been enacted to provide for the
reclamation of the inactive or abandoned nine site.
6.0 RECLAMATION EFFORTS
There is no formal program in Arkansas dedicated to reclamation of
inactive or abandoned sites (IAN). Location and documentation of
open cut IAMs only recently became possible. As these sites are
located, an attempt is made to determine who the operator was, and
when the site was mined. If the mining was done post 1971, then
it may be possible to locate the operator (s) and arrange for
reclamation of the site. However, most of the time, the current
land owner, either did not own the land when it was mined, does not
remember when it was mined or does not remember who mined it.
Currently, the only possibility of getting prelaw sites reclaimed
is if the site is permittedd under current law or is reclaimed as-
part of an adjacent permitted site. Thus, most of the sites will
remain as they are unless some program is established to allow the
State to reclaim these sites.
5

-------
NONCOAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES1
STATE OF ARKANSAS
DEPARTMENT OF POLLLUTION CONTROL AND ECOLOGY
SURFACE MINING AND RECLAMATION DIVISION
OPEN CUT DATA SUMMARY2
Mineral^
Length of*
Highwall (mi)
Polluted^
Water (mi)
Mine1' Hazardous'
Dunps(ae) Structures (ea)
Disturbed
Land (ac)
Sand &
Gravel
8.4

135.2 36
1080
Quarry
Stone
11.6

76.5 4
354
Clay
0.15

0 C
15
Shale
0.18

0 0
7
Barite
2.05

20 2
530
Bauxite
3.03
73.0
900 2
1800
Iron
0.10

0 0
6
Quartz
1

1 0
1
TOTAL
26.51
73.0
1132.7 44
3793
COST
$954,360 <
> $54,750,00010 ~
S78,008,845" ~ *132,0C012
2,465,45013  $136,310,635
UNDER GROUND DATA SUMMARY14
Mineral
Mine Entrance1'*
Mine Air Shafts
16 Mine Durps1'
Disturbed Land (ac)

lead/Zinc
198
198
98

Mercury
67
67
33
*-
Antimony
44
44
22

Other18
100
100
50

TOTAL
409
409
203

COST
$6,135,00019 ~ $2,863,00020
~ $131,95021
 $9,129,95^
TOTAL;$145,44 0,585.0

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INACTIVE ABANDONED MINE INVENTORY SUMMARY
STATE OF ARKANSAS
FOOTNOTES
1.	Inactive/abandoned nines (IAMs) are defined as properties
where there is no continuing reclamation responsibility by the
owner or claimant/lessee to remediate the impact of past
noncoal mining. Sites reported in this data summary are not
covered by any mining permits, reclamation bonds, state or
federal licenses or any reclamation contracts.
As specified in the Narrative Summary, the Arkansas Department
of Pollution Control and Ecology only regulates open cut
mining operations. A part of this program is the
documentation of IAMs. It is estimated that, to date,
approximately one-half of the sand and gravel sites and one-
third of the quarry sites have been documented. It is
believed that all other sites have been documented. The
numbers used are projections based on the current information.
Quartz mining is growing in Arkansas, thus, few sites are
abandoned. Most of the quartz mining is done on national
Forest Service land. If abandoned by the operator, the Forest
Service will reclaim the site
2.	Included with this report package is a Data Summary Table and
narrative. The quality of the data and basis of its
reliability is reported in these Footnotes.
3.	The acres listed for each mineral type include the disturbed
or impacted land resulting from mining/milling/processing
activities within the IAM noncoal site. This acreage total
includes health and safety hazards, unvegetated areas, and
environmental degradation on and off site.
4.	Highwalls are defined as the face of exposed overburden and
mineral in an open cut or strip mining operation. Reclamation
of these sites would involve excavation and embankment,
regrading, or blast and terrace procedures.
5.	The data reported is from the Arkansas Department of Pollution
Control and Ecology's current Section 305(b) report to the
U.S. EPA. The data is derived from monitored streams only.
Many smaller streams are not included because they are not
monitored.
6.	Mine dumps are defined to include waste rock dumps, tailings
impoundments, hazardous waste, or overburden stock piles.
Reclamation of these sites could involve any of the following:
grade out and/or relocate mine waste, construct drainage
systems, install erosion netting, dispose of hazardous waste,
apply soil amendments, and revegetate disturbances.
7.	Hazardous structures are defined as noncoal related
0 O

-------
structures, foundations, abandoned excavation equipment, etc.
which could pose a hazard to people being in, on, or around
them. Remediation of these hazards involves demolition,
removal, or restoration.
8. Disturbed land means any land which has not been revegetated
to a similar condition or has a utility similar to surrounding
land. Included in this definition are disturbances such as
open pits, portal areas, haul roads, and waste water treatment
ponds. Reclamation of these sites would involve revegetation
efforts which could be performed without earthwork.
9.	The cost for highwall reclamation is an estimate based on an
average of the current cost in Arkansas to move fill material
less than 500 feet ($0.60/yd.) and greater than 500 feet
($1.30/yd.). The average highwall is approximately 20 feet
high. Grading this to a three feet horizontal to one foot
vertical calculates to $36,000 per mile inclusive of 30% for
administrative costs.
10.	The cost for reclamation of a stream is a figure for which
little background information is possessed. Based on
professional judgement the state of Montana estimated
reclamation of High Impact streams to cost $1,000,000/mile and
Moderate Impact streams to cost $500,000/mile. The stream
miles reported here are totally without aquatic life or
severely limited. For lack of a better method to judge this
reclamation cost, an average of the two Montana categories is
used ($750,000) .
11.	Reclamation of noncoal impacts as defined in the mine dump
category are diverse and would be site specific. Based on
information gathered to date: 1) the average mine dump - is
fifteen feet high, 2) a total of 232.7 acres of mine dump
exists not including the bauxite mine dumps, 3) it will cost
$0.60/yard to move this material, and 4) all material will be
put into the excavation from which it came. The average
bauxite mine dump is thirty feet high. There is approximately
900 acres of this material to be moved at a cost of $1.30/yard
to place it back in the excavation.Thirty percent is added for
estimated administrative costs, including design and
construction oversight.
12.	Remediation of hazardous structure is a cost not yet incurred
in Arkansas. However, the cost factor used by the state of
Montana ($3,000/structure) would probably apply in Arkansas.
13.	Reclamation of disturbed land was limited by definition to
include only revegetation efforts. Based on actual
reclamation cost in Arkansas, $650/acre has been utilized for
this estimate, 30% of which is estimated as administrative
costs.
5?

-------
14.	Since Arkansas does not regulate underground noncoal mines,
it was necessary to depend on information obtained from the
State Geology Department concerning quantity and condition of
underground mining operations.
15.	Most underground mines had only one entrance and one air
shaft. However, some were shallow and had no air shaft while
others were deep and had many air shafts. For this report
each entrance is assumed to have one air shaft.
16.	See footnote 15.
17.	The documents reviewed at the State Geology Department were
not prepared with reclamation in mind, so spoil materials and
affected area at the mines site were not addressed. For this
report, the following assumption is made: Affected surface
area at each site is assumed to be one-half acre inclusive of
spoil area.
18.	Other minerals mined in Arkansas include iron, manganese,
nickel, silver, diamonds, phosphate and bauxite. For this
report these abandoned mine sites are estimated to number
about one hundred.
19.	The estimated average cost of closure for noncoal mine
entrances is $15,000/entrance. This figure is based on the
current average cost for closure of coal mine entrances.
20.	The estimated average cost of closure for air shafts is
$7,000/shaft. This figure is based on the current average
cost for closure of coal mine air shafts.
21.	The majority of the underground mines in Arkansas are in the
Ozark and Ouachita Mountains. Regrading with heavy equipment
would not be feasible. In all probability it would do more
esthetic and environmental harm than would be repaired.
Revegetation only is included in this category at $650 per
acre.

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ILLINOIS

-------
NARRATIVE SUMMARY
NON-COAL MINES
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINES
STATE OF ILLINOIS
Introduction
The beginnings of the non-coal industry in Illinois are unknown with the
exception of selected minerals. The first recorded fluorspar mine was
recorded is 1842. Production continues today from four sites with one
active mill. The majority of fluorspar production has been from
underground mining. With the growth and development of the Chicago area in
the 1800's it is apparent the was a demand for stone products. Both sand
and gravel and limestone are readily available in this portion of the
state. Lead and zinc production from underground mines began in the late
1700's in northwest Illinois with last active underground site closing In
1975. Peat mining continues In the northeastern part of the state. There
are a variety of sites which have been mined historically for clay and
shale for bricks, ceramics, absorbant clay products. Shales and limestones
are mined for cement. Silica has been mined for many yaars for glass
manufacture as well as tripoli and ganlster . (fine grained and amorphous
silica). Available site specific information is found in a more
comprehensive document (Sherrill) prepared for this report.
Specific processing wastes.
Ore wastes are associated with the several of these minerals. For the
purposes of the Inventory all known mine sites were counted. In this
paragraph however mine spoils and pit water are not considered as mine
waste. Mine waste will be identified as a processing waste, either as a
coarse or fine (slurry) waste product. Fluorspar production today results
in an Impounded slurry waste. No water quality problems are noted with
these operations. Most of the older sites did not process the ore using
today's techniques resulting in no specific waste piles. Coarse waste from
fluorspar was sold as road rock but is not currently generated. Clay mines
may or may not wash their product depending on purity and end product.
Waste from clay mines (absorbant clay) is an Impounded high clay waste left
In slurry ponds. This material is non-toxic and readily vegetates. Clay
dust from brick manufacturing is disposed of In approved landfills. Peat
mines do not produce a waste. Excavated areas typically fill with water to
form a lake.
Silica (glass) operations wash their mineral resulting in a fine
soil/silica waste which is impounded. Cement operation only produce a kiln
waste which is understood not to be considered a waste subject to this
review. Limestone and sand and gravel operations may wash their minerals
according to local conditions and product demands. The wastes are either
fine soil particles or fine limestone particles. Tripoli operations do not
produce a waste. The lead/zinc operations all now abandoned, were
underground mines and have produced numerous waste piles of waste ore and
sinkholes from shafts. These sites have the most potential for
environmental concern, however information is limited.

-------
Health and Safety Concerns
The primary health and safety concerns of the non-coal abandoned sites are
unprotected highvalls and mine openings. Current Mine Safety and Health
Administration regulations 30 CFR 57.20021 require the sealing or entrance
barriers after mine closure. Both permitted and non-permitted non-coal
mines in Illinois are exempt from highwall sloping or backfilling. Due to
the depth of pits particularly limestone quarries the sloping of highvalls
is not, in most instances, practical or desirable, as excessive land and
reserves would be used to achieve the slope. There are no current
regulations for the fencing of highvalls, hovever fencing does commonly
occur at quarries near urban areas.
Environmental Impacts
The main environmental Impact of the abandoned non-coal mining industry is
non-point source sediment loss from overburden deposition. With rare
exception toxic (acidic) overburden is not encountered. With the possible
exception of fluorspar and lead/zinc, due to lack of information, none of
the mine waste would be considered toxic or produce potentially toxic
discharge. The fluorspar industry must monitor fluorine discharges as an
added parameter under their NPDES permits.
Laws and Regulations
The state of Illinois, Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation Council, has
recently begun to work on a limited number of non-coal sites under the
Title IV portion of the federal coal lav SMCRA. The state is now
authorized to spend a maximum of two per cent (two hundred thousand dollars
per year) of their annual budget on non-coal sites where extreme hazards
are present. This authorization beginning 1989 will continue until 1994.
Present activities are filling twenty open fluorspar and lead mine shafts.
Illinois began reclamation regulation of the non-coal industry in 1962.
Reclamation standards of this industry increased in 1971 to require the
overburden to be graded to a rolling topography. From 1962 to 1971 the
overburden ridges were required to be struck off and vegetated. Currently
pit excavations may be left dry or to form lakes. Highwalls may be left
ungraded or not backfilled. Support areas such as processing and storage
areas are not subject to reclamation regulations.
Reclamation Efforts
Reclamation planning of non regulated abandoned site began in 1990 and site
work will continue through 1994. Twenty open fluorspar and lead mine
shafts have been identified for OSM Title IV funding for 1990 and 1991.
The inventory presented assumes all active sites have some abandoned or
non-regulated portions within the total affected acreage.

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NON-COAL INVENTORY - INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINES
STATE OF ILLINOIS
ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND MINERALS
LAND RECLAMATION DIVISION
AGENCY CONTACT DEAN SPINDLER
(217) 782-4970
CONSTRUCTION/COMMERCIAL ORES
TYPE	# OF FEATURE	UNITS # OF	COST
SITES (see footnotes)	UNITS	$
SAND AND GRAVEL
839
POLLUTED WATER
MILES
0
$0
LIMESTONE
484
MINE DUMPS
ACRES
100
$200, OCX)
CEMENT
5
DISTURBED LAND
ACRES
32555
$65,110,000
PEAT
7
HIGHWALLS
MILES
1011
$27,950,000


MINE OPENINGS
#
UNKWN
$0


SUBSIDENCE PRONE
ACRES
NA
$0


HAZARDOUS STRUCTURE
#
UNKWN
$0
SUBTOTAL
1335



$93,260,000



METALLIC ORES



TYPE
# OF
FEATURE
UNITS
# OF
COST

SITES
(see footnotes)

UNITS
$
LEAD/ZINC
212
POLLUTED WATER
MILES
UNKWN.
$0
FLUORSPAR/

MINE DUMPS
ACRES
100
$1,000,000
ASSOC. MINERALS
213
DISTURBED LAND
ACRES
850
$1,700,000
(Zn,Ba,Pb)

HIGHWALLS
MILES
0
$10,640,000


MINE OPENINGS
#
>400
$1,600,000


SUBSIDENCE PRONE
ACRES
UNKWN
$0


HAZARDOUS STRUCTURE
#
UNKWN
$0
SUBTOTAL
425



$14,940,000
	

INDUSTRIAL ORES
	
	
	
TYPE
# OF
" FEATURE
UNITS
# OF
COST

SITES
(see footnotes)

UNITS
$
SILICA
4
POLLUTED WATER
MILES
0
$0
CLAY
110
MINE DUMPS
ACRES
300
$600,000
TRIPOLI/
19
DISTURBED LAND
ACRES
1538
$3,076,000
GANISTER

HIGHWALLS
MILES
63
$1,522,400


MINE OPENINGS
#
>10
$40,000


SUBSIDENCE PRONE
ACRES
UNKWN
$0


HAZARDOUS STRUCTURE
#
UNKWN
$0
SUBTOTAL
133



$5,238,400
TOTAL
1893

APPROX.
$113,000,000

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NON-COAL INVENTORY
inactive and abandoned mines
STATE OF ILLINOIS
FOOTNOTES
Inactive and abandoned mines (IAMs) are defined as areas where there
is no reclamation responsibility to the 111 Department of Mines and
Minerals. This will include many sites that are periodically active
or active sites that have abandoned areas on the site. This will also
Include numerous permit exempt sites for which only mineral and
location is known. Exact activity status is unknown.
Average acres per site has been estimated from experience with active
sites. There is no accurate acreage database for permit exempt sites
which represents the majority of these sites.
Ownership information is not available. Tripoli and fluorspar mining
disturbances are know to occur on federal land.
Polluted water would be defined as water quality ?s a direct result of
the mining activity which would not meet the federal Clean Water Act.
There are no known sources of polluted water created as a result of
non-coal mining. Sediment loss appears to be the main impact for
these sites.
Mine dumps would be defined as ore waste piles and Impounded fine
waste (slurry ponds). Slurry pond reclamation requirements under the
current state law require promoting natural reforestation within the
ponds. Reclamation of LAM sites would be similar.
Disturbed land would be defined as land affected by overburden removal
or deposition, mineral processing, storage and transportation other
than used as a mine dump.
Hazardous highwall would be defined as the vertical face of the
unmined mineral and overburden. All highwalls are inherently
dangerous if ungraded or unprotected from public access. The grading
or backfilling of many pits, particularly limestone quarries, is not
considered practical due to loss of mineral reserves due to depth of
excavation( > 200 feet), and relatively thin overburden (5-30 feet).
Fencing may be an appropriate alternative. The estimated cost of
fencing is $10/linear foot.
Hazardous mine openings would be defined as any unsealed opening into
an underground mine (shaft, slope or drift). Shaft sealing Includes
removal of debris, backfilling and capping.
Subsidence prone areas would be defined as area overlying undermined
area where Inadequate roof support was left for long term stability.
The acreage cannot be determined, however subsidence has been
associated with trlpoll and lead mining.

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Hazardous structures would be defined as buildings and processing
structures abandoned on site. The removal of the9e structures has not
been nor is currently regulated. Most mines have some type of these
structures of which some are portable and are removed after the site
Is inactive. No cost estimate can be calculated due to lack of
available information.

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STATE OF ILLINOIS
NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINES
REFERENCE GUIDE
1.	Anderson, R.C. 1964. Sand and Gravel Resources of Dekalb County,
111. State Geol. Survey (ISGS) Circ. 367, 16pp.
2.	Anderson, R.C. 1967. Sand and Gravel Resources Along the Rock River
in Illinois, ISGS Circ. 414, 17pp.
3.	Bastin, E.S. 1931. The Fluorspar Deposits of Hardin and Pope
Counties, Illinois. ISGS Bulletin 68, 116pp.
4.	Baxter, J.W. et al. 1963. Areal Geology of the Illinois Fluorspar
District Part 1. ISGS Circ. 342, 43pp.
5.	Baxter, J.W. and G.A. De9borough. 1965. Areal Geology of the
Illinois Fluorspar District Part 2. ISGS Circ. 385, 40pp.
6.	Bradbury, J.C. 1957. Outlying Occurrences of Galena, Sphalerite, and
Fluorite in Illinois. ISGS Ind. Min, Notes 7, 5pp.
7.	Bradbury, J.C. et al. 1968. Fluorspar in Illinois. ISGS Circ. 420,
64pp.
8.	Cook, W.J. Jr. 1979. Non-Coal Subsurface Mines in Illinois. 111.
Inst, of Nat. Resources. Earth Materials Tech. Sect. 353pp. The
purpose of this inventory was to locate and describe site conditions
at underground mines. Most of these site are abandoned.
9.	Ekblav, G.E.and J.E.Lamar. 1964. Sand and Gravel Resources of
Northeastern Illinois. ISGS Circ. 359, 8pp.
10.	Hickman, T.J. and J.R. Nawrot. 1980. Preliminary Evaluation of
Potentially Hazardous Fluorspar Mine Entries. 111. Abandoned Mine
Land Reclamation Council (IAMLRC) Summary Report 23pp.
11.	Hickman, T.J. and J.R. Navrot. 1980. Evaluation of Potentially
Hazardous Mine Entries Phase II. 111. Abandoned Mine Land
Reclamation Council (IAMLRC) Summary Report 31pp. This report was
prepared for the Illinois Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Council by
the Southern 111. Univ. Coop. Wild. Res. Lab. to Identify sites
potentially eligible for reclamation under SMCRA.
12.	Hester, N.C. 1970. Sand and Gravel Resources of Sangamon County,
Illinois. ISGS Circ. 452, 18pp.
13.	Hester, N.C. and R.C. Anderson. 1969. Sand and Gravel Resources of
Macon County, Illinois. ISGS Circ. 446, 16pp.
14.	Hunter, R.E. and J.P. Kempton. 1967. Sand and Gravel Resources of
Boone County, Illinois. ISGS Circ. 417, 14pp.

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15.	Illinois Dept. of Mines and Minerals - Land Reclamation Div, 1991.
NON-COAL DATABASE, This database contains site information on
permitted and non-permitted sites since 1971. The current land
reclamation law exempts the majority of non-coal mines in the state
due to size and/or overburden thickness. Numerous non-permitted sites
are inspected for site condition changes. The database also records
reclamation and closure of permitted sites.
16.	Illinois Dept. of Transportation. 1988. Sources and Producers of
Aggregates for Highway Construction in Illinois. Illinois Department
of Transportation, Bulletin 23. This publication is periodically
updated and has been produced for approximately 70 years.
17.	Jacobs, A.M. 1971. Geology for Planning in St. Clair County,
Illinois. ISGS Circ. 465, 35pp.
18.	Labotka, T.C. and N.C. Hester. 1971. Sand and Gravel Resources of
Mason County, Illinois. ISGS Circ. 464, 18pp.
19.	Krey, P. and J.E. Lamar. 1925. Limestone Resources of Illinois.
ISGS Bull. 46, 392pp.
20.	Lamar, J.E. 1953. Siliceous Materials of Extreme Southern Illinois.
 ISGS RI 166, 39pp.
21.	Lamar, J.E. 1965. Industrial Minerals and Metals of Illinois. ISGS
Educational Series ES 8, 48pp.
22.	Lamar, J.E. 1959. Limestone Resources of Extreme Southern Illinois.
ISGS RI 211, 81pp.
23.	Larsen, J.I. 1973. Geology for Planning in Lake County, Illinois.
ISGS Circ. 481, 43pp.
24.	Levine, C.R. 1973. Geology of the Clear Creek Tripoli Deposits of
Alexander County, Illinois. M.S. Thesis, Southern 111. Univ,
25.	Masters, J.M. 1978. Sand and Gravel and Peat Resources in
Northeastern Illinois. ISGS Circ. 503, 11pp.
26.	McHenry County Department of Planning. 1990. McHenry County
Inventory of Earth Extraction Operations. 257pp.
27.	Reinertsen, D.L. 1984. Fluorite: Illinois State Mineral. ISGS
Educational Ext. Publication Geogram 9, 2pp.
28.	Samson, I. and J.M. Masters. 1990. Directory of Illinois Mineral
Producers 1988-1989. ISGS IMN 103, 103pp. This publication is
periodically updated.
29.	Sherrill, J. et al. 1991. Non-Coal Mineral Site Directory. This
directory is a compilation of the location of all known sources of
non-coal mines in Illinois prepared by the Southern 111. Univ. Coop.
Wild. Res. Lab. for the Illinois Department of Mines and Minerals.
Some site specific information Is available.

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30.	Stevens, D.F. 1942. Directory of Illinois Clay and Clay Products
Producers. ISGS Circ. 78, 35pp.
31.	U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Mines. 1990. State Mineral
Summaries 1990. 159pp.

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INDIANA

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INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
PATRICK R. RALSTON, DIRECTOR
INDIANA
NON-COAL MINERAL EXTRACTION DATA SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
The State of Indiana does not have a comprehensive automated or manual
database of non-coal mineral extraction sites, active or inactive. There are
numerous sources of information on these sites, but the data is kept by
different agencies in different forms. The Indiana Department of Natural
Resources is the agency that has compiled this information.
The Indiana Geological Survey (ICS), a division of the Indiana Department
of Natural Resources, keeps the best available data on active sites. These
records are kept in card files and on typewritten lists. The IGS maintains
excellent control of information on active operations and associated geologic
data. Unfortunately, the Survey has not had the resources to update and
computerize their historical, inactive, and abandoned mine data.
In 1986, the Indiana General Assembly enacted the Mineral Extraction Mine
Reclamation Program. The program was administered by the Division of
Reclamation, Indiana Department of Natural Resources. This program was an
attempt to regulate the Band, gravel, and limestone industries. The program
was repealed the following year. During the time the program was in effect, a
database was developed to inventory the Btate's sand, gravel, and limestone
(excluding dimension limestone) active and inactive sites and operations. The
database is essentially incomplete due to the short duration of the program
and the emphasis on active commercial sites. However, a high volume of raw
data was recorded and a basic computerized database format was developed.
Non-coal mining in Indiana consists of Band, gravel, limestone (crushed and
dimension), peat, marl, gypsum, clay, ehale (including oil shale), and
sandstone. The major industries in Indiana which account for the largest
number of sites are sand, gravel, and limestone. Historical production of the
other commodities has not been significant by comparison. Recording of the
production of other commodities has not been consistently documented.
MINING METHODS
Surface mining is the basic method of extraction of non-coal minerals in
Indiana. Mining consists of removal of topsoil, excavation to the pit, and
direct extraction of the desired commodity. Haste material associated is
limited. Disposable waste material consists of soil, occasionally shale, and,
in the case of dimension limestone, large blocks of limestone that are
extracted but not marketable. The limestone block piles are the most dramatic
form of waste material.
"EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER"


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Soil may be stockpiled or sold for fill. Shale and subsoil clay are hauled
to the most convenient location adjacent to the site. Quarrying involves the
occasional use of blasting agents. The material that is extracted is crushed
or graded and transported to its final destination. Nearly all processing
occurs on or near the operation. Limestone block waste is piled out of the
way of the active portion of the quarry.
When extraction is complete and an operation is abandoned, effects of the
extraction remain. Lakes, ponds, craters, haul roads, bare parking areas,
equipment, and etructures are left in place. With dimension stone removal,
sheer stone walls, large blocks and block piles are also present. With sand
and gravel operations, highwalls and ridges of moved material remain.
Many of the sites are reclaimed by nature, as vegetation encroaches on the
roads, bare spots, and heaps of material. The ponds and lakes checked by DoR
contained fish. Mine operations near populated areas or urban centers are
often reclaimed by the operators or landowners for residential, commercial,
and recreational development.
HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS
Non-coal mining methods and mine waste do not create a significant impact
on the health and safety of the public. The hazards which exist on these
abandoned sites include lakes, vertical cliffs, and abandoned buildings. The
lakes, especially in dimension atone sites, are very deep and have cliffs
instead of gradual banks for sides. There is a constant danger of accidental
drownings. Most of these sites have "no trespassing" signs posted, but the
temptation of these sites remains a continuous threat.
The steep cliffB of pits and quarries are a hazard, especially when located
close to roadB with no guardrail. Abandoned structures and equipment pose a
hazard, as they are very attractive to children as play areas.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Waste material which is disposed of near mining sites, if not immediately
vegetated, may cause erosion problems. Sedimentation into nearby surface
water is also a problem. These problems are temporary in most cases, as the
sites are either used by man or overgrown by nature.
The integration of toxic materials associated with non-coal mineral
extraction mines is insignificant. More toxic materials are dumped on the
soil by spillage at heavy equipment fueling on site than by the material
itself.
One effect of these extractions is that large areas may be left barren or
unproductive after the extraction is completed. The large flat barren floors
of extensive gravel, sand, and stone sites that are not water filled are
examples of areas larger than some farms that are rendered useless.
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LAWS AND REGULATIONS
There are no currant laws or regulations which apaeifieally address the
non-coal mineral industry or problems aaaociated with non-coal mine waata.
The Indiana General Assembly enacted a program which regulated the sand,
gravel, and limestone industries in 1986. The legislation provided for the
establishment of the Mineral Extraction Mine Reclamation program (IC 14-4-9).
This law was repealed the following year due to pressure from the industry.
The failure of the program wbb largely due to permitting and bonding
requirements which would have adveraely affected smaller operations.
A plan to address legislative activity regarding non-coal mineral
extraction is needed. Support for such legislation should be cultivated among
lawmakers. The enactment of a federal program should encourage positive
legislative action at the Btate level.
RECLAMATION EFFORTS
Non-coal reclamation in Indiana is the responsibility of the operator.
Abandoned sites are most often left to be reclaimed by nature. Sites which
are favorable for commercial development are reclaimed promptly with the
postmining land use clearly planned.
A preliminary study compiled by the Indiana Geological Survey estimated
the percentage of lands disturbed for extraction that were reclaimed by
nature. The figure for sand, gravel, peat, and marl sites was over fifty
percent. About five percent of crushed limestone quarriea ware reclaimed by
nature. The figure for dimension stone was less than one percent.
As mentioned earlier, dimension limestone quarries are a unique reclamation
problem. Becauae of the nature of the material, about fifty percent of the
atone extracted from the quarry is waste. Stone that does not fit precise
apecificationa, has flaws or color differentiation, is disposed of on site;
This stone ie not toxic, but doeB cause some health and safety problems.
Aesthetics of these sites are also important, especially where they adjoin
urban areas.
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CURRENT MINE WASTE DATA BASE SUMMARY
Data from four sources is represented in the Mine Waste Data Base. Each of
the sources is briefly outlined below. The two databases mentioned earlier
are a product of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. The second two
are from federal information sources. Each database prioritizes its
information differently. Two common elements missing from all four are
estimates of affected acreage and estimates of cost to reclaim. The
assessment of these databases has changed from our original submission, due to
field verification of a sampling of the data from each one.
Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Division of Reclamation
The only automated database of the four used was the IDNR, DoR Sand,
Gravel, and Limestone program data. This information was assembled during
Indiana's sand and gravel program which ended in 1987.
The database has several features that make it unique and useful. It is
computerized with the information recorded in an RBASE program. It also
references almost every extraction site in Indiana.
Information was initially gathered by studying each of the 705 topographic
quad mapaheets that represent Indiana for indicators of extraction activity.
The information was then recorded in the database, with no entry in the
comments section. In many cases, there was also no entry in the operation
type section. As the sites were visited, brief notes were recorded in these
portions of the database. Photos were also taken in some cases and converted
to slides. The slides are stored in a ring binder and coded so they can be
associated with the entry in the computer.
There are several weak points in the database. The locations of sites,
recorded in the cadastral system, are recorded only down to section which is
an insufficient degree of detail. When more than one site is located in a
section, a number is placed in the operation type column or in the comments
section to indicate the number of sites. There is no differentiation between
sites.
The comments ar> often inaccurate or give no information. Examples of
these comments include: locating a site on the west side of a road when it was
on the east, "Both abandoned-no photos", "Abandoned Checked 3-25-88", "both
abandoned-unstable highwalls", "couldn't stop for photo, checked 1-26-89",
"abandoned-too far for photo", "abandoned, now a lake.(no film)". A five Word
entry the includes the words "no film" does not give working knowledge of a
site.
Additionally, no files were made for the sites. These files would contain
the hard copy information, such as inspection reports, more detailed site
descriptions, and photographs.
No reports of inspection or field trip results reports were made.
4

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Indiana Ceoloaical Survey
The ICS database is large, accurate, and unwieldy. It records site
location down to quarter quarter section in the cadastral system of actively
producing sites. Addresses, company officers( and directions to the sites are
included. There are two forme of data recording. A card file with manual
entries for the siteB is the repository of detailed data. Additionally,
different sections publish booklets with operator information.
The strength of this data is its accuracy. Fourteen ICS data sites were
checked and all data recorded on each site was correct. The two individuals
in ICS that DoR staff dealt with, Todd Thompson and Curtie Ault, were very
knowledgeable and helpful.
Mineral Resource Data System. U. S. Ceolooical Survey
This database is extremely detailed. It is automated, but the data used here
was received in printed tabular form. Each site has a two page description of
the mineral available, extraction activity, geological data, and location.
The locations are recorded in one or more Byatem: Geodetic Coordinates,
Cadastral, and Universal Transverse Mercator Coordinates.
The MRDS system deals with minerals other than limestone, sand, and
gravel. It records findings of minerals, such as iron and fluoride, that are
present in the state but have never been developed. The two sites that are
relevant to the DoR database were gypsum extraction siteB.
The two sites relevant to Mine Haste were also checked. MRDS data was
found to be accurate in detail. Their locations were recorded in the
cadastral system.
United States Department of the Interior, Mineral Availability System
The Mineral Availability System catalogues stone, coal, clay, sand and
gravel, iron, magnesium, sodium, silicon, aluminum, fluoride, calcium, lead,
sulphur, gypsum, and tungsten availability sites. Most of the sites, other
than coali atone, sand, and gravel, are under the heading of "raw prospects",
indicating that they have never been developed. Other data in the system
includes active or paBt producer status and name of the site operator, if
known.
The data from five MAS Bites was checked and found to be accurate. There
was a problem with integrating the MAS data into the total database. All site
locations were recorded only by county and longitude and latitude (Geodetic)
coordinates. There is an overlap of entries between this and the other
databases. Time was not available to convert all of the location data into a
common system and eliminate these duplicate entries.
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DATABASE RECOMMENDATIONS
This database is to be the source of reference and management tool for a
reclamation and regulatory effort. It is currently a combination of the DoR
Sand and Gravel database, the ICS database, the MRDS system, and the MAS
system. Much accurate, useful data has been recorded and is available. But,
for it to fulfill its purpose, it must be developed. The automated portion
must be made more responsive to uBer requests for information, and the hard
copy portion must contain more documentation of site status.
Recommendations for further development of the database are as follows:
1.	Record site locations by all three coordinate systems (UTM, Cadastral, and
Geodetic coordinates) and enter this in the computerized portion of the
database as well as the hard copy files. Where the DoR database lists a
section with more than one site, give each site a unique entry in the
database. As soon as this is accomplished, a sort of current data will be
done by location (UTM is the most efficient sorting data field) and duplicate
entries will be eliminated. Any new data submissions, no matter what location
system is used, can be checked against existing entries in the database. This
single step eliminates duplication of effort and refines the database to a
single entry per site.
DoR has added a column to the original database for UTM coordinates and
recorded a UTM for each site that was visited during database verification
field trips.
2.	Notify the USGS of any changes that should be made to topo quad maps.
Where an activity is indicated on the map and no longer exists on the ground,
the USGS should be notified so that when a particular quad is republished it
will no longer indicate that activity.
DoR has contacted USGS for procedures to forward this information.
3.	Expand the number of data tables in the automated system. There is
currently only one table which records location, site type, and comments.
The comments section is overused and does not give data that can be sorted
readily and converted to numerical data. There Bhould be five tables with key
columns that link the data in them.
The first table would hold data on location to include county, topographic
quadrant map name, Cadastral, UTM, and Geodetic coordinates, site or operation
type, whether the site iB active or inactive, and whether the site has been
reclaimed or not.
The second table would be keyed to the first by quad name and UTM. It will
contain only active sites and give the name, address, and phone number of
operators, approximate size of the operation, and information on production at
the site. The date of the laBt site check would also be recorded.
6

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Tha third table would contain sites that are not active but have not bean
reclaimed. Again, quad and UTM will be the link to other tables. Size and
reclamation cost estimates will be included here, as will date of last visit.
A priority system will also indicate the order in which these will be
reclaimed.
The fourth table will contain sites that are under reclamation
construction. This table will indicate project number, design and construction
status, estimated cost, actual cost, and status until the site is reclaimed.
Again quad, UTM, and last check date will be included.
The fifth table is for reclaimed sites. The three standards, quad, UTM, and
last check will be present, along with information on the method of
reclamation (reclaimed by nature, operator, landowner, etc). It should also
indicate the date that information on the site reclamation was communicated to
the USCS, so that future publication editions of USCS maps will no longer
indicate the quarry, pit, or activity that has been reclaimed.
4.	Create a hard copy document file on each site. This should include the
inspection reports for the site, information on sources of data for the site,
photographs of the site, and a map of the site (a copy of the portion of the
quad where the site is located). Any other information on the site should be
stored here. The slides that are part of the DoR database will be sorted,
made into photographs, and filed by site. These files will be organized in
order of quad map and UTM. Each site file will be color coded as to status
(active, inactive but not reclaimed, reclaimed).
In the case of some of the extensive dimension stone quarries, aerial
photos must be acquired for the site files. Soma of these sites have
disturbed more than a square mile of surface area. Surface photos and
descriptions do not provide sufficient information.
DoR staff have created a file for each of the sites that were visited
during field trips to verify the database. These files contain the
information listed above.
5.	Field check each site in the database. As stated earlier, there is almost
no recorded information available as to what is actually on the ground in
terms of acreage affected, estimates of reclamation costs, photographs, or
status of sites.
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CONCLUSIONS
The current data available gives DoR a good starting point for a definitive
database. Data ae it exists in each base is adequate for the current user. No
site that is referenced either by a symbol on the topo quad or in the printed
data is missing from the database. Some sites where undefined activity exists
(such as new farm ponds) are also in the base. Written information on all
active operations is available.
The database in its present form has not been developed to a level of detail
required for programmatic usage. Hard files only exist on sites visited by
DoR to validate the database. Sites are not sorted by status. Locations are
not recorded in a way that precludes duplication of entries.
In order for the Division of Reclamation to bring this database to the
deBired level of detail and accessibility, several things are required. There
must be a considerable expansion of the amount of electronically recorded
data. A definitive set of hard copy files must be created. Field checks of
the existing data must be done to verify the database.
Costs for these activities are outlined in the Task I submission.
NOTE: The Indiana Mine Waste Data Base is too voluminous for Inclusion
in this report but is available from either the Interstate Mining
Compact or from the Indiana DoR.
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ANNEX A FIELD TRIP NARRATIVE
Members of the Division of Reclamation made three field trips to sites
listed in the database. The purpose of the trips was to check the printed
data against actual conditions on the ground, cheeks were made of data from
all four of the sources included in the base. In all, 47 sites on 41
topographic quads in 22 counties were visited.
To create a standard record format for our findings, a data form was
developed by staff. Photographs were also taken at the sites. A filing
system, using quad sheet name, UTM, and color codes for status of the sites
was initiated. Computer data was updated and a data table for UTM coordinates
was added to the computer database as a method of sorting the data and
eliminating duplication. These changes set the foundation for future
development of the Indiana Mine Waste Information SyBtem.
Another result of the field work was that four duplicate entries were
eliminated from the database and one entry that included two completely
separate siteB was recorded as two.
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ANNEX B FIELD FINDINGS
Andrews Quad, Huntington County, UTM 0625140 4511960,
reclaimed by nature. In Psearch by location, no other
a) reclaimed by nature, should be reported to USGS
printing
Bargersville Quad, Johnson County, UTM 0565930 4483400, abandoned gravel pit
in the center of a rowcrop field. Psearch data correct.
Bedford West, Lawrence County, UTM 0540180 4301470, abandoned dimension
limestone quarry. Psearch data correct.
Blocher Quad, Scott County, UTM 061*7000 4283000, Scott County Sand and Gravel,
an active crushed limestone site. LiBted in the ICS data system. Existing
data correct.
Bloomington Quad, Monroe County, UTM 0538600 4331200, large abandoned
dimension limeBtone site. Psearch data correct.
Bluffton Quad, Wells County, UTM 0650900 4802800, An abandoned Band and gravel
site. Location listed in PSearch without elaboration.
Brownstown Quad, Jackson County, UTM 0578300 4303550, County Materials, active
sand and gravel site. Listed in ICS data system. Existing data correct.
Brownstown Quad, JackBon County, UTM 0581640 4304070, abandoned small
limestone quarry within town of BrownBtown, approx 4 acres. LiBted in PSEARCH.
Existing data correct.
Brownstown Quad, Jackson County, UTM 0582430 4304500, abandoned clay pit,
kilns, and structures. Listed in PSEARCH. Existing data correct.
Brownstown Quad, JackBon County, UTM 0585500 4506500, abandoned site,
hazardous due to cliffs close to roadside with no guardrail. Listed in
PSEARCH. Existing data correct.
Butlersville Quad, Jennings County, UTM 0619400 4319450, Kentucky Stone
Co/Berry Materials, a large, active, crushed limestone site. Listed in ICS
data system and MAS data system. Existing data correct.
Butlersville Quad, Jennings County, UTM 0627350 4323780, abandoned limestone
quarry, overgrown, trash, sheer cliffs. Listed in PSEARCH. Existing data
correct.
Charleston Quad, Clark County, UTM 0610300 4249800, Sellersburg Stone Company,
a large, active crushed limestone operation, approx 320 acres. Listed in ICS
data system and MAS system. Existing data correct.
Charleston Quad, Clark County, UTM 0611000 4255000, Coplay Cement Co. Speed
Plant, a limestone extraction and cement production site over one square mile.
Listed in ICS data system. Existing data correct.
Site completely
data.
for deletion from future
10

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Clear Creek Quad, Monroe County, UTM 0541000 4326200, a huge, abandoned,
dimension limestone site. Psearch data correct.
Cloverdale Quad, Putnam County, UTM 0518900 4375200, large quarry, abandoned
and overgrown. In both ICS and Psearch data bases correct.
Corydon Heat Quad, Harrison County, UTM 0575890 4230195, an abandoned pit in
the middle of a subdivision. Listed in PSEARCH. Existing data correct.
Corydon West Quad, Harrison County, UTM 0575750 4224430, Mathes Stone Company,
an active crushed limestone site. Listed in the ICS data system and mas data
system. Existing data correct.
Forrest Hill Quad, Decatur County, UTM 0619297 4358695, an abandoned and
overgrown site. The site has been reclaimed by nature. Listed in PSEARCH.
Existing data correct.
Creencaetle Quad, Putnam County, UTM 0518900 4387800, site totally reclaimed.
The only evidence of the site is a flat area on a hillside, shown as quarry on
USGS map. Psearch data correct.
Hagerstown Quad, Wayne County, UTM 065BOOO 4420500, Hageratown Sand and
Gravel, active. ICS data correct.
Hayden Quad, Jennings County, UTM 0610425 4315900, Berry Materials, a
limestone aggregate site. Listed in ICS data system and MAS data system.
Existing data correct.
Hindustan Quad, Monroe County, UTM 0544300 4347700, Landfill shown as an
unlabeled purple croashatched area on the USGS topo. Psearch data is correct.
Huron Quad, Martin County, UTM 0524900 4281400, active gypsum mine and plant.
MRDS data Correct.
Koleen Quad, Greene County, UTM 0511520 4309210, Abandoned coal mine shown as
a quarry on USGS topo. Peearch data Correct.
Koleen Quad, Greene County, UTM 0511870 4309620, abandoned coal mine shown as
quarry on USG5 topo. Psearch data correct.
Laconia Quad, Harrison County, UTM 0580176 4219460, abandoned limeBtone
extraction site close to road. Listed in PSEARCH- Existing data correct.
Lanesville Quad, Harrison County, UTM 0593090 4220530, US Silica, an active
site processing white sand. Listed in PSEARCH as an abandoned site, existing
data was incorrect.
Martinsville Quad, Morgan County, UTM 0548700 4368700, abandoned gravel pit,
now a lake. Psearch data correct aB to location, no information recorded from
visit.
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Mooreaville Quad, Morgan County, UTM 0562500 4379400, large active ait*. ICS
and Paearch data duplicate each other. Both correct, however ICS data more
detailed.
Mauckport Quad,Harrison County, UTM 0571000 4208500, Lucaa Corp, a very large,
active sand and gravel site. Listed in ICS data, PSEARCH and the MAS system.
Existing data correct.
Modoc Quad, Randolph County, UTM 0654950 4441B70, Abandoned sand and gravel
pit. In PSearch database, correct.
Mount Etna, Huntington County, UTM 0625060 4511560, abandoned site, part of
the Salamonie River bed. In PSearch by location, correct square mile section.
North Vernon Quad, Jennings County, UTM 0618000 4320300, Lee's Ready Mix, a
concrete plant and extraction site. Listed in PSEARCH as an abandoned site.
Existing data was incorrect on this site.
New Castle East, Henry County, UTM 0624050 4425420, Active pit of very small
operator. In Psearch, data correct.
New Castle West Quad, Henry County, UTM 0633600 4421600, Roberts Farm Supply,
operation is part of farm. Listed in PBearch, correct.
Oolitic Quad, Lawrence County, UTM 0541000 4307000, active site over one
square mile, dimension limestone. Psearch identifies this as two sites, ona
abandoned, one active. This is incorrect, as it is all one site.
Ossian Quad, Wells County, UTM 0648150 4528150, Not a mine of any sort. This
is a pond constructed by the land owner. It is above the original topography
of the area. Listed in PSearch database, inclusion in existing data incorrect.
Database corrected.
Palmyra Quad, Floyd County, UTM 0585500 42485880, abandoned site reclaimed by
nature. Listed in PSEARCH. Existing data correct.
Pennville Quad, Jay County, UTM 0658400 4484300, Active site. ICS data is
Correct.
Petroleum Quad, Jay County, UTM 0656850 4407710, An abandoned sand and gravel
site. Listed in PSearch, location is correct as to section. However, caption
data describes site on west side of road. Site is actually on east side.
Error.
Redkey Quad, Randolph County, UTM 0656000 4460700, active crushed limestone
site. Correct in both IGS and Psearch.
Salem Quad, Washington County, UTM 0578530 4271700, an abandoned limestone
quarry. Listed in PSEARCH. Existing data correct.
12

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!
Salem Quad, Washington County, UTM 057B640 4269090, an abandoned limestone
pit. Not liatad in currant data or shown on OSGS quad mapa. Diacovarad
during field tripa.
Shoals Quad, Martin County, DTM 0521400 4286300, active Gypsum sita. HRDS data
correct.
Spencer Quad, Owen County, UTM 0517000 4349400, abandoned dimension limestone
quarry. In Psaarch location correct, however caption entry "too far for
photo" ia incorrect. On our inspection we took photographa of the site while
walking over it.
Uniondale Quad, Wells County, UTM 06533370 4514530, Active Bite, Erie Stone
Company. Liated correctly in ICS data. One portion liated in Psearch, site as
whole misalocated.
13

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ANNEX C STATISTICAL DATA
The numerical data is as follows
1.	There are 92 Countiea in the Database. 22 or 23.9% were visited .
2.	There are 705 Quad Mapsheeta in the Database. 41	or 5.8% were
visited.
3.	There are 1940 Sites in the Database. 47 or 2.4%	were visited.
4.	Of the 1940 sites, 642 are indicated as active.	1298 abandoned sites.
5.	47 sites were visited: 25 were abandoned, 4 reclaimed by nature, 21
required reclamation, 2 BiteB were not related to mineral extraction,
20 were active.
6.	Of the 25 sites which are indicated as abandoned, 16% are indicated as
reclaimed by nature. 84% require some level of reclamation.
7.	Of 1298 abandoned sites in the database
1090 for reclamation
208 reclaimed by nature
8.	Psearch Sites: 34 were visited, with 7 or 20.6% containing
incorrect information.
9.	MRDS Sites: 2 were visited, with all data recorded for them being
correct.
10.	MAS Sites: 5 were visited, with all data recorded for them being
correct.
11.	ICS Sites: 14 were visited, with all data recorded for them being
correct.
14

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NCfHXAL mJSlflCRi INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES
STAIE CF INDIANA
DATA SUWRW	-REVTSED-
NIXEm OF
ABANDCNED SPIES
KMRALTYJE HDCDC JCIKD EHfTIFIH) FEA31KES
SI miABASE	units	aost
Clary	Surface Mining	49
Disturbed Lands
acres
580
2,900,000.00
Higfwalls
feet
3,720
35,227.00
Ftol luted Vfater
miles
0
0.00
Mine Durpe
acres
37
744,000.00
Mine Openings
nunter
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures ranter
6
18,000.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Dolomite	Surface Mining	5
Disturbed Lands
acres
264
1,320,000.00
Hicjwalls
feet
1,410
13,352.00
Ftol luted Vbter
miles
0
0.00
Mine Drops

0
0.00
Mine Coalings
number
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
nuitoer
0
0.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Gravel	Surface Mining	10
Disturbed Lands
acres
330
1,650,000.00
Highwalls
feet
4,230
40,057.00
Polluted Water
miles
0
0.00
Mine Drops
acres
42
846,000.00
Mine Openings
nroter
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
r*s rrtTT
0
0.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Gypsun	Surface Mining	1
Disturbed Lands
acres
0
0.00
HijJwalls
feet
0
0.00
Polluted Water
miles
0
0.00
Mine Drops
acres
0
0.00
Mine Openings
runter
0
0.00
Hazardcxjs Structures rairber
0
0.00
Subsidence Prone
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00

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NCN-CQAL INVHTORT INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES
STATE OF INDIANA
DATA SU-MAFY	-REVISHD-
NLhEP OF
ABANDONEE SITES
MINERAL TYPE MINING Nt'ltil) HSNTIFIED F1AHFES
IN DATABASE	units	cost
Limestcne	Surface Mining	70
(agg) Disturbed Lands	acres	3,060 15,400,000.00
Hi^walls	feet	15,510	146,875.00
Ftol luted Water	miles	0	0.00
Mire Dunps	acres	28	564,000.00
Mire Openings	ranter	0	0.00
Hazardous Structures ranter	0	0.00
Subsidmce Prcre	acres	0	0.00
Other	0.00
Liiiest.de	Surface Mining	51
Disturbed lands
acres
4,300
21,500,000.00
Highballs
feet
11,400
107,955.00
diluted W&ter
miles
0
0.00
Mire Dunps
acres
11
228,000.00
Mine Openings
nunter
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures rurber
0
0.00
Suhsictence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Kbrl	Surface Mining	2
Disturbed Lands
acres
40
200,000.00
High-ells
feet
0
0.00
Ftol luted lfeter
miles
0
0.00
Mire Durps
acres
0
0.00
Mine Openings
router
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures ranter
0
0.00
Subsidence Prcre
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Ffeat	Surface Milling No Idmtified Abandcred sites
Disturbed Lands
dcxrss
0
0.00
Higtaalls
feet
0
0.00
Balloted Water
miles
0
0.00
Mine Dunps
acres
0
0.00
Mine Openings
ranter
0
0.00

0
0.00
Subsidence Prcre
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00

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NCN-CQAL INVHTCOW BffiCTIVE/ABANDCMD MINES
STA2E OF INDIANA
DMA SLhMAFQf	-REVISED-
NdfiER OF
ABANDONED SITES
MINERAL TYFE MINING hEUCD ILfclsfl'lb'liJD FEATURES
IN DATABASE	rnits	cost
Sand	Surface Mining	21
Disturbed laids
acres
1,254
6,270,000.00
Hi^valls
feet
4,230
40/057.00
Polluted ttoter
miles
0
0.00
Mine Durpe
acnes
0
0.00
Mine evenings
ranter
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
mater
0
0.00
Subsldaioe Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Sand and Gravel Surface Mining	499
Disturbed Lands
acres
41,370
206,850,000,00
Highballs
feet
95,880
907,955.00
Folluted Ubter
miles
0
0.00
Mine Durtps
acres
353
7,050,000.00
Mine evenings
ranter
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
nunfaer
17
51,000.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Othsr


O.OO
Sandstone	Surface Mining	8
Disturbed lands
acres
528
2,640,000.00
Higtaalls
feet
4,230
40,057.00
RdI luted tfeter
miles
0
0.00
Mine Duips
acres
0
0.00
Mine Openings
rurber
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
mrber
0
0.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00
Shale	Surface Mining	5
Disturbed Lands
acres
100
500,000.00
Hic^valls
feet
2,480
23,485.00
Polluted Vfeter
miles
0
0.00
Mine Dorps
acres
37
744,000.00
Mine Openings
number
0
0.00
Hazardous Structures
number
1
3,000.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00
Other


0.00

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NCN-CQAL mJWKFX INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINE
STA3E CF INDIANA
DATA SLM-WW	-REVISED-
NUSl OF
ABANDONED SITES
MINERAL TVTE MINING hEIHDD HSNTIFIED FEAIURES
IN DATABASE	units	ccst
Vhetstcne,

2
Disturbed Lands
acres
0
0.00


Higfoalls
feet
0
0.00


Polluted Mater
miles
0
0.00


Mine Dunps
acres
0
0.00


Mine Openings
rmfcer
0
0.00


Hazardous Structures ruer
0
0.00


Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00


Other


0.00
UNKM>ls'

519





Disturbed Lands
acres
34,254
171,270,000.00


Highwalls
feet
80,370
761,080.00


BdIluted Water
miles
0
0.00


Mine Dunps
acres
367
7,332,000.00


Mine Opening
nunber
0
0.00


Hazardous Structures nunfeer
16
48,000.00


Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00


Other


0.00
Aluminun
Elmmts found in




Calcium
the MAS database.
Disturbed Lands
acres
0
0.00
Magnesium
No verification as
Highballs
feet
0
0.00
Ferlite
to actual mining.
Ftol luted Water
miles
0
0.00
Tungsten

Mine Duips
acres
0
0.00


Mine Opsiings
rurter
0
0.00


Hazardous Structures runtoer
0
0.00


Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00


21 Other


0.00
T aarf
Elements found in




Sulfer
Lake County en the
Disturbed Lands
acres
0
0.00
Fluorine
NftS database.
Hic^valls
feet
0
0.00

Not likely mined
Polluted Water
miles
0
0.00

at this location.
Mine Durrps
acres
0
0.00


Mine Openings
ruifeer
0
0.00


Hazarck^js Stxxjctures ruri^er
0
0.00


Subsidence Prcne
acres
0
0.00


5 Other


0.00
	e-S

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NCIf-COAL INVHtTCFY INACTIVE/ABANDCNEII MINES
STAIE CF INDIANA
DftIA
-REVISED-
NIMEER CF
ABANDONED STIES
MINERAL TYPE MINING f"W3D HENFUTED
IN DKWBASE
FEATORES
units
cost
IDEAL
1266
GRANT TOTAL
Distillled Lands
8lC3^e^$
430,500,000.00
High-alls
feet
2,116,100.00
ft>lluted Water
miles
0.00
Mine Dorps
acres
17,508,000.00
Mire Opaiings
luitar
0,00
Hazardous StiMctures
muter
120,000.00
Subsidence Prcne
acres
0.00
Other

0.00


450,244,100.00
* Sites in the database are ccnrcnly idsitified crily dowi to tonship, range,
secticn. The database is not ocnsistant aid often indicates more than cne site
within a secticxi. LNKNON sites haws been identified cn quad maps, howeMer, no
dxvmented infomBticn is available and the sites have not been visited.

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INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINE INVENTORY SUMMARY
STATE OF INDIANA
FOOTNOTES
1.	Inactive/abandoned mines have been identified as properties where there
is no continuing reclamation responsibilities bv the owner or'any
individual to remediate the impact of past non-r.oal mining. Sites
reported in the database and summary are not covered by any permit,
reclamation bond or state and federal licenses.
2.	The acres listed for each mineral include the disturbed or impacted land
resulting from mining of a nnn-coai mineral. The acreage is an estimate
based on actual field verification and projecting the average toward the
database site listing. The State of Indiana does not have a
comprehensive automated database of non-coal mineral sites
3.	There are four sources represented in the Mine Waste Data Summary. Vost
of the database is based on the information assembl eri from Indiana's
sand ar>d gravel program which ended in 1987. Other sources inclurieH the
Indiana Geological Survey database, the Mineral Resourre Outa System
from the Li. S. Geological Survey, and the l!. s. Dept. of the Interior.
Mineral Availability System. Not all of the data was compatible to the
established database. Querying specific information is not reliable.
The database information is reported with a 60%, confidence level.
4	The Data Summary is based on the Mine Waste database information, field
verj fi cat ;on . and the estimated cost for rec 1 am.it j nr. using thr
Department of Natural Resource's Abandoned Mine Lands 'AML) prcgran-
resources documentation.
5. Disturbed Lands has been identified as any land which has been affected
hy the mining of a mineral. Included in this definition are
disturbances such as open pits, haiu roads, exploration hnrehules. and
waste water treatment ponds. Reclamation of these sites would involve
grading and revegetation efforts
f>	Highwnlls are defined as the fare of exposed overburden and mineral in
an open cut or strip mining operation. Reclamation of these sites would
involve the possible excavation and embankment, fencing or guardrail
instal1 ation . regrading, or blast and terrace procedures
7. Polluted water is defined as the number of stream miles whi"h do not
meet the fishable goals of the federal Clean Water Act. Database
information does not include this type of information at this time.
During field verification of the database, no harmful effects were noted
to streams The abandoned sites have stabilized and the minerals
extracted did not adversely degrade or pollute the surface hydrology
over a long period of time.

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8. Mine Dumps are identified to include waste rock dumps, overburden stock
piles hazardous waste, and trash or refuse dumping. Rpc]amation of
these sites would include grading, burying, or relocating the waste
Disposal of hazardous waste would involve identification and special
handling as required by federal standards. The reclamation of dimension
limestone sites is not included in the reclamation figures. These sites
involve the extraction of large limestone blocks which were net
marketable. About 5QS> of the limestone extracted is not usable and is
left on the surface. The cost of reclamation to return these blocks
limestone to the pits would be extreme
9	Mine openings are defined as vertical or drift openings associated with
underground mining. No information was identified concerning this type
of mining. Reclamation of these sites would consist of permanent
closure which include backfilling, blasting, and engineered structures
I concrete shaft caps).
10	Hazardous structures are identified as buildings, f mmdat: ens .
h^adfmine? , ctr wnicli conlr! posp a ha?ard to people being jn. ny. or
around thpm. Remediation of these hazards involves demolition or
removal of the structures.
II. Subs i denrp prone features were not identified in the database Fiejr!
invest: gat i ons were ori surface mined sites. Subsidence prone areas are
those sites where shallow mines existed ihat may he subject to ground
surface cnlv apse in t he future. Rc1anntion is not considered for these
f eaturrs "nt il col) apse has beer, identified. At that t ime lan.ftt | or.
is consistent u-; 1 ( treatment of hazardous mine openings.
J'd . T!:e "ot her" feature ca t. egory reports acreage totals of iff pact ed } and
exhibit i ng env j ronmerl n ) degradat i or; from non-coa] mining wi thout
displaying surface disturbance. Included are acres of contaminated
stream hanks and soils
13 Mineral type indicating; 'unknown" are site locations identifier] in the
database hut for which the eytvarted mineral is not known as indiratr-d
before. the database is not comprehensive, ruder the sand and grave]
program, when the database was initially developed, sites w
jdentifier) from a variety of sources. The most predominant source was
the r.S.fi.s. quart maps. Sire locations kt identified on quad mupy to
he field checked for accuracy and verification at a later time. The
program was discontinued before these sites could he investigated.
14. The following explanation is the rational and basis for the cost
estimates presented in the report:
Utilizing the Mine Waste Database, ail inactive-abandoned sites were
identified. This data was ranked by mineral type. Comments were
examined and associated with the designated feature. Field
investigations were conducted to achieve a random sampling of t,V-  ; tes 
Ar. Abandoned Non-coal Mine Wastp pat a Sheet free attachment I wat
developed to assist and identify site fea*ures. These data sheets were
tallied by averages and means. Results were compi ]'-<;) fo" re J at iotial
adjustment to nach known mineral by percentage. "Unknown" sites w
-------
identified and estimated as a percentage relating to the "known" mineral
type sj tes .
There were a few sites in the Mine Waste Database Khfr The mineral
element was entered from the MAS database. Due to the nature of the
mineral and the location, these sites were not utilized as verifiable
data. The minerals specified were aluminum, calcium, magnesium,
perlire. tungsten, lead, sulfur, and fluorine.
DISTURBED LANDS - Reclamation of disturbed 'and includes open pits. hat<3
roads, exploration boreholes, and waste water treatment ponds.
Reclamation of these sites would involve grading and revegetatior
efforts. In Indiana, reclamation would cost S3,000 ''acre. 2."* of which
would Include administrative costs. Reclamation costs were based on
Indiana's AM! program cost figures.
HIGHWALLS - Reclamation costs for the reduction of highwalls within tl'u
non-cnaJ sites were based on Indiana's AM1., program cost figures The
resulting cost indicated S50 . OOO.'mi ] e of higliwaJI. Administrative costs
a:e :nriuded at 2TA of the cost.
pDLI.i'TF.L'i WATFFi - Stream cnntaminot ion associated with the non-ena]
abandoned sites were determined to be insignificant Nn cost estimates
were associated with this feature.
MINE DUMPS - Reclamation of mine dumps are diverse ard site spe'ific.
Re]a'ed costs from the Indiana AML program were identified -u'c applied
to this category. A S20.000/arre cost figure was developed. wh j r h
includes a 2 5% estimated cost of a dm i n i s r ra t i vp activities.
MTN'E OPENINGS - Mine openings for non-coal s i -es were ps: i mated at
$800,.- open j ng These figures were generated from the Indiana AML
program No information was confirmed within the database as to the
existence of m-'ne openings.
HAZARDOUS STRlTTl'RF.fi - Actual cost of structure demolition or: uorwoal
abandoned sites ws projected at S.'-i. 000  st ructure . Thj^ estimate k?> s
generarprl from the Indiana AML program.
SUBSIDENCE PRONE - No reclamation costs were estima-.ed for these
features as their remediation would be covered under one uf the other
categories after surface collapse has occurred.
OTHER - The acreage totals of impacted land exhibiting environmental '
degradation from non-roal mining without displaying surface disturbance
were considered to be minor. No cost estimates were associated with
this feature.

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I
ABANBOMES HON-COAL MINE WASTE
DATA SHEET
Date
COUNTY 		QUAD
Township	Range	Section 	
UTM
~ ~~~~~~ ~~~~-~~~
OPERATION
Hina Name: _______________________________ i* known
Addreaa:		
Type of Operation:
Sand
Limaatone (agg)
Peat/Hit1
Sandatone
Shale
Sand  Gravel
Limestone (dimen)
Gypaun
Clay
Other:
ATFECTED AREA:
Approximate Acraa
SITE CONDITIONS
Impoundments:	_____ iixe
Highwalla	length
Waste Pilea	comments
Road a	Length
Buildinga
Prevailing Drapiage
Nearest Stream	_
diatanca	.
Nearest Residence
distance
Reclaimed by Nature Yea 	 No 	
It no, approximate acraa to be reclaimed
COMMENTS
VEGETATION

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IOWA

-------
jus 14 '9i 17:52 ioupTdept. or agri a land
3auia Sfpartment of Agriculture
and 2Jani) &tuiari>Hijtp
DALEM.COCHRAN
KCHCTAffr 0* *C*lCJVrvM
1HINUCY OANSKIN-WMITC
bvuty fc*?A*Of aowcjl*mc
HINRY A. WALUkCE BUILDING
DCS MOINES. IOWA SOJ1
June 14, 1991
Breg Conrad, Executive Director
Interstate Mining Compact
*59B Carlisle Drive
Herndon, Virginia
22070
RE: Mine Wastes Study/Inactive and Abandoned Mines ~ Task II
Dear Mr. Conrad:
Ac previously discussed with you by phone, Iowa Mas unable to participate
as a grant recipient under the auspices of your grant from trie U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency  sites in
Iowa.
Statutory authority for licensing, bending, and reclamation of non-fuel
mineral operations in Iowa Is provided in Iowa Code Chapter 93A which is
specifically delegated to the Division of 5oil Conservation of the Iowa
Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. The Division is also
assigned responsibility for coal programs which are authorized in a
separate statute, Iowa Code Chapter 83.
I am the primary contact person for both statutes as Chief of the
Division's Mines and Minerals Bureau. My immediate supervisor is James B."
Gulliford who is the Administrator of the Division of Soil Conservation,
Mr* Gulliford in turn serves at the pleasure of Iowa Secretary of
Agriculture Dale M. Cochran who is an elected state official and is tne
department head Of the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land
Stewardship.
Mining operations for non-fuel minerals in Iowa includes some 1100 to 1200
active sites. Materials produced Include limestone, sand and gravel, clay,
and gypsum, The bulk of the sites are either limestone quarries or sand
and gravel pits. Most operations are surface mines or open quarries.
Active sites once developed, remain serviceable and productive for a number
of years.

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JUN 14 '91 17:53 IOWA DEPT. OF AGRI & LAND
Iowa's current reclamation statute, low* Code Chapter 83ft, was first
enacted In 1969. It ha* tinea been amended in 1973 and 1983. The Division
alio ha* administrative rules for administration of its policies pursuant to
B3A (Iowa Administrative Code 27-60).
Inactive and abandoned sites are not a significant problem in the State.
The 1968 law encompassed most sites that were operating and has caused
some reclamation to be affected en most sites prior to their release.
While the Iowa law allows the operator to leave impoundments, pit floors,
haul roads, and highwalls, provided that overburden piles are graded and
vegetated, and other disturbed areas and stockpile areas are also reclaimed
and vegetated, IAM sitesincluding those released by the Division since
l960--do not constitute significant environmental problems either locally or
on a state-wide basis. Neither is the need for reclamation of those sites
a significant issue either locally or state-wide.
Many of tne I AM sites have become wildlife habitat or recreational area*.
The Division is not aware of any IAM sites in the State of Iowa that could
be classified as generators of mine waste.
Active operations that discharge water must permit with and meet the .
requirements of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources pursuant to the
National Pollution Discharge Elimination System :NPDES>.
A minimum bond of S2000 per site is presently being maintained on all 1130
actively registered non-fuel sites, with bond established at a rate of
approximately $300 per acre for non-minimum operations.
Iowa does not have accurate data on IAM acreage, either inactive or
^ Wuld estirn*tB remediation costs for the purpose of
e.iminatmg known non-fuel mine wastes to essentially Oe nejligible.
Please call or write if we can provide additional clarification.
Thanks again for the opportunity to participate.
Kenfeth R. Taw, Chief
Mines and Minerals Bureau
Division of Soil Conservation
SlS-S81-61
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LOUISIANA

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IMCC / Interstate Coalition
on
Mine Waste
State of Louisiana
Narrative Summary - Task II
June, 1991
Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
Office of Conservation
Injection and Mining Division
Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction
1
8.0 Reclamation Efforts
4
2.0 Mining History
1
9.0 Program Impacts
5
3.0 Minerals Mined
2
10.0 Reclamation Scoring Criteria
6
4.0 Health and Safety Impacts
2
11.0 Scoring Results
7
5.0 Environmental Impacts
3
12.0 Closing Remarks
8
6.0 Laws and Regulations
3
13.0 Bibliography

7.0 Inventory Statistics
4
Attachment 1 - Data Sheets
10

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Task II
Narrative Summary
1.0 INTRODUCTION
The background regarding Louisiana's involvement in noncoal mine evaluations began on
August 2,1982, when a cooperative agreement financed by 100% funding between state and
Federal authorities was approved for the purpose of assembling information required for
the preparation of Louisiana's Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Reclamation Plan and
initiation of Louisiana's AML Reclamation Plan. The initial charge of the program was to
inventory and reclaim abandoned coal sites; however, the forty-nine coal sites identified in
Louisiana were found to pose no significant threat as a result of natural reclamation
processes.
Upon completion of coal site investigations, program activities were shifted to inventory and
evaluation of noncoal abandoned mine lands across the state. All inventory work was
accomplished by either Louisiana Office of Conservation (Office) personnel or by a
contractor, Southern Services. Inventory efforts were completed in 1990, as well as initial
reclamation need assessments for over 90% of the inactive and abandoned sites inventoried.
Inactive and abandoned mine lands are those upon which there are no current mining
operations or activities.
2.0 MINING HISTORY
The mining industry (noncoal) in Louisiana has existed since the first settlements during the
sixteenth century, as material was needed to serve as fill for low areas. More recent noncoal
mining activities are in evidence throughout the state. Only a very limited number have
been the subject of any reclamation effort. Where reclamation activities have been
attempted, they fall well short of the standards set forth by the State's surface coal mining
law. Tracts ranging from a few acres to over 4,000 acres have been identified. Noncoal
mining activities include the recovery of iron ore, sand, gravel, bentonite clay, gypsum,
sandstone and various other mineral resources.
Page 1

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IMCC inmXSTATE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
3.0 MINERALS MINED
In previous years, iron ore was mined for smelting purposes, but is now mined exclusively as
a road base material. Iron ore removal has most often been accomplished by hilltop
removal operations, in which the reserves are excavated down to the underlying clayey
materials. Operators of these mine areas seldom, if ever, carried out reclamation activities
following removal of the ore.
Sand and gravel operations cover wider expanses of land, are deeper (resulting in more
drastic highwalls), and are more closely related to surface and groundwater sources than
other types of mining which have occurred in the state. These factors cause sand and gravel
operations to be among the most detrimental noncoal mining activities in the state. Large
expanses of land have been rendered virtually useless as a result of sand and gravel mining
activities.
A minima] amount of bentonite clay mining has occurred, almost exclusively in one parish.
Gypsum, locally known as "Winnrock" is mined in Winn Parish for production of a relatively
high quality road base material. Sandstone mining occurs in a relatively narrow band across
the middle of the state where the Catahoula Sandstone outcrops. Much of this resource
remains untapped due to its occurrence on Federally owned lands. Studies indicate that
land disturbances remnant of these lesser mining activities involve an extremely limited
number of acres and are therefore not considered as a major portion of all mining activities.
4.0 HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS
Noncoal mining has produced significant health and safety hazards in Louisiana. Health
hazards may result due to the fact that many abandoned mine sites have been utilized for
waste disposal by both illegal dumpers and ill-advised municipal waste disposers. This can
cause a great potential for direct connection to underground sources of drinking water.
Improper disposal of waste material into abandoned mine lands offers harborage for insects
and vermin. Also, shallow stagnant strip pit lakes provide excellent breeding sites for
mosquitoes as well as other pests and vermin.
Physical hazards include highwalls, flooded excavations, hazardous structures. Abandoned
highwalls are a common problem, with vertical or near vertical embankments being left
unprotected and ungraded. Dangers caused by their presence includes the risk of slope
Page 2

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IMCC l INTER ST A TE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
failure, as well as the danger to persons who may unintentionally walk or drive over these
man-made cliffs. Their presence near populated places and well travelled roads is common
and poses a severe threat. Those in more isolated places pose an additional threat to the
many outdoorsmen in Louisiana who hunt, fish hike and participate in other outdoor sports
and recreational activities in these areas. Excessively deep and often unstable water
impoundments have been created as a result of many of the abandoned mining operations
in the state. The possibility of drowning in one of these impoundments is serious.
Abandoned mine facilities pose a threat of injury since, in many cases, equipment and
structures have not been secured so as to prevent exploration by unwary children and adults
alike.
5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Abandoned mines in Louisiana have impacted tens of thousands of acres. The potential for
and reality of erosion and resultant downstream sedimentation is extremely high. The total
destruction of vegetative materials during mining activities, along with he almost complete
absence of revegetation efforts, has resulted in drastically increased erosion and sediment
production rates. The lack of reclamation and the resultant erosion has resulted in a
significant acreage of wasteland. While this acreage makes up a small percentage of the
State as a whole, the presence of this wasteland is an important problem. In many cases,
these lands have been totally removed from any productive use.
Many of the abandoned mine lands in Louisiana exist in areas which, prior to mining
operations, offered high suitable habitat for many forms of wildlife. Degradation of these
lands by mining activities without subsequent reclamation has resulted in a possible net loss
of available habitat.
6.0 LAWS AND REGULATIONS
Louisiana currently has no laws or regulations governing the reclamation of non-coal mining
activities. The Office introduced legislation during the 1991 regular session of the Louisiana
Legislature which would authorize the regulation of non-coal surface mining in Louisiana.
After making it out of the House Natural Resources Committee with a positive
recommendation, the proposed "Louisiana Non-Coal Surface Mining Act" was defeated in
June of 1991 by the full House of Representatives. It is uncertain at this time as to any
future action regarding this legislation. At the current time, active mine operators must
Page 3

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IMCCI INTERSTATE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
comply with current EPA and Louisiana Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulations
regarding any discharges from the minesites. In addition, they fall under the Mine Safety
and Health Administration (MSHA).
7.0 INVENTORY STATISTICS

SITES
ACRES
% OF SITES
ACTIVE MINING OPERATIONS
INACTIVE/ABANDONED TOTAL
299
947
50,525
81,197
24%
76%

INACTIVE/ABANDONED SITES (BY NEED)

SITES
ACRES
% OF IAM
w/ Reclamation needed
w/ Minimal to no
reclamation need
Reclamation needs
to be assessed
301
559
87
35,347
28,480
17,370
44%
35%
21%
TOTAL INVENTORIED SITES 1,246
TOTAL DISTURBED ACREAGE 131,722
8.0 RECLAMATION EFFORTS
Reclamation of noncoal mining sites is not required by any state or Federal Law or
Regulations. As a result, the majotity of the reclamation that has taken place is that which
results from natural processes. Occasionally landowners will include reclamation
requirements in lease agreements with mining companies. To date, no efforts have been
undertaken by the Office to reclaim any of the abandoned sites.
Page 4

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IMCC i INTERSTA TE COAUTIOS OS MINE WASTE
9.0 PROGRAM IMPACTS
9,1 Staffing Costs
It is anticipated that a two (2) to three (3) year compliance period will be necessary for
implementation of the proposed regulatory program, with an estimated 200 to 300 permits
to be processed during the initial permitting period.
Each application will require an average of 120 man-hours to process, requiring nine (9)
employees to handle the total yearly load. It is anticipated that the annual operating budget
for handling these permits will be approximately $500,000. Justification for the number of
hours required to process each application (120) is as follows:
Technical review - 80 man hours
applicant meetings, permit document review and comment,
review of supplementary submittals, and completeness
determination.
Administrative review and approval - 40 man hours
public hearings, bonding and insurance approval, permit
issuance/denial.
The suggested staff would be as follows:
six technical staff members
two clerical assistants
one program supervisor
A basic budgetary breakdown would be as follows:
$ 50,000 per employee year (salary, fringe benefits Sl overhead)
	X 9 employees
$450,000 annual operating expenses
9.2 Remediation Costs
It has been estimated that the 301 sites that comprise the reclamation needed category will
require an average of $2,500 per acre for reclamation to be accomplished. The 559 sites
comprising the minimal to no reclamation needed category would require an average of
Page 5

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JMCC/INTERSTATE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
$1,500 per acre. This comes out to approximately $ 88,367,500 and S 26,083,480,
respectively, for the two categories.
The total cost for reclamation of the sites identified in the inventory is approximately
$114,450,980. This figure does not take into account the acreage that is becomes
abandoned each year as a result of either cessation of operations by an operator or mined
out land. It has been estimated that land disturbance will continue at a rete of about 1,000
acres per year.
Costs for remediation of offsite damages, such as impacted streams, has not yet been
ascertained. Site inspection notes and impacted drainage system data have been assembled
for use in development of an impact assessment document proposed for completion in the
future.
10.0 RECLAMATION SCORING CRITERIA
FUTURE MINING POTENTIAL
0	-	Active Mining Operations
1	to 3		Planned or Permitted Remining
4 to 6	-	Probable remining within next 10 years
7 to 9	-	Minimal probability of remining within next 10 years
10	-	No possibility of remining
PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK(S)
0	 . No impact
1	to 3	- Identifiable potential with no current impact
4 to 6	- Existing minimal impact with identifiable potential for extreme
impact
7 to 10 - Existing or imminent severe adverse impacts
DEGREE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION
0	- Area not affected
1	to 3	 Area affected is actual area to be reclaimed
4 to 6	- Area affected is actual project area and there will be some
impact to surrounding lands or water
7 to 10 - Area affected is actual project area with a continuing large
problem affecting surrounding lands and waters
Page 6

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IMCCI INTERSTATE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
WATER QUALITY IMPACTS
0	No impact to water resources
1	to 3	- Water quality slightly impacted for drinking, especially with
minor amounts of toxic materials or suspended solids
4 to 6	- Water quality for drinking purposes does not meet potable
standards, and pollutant, toxicants and suspended solids affect
agricultural, recreational and fishing quality
7 to 10 - Creates a severe threat for use for any purpose; toxicants,
pollutants and solids could cause a fish kill
The above scoring data was rated to establish a single site score from "0" to "100", with "0"
equating to "No reclamation Need". In assessing the scores, it should be noted that only an
active site with no impact will receive a score of 0", while a site with no potential for future
mining and no reclamation would receive a score of "20". The basis for scoring is as follows:
Future Mining Potential	*	2.0
Public Health and Safety Risks	*	3.0
Degree of Environmental Degradation	*	2.5
Water Quality Impacts	*	2.5
11.0 SCORING RESULTS
As previously stated, the scoring criteria have been used to quantify reclamation need scores
for 666 of the 1,246 inventoried sites, with data extrapolation being utilized to bracket scores
for an additional 384 sites, bringing the scored total to 1,050. Reclamation need scores have
been grouped in the following score ranges to provide a simpler means of data
interpretation:
Minimal to No Impact/Reclamation Needs	0-25
Moderately Low Impact/Reclamation Need	25-40
Moderate Impact/Reclamation Need	40-60
Moderately High Impact/Reclamation Need	60-70
High Impact/Reclamation Need	70-80
Very High Impact/Reclamation Need	80-90
Extremely High Impact/Reclamation Need	90-100
Reclamation need scoring results are depicted by the above groupings in the Data Sheets in
Attachment 1.
Page 7

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IMCC f LITER ST A TE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
12.0 CLOSING REMARKS
The current status of the Abandoned Mine Land (noncoal) Inventory for Louisiana may be
summarized as follows:
1,246 Noncoal sites have been inventoried across the state
299 sited were found to be currently active
Impact/reclamation need evaluations have been conducted on 190 of these
sites, with evaluation results indicating the following:
High to Moderately High Impact/Reclamation Need 29 out of 190
Moderate Impact Reclamation Need	78 out of 190
Moderately Low Impact/Reclamation Need	53 out of 190
Minimal to No Impact/Reclamation Need	30 out of 190
Supplemental investigations are proposed to determine the degree of
impact/reclamation need for the remaining 109 active sites for which scoring
data has not been developed.
Combined quantitative and qualitative site evaluations have been utilized to
characterize the level of impact/reclamation need for the 860 inactive/abandoned
noncoal siteS across the state as follows:
Very High to Extremely High Impact/Reclamation Need	12 out of 860
High to Moderately High Impact/Reclamation Need	39 out of 860
Moderate Impact Reclamation Need	132 out of 860
Moderately Low Impact/Reclamation Need	118 out of 860
Minima] to No Impact/Reclamation Need	559 out of 860
Supplemental investigations are proposed to determine the degree of
impact/reclamation need for 11 known inactive sites and 76 sites not
previously inspected.
Impact/reclamation need scoring data have been developed for 1,050 of the 1,246
sites inventoried to date, representing an 84.3% completion level. Data developed
from these investigations have been used to rank the inventoried sites in regard to
severity of the safety and environmental risk posed.
Page 8

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IMCCIMTERSTA TE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
13.0 BIBLIOGRAPHY
Louisiana Abandoned Mine Reclamation Plan, Louisiana Department of Natural
Resources, Office of Conservation, January, 1986
Louisiana Non-Coal AML Inventory Update 1989/90 Final Project Report, Volume 1,
Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, Baton Rouge, LA, November, 1990 (Prepared
by Southern Services, Shreveport, LA)
Page 9

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?
IMCC INTERSTATE COALITION ON MINE WASTE
Attachment 1
DATA
SHEETS

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION MKKD 8CORtIia
XHACTIVB Mill IRQ OPERATIONS




FUTDRS
RISK
BHV.
WATER
ATRCTED
AJTBCTKD

PARISH
sin so.
STATUS
mxhkral
POTENTIAL AHALTSI8
IMPACT
IMPACT
ACREAGE
STRXAM(S)
SCORE
1HACTXVB 8ITKS WITH KXTRKKKLT HIOH IKPACT/RKCUUtATIOH ITKZDl







AST BATON ROOGB
BBR0C0109
iDMtiw
Clay
10
10
10
10
400
Miaalaalppl River
100.0
KVMrasLnai
BV020102
Xautlw
(and, olay and gravel
10
id
10
10
SOO
Bayou Cocodrla
100.0
1VABMUM
KV020101
XnBOtlT*
(and, olay, graval
9
10
10
10
<00
Bayou Cocodrla
98.0
RAPXDKS
RA01H0207
Iautln'
Sand and graval
7
10
10
10
100
Cooodrle lake
94.0
ST. mourn
8TOS1201
Iniotln
Sand and graval
7
10
10
10
320
Bogue Chltto Rlvar
94.0
WASHINGTON
W8021305
XMOtlva
Band, olay and graval
10
7
10
10
SO
Paarl River
91.0
COUNTl <
XNACTXVI Bins WITH VERT 8101 DfPACT/RXCLAHATIOlt HDD I
EVANGELINE
EV010101
Inaativa
Sand, olay and graval
9
7
10
10
1C0
Bayon Cocodrla
89.0
GRANT T
OR070110
PjLe -77 w/Beed
Onepeolfled
10
9
10
<
800
Little Rlvar
87.0
tanoipaboa
TA0S0702
Inactive 
Sand and graval
10
10
7
7
100
Ponchatonla Croak
85.0
RAPIDE8
RA01020S
Xnaotlva-
Clay and graval
9
10
7
7
10
Spring Creek
83.0
OUACHITA
0*170203
Pra-77 w/Heed
Dnapeolfled
10
9
8

420
Ouaohlta Rlvar
82.0
RAPIDES
RA040201
Inaativa
Sand, graval and olay
1
10
10
10
40
Ballna lala .
82.0
COUNTI	C
INACTIVE 8ITI3 WITH HIQH XKPACT/KKCLAMATIOIt KKSDl
OUACHITA
QA1C0301
Pie-77 w/Naed
Unspecified
10
8 8
S
Dnapeolfled
Ouachita River
79.0
EVAHQELINE
EV020103
lomtlra
Sand, olay, allt
9
( 7
10
40
Bayou Cocodrla
78.5
GRANT
SR050103
PjLa -77 w/Xeed
Dnapeolfled
10
7 10
5
Dnapeolfled
Bayou Rlgolette
78.5
EVANGELINE
EVOtOlOl
Xnaotlva
Sand, olay, graval
10
7 7
7
10
Bayou Dee Cannae
7C.0
WASHINGTON
W8031402
Xnaotlva
Sand and graval
10
7 7
7
40
Pearl River
7S.0
RAPIDES
RA010110
Xnaotlva
Clay and graval
9
7 7
7
200
Indian Creek Reaervolr
74.0
WEBSTER
WB190902
Reoent Mining
aand, graval
9
7 7
7
25
Lake Bletlneau
74.0
BAST BATON ROUGE
KBR0C01W081BACTIVB
Clay
10
S 7
7
40
Miaalaalppl River
73.0
WASHINGTON
WS011302
Xnaotlva
Sand, gravel and olay
10
 7
7
2
Pearl River
73.0
WASHINGTON
W8041202
Xnaotlva '
Sand and graval
10
C 7
7
100
Bogue Chltto River
73.0
OUACHITA
0*190503
Pra-77 w/Heed
dnapeolfled
9
8 6
<
Dnapeolfled
Bayou Lafourche
72.0
< ,*	, '.-.V	 , *

-------
DtPACT/KXCtJUtATIOII RHKD SCOftlHO
inactive mining operations




FUTURE RISK KHV. WATER
AFFECTED
AFFECTED

' PARISH
SIB NO.
STATUS
NZNBRAL
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS IMPACT IMPACT
ACRXAOS
STRXAM(S)
8C0RS
IHACTIV1 BITKB WIT* HICH IMPACT/RBCZAMATION HMD (Continued)1




BtAOREOARD
81131201
Inactive
Sand and gravel
9 7 7 <
. 100
Sabine River
71.3
ST. TAMMANY
BT0C1401 .
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay
10 7 < <
10
weat Pearl River
71.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA0<0703
Inaotive
Sand
10 < < 7
1C0
Natalbaay River -
70.3
SABINE "
88031202
Pro .77 w/Need
Onapeolfled
10 3 < 8
Onapeolfled
Ibledo Bend Reaarvolr
70.0
ST. TAMMANY
ST031102
Inaotive
Clay
7 7 7 7
10
Bogae Palaya
70.0






COURT1
1*
INACTIVE SITES WITH MODERATELY HIGH IMPACT/RECLAMATION RRDl




beaoreoard
BE031203
iBietlm
Band and gravel
9 7 < <
100
Sabine River
69.0
vurihqtoiv
W8011303
Inaotive
Band, clay and graval
9 <7 <
100
Pearl River
(8.3
GRANT /
OR0C0302
Pre-77 v/lwd
Unspecified
7 8 7 3
Onapeolfled
Bayon Rigolette
<8.0
RAPIDS*
RA01010S
Inaotive
Clay and gravel
C 7 7 7
20
Indian Creek Reaarvolr
<8.0
RED Rim
RR130801
tooent Mining
olay, gravel
10 < < <
30
Blaok take Bayon
<8.0
8T. TAMMANY
ST071402
Inactive
8andy gravel and olay
10 c c <
: 40
Neat Pearl River
<8.0
TAJtOIPAHOA
TA0C081O
Inafitln
Sand and gravel
10 < < <
20
Tangipahoa River
<8.0
WASHINGTON
WS041208
Innative
Sand and gravel
10 3 7 <
320 .
Bogae Chitto River
<7.3
GRANT
OR0C0201
Pre-77 v/lwd
Onapeolfled
3 7 7 7
Onapeolfled
Bayon Rigolette
M.O
LUfCOUf
1X180302
Recant Klnlnf
olay, gravel

3
Pngdaaana River
66.0
1ASAIXI
8080302
Fn-77 */lMd
Onapeolfled
7 9 3 3
Onapeolfled
Catahoula Lake
.o
RAPIDES v
RA010109
motlm
Clay and gravel
9 C C <
300
Indian Creek Reaarvolr
(6.0
TAlfOIPABOA
TA040703
Inactive
Sand and gravel
9 4 7 7
800
Tangipahoa River
<3.0
DNION 'rt
ON}00304
Pre-77 v/lwd
Onapeolfled
10 7 < 3
Onapeolfled
Oaachlta River
<3.3
VUHmOION
W8031401
iMOtiT*
Sand and gravel
10 7 < 3
30
Pearl River
<3.3
WASHINGTON
W8031001
iMOtlt*
Sand and gravel
9 3 C <
1,000
Bogae Chitto River
<3.0
WIST FELICIANA
WP020309
Inactive
Sand and gravel
< <7 <
200
Bayon Sara
<2.3
BAST FELICIANA
RV040101
iButlm
Clay and graval
7 < < <
<0
Thompson Creek
<2.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA020701*
Inaotive
Sand and gravel
10 4 C <
<
Tangipahoa River
<2.0
ST. TAMMANY
8T031104
iMotlm
Onapeolfled

200
Bogne Palaya
<1.0
CATAHOOLA
CH090S14
Raoont Mining
olay, gravel
< < < <
300 .
Ouachita River
SO.O
TANGIPAHOA
TA020703
Inactive
Sand and graval .
7 7 10 0
1,000
Tangipahoa River
<0.0
WASHINGTON
WS031103*
luoilM
Sand and gravel
C  ( t
230
Bogne Chitto River
SO.O
' :





COUNTI
23

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HtPACT/RSCLAMATICm NKKD SCORING
zmactxvi mininq on rations
rum Kg risk nv. natkr aitkchd	appictkd
PARISH	SITS NO. - STATUS	MINERAL	FOT1NTIAL AMALTSIS IMPACT IMPACT ACRXAQ1	BTRXAM(S) .	6 COR*
INACT1V1 SIT8S WITH MOOKRAXX IMPACT/RKCLAHATION HSCDl
WKBSm
NB180918
Pre-77 w/Need
Onap*oifl*d
7 6
5 Onapeoified
Lake Biatlneau
59.S
TANGIPAHOA
XA010S0S
InaotlT*
Sand, graT*l and clay
4 7
< 20 
Tangipahoa River
59.0
VXmiLZOH
VM120501
InaotlT*
Solfor
10 3
C 20
Lain Peignenr
59.0
WA8HINQT0N .
V8031002
Imotin
Band and gravel
7 5
< 250
Bogus Chltto River
59.0
BRAORSOARD
BK031204
ZnMtln
Sand, graral A olay
10 (
4 14
Sahlne RlTer
58.0
WKBSTIR
NB191003
Prt-7T /lNd
Onapeoiflad
5 C
S Onapeoified
Lake Biatlneau
58.0
msmt
NB220902
Recent Mining
olay, ironstone
10 6
4 5
Bayou Doroheat
58.0
WKBSTKR
NB231101
Iterant Mining
olay, sand, graTel
10 6
4 100
Bayou Bodoau
58.0
WA8H1HOTOH
N8021304
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10 S
3 20
Pearl RlTer
58.0
AST ntLICIANA
KP030202
InaotlT*
Sand and (rar*l
7 4
C 700
Thompson Creek
5S.0
LINCOLN
LH190201
Pre-77 w/Rotd
Onapeoified
10 7
1 Unspecified
Bayou D'Arbonne Lake
5C.0
red nim
RR130810
Recrat Mining
olay, gravel

4 3
Black take Bayou
5S.0
TA1KJIPABQA
XA040707
InaotlT*
Sand and gravel

6 300
Tangipahoa River
5C.0
UNION
DN200303
Pre-77 w/Need
0nep*alfl*d
9 6
2 Dnapaolflad
Ouaohlta River
56.0
VKRNON'
VNO21106
InaotlT*
Sand and graval
7 4
 20
Bayou Anaeoeo
56.0
RKD RIVRR
RR130B03
Pr-77 w/Need
Unspecified

2 Unspecified
Blaok Lake Bayou
55.5
TAROIPABOA
TA030703
InaotlT*
Sand and gravel
S 3
6 480
Tangipahoa River
55.0
CATAHOULA
C8100716
Recant Mining
olay, sand, graval
C 4
( 20
Ouachita RlTer
54.0
PLAQUKHINBS
PL152402
InaotlT*
Sand and olay
( 4
6 10
Mlaaiaalppi RlTer
54.0
WASHINGTON
NS021003
InaotlT*
Sand and gravel
( 4
6 1C0
Bogue Chltto River
54.0
BXAORSQARD
BK030701
Inaotlv*
Clay and gravel
10 (
3 20
Bundick Lake
53.0
BIKNVTLL1
BB150902
Pr*-77 */l**d
Onapeoified
9 S
2 Unspecified
Black Lake Bayou
53.0
tansipahoa
XA040708
InaotlT*
and and gravel

4 ISO
Tangipahoa River
53.0
VRRHON*
VN010704
InaotlT*
Sand and gravel
7 3
C 80
Little Six Mile Creek
53.0
WSST PBLICIANA '
VT010203
Inaotlv*
Sand, gravel and olay
10 <
3 S
Bayou Sara
53.0
WASHJUOTON
NS011405
InaotlT*
Sand and graT*l

C CO
Pearl RlTer
53.0
WASNINOTON
W804110C
InaotlT*
Onapeoified
7 3
( 100
Bogue Chltto River
53.0
RAPIDSS
RA050206
InaotlT*
Sand, gravel and olay
9 4
4 100
Saline Lake
52.5
BEAtJRKQARD
BK021101
InaotlT*
and and graTal
10 4
4 SO
Bayou Anacoco
52.0
AST BATON ROUGH
SBR0S0101
InaotlT*
Clay and Sand
10 4
4 2
Cosdte RlTer
52.0
RAPIDSS
RA020204
InaotlT*
Sand, graTal and olay
10 4
4 300
Bayou Boeuf
52.0
ST. LANDRT
SL060401
InaotlT*
Sand and graval
10 4
4 40
Bayou Teche
52.0
TAMMAHT
ST051301
InaotlT*
Sand and gravel
10 4
4 160
Little Brushy Branch
52.0
TANQIPAHOA
TA030705*
InaotlT*
Sand and graTal
10 4
4 400
Tangipahoa River
52.0
TAHOIPAHQA
TA030707
InaotlT*
Sand and graT*l
10 4
4 CO
Tangipahoa River
52.0
... , .

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IMPACT/RECLAMATION KRD SCORIDO
IHACTIVE MINING OPERATIONS
future risk mrv. water . affected	affected
PARISH	Bill HO. STATUS '	MINERAL	POTENTIAL AKALTSIB IMPACT IMPACT ACREAGE	STREAH(S)	SCORE
TRACTIVE SIRS WIT! MODERATE IMPACT/RECLAMATION REED (Continued) I
TAiraiPABOA


iNOtlW
Sand and graral

10
4 4
4 230
Tangipahoa Rlrar
32.0
VERNON


XBMtiv*
Clay and graral

10
4 4
4 100
Bayoa Anaceoo
32.0
WEBSTER


Pra-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

S
4 7
S Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
52. 0
VUHllKJlUH


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

7
C S
3 1C0
Bogua Chltto Rlrar
32.0
RAPIDES .


Inutin
day and graral

7
4 C
4 SO
Caloaalaa Rlrar
31.0
BSAOREQARD


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

9

4 200
Sablna Rlrar
30.0
EAST BATON. ROOOH


'Inaotlra
day and Sand

10
S 3
3 S
Aadta Rlrar
30.0
EAST BATOR ROUGE


Xnaotlv*
Sand and graral

9

4 2
Coalta Rlrar
30.0
LIKCOUI


Recent Mining
slay* graral

9
4 4
4 2
Cypress Crakk
30.0
LASALU


Raoant Mining
olay, graral

9
4 4
4 30
Little Rlrar
30.0
RED RIVER


Raoant Mining
olay, graral

9
4 4
4 2
Blaok laka
30.0
ST. TAMMANY


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

7
7 3
3 10
Pearl Rlrar
30.0
WEBSTER


Pra-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10
0 10
2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
30.0
WEBSTER


Pr-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10
0 10
2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
30.0
WEBSTER


Pra-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10
0 10
2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
30.0
WEBSTER


Pr-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10

2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
30.0
WEBSTER


Pr-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10
0 10
2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
SO.O
WEBSTER


Pra-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

10
0 10
2 Onapaolflad
Laka Blatlnaaa
30.0
BSAOREQARD


tnaotiv* .
Sand and graral

10
4 4
3 10
Bayoa Anaaooo
49.3
OUACHITA.


Vim-11 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

7

4 Onapaolflad
Bayoa Lafourche
49.3
WEST BATON ROUGE


Inaotlra
Sand, graral and
olay
10
4 3
4 30
Choctaw Bayoa
49.3
UV1HC3T0H


tnaotlra
Sand and graral

10
3 4
4 CO
Anita Klrar
49.0
LIVIHOSTOH


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

10

4 SO
Aalta Rlrar
49.0
RAPIDES


Inaotlra
Clay and graral

7
3 4
4 10
Xlneaid Raaarrolr
49.0
RAPIDES


Inaotlra
Sand graral and
olay
10

4 S
Red Rlrar
49.0
RAPIDES


Tnaotlra
Sand, graral and
clay
10
3 4
4 30
Saline Laka
49.0
RED RIVER


Raoant Mining
olay, graral

10
3 4
4 30
Black Laka Bayou
49.0
WASHINGTON


Inaotlra
Sand* graral and
olay
10
3 4
4 20
Paarl Rlrar
49.0
WASRINCTON


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

10
3 4
4 40
Pearl Rlrar
49.0
WASHINGTON


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

10
3 4
4 C40
Bogua Oiltto Rlrar
49.0
WASHINGTON


Inaotln
Onapaolflad

 7
S 4
4 40
Bogua Chltto Rlrar
49.0
OUACHITA


Pra-77 w/Naad
Onapaolflad

.0
5 7
0 Onapaolflad
Ouachita Rlrar
48.5
ST. TAMMANT


Inaotlra
Oraral

10

1 10
Paarl Rlrar
48.3
BOSSIER .


Recant Mining
olay, lronatona

s
C 4
4 3
Coney Creek
48.0
TAROIPAHOA


Inaotlra
Sand and graral

7
3 5
S 10
Natalbany Rlrar
48.0

-------
IMPACT/RKCLAMATIOR IR1D SCORIRO
XNACTIVS HIMIira OPS RATIONS
PARISH
SITS BO.
8TAZDS
MINERAL
FUTURE RISK
POTENTIAL AKALIBIS
ERV. WATER
IMPACT IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFECTED
STREAM(B)
SCORS
IHACTIVB SITRS WITH M0DKRA3R XMPACT/RHCZAMATXOII NSSD (Continued)!





union
OH200402
Pr-77 w/Raed
Unspecified
9 S
S 1
Unspecified
Onaohlta River
4B.0
WASHIRGTOM
WS041206
Inactive
Sand and gravel
9 5
3 3
2S0
Bogue Cbitto River
48.0
CADDO
CA221S04
Recent Mining
and, graval
9 3
4 4
5
Blaok Bayon laka
47.0
CAXCASJXO
CC091001
laaotln
Sand and clay
10 9

25
Rouaton River
47.0
EAST RLICIAHA
KF030201
Inutln
Sand and graval
9 3
4 4
300
Thompson Creek
47.0
GRART
OROBOIOB
Aaoent Mining
olay, aand, graval
1 5
6 6
5
Little Rlvar
47.0
OOACHITA
OA180301
Pie 77 w/Reed
Onapeolfled
7 6
5 1
Unspecified
Onaohlta River
47.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA010702
Inactive
Sand, graval and clay
10 4
3 3
3
Tangipahoa River
47.0
TAROIPAHQA
TA020702
iMOtlW
Oraval and olay
10 4
3 3
2
Tangipahoa River
47.0
TARQIPAHOA
TA0S0701
Inaotlra
Clay
10 4
3 3
10
Ratalbany River
47.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA070703
IMOtlW
Sand and graval
10 4
3 3
s
Ratalbany River
47.0
NKBBTBH
WB180922
Pr-77 w/Reed
Onapeolfled
 2
7 3
Onapaaiflad
Lake Bistlneau
47.0
MASRIRCTON
W8031301
Inaotlw
Onapeolfled
10 4
3 3
2
Pearl River
47.0
WASH1HCTOH
WS021404
iMOtln
Sand and graval
10 3
4 3
160
Pearl Rlvar
46.S
ST. CBARU3
SC132001
Inactive
Sand and olay
4 6
4 4
200
Hlsaiaalppi River
46.0
ST. TAMMARY
ST0S1001
Inaotlra
Clay and sand
7 4
4 4
< 40
Tchefunota River
46.0
VKRJfOtf h
VR010908
Inaotln
Clay and graval
10 7
1 1
SO
Bayou Anacoco-
46.0
WKBSTRR
mmooi
rie 77 w/Reed
Unspecified
5 2
10 2
Onapaaiflad
Bayon D'Arbonne
46.0
WZBSTRR
. WB180933
Pra-77 w/Head
Unspecified
9 0
B 3
Unspecified
Uk* Biatlneau
45. S
CADDO i .
CA171401
Vr*-77 w/Head
Unspecified
7 6

Onspeoified
Wallace take
44.S
OUACHITA
QA170312
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified
10 4

Onapaaiflad
Ouachita River
44.S
RED RITBR
RR140B0C
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified
7 6
4 1
Dnspaciflad
Blaok Lake Bayou
44.S
CADDO $
CA2U603
Raoant Mining
olay, ironstone
10 3

10
Caddo Lake
44.0
DHSOTO>
DS131202
Raoant Mining
olay/ Ironstone
10 3
3 3
200
Bnithport Lake
44.0
CRART/
OR0B0204
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified
1 4
( (
100
Little Rlvar
44.0
IBKRVILU
IV091301
Inaotlra
Clay
10 3
3 3
SO
Bayon Oroaaa Tete
44.0
OUACHITA
OA170305
Pr-77 w/Heed
Onapaaiflad
10 3

Unspecified
Ouachita River
44.0
RAPIDK3
RA010113
Inactive
Clay and graval
10 3
3 3
40
Indian Creek Reservoir
44.0
RAPIDSS>
RA0S0203*
Inaotlra
Oraval
10 3
3 3
60
Plagon Bayoa
44.0
ST. TANMART
81061402
Inaotlra
Unspeolfled
10 3
3 3
SO
Pearl River
44.0
TAROIPAHDA
TA020704
Inaotlra
Clay and graval
10 3
3 3
2
Tangipahoa River
44.0
TAHOIPAROA
TA030706
Inaotlra
Sand and graval
' 10 3
3 3
SO
Tangipahoa River
44.0
XAROIPAHOA
XA060702
Inaotlra
Clay
10 3
3 3
20
Yellow Water River
44.0
h fcRBSRR
WB170902
Recant Mining
olay. Band, graval
6 4
4 4
IS
Lake Bistlneau
44.0
iwnm
WR090S03
Recent Mining
olay, graval, sand
( 4
4 4
s
Ratachie Lake
44.0
'.'4

-------
IHPACT/RHCLAItATIOH HKSD 8CORIKO
XHACTIVS MIWIWJ OPRRATIOHS
fiituri risk bhv. mm Arncm	otkbd
PARISH	Bin HO, STATUS	MimtRAI.	POTRHTIAL ARALT8X8 IMPACT IMPACT ACRRAQI	STRKAM(S)	scors
1HACT1VB Bins WITH HODRRAR MFACT/KRCKAHATIO!t RSSD (Continued)!
WASmUQTOR

Inwtln
Sand and gravel
10 3
3 Unspecified
Pearl River
WASHUWTOW

iBMtlT*
Clay
10 3
3 2
Pearl River
WASMIHRUH

iBNtln
Band end gravel
10 3
3 20
Pearl River
SAST BATON ROOOH

Inactive
Sand and gravel

4 3S0
Amlta River
LASAUS

Recant Mining
olffi gravel
10 1
4 S
little River
LASALZS

Recant Mining
aandy olay
7 3
4 10
Little River
V1RHOH

Inactive
Clay, aand and gravel
7 3
4 30
Little Six Mile Creek
WHBSTKR

Pre-77 v/RMd
On spaaIfled
9 0
3 Onepeolfled
Lake Blatlnean
WASH UKT1UII

Inactive
Band and gravel
7 3
4 80
Bogae Oiltto River
RAPIDSS

Inactive
Gravel
10 S
0 10
Caloaaleu River
DESOTO

IS Recent Mining
olay. Ironstone
9 3
3 20
Bayou San Patrlalo
LIltCOtH

Reoant Mining
clay, gravel
9 3
3 10
Dagdenona River
RAPIVBS

Intotln
Clay, aand and gravel
9 3
3 2
Bayoo Rapides
SABim

Racant Mining
olay
9 3
3 10
Toledo Bend Reservoir
ST. muuii

Inactive
Band end gravel
9 3
3 100
Amite River
VHRMON

Inactive
Clay, eand and gravel
9 3
3 SO
Bayoa Anacoco
WHBSTKR

Racant Mining
elay, gravel
9 3
3 2
Lake Blatlnean
WBB8TKW

Recant Mining
elay, gravel
9 3
3 20
Baron Do reheat
WB8T miCIAHA

Inactive
Band and gravel
5 4
4 4
Bayou Sara
bASBlROTOR

Inactive
Onapeaifled
9 3
3 40
Bogue Oiltto River
GRANT

Racant Mining
elay, gravel
1 3
 3
Bayoa Rlgolette
OUACHITA

Pre-77 w/Heed
Onepeelfled
C 3
3 Onapeclfled
Ouachita River
RKD RIVER

Remit Mining
elay, gravel
7 4
3 2
Black Lake
IA8ALU

Recant Mining
elay, gravel
4 4
4 S
Catahoula Lake
LXVIWMTOH

Inactive
Band and gravel
10 0
4 200
Amite River
ST. CRARUS

Inactive
Band end elay
< <
4 4
Mleelaelppl River
WASHINGTON

Inactive
Band and gravel
B 3
3 3 20
Bogue Oiltto River
COUNTI

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION HMD SCORING
INACTIVE NIHIIfO OPERATIONS
PARISH '
BITS NO.
STATUS
MZNHRAL
FUTURE RISK
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS
EHV. MATER
IMPACT IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AfTHCTED
STRHAH(S)
SCORH
INACTIVE BITES WITH MODERATELY SOW IMPACT/RECLAMATION HEEDl





GRANT
GR070210
Pr*-77 w/Need
On specified
3 4
4 3
Unspecified
Bayou Rlgolatta
39.3
LIHCOLH
LN190202
Pra-77 v/RHd
Dnapaolflad
10 4
3 0
Dnapaolflad
Bayou D'Ar bonne Lake
39.3
TAHOIPAHOA
TA040704
Iniotin
Band and gravel
10 3
2 2
320
Tangipahoa River
39.0
WEST FELICIANA
WP010202
XBBOtlT*
Clay and gravel
10 3
3 1
3
Bayon Sara
39.0
anion
011200301
Pi' 77 w/Heed
Dnapeolfiad
7 4
3 0
Dnapaolflad
Ouaohlta River
38.5
ACADIA
AC080201
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
9 0
4 4
10
Bayou daa Cannaa
38.0
Claiborne
CL200602
Pra-77 v/Rttd
Dnapaolflad
9 0
( 2
Dnapeoifiad
Lake Claiborne
38.0
DESOTO
D3121303
Recent Mining
olay, lzonatona
10 1
3 3
20
Bayou Ha Bonchaaaa
38.0
BAST BATOR ROUGH
EBR040301
Inactive
Band and graval
7 3

200
Anita River
38.0
LINCOLN
UI180102
Recent Mining
olay, gravel
9 0
4 4
2
Ouachita River
38.0
NATCHITOCHES
KA120C02
Recant dining
olay, gravel
10 1
3 3
5
Sallna Lake
38.0
RED RIVER
RR120809
toont Mining
olay, gravel
7 3
3 3
40
Blaok Lake
38.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA040702
Inactive
Band and gravel
7 3
3 3
so
Tangipahoa River
38.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA060804
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10 1
3 3
10
Tangipahoa River
38.0
WEBSTER
WB220903
Recent Mining
olay, lzonatona
10 1

3
Bayou Do reheat
38.0
WEBSTER
WB230902
Mont Mining
olay, gravel
10 1
3 3
100
Bayou Doroheat
38.0
CADDO
CA221303
Raoant Mining
olay, lzonatona
4 3
4 4
3
Black Bayou Lake
37.0
LASALLS
LS070304
Raoant Mining
olay, graval
7 1
4 4
10
Catahoula Laka
37.0
LASALLK '
LS070307
Raoant Mining
olay, graval
4 3
4 4
3
Catahoula Laka
37.0
JACKSON
JA130101
Pra-77 w/Need
Dnapaolflad
3 3

Dnapaolflad
Caator Creak
36.3
RED RIVER
RR130818
Pra-77 w/Heed
Dnapaolflad
3 3
4 3
Dnapaolflad
Blaok Laka Bayou
3C.3
TANGIPAHOA
TA030901
Inaotiva
Clay and graval
10 3
3 0
40
Tangipahoa River
36.5
LINCOLN
UI180402
Raoant Mining
olay, graval
( 3
3 3
3
Dugdanona River
36.0
LINCOLN
LH190303
Raoant Mining
olay, graval
9 1
3 3
2
Dugdanona River
36.0
RAPIDES
RA010406
Inactive
Band and olay
9 1
3 3
2
Calcaaiau River
3C.0
ONION '
ON190201
Raoant Mining
olay
9 1
3 3
2
Ouachita RIvar
36.0
WASHINGTON
WS021402
Inaotiva
Band and graval
6 3
3 3
2
Pearl River
36.0
EAST BATON ROUGE
EBR050303
Inaotiva
Band and graval
10 1
1 4
350
Anita River
35.3
LASALLS
LS080206
Pra-77 w/Heed
Dnapaolflad
10 1
2 3
Dnapeoifiad
Little River
35.3
AVOTELLES
AV010401
Inaotiva
Band and graval
10 0
3 3
10
Lao aux Parle*
35.0
HAST BATON ROUGE
EBR060202
Inactlva
Clay and Band
10 0
3 3
100
Comite River
35.0
GRANT
GR0S0101
Pra-77 w/Need
Dnapeoifled
7 2
4 2
Dnapaolflad
Little River
35.0
IBERVILLE
ZV071001
InioUn
Clay
10 0
3 3
10
Intercoaatal Waterway
35.0
LIVINGSTON
LV070601
InaotlTa '
Sand and graval.
10 0
3 3
2 .
Tickfaw River
35.0
ST. TAMMANY
8TO31202
Inaotiva
Band and graval
10 0
3 3
30
Bogua Chitto River
35.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION NEED BCORINQ
INACTIVE Nfflim OPERATIONS
mm RISK IRV. WATER AFFECTED '	AFFECTED
PARISH	Sill NO. BTATOS	NimRAL	POTENTIAL ANALYSIS IMPACT IMPACT ACREAGE	BTRXAM(S)	800RH
INACTIVE SITES Win MODERATELY LOW IMPACT/RECLAMATION NEED (Continued) I
WEBSTER
WB201
Reoent Mining
clay, gravel 10
3 3 2
take Biatlnean
35.0
WASHINGTON
W8011
Inactive
Sand and gravel 10
3 3 20
Bogne Chltto River
35.0
WEBSTER
WB190
rr 77 w/Heed
Onapeolfled 7
1 0 Onapeolfled
lake Biatlnean
34. S
NA8IUIQ1QR
WS041
Inactive
Sand and graral 9
3 0 10
Bogne Chltto River
34.S
RED RIVER
RR140
Pre-77 w/lMd
Onapaolflad 7
1 1 Onapeolfled
Blaok Lake Bayou
34.0
ST. TAJWANY
ST051
Inactive
Clay 10
1 1 5
Bogne Falaya
34.0
TANGIPAHOA
TAOSO
Inactive
Sand and gravel 10
11 <0
Tangipahoa River
34.0
WEBSTER
WB190
Pre-77 v/Rnd
Unspecified 10
2 0 Onapeolfled
Lake Biatlnean
34.0
GRANT
GR060
Pre 77 w/Need
Onapaolflad <
3 2 Onapeolfled
Bayou Rigolette
33.S
GRANT
GR070
Pre-77 w/Need
Onapaolflad 7
3 1 Onapeolfled
Bayon Rigolette
33.0
GRANT
OROSO
Rwmt Mining
ohert, olay, gravel 9
3 3 5
Bayou Rigolette
33.0
RAPIDES
RA030
Inactive
Clay and gravel 9
3 3 2
Bayon Boenf
33.0
WASHINGTON
WS031
Inactive
Sand and gravel 9
3 3 23
Bogne Chltto River
33.0
RAPIDES
RA010
Inactive
Clay and gravel 9
1 I S
Indian Creek Reservoir
32.0
WASHINGTON
WS011
Inactive
Sand and gravel 7
3 3 Onapeolfled
Bogne Chltto River
32.0
OTACRITA
OA190
Pra-77 v/lMd
Onapaolflad 7
S 2 Onapeolfled
Bayon Lafourche
31.5
OtJACHTTA
OAICO
Pre-77 w/Need
Onapeclfled S
4 2 Unspecified
Ouachita River
31.0
RAPIDES
RA050
Inactive
Oravel 7
3 0 100
Flagon Bayon
30.5
JEFFERSON DAVIS
JD090
Inactive
Sand, olay and gravel 10
13 20
Bayon Netplque
30.0
RAPIDES
RAOSO
Inactive
Gravel 10
3 1 20
Flagon Bayon
30.0
RED RITER
RR130
Pre-77 w/Heed
Onapaolflad S
4 4 Onapeolfled
Blaok Lake Bayou
30.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA050
Inactive
Sand and gravel 10
13 10
Tangipahoa River
30.0
WEST RLICIANA
WF030
\ Inactive
Sand, gravel and olay 10
1 3 200
Mlaaiaalppl River
30.0
RAPIDES
RADIO
Inaotir*
Orarel 10
0 0 240
Coeodrle Lake
29.0
RAPIDES
. RA020
* Inactive
Oravel 10
0 0 120
Indian Creek Reservoir
29.0
TANGIPAHOA
TAOSO
Inactive
Sand and olay 10
0 0 4
Hatalbany River
29.0
ianoipahoa
TAOSO
Inactive
Sand anil gravel 10
0 0 10
Tangipahoa River
29.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA060
Inactive
Oravel 10
0 0 20
Tellow Water River
29.0
TANGIPAHOA
TAOfO
Inactive
Sand and gravel 10
0 0 2
Yellow Water River
29.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA060
Inaotlve
On specified 10
0 0 SO
Ponohatoula Creak
29.0
LASALLS
L8070
Pre-77 w/Need
Onapeolfled 
1 4 Onapeolfled
Little River
28.5
VERNON
VN010N
1 Inactive
Sand and gravel 9
3 0 5
West Six Nile Creek
28.S

-------
XKPACT/RSCLAMATION KKBD SCORIHQ
IHACTIVS HININO OPERATIONS
PARISH
Bill NO.
8TATU8
MINERAL
FUTURE RISK mv. MATER
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS IMPACT IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFKCTBD
BTREAM(S)
SCORE
HUCTIVS 8ITE8 WITH KKKRAIKLY LOW IMFACT/R8CLAHATI0H IRID (Continued) 1



BKAURKOARD
BS030702
Inactive
8and gravel  clay
9 0 3 1
20
Bmdlck Lake
28.0
CATAHOULA
CN100722
Recent Mining
ohr> gravel
10 11 1
60
Ouachita River
28.0
catahoulA
CN100725
Raent Mining
clay, aand, gravel
10 11 1
10
Ouachita River
28.0
8ABIHB
SB081304
Recent dining
day, aand/ gravel
10 11 1
3
Toledo Bend Reservoir
28.0
ST. RILSIU
SR020603
Inactive
Clay
10 11 1
3
Tlckfaw River
28.0
ST. TAMMANY
6T051103
Inactive
Clay
10 11 1
5
Bogus ralaya
28.0
TAHQIPAHOA
TA070701
Inactive
onapeaifled
10 1 1 1
2
Tallow Water River
28.0
MXBSTBR
WB220901
Recent Mining
ol*7, lronatone
10 11 1
50
Bayou Do reheat
28.0
NST F1LICIAHA
WP010201
Inactive
Band, gravel and clay
10 11 1
5
Bayoa Sara
28.0
WHST RLICIANA
WP020302*
Xnaetlve
Band and gravel
10 11 1
10
Bayou Sara
28.0
AVOYELLES
AV010301
Inactive
Band and gravel
10 0 0 3
5
Bayon Dulao
27.5
TANGIPAHOA
TA060801
Inactive
Band and gravel
10 0 0 3
5
Tangipahoa River
27.5
TANGIPAHOA
TA060802
Inactive
Band and gravel
10 0 0 3
5
Tangipahoa River
27.5
TANGIPAHOA
IA060803
Inactive
Band and gravel
10 0 0 3
3
Tangipahoa River
27.5
union
UN200405
Pr-77 w/Heed
Onepeoified
5 5 1 0
Unspecified
Ouachita River
27.5
RID RIVER
RR130825
Pi a 77 w/Heed
Onapeaifled
6 0 4 2
Unspecified
Black Lake Bayon
27.0
WASHINGTON
WS041103
Inattln
Band and gravel
9 3 0 0
50
Bogua Chitto River
27.0
union
UN220304
Pre-77 w/Heed
Unspecified
7 0 1 4
Unspecified
Ouachita River
26.5
CATAHOULA
CN100706
rie- 77 /RM
Unspecified
9 11 1
Unspecified
Ouachita River
26.0
GRANT
GR070306
Pr-77 v/Heed
Unspecified
5 2 2 2
Unspecified
Bayon Rlgolette
26.0
OUACHITA
OA200401
Reoent Mining
and
9 11 1
50
Ouachita River
26.0
RAPIDES
RA010201
Inactive
Oravel
10 2 0 0
40
Indian Creek Reaervoir
26.0
RAPIDES
RA0S0301
Inactive
Clay
10 2 0 0
5
Red River
26.0
WEBSTER
WB171004
Pr-77 w/Heed
Unspecified
8 0 4 0
Unspecified
Lake Biatineau
26.0
WASHINGTON
WSOUOU
Inactive
Band and gravel
4 13 3
80
Bogua Chitto River
26.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION HBtD SCORING
iHAcnvs Minima operations
PARISH
sin
MO.
STATUS
MINERAL
FUTURE RISK
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS
BWV. WATER
IMPACT IMPACT
1
1
1
0	aj
p i
e P 1
1	* i
i
AFFECTED
STREAM(S)
8C0RB
INACTIVE Bint WITH MODERATELY LOW IMPACT/RECLAMATION RSID (Oontlnned) 1





BKAURKGARD


Inaotir*
Sandf gravel i clay
10
1
1 0
2
Bnndick take
23.5
EAST BATON ROUGE

3
Inactive
Band, olay and graral
10
1
1 0
20
Oomlte Hirer
25.5
wim


Pi 77 w/Heed
Onapeolflad
S
2
2 1
Unspecified
Red Rirar
25.5
CALCABIBU


Inaotir*
Sand and gravel
10
o-
1 1
5
Buxton Creak
25.0
BAST BATON ROTO*



Clay and Sand
10
0

40
Comite Rlrar
25.0
JBFPBR&OW DAVIS


iBMtlw
Clay
10
0
i 1
2
Calcaelen Rlrer
25.0
LIVINGSTON


Inaotir*
Sand and gravel
s
0
3 3
20
Malta Rirar
25.0
LIVIIiaSTON


Inaotir*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
40
Anita Rlrer
25.0
RAPIDB8


Insotln
Clay and graral
10
0
1 1
2
Bayon Cooodrle
25.0
RAPIDBS


Inactive
Orarel
10
0
2 0
160
Cocodrla Lake
25.0
RAPIDBS


Inaotir*
Clay and graral
10
0
1 1
10
Oocodria Lake
25.0
RAPIDBS


Inaotir*
day and graral
10
0
1 1
2
Calcaelen Rlrer
25.0
RBD RIVBR


Pi 77 w/HMd
Onapeolflad
s
0
4 2
Unapeolflad
Bleck Lake
25.0
ST. TAMMANY


Inaotir*
Onapeolflad
10
0
2 0
s
Bogna Chltto Rlrer
25.0
ST. TAMMANY


Intotin
Unspecified
10
0
1 1
10
Pearl Rlrar Canal
25.0
TAJTOIPAHOA


Inaotir*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
40
Tangipahoa Rlrer
25.0
TANGIPAHOA


Inaotir*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
10
Tangipahoa Rlrer
25.0
VERNON


Inaotir*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
10
Bayon Anacoco
25.0
VERNON


Inaotiv*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
s
Bayon Anacoco
25.0
WBST FELICIANA


Inaotiv*
Clay and graral
10
0
1 1
2
Bayon Sara
25.0
WBST FELICIANA


Inaotlv*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
1
Bayon Sara
25.0
KB ST FELICIANA


InaotiT*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
10
Bayon Sara
25.0
WBST FELICIANA


InaotiT*
8andf graral and olay
10
0
1 1
400
Hlaaiaaippi Rirar
25.0
WASHINGTON


InaotiT*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
20
Bogue Chltto Rlrer
25.0
WASHINGTON


InaotiT*
Onapecified
10
0
2 0
Unpacified
Bogue Chltto Rlrer
25.0
WASHINGTON


InaotiT*
Sand and graral
10
0
1 1
10
Bogue Chltto Rlrer
25.0
COUNTI lie

-------
IKPACT/RECLAMATIOH HEED SCORING
INACTIVE MININO OPERATIONS
PARISH
BITS NO.
STATUS
MINERAL
FUTURE RISK ENV.
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS IMPACT
WATER
IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFECTED
BTRBAH(S)
SCORE
TRACTIVE 8ITKS WITH HIHIHAL TO NO IMPACT/RECLAMATION HEEDl






WEBSTER
WB170907
Pre-77 w/Need
dnapeoified
7
1 2
1
Unapeoified
Ouachita River
24.3
WEBSTER
WB18093S
Pre-77 /NMd
Unspecified
7
1 3
0
Unspecified
Lake Biatineau
24.5
ST. TAMMANY
8T051305
Inactive
Band and gravel
9
1 1
0
40
Bogue Chitto River
23.5
beauregard
BE030B01
Inactive
Band, gravel  olay
10
1 0
0
S
Ban dick Creek
23.0
DESOTO
DS121214
Recent Mining
olay, ironatone
10
1 0
0
Unspecified
Bayou Pierre
23.0
RAPIDES
RA010102*
Inactive
Gravel
10
1 0
0
200
Indian Creek Reaervoir
23.0
ST. TAMMANY
ST041301
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
1 0
0
10
Bogue Chitto River
23.0
ST. TAMMANY
8T041302
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
1 0
0
10
Pearl River
23.0
ST. TAMMANY
BT051302
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
1 0
0
160
Bogue Chitto River
23.0
TANGIPAHOA
TA060701
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
1 0
0
40
Yellow Water River
23.0
NEST FELICIANA
WF040202
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
1 0
0
10
Hiaaiaaippi River
23.0
WASHINGTON
WS0U301
Inactive
Band, gravel and clay
10
1 0
0
2
Pearl River
23.0
GRANT
GR060207
Pre-77 */NMd
dnapeoified
10
0 1
0
Unapeoified
Bayou Rigolette
22.5
GRANT
GR070204
Pre-77 w/Need
Unspecified
<
1 2
1
Unapeoified
Bayou Rigolette
22.5
JACKSON
JA140402
Pre-77 w/Naad
Onspecified
<
1 1
2
Unapeoified
Dugdenona River
22.5
ST. TAMMANY
ST041101
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
0 1

10
Bogue Chitto River
22.5
ST. TAMHANT
8T041203
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
0 1
0
50
Bogue Chitto River
22.5
ST. TAMHANT
ST051307
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
0 0
1
2
Pearl River
22.5
TANGIPAHOA
ZA0S0712
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
0 0
1
S
Tangipahoa River
22.5
TANGIPAHOA
TAO50803
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0 0
1
3
Tangipahoa River
22.5
WEST FELICIANA
WF020303
Inactive
Band and gravel
10
0 0
1
10
Bayou Sara
22.5
WASHINGTON
WS021001
Inaotiva
Band, gravel and clay
10
0 1
0
10
Bogue Chitto River
22.5
BIENVILLE
BN160907
Pre-77 w/Need
Dnapeoified
4
3 1
1
Unspecified
Black Lake Bayou
22.0
GRANT
GR060203
Pre-77 w/Naad
dnapeoified
7
1 2

Unapeoified
Little River
22.0
SABINE
SB0C1001
Recent Mining
olay, iron
7
1 1
1
2
Sabine River
22.0
WEBSTER
WB1B0934
Pre-77 w/Naad
dnapeoified
7
1 2

Unapeoified
Lake Biatineau
22.0
GRANT
GR080402
Pre-77 w/Haed
dnapeoified
5
2 1
1
Unspecified
Bayou Rigolette
21.0
BIENVILLE
BN151001
Pre-77 w/Need
dnapeoified
2
3 2
1
Dnapecified
Loggy Bayou
20.5
WEBSTER
WB180903
Pre-77 w/Need
dnapecified
S
1 2
1
Dnapeoified
Lake Biatineau
20.5
WEBSTER
WBI90909
Pre-77 w/Head
Dnspecified
5

0
Unspecified
Lake Biatinaau
20.5
AVOYELLES
AV010701
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0 f;
0
2
Belaon lake
20.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION HEED SCORING
INACTIVE MINING OPERATIONS
PARISH
BITE HO.
STATUS
rUTURl RISK
MINERAL POTENTIAL ANALYSIS
HHV.
IMPACT
WATER
IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFECTED
STRXAM(B)
6CORK
INACTIVE SITES WITH MINIMAL
TO HO IMPACT/RECLAMATION NEED (Continued)1







BEAUREGARD
BE020801
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bundlok Creek
20.0
BEAUREGARD
BE031101
Inactive
Clay
10
0
0
0
S
Trout Creek
20.0
CALCASIEU
CC090901
Inactive
Sand and olay
10
0
0
0
20
Bayon d'Inde
20.0
CALCASIEU
CC090902
InactIt*
Sand and clay
10
0
0
0
10
Bayou d'Inde
20.0
CALCASIEU
CC090903
Inaetln
Sand and olay
10
0
0
0
40
Bayou d'Inde
20.0
CALCASIEU
CC091002
Inactive
Sand and day
10
0
0
0
40
Bayou d'Inde
20.0
CATAHOULA '
CH090313
Pw 77 /Red
Unspecified
5
0
3
1
Unspecified
Ouachita River
20.0
EAST BATOR ROUGE
EBR040304
Inactive
8and and gravel
10
0
. 0
0
300
Amite River
20.0
BAST BATOR ROUGH
EBR050202
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
S
Amite River
20.0
BAST BATOR ROUGK
KBR030301
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
100
Amite River
20.0
KAST BATOR ROOCI
KBR0C010C
Inactive
Clay and 6and
10
0
0
0
20
Comlte River
20.0
BAST BATOR ROUGK
KBR0S0107
Inactive
Clay and Sand
10
0
0
0
2
Comite River
20.0
KAST BATOR ROUGH
KBR0C0206
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
50
Amite River
20.0
KAST FKLICIAHA
BP02010I
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Thoopaon Creek
20.0
BAST RLICXAHA
EP020102
InactIt*
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Thooqpson Creek
20.0
IBERVILLE
rvoeoioi
Inactive
Sandr gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
*0
Mlealaalppl River
20.0
IBERVILLE
IV091201
Inactive
Sand
10
0
0
0
40
Hlaslaelppl River
20.0
IBKRVItt*
IV091202
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Mississippi River
20.0
LIVINGSTON
LV0S020I
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Amite River
20.0
LIVINGSTON
LV070301
Inactive
Clay
10
0
0
0
40
Grays Creek
20.0
LIVINGSTON
LV070S01
Inactive
Gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Tlckfaw River
20.0
POINTS COOPKI
PC030701
Inactive
Sand and olay
10
0
0
0
S
Atchafalaya River
20.0
POINTH COUPES
PC030702
Inactive
Sand and olay
10
0
0
0
s
Atchafalaya River
20.0
PLAQUEMINES
PL1S2401
Inactive
Sand
10
0
0
0
10
Mississippi River
20.0
PLAQUEMINES
PL152403
Inactive
Sand
10
0
0
0
2
Mississippi River
20.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION HB1D SCORINO
INACTIVE MINING OPERATIONS




future
RISK
BNV.
WATER
APTBCTBD
APTBCTBD

PARISH
8ITX HO.
STATUS
MINERAL
POTENTIAL ANALYSIS
IMPACT
IMPACT
ACRBAGB
STRBAM(S)
SCORE
INACTIVE SITES
WITH MINIMAL TO HO IMPACT/RECLAMATION HBBD (Continued)!






RAPIDBS
RA010103
Inaotive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Cocodrle Lake
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA010112
Inaotive -
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Cocodrie Lake
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA01020S
Inaotive
Gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Cocodrle Lake
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0I0207
Inaotiva
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Spring Creek
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA01040S
Inaotive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Calcasieu River
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA020203
Inaotive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
100
Bayou Boeuf
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA030201
Inaotive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Red River
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA03030I
InaotiTa
Clay
10
0
0
0
5
Kincald Reservoir
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA050201
Inactive
Gravel
10
0
0
0
30
Flagon Bayou
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0S0202
Inaotiva
Gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Flagon Bayou
20.0
RAPIDBS


Gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Flagon Bayou
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0S0203
InaotiTa
Gravel
10
0
0
0
160
Plagon Bayou
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA050302
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0
0
0
20
Red River
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0S0303
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0
0
0
5
Catahoula Lake
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA050402
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0
0
0
2
Lake Rodemacher
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0S0403
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0
0
0
2
Lake Rodemacher
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA0S0404
Inactive
Clay
10
0
0
0
2
Lake Rodemacher
20.0
RAPIDBS
RA060202
Inactive
Gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Flagon Bayou
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SH010S02
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
8H010601
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SH02050I
Inactive
Sand, olay, gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Twelve Mile Creek
20.0
ST. HBLBNA
SH020S02
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SH020S03
Inaotiva
Sand, gravel and olay
10
0
0
0
20
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SB020601
Inaotive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
6H020604
inaotive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Amite River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SH04060I
Inaotive
8and, gravel and dirt
10
0
0
0
2
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. HBLBHA
SH040602
Inaotiva
Sand, gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
2
Tickfaw River
20.0
ST. LAHDRY
SL0S0401
Inaotiva
Clay
10
0
0
0
10
Bayou Courtableau
20.0
ST. HART
SM17100I
Inactive
Salt, Underground
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Atchafalaya Bay
20.0
ST. TAMMAHT
ST051203
Inaotive
Gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Bogue Chitto River
20.0
ST. TAMMAHT
ST0S1206
Inactive
Unspecified
10 '
0
0
0
100
Bogue Chitto River
20.0
ST. TAMMANY
ST0S1401
Inaotive
Fill Dirt
10
0
0
0
5
Bayou Bonfouca
20.0
ST. TAMMANY
ST081403
Inactive
Unspeoified
10
0
0
0
20
Bayou Bonfouca
20.0
ST. TAMMANY
ST081501
Inactive
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
30
West Pearl River
20.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION HEED SCORING
INACTIVE MINING OPERATIONS
PARISH
SITE DO.
STATUS
FUTURE RISK
MINERAL POTENTIAL ANALYSIS
ENV.
IMPACT
WATER
IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFECTED
STREAM(S)
SCORE
INACTIVE SITES
WITH MINIMAL
TO NO IMPACT/RECLAMATION HEED (Continued)!







TANOIPAROA
TA010703
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
2
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA010707
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
5
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TAHQIPAHOA
TA0107M
Inactive
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
2
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA010803
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chitto River
20.0
TAHOIPAHOA
TAO10004
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bogue Chitto River
20.0
TAHOIPAHOA
TA020C01
Inactive
Gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
2
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA020703
Inactive
8and and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA020706
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
3
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TAHOIPAHOA
TA04070S
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
60
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA030708
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA050801
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
3
Skulla Creek
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA0S0802
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA050B04
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA050807
Inaative
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
Unapecifled
Tangipahoa River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA060704
Inactive
Oravel
10
0
0
0
2
Ratalbany River
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA0C080C
Inactive
Pill dirt
10
0
0
0
10
Lake Haurepaa
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA060807
Inactive
Fill dirt
10
0
0
0
3
Lake Haurepaa
20.0
TAHOIPAHOA
TA040808
Inactive
Fill dirt
10
0
0
0
3
Lake Haurepaa
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA0080
Inactive
Fill dirt
10
0
0
0
10
Lake Haurepaa
20.0
TANOIPAROA
TA070601
Inactive
Fill dirt
10
0
0
0
3
Lake Haurepaa
20.0
VERHOH
VN010703
Inactive
Clay, land and gravel
10
0
0
0
100
Whiaky Chitto Creek
20.0
VERHOH
VH010903
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Bundiek Creek
20.0
VERHOH
VH010904
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Bundlck Creek
20.0
VERNON
VN01090S
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Bundiek Creek
20.0
VERHOH
VH010906
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Flat Creek
20.0
VERNON
VN011004
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bayou Anacoco
20.0
VERNON
VH011006
Inactive
Clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bayou Anacoco
20.0
VXRNOR
VH0180702*Inactlve
Clay, aand and gravel
10
0
0
0
40
Whiaky Chitto Creek
20.0
VKRNON
VN021007*
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
3
Bayou Anacoco
20.0
WEST FELICIANA
WF010204
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
2
Thcnpaon Creek
20.0
NEST FELICIANA
WF020201
Inaative
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Thompson Creek
20.0
WEST FELICIANA
WF040204
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
100
Mlsalaaippi River
20.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION REED SCORIRO
IRACTIVE MIRIRQ OPERATIONS
PARISH
SITE NO.
STATUS
MINERAL
FUTURE
POTENTIAL
RISK
ANALYSIS
EHV.
IMPACT
WATER
IMPACT
AFFECTED
ACREAGE
AFFECTED
STREAM(S) SCORE
INACTIVE SITES
WITH MINIMAL
TO NO IMPACT/RECLAMATION REED (Continued)I






WASHINGTON
WS010902
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
S
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS01I002
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WSOilOiO
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS0I1012
Inactiva ,
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS0I1201
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
20
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS011202
Inaotiva
Sand, clay and gravel
10
0
0
0
30
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS011401
Inactiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS011404
Inactive
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS021009
Inactiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bogue.Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS02I010
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS021012
Inaotiva
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Calico Branch
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS021013
Inactiva
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS02I102
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS02120X
Inactiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS021401
Inactiva
Band and gravel
10
0
0
0
2
Pearl River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS031003
Inaotiva
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
2
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS041102
Inactiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
10
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS041104
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS041I07
Inaotiva
Pill dirt
10
0
0
0
Unspecified
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS04110B
Inaotiva
Unspecified
10
0
0
0
10
Bogue Chltto River
20.0
WASHINGTON
WS031302
Inaotiva
Sand, gravel and clay
7
1
1
0
2
Coburn Creek
19.5
ST. HELENA
SH010S01
Inactiva
Sand, day and gravel
7
0
1
1
100
Tickfaw River
19.0
GRANT
GR080I02
Pra-77 w/Need
Unspecified
4
1
2
1
Unspecified
Little River
18.S
OUACHITA
OA1C0306
Pra-77 w/Need
Un specified

0
1
0
Unspecified
Ouachita River
18.5
ASCENSION
A8111401
Inactiva
Sand
9
0

0
60
Mississippi River
18.0
BIENVILLE
BN15090S
Pra-77 w/Need
Unspecified
S
1
1
1
Unspecified
Black Lake Bayou
18.0
BIENVILLB
BN160904
Pra-77 w/Need
Unspecified

1
1
1
Unspecified
Lake Biatlneau
18.0
GRANT
GR080207
Pra-77 w/Need
Unspecified
S
1
1
1
Unspecified
Little River
18.0
IBERIA
IB140701
Inactiva
Sand
9
0

0
2
Plantation Lake - 6andy
18.0
ONION
UN220302
Pra-77 /RMd
Unspecified

1
1
1
Unspecified
Ouachita River
18.0
VERNON
VN010602
Inactiva
Sand and gravel
9
0

0
S
West Six Mile Creek
18.0
VERNON
VN010702
Inactiva
Sand and gravel

0
6
0
400
Birds Creek
18.0
VERNON
VN0180701
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel

0
0
0
100
WhiBky Chltto Creek
18.0
WEST FELICIANA
WF010101
Inaotiva
Sand and gravel
9
0
0
0
5
Thompson Creek
18.0
WEST FELICIANA
WF040203
Inactiva
Sand and gravel

0
0
0
40
Mississippi River
18.0

-------
IMPACT/RECLAMATION REED SCORING
INACTIVE MININO OPS RATIONS




FUTURE
RISK
ERV.
WATER
AFFECTED
AFFECTED

PARISH
SITE MO.
STATUS
MINERAL
POTENTIAL
ARALTSIS
IMPACT
IMPACT
ACREAGE
STREAM(S)
SCORE
INACTIVE SITES
WITH MINIMAL TO NO IMPACT/RECLAMATION REED (Continued)!






WINN
WN120501
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspeaifled

1
1
1
Unspecified
Saline Lake
18.0
WINN
WH100402
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

1
1
0
Unspecified
Rantachie Lake
17.5
WINN
WN090402
Recant Mining
and, clay, gravel

0
3
3
100
Bayon Bodcau
17.0
WASHINGTON
WS031201
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay

1
0
0
10
Bens Creek
17.0
UNION
UN230304
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

0
1
0
Unspecified
Ouachita River
16.5
ONION
UN210405
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

0
1
2
Unspecified
Ouachita River
15.5
RED RIVER
RR140907
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

0
1
1
Unspecified
Black Lake Bayou
15.0
ALLEN
AL070602
Inactive
Clay

0
0
0
3
Calcasieu River
14.0
WASHINGTON
WS010901
Inactive
Sand and gravel

0
0
0
2
Bogue Chitto River
14.0
WASHINGTON
WS011102
Inactive
Clay and gravel

0
0
0
Unspecifled
Lawrence Creek
14.0
WASHINGTON
WS031303
Inactive
Sand, gravel and clay

0
0
0
10
Pearl River
14.0
OUACHITA
OA180314
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

0
1
0
Unspecified
Ouachita River
12.S
WASHINGTON
WS010904
Inactive
Clay and gravel

0
0
0
2
Bogue Chitto River
12.0
BIENVILLE
BN151003
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

1
1
1
Unspecified
Loggy Bayou
10.0
BIENVILLE
BN151007
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

1
1
1
Unspecified
Loggy Bayou
10.0
CATAHOULA
CH100712
Recent Mining
clay, gravel

1
1
1
5
Ouachita River
10.0
CALDWELL
CD130402
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unsppr. 1 f led

1
1
0
Unspecified
Ouachita River
9.5
CLAIBORNE
CL190C02
Pre-77 w/Reed
Unspecified

0
1
1
Unspecified
Black Lake Bayou
9.0
COUNTI 175
TOTAL I	476
Note: In addition to the 175 sites listed here In the Minimal to No Impact/Reclamation Need category,
there are an additional 384 sites that have been assigned a score of 25 or less. This brings the total
number of inactive sites that have been scored to 860.

-------
MAINE

-------

*/4'( 01
Task II Inactive/Abandoned Mining
Data Summary
Interstate Mining Compact Commission
Contents
1.0	History
2.0	impact of Past Mining on the Environment and Public Safety
3.0	Laws and Regulations
4.0	Data Analysis
5.0	Site Reclamation Costs
6.0	Definitions
7.0	Reference Guide to Data Summary Table
8.0	Data Summary Sheets
prepared for
June 15,1991

-------
1.0 HISTORY
Maine has been subject to mining for valuable mineral resources throughout its
history. For many years the Abanaki Indians used for decoration a red pigment
from a river bed which passed through an iron deposit. This deposit later
became the Katadin Iron Works which operated from 1646 to 1699. During the
period 1673-1663, Maine also experienced a "Mining Boom" in which a multitude
of companies were formed and numerous shafts sunk in the coastal region.
Commodities of interest were gold, silver, copper, zinc and lead.1
Since the 1860s, Maine has experienced very few base metal operations. The
most recent metal mines to operate were the Blue Hill and Cape Rosier mines
which operated from 1966 to 1977. Since the late 1970's no metal mines have
operated, but a number of companies continue to conduct exploration activities
throughout the state. At present, three internationally based firms have
announced intentions to start-up mining operations in Maine for gold, copper,
zinc and nickel.
Construction ores in the State have been a valuable resource since the first
settlers began using granite for building foundations. Currently, sand and
gravel accounts for the greatest portion of the State's mineral commodity
value, followed by cement, dimension stone and crushed stone.2 Maine has an
extensive history of quarrying activities. These mines are famous throughout
the world as sources for semi-precious gem minerals including varieties of
tourmaline, beryl, topaz and rose quartz.3 Recently, commercial mining of peat
has occurred along with the construction of North America's first peat-fired
electric power plant in Eastern Maine.
Maine's mineral resources have enhanced and continue to enhance the State's
economy. But the potential for adverse impacts, from past mining operations,
on Maine's environment and public health and safety has not been determined.
2.0 IMPACTS OF PAST MINING ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY
Whether or not inactive or abandoned mines have adversely affected the State's
environment and public safety, and if so, to what degree, is not known. There
are, however, a few examples of known impacts that warrant further discussion.
For example, abandoned sand and gravel pits have become host to illegal
dumpsites throughout the State. Sixteen abandoned pits are currently being
investigated by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) as
illegal dumpsites for industrial waste, hazardous waste and abestos.^
The State also has hundreds of abandoned rock quarries which pose potential
dangers to public safety. The possibility of falls and drownings as well as
the hazard posed by illegal dumping threaten public health. Many abandoned
quarries in the State are now flooded and used as recreational areas.
The numerous shafts driven in the 1880 Mining Boom may also pose a threat to
the environment and public safety. But the extent of these historic sites is
not known.
- 1 -

-------
The only mine site in the State with known contamination has affected 1.4 miles
of a stream.3 This site is located on the coast and possibly may have
contaminated the marine environment. Studies performed by the DEP, Army Corp
of Engineers and Robert Dow and John Hurst indicate high levels of copper,
zinc, lead and cadmium in sediment samples, plants and mussel tissues. This
site has been placed on the State's Uncontrolled Sites list and is under
investigation.
3.0 LAWS AND REGULATIONS
Since the implementation of the Site Location of Development Act in 1970, all
mining activities in Maine are required to include a provision for safety and
reclamation of land affected. This statute also regulates borrow pits (sand
and gravel) greater than 5 acres. Recently, Public Law Chapter 640, which
concerns the siting of borrow pits smaller than 5 acres, vas enacted, requiring
notification and setback provisions to protect the adjacent property owner.
This law also gave the State the authority to establish slope rules to ensure
safety at small borrow pits.7
The DEP and the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission are now involved in
developing a set of regulations that consolidates the permitting requirements
for metallic mineral mining. At present, the Department is in the midst of the
formal rule-making process.
The State of Maine, unlike some other states, does not have any regulatory
programs that deal with abandoned/inactive mines. But these sites can be
affected by existing statutes if they become active again.
4.0 DATA ANALYSIS
The following is a summary analysis of the data collected in this Task II
effort:
The literature and data researched do not accurately describe the impacts
associated with Maine's inactive/abandoned mines. All records reviewed
indicate only location, mineral commodity, and miscellaneous comments
noting shafts, pits and trenches. No records of environmental/public
safety impacts were noted in the literature researched.
The State of Maine does not have any programs that address
inactive/abandoned sites. Therefore, the researchers had no mechanism
available, other than extensive field surveys, to determine if sites listed
were active or inactive. This was especially true for sand and gravel pits
listed in the Minerals Industry Location System (MILS) database.
Regarding metallic ores, only the listing of mine sites with comments
stating shafts and pits were included in the inventory.3 The DEP is
assuming that all those sites listed are inactive/abandoned. No records
researched indicate acreage affected. Where information stated shaft sunk,
it was assumed that it meant two and there is an associated waste rock
dump. Some records included comments pertaining to smelters, slag dumps
and millsites, and these sites were included in the inventory.
- 2 -

-------
Regarding construction ores, 255 sites for sand and gravel pits were listed
in the MILS database. Location coordinates were the only information
given. Other pertinent information such as pit size, operational status
(active/inactive) was not recorded. Therefore, the DEP has not included
any information on sand and gravel pits in this data summary. Field
investigation is needed to confirm the operational status of these borrow
pits. Also, based upon the knowledge of Department staff, it appears that
the number of sand and gravel pits listed is underestimated. The DEP is
also assuming that a majority of the granite and other quarries listed are
inactive and contain highwalls. The basis for this assumption is the fact
that the State currently has very few quarries in actual operation.
Regarding industrial ores, 203	pegmatite mines (feldspar) were included in
the inventory, based upon the assumption that these sites are all
inactive.^ No information was	given, other than location, for acreage,
pits or shafts.
In summary, it can be assumed that	the State of Maine may have a large number
of inactive/abandoned mine sites.	However, without further investigation, the
exact extent of potential problems	from these sites may not be known
5.0 SITE RECLAMATION COSTS
Cost estimates for reclamation of the sites listed in the inventory have not
been included in this Task II report. As stated earlier, the State does not
have a mechanism or program in place to deal with inactive/abandoned mines.
The Department, therefore, will have to defer to professionals with experience
in the development of these cost estimates.
6.0 DEFINITIONS
Extraction. "Extraction" means the process of mining of metallic mineral
deposits, removal of ores, minerals, and overburden; but does not include the
injection of leaching solutions, lixiviants, or solutions to solubilize or
extract metallic minerals in place (in situ) from existing geologic formations.
In-Situ Leaching/Mining. "In-situ leaching/mining" means the leaching ur
mining of minerals occurring in the situation in which they were originally
formed or deposited. In-situ leaching/mining is not considered metallic
mineral mining.
Mine Site. "Mine site" means the area and facilities owned, leased, or
otherwise subject to the possessory control of a mining company within which
mining or activities incidental thereto occur. The mine site includes, without
limitation: the excavation, tailings, waste rock or overburden, storage area,
imills, conveyors, concentrators, crushers, screens, pipes, canals, dams, ponds,
lagoons, ditches, roads, access roads, utility facilities or equipment,
pollution control facilities, railroad tracks or sidings, administrative or
other buildings, or improvements, structures, rights-or-way, or easements
appurtenant or related to any of the foregoing.
- 3 -

-------
Mine Vaste. 'Mine waste' means all waste materials (solid, semi-solid, or
liquid) associated with exploration, advanced exploration, and mining. Such
wastes include, but are not limited to rock, tailings, and other process vaste
such as leachate and wastewater treatment plant residuals. Land clearing
debris, voodwaste, wastes from solvent extraction and electrowinning, and
materials and wastes regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation
and Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq. are not considered mine wastes for
purposes of this rule.
Mine Waste Unit. "Mine waste unit" means any land area, structure, location,
equipment, or combination thereof on or in which mine wastes are managed. A
land area or structure shall not become a mine vaste unit solely because it is
used to store (for 90 days or less) hazardous wastes generated on the same
site.
Mining or Mining Activity. "Mining" or "mining activity" means any activity or
process that is for the purpose of extraction or removal of metallic minerals,
and includes processes used in the separation or extraction of minerals or
minerals from other material including, but not limited to: crushing,
grinding, beneficiation by concentration (gravity, floatation, amalgamation,
electrostatic, or magnetic); cyanidation; leaching; crystallization; or
precipation or processes substantially equivalent, necessary, or incidental to
any of the foregoing. Mining or mining activity does not include exploration,
advanced exploration, roasting, or thermal or electric smelting.
Ore Leaching. "Ore leaching" means the intentional separation, selective
removal, dissolving-out, or extraction of soluble metals, salts, or other
constituents form an ore by the action of percolating vater or other
percolating solution. Ore leaching may include, but i6 not limited to, heap
leaching, vat leaching, agitation leaching, dump leaching and bioleaching.
Pollutant. "Pollutant" means dredged spoil, solid vater, junk, incinerator
residue, sewage, refuse, effluent, garbage, sewage sludge, munitions,
chemicals, biological or radiological materials, oil, petroleum products or
by-products, heat, wrecked or discarded equipment, rock, sand, dirt and
industrial, municipal, domestic, commercial or agricultural vastes of any kind.
Reclamation. "Reclamation' means the rehabilitation and continued maintenance
of the area of land affected by mining under a plan vhich includes, but is not
limited to, grading and land shaping, the creation of lakes or ponds, the
planting of forests, the seeding of grasses and legumes, the planting of crops
for harvest, and the enhancement of wildlife and aquatic resources, but does
not include the filling in of pits, shafts, and/or underground vorkings vith
solid materials.
Surface Impoundment. "Surface impoundment" or "impoundment" means a mine waste
unit or part of such a unit that is a natural topographic depression, man-made
excavation, or diked area formed of earthen or other materials that is designed
to hold an accumulation of liquid and solid vastes.
Tailings. "Tailings" means those portions of a metallic mineral deposit
remaining after extraction of minerals by physical or chemical means.
Unstable Area. "Unstable area" means any area vhere mass movement of earth
materials such as landslides, rockfalls, mudslides, slumps, earth flows,
subsidence, or debri6 flows are likely to occur.
- 4 -

-------
Waste Rock. "Waste rock" means rock which has been removed during mining or
advanced exploration but does not contain sufficient metallic minerals to
constitute ore.
7.0 MAINE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DATA SUMMARY TABLE
1.	Maine Metal Mines and Prospects, Mineral Resources Index No. 3, Maine
Geological Survey 1958.
2.	Maine Minerals Yearbook 1988, P. K. Harrison, W. Anderson, M. Foley, Bureau
of Mines, U.S. Department of Interior.
3.	Maine Pegmatile Mines & Prospects, Mineral Resources Index No. 1, Maine
Geological Survey 1958.
4.	Uncontrolled Sites Listing, Maine Department of Environmental Protection,
Bureau of Oil & Hazardous Material Control, 1991.
5.	State of Maine 1990 Water Quality Assessment Section 305(b) Report to
Congress.
6.	Renewable Resource Problems of Heavy Metal Mining in Coastal Maine, Robert
L. Dow and John W. Hurst, Jr., Research Bulletin /35, National Fisherman,
1972.
7.	30 M.R.S.A.  3556 An Act to Ensure the Safe Siting of Gravel Excavation.
8.	Maine Granite Quarries & Prospects, Mineral Resources Index No. 2, Maine
Geological Survey 1958.
9.	Minerals Industry Location System, Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of
Interior.
10.	Mineral Resource Data System, U.S. Geological Survey.
- 5 -

-------
SON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES1
Starc r	miw	
data summary2-5

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ir

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^ Not Enough Information Availabl

-------
data summary2*3 - Pug
0o*EH3Hiy
MMCAAi. TfK
N/A

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'dOA StfVCWO
Pfliuufl Ht&tw
N/A
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Pihc* Pram
au jsvc&ro
TOTAL
705
PJhW4 Wl!v
S~Jbt0a*c*

-------
MARYLAND

-------
STATE OF MARYLAND
TASK II FINAL REPORT
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS

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State of Maryland
Task II Final Report
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE LANDS
Introduction and Historical Background
A great variety of mineral products have been produced in
Maryland at one time or another. The present output mainly
consists of sand and gravel, stone, clays and some other non-
metallic minerals. Coal is produced in Maryland, but is not the
subject of this report. There are four basic geologic areas in
Maryland. They are the costal plain, piedmont, valley and ridge
and the Allegany Plateau. At one time Maryland was an important
iron-producing State, the leading chrome producer in the world,
and ranked high in copper production. These industries
eventually succumbed to the discovery of richer deposits in other
parts of the world and changes in technologies in other areas.
The western part of Maryland and the Piedmont region have
yielded the most varied type of mineral products.
Although Maryland at one time produced a wide variety of
minerals that variety is significantly reduced today. Iron ore
has not been mined since about 1916. Placer type mining of gold
continued until about 1940. Copper production in Maryland ceased
about 1918. There have been some exploratory drilling programs
in the Linganore copper district of Frederick County. The
results of these explorations have not been significant enough to
warrant any further activity by the companies involved. Chromium
production continued until about 192 0, although the latter
remnants were small placer operations.
As you will note the variety of minerals once produced has
dropped considerably and now is concentrated on production
oriented aggregates. The metallic minerals are no longer
produced. The size of the original mines and the passage of time
has allowed these areas to heal and to conceal any previous scars
from mining. No known water quality effects are being produced
by old metallic mineral mines.
Aggregate mining is now regulated under the Maryland Surface
Mine Law and will be discussed in more detail later.

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Mining
There are basically two mining methods in Maryland to
extract non-coal minerals. Some placer mining has been done
historically but no longer occurs. All mining in Maryland now is
done underground or by surface mining.
All but two of the mining operations in Maryland are surface
mines. The basic procedure for surface mining in the coastal
plain area is to strip the topsoil, remove the overburden, mine
the mineral, replace the overburden and topsoil and stabilize the
area. In the piedmont, valley and ridge and plateau areas, the
rock must be drilled and blasted. Waste rock may be deposited
with the overburden or used to reduce final highwalls.
There are two active non-coal underground mines in Maryland.
Both mines produce limestone and consume all of their product in
the process. Both of the mines discharge water from the pit
which is regulated by a N.P.D.E.S. permit. Turbidity is the main
parameter of concern since no toxic or minerals of concern are
encountered.
Health and Safety Impacts
Non-coal mining methods have created some safety hazards in
Maryland. Physical hazards include highwalls, flooded excavation
areas, unsafe structures, subsidence or sink hole areas, and
overburden areas. There are no known health related impacts from
abandoned mines in Maryland.
Highwalls have many times been left in vertical formation
with no warning or safety features built in. Highwalls in rock
areas may be in excess of 100 feet with vertical drops into water
or onto solid rock. A hazardous highwall is not totally a
function of height. A unconsolidated material, or overhang may
also be hazardous to public safety. Visibility to highwalls from
the top have led to accidents. A hazardous highwall may
therefore be defined as any unconsolidated material left in a
vertical (1:1 or less) state that exceed 15 feet in height. Sand
and gravel highwalls are not as high but may be prone to slumping
and cave ins. Areas in the coastal plain and piedmont areas are
particularly prone to having impounded water. Safety features
such as walk out areas, shallow water areas or underwater slopes
were not required in the past. Maryland has experienced at least
10 deaths in the past 5 years from drowning at abandoned surface
mines.
There is no information available to suggest that there is a
problem with hazardous mine openings in Maryland for non-coal
mining. Any unsafe structures such as buildings, machinery and
abandoned roadways may be a safety hazard in abandoned pits.

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Sink holes and subsidence areas are common to the limestone
producing piedmont areas. Legislation passed in the 1991 session
deals directly with subsidence and water loss from mining. The
areas of Karst limestone topography are the only areas that will
be affected by subsidence in non-fuel mining. These problems may
be more related to active operations however where dewatering is
required.
Abandoned overburden and waste rock are a danger to
trespassers and explorers. Hazardous structures such as wash
plant conveyors and stacking equipment may be dangerous for
unknowing trespassers.
Environmental Impacts
Abandoned mines in Maryland have impacted thousands of acres
of land and water resources. Although there are no leachates or
point source discharges of metals or contaminants there is a
significant discharge of sediment from many abandoned sites. A
typical abandoned site (assuming disturbed land surface and in
proximity to a stream) may be expected to discharge in excess of
100 tons of sediment per acre per year. There are no known
discharges of leachate from underground mines. Although some of
the copper mines have flooded there is no documentation to
suggest a discharge or leachate problem. As previously mentioned
there has been no metallic mineral mining in Maryland since the
early 1900's.
There have been instances of glauconite being uncovered in
the overburden of some coastal plain areas. In the presence of
air and water glauconite can form a sulphuric acid resulting in-a
very low ph. This is routinely neutralized by covering the
galuconite as soon as possible. Currently the Administration is
undertaking the reclamation of an abandoned glauconite mine in
Calvert County.
In as much as Maryland does not produce the minerals
referred to in Strawmann II nor has it produced metallic minerals
in the recent past there are no effects from fugitive dust or
wind blown tailings.
Laws and Regulations
In 1975 Maryland passed a surface mine law for all non-coal
mining. That statute requires a permit for all mining exceeding
one acre in size. A critical component of all surface mining
permits is a Mining and Reclamation Plan. This plan requires the
permittee to develop and implement a plan to reclaim all land
affected by the mining operation. There are no more abandoned
mine lands being created with the implementation of the present
mining law. In December of 1989 Maryland adopted regulations to
give more regulatory authority to mining enforcement.

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An abandoned surface nine is defined as those sites mined
and unreclaimed prior to January 1, 1977. Sites dug prior to
that time had no statewide responsibility to reclaim disturbed
areas.
The state surface mine law also establishes a Surface Mined
Land Reclamation Fund. The fund was established to assist in the
reclamation of pre-law surface mines. The state matches that
contribution annually. Reclamation fees may only be used for the
reclamation of pre-law surface mines.
Reclamation Program
Non-coal reclamation in Maryland is administered by the
Department of Natural Resources (DNR), within the Minerals, Oil &
Gas Division of the Hater Resources Administration. The Division
is responsible for the reclamation of pre-law surface mines and
bond forfeiture sites. Pre-law surface mines were mined and
unreclaimed prior to enactment of the surface mining statute, on
January 1, 1977. Bond forfeiture sites are permitted surface
mines that have submitted to an absolute forfeiture of a
performance bond for failure of the permittee to perform in the
manner set forth in the approved Permit.
The reclamation program is funded from license fees, permit
fees, special reclamation fees, bond forfeitures, and fines
collected by the Department. Additional funding has been
obtained through grants from the Environmental Protection Agency
(for Chesapeake Bay Implementation Projects), and the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. To extend the Division's
reclamation fund, a private landowner may be required to assume a
portion of the cost associated with construction activities. The
Division may also initiate partnerships with other agencies or
individuals required to mitigate for non-tidal wetlands, and
reforestation projects thereby engineering the project and
reducing cost.
Since 1988 DNR has administrated over $11,015,783 in funds
to reclaim 303 acres of land affected by pre-law and bond
forfeiture surface mines. Post reclamation land use include:
park land; open space; sports complexes; deep water ponds; non-
tidal wetlands; reforestation; wildlife habitats and
environmental study areas with trails and interpretive displays.
The Division has identified, inspected, ranked, and prepared
a statewide inventory of approximately 195 pre-law sites ranging
in size from one-half acre to over 350 acres. Providing for
reclamation of areas of land affected by surface mining will:
aid in the protection of wildlife, decrease soil erosion, prevent
pollution of rivers and streams, eliminate hazards to health and
safety, assure the use of these lands for productive purposes,
provide areas for education and environmental studies and provide
for the continued use and enjoyment of these lands.

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Cost of Remediation
The cost estimates are based upon actual costs incurred by
the State of Maryland in our non-fuel abandoned mine program.
The average cost in Maryland at non-stone sites is approximately
$5,000.00 per acre. Revegetation alone will cost between
$1,500.00 and $2,000.00 per acre. Creative reclamation such as
non-tidal wetland creation or reforestation could easily approach
$10,000.00 per acre. This amount does not include engineering or
survey costs which will run approximately $1,000.00 per acre for
an average site presenting no significant problems such as major
highwalls or waste product storage. The cost of reclaiming the
sites on Maryland's abandoned mine inventory will exceed $25
million. That cost could easily double if an exhaustive study is
undertaken to locate all former mining sites. .To date we have
spent more than $11 million in reclaiming 303 acres of abandoned
surface mines. We anticipate spending $17.8 million to reclaim
sand and gravel sites and $8.2 million on abandoned quarries.
In 1990 Maryland reclaimed a 10 acre abandoned mine site.
The site was a former sand and gravel pit that was mined in the
mid 1960's. The site was sparsely vegetated with very little
topsoil available. Scrub pines were the dominant plant species
with some undergrowth of vines and sedges. There was also a 2+
acre pond that was surrounded by 15 foot highwalls. There were
15-25 foot highwalls in other areas of the site. Several tons of
sediment per year was leaving the site and being deposited in the
Patuxent River.
There were obvious safety problems because of the standing
water and highwalls. The pollution problems, although not
severe, were documented. The site was also becoming an
attractive nuisance for trash and debris.
The base cost of the project for grading, sediment control
and traditional planting of grass was $150,000. In order to
create wildlife habitat, do some reforestation and create
wetlands the cost of the project escalated to $372,000. The
project was paid for with money from the abandoned surface mine
fund, grants from the Environmental Protection Agency and
participation from the Maryland State Highway Administration.
At the beginning of FY 92 there will be approximately
$52,000 in Marylands abandoned mine program. Without outside
fund enhancements and grants very little reclamation could be
accomplished. We are aware of more than 800 acres of abandoned
surface mines in Maryland. We also realize that we do not have
all the sites inventoried.

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NON-COAL INVENTORY - ABANDONED MINE LAND
REFERENCE GUIDE FOR DATA SUMMARY
Stale of Maryland
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
MINERALS OIL & GAS DIVISION
Attn: C Edition Larrimore
Telephone (301) 974-3874
REFERENCE GUIDE
Mineral
Type
Mining
Type (seres)
Ownership
(acres)
Features
(units)
(cost)
Metallic
Ores
Mines
0
Federal
0
Polluted Water
(miles)
0
Mi IIsites
0
PrivBte
0
Mine Dunps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Lend
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
HighwalIs
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(nunber)
0





Subsidence Prone
(Bcres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nunber)
0





Other
(units)
0
Metallic
Mines
10
Federal
0
Sediment Pollution
Tons/Acre/Tear
165,850
Unknown
Non-Mitallie
Minerals
Wash Plants
40
Private
844

Sand and
Gravel
638
Public
24
HighwalIs   15 Feet
Linear Feet
70,675
Unknown





Quarries
180


Safety Hazard
(miles)






Mine Openings
(nunber) 12 *
Unknown





Subsidence Prone
(acres)






Total Cost

25 M i11i on
Industrial
Ores
Mines
0
Federal
0
Pol luted Water
(miles)
0
Millsltes
0
Private
0
Mine Dunps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Land
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
HighwalIs
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(nunber)
0





Sifesidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nunber)
0





Other
(units)
0

-------
Phosphate
Bock
Mines
0
Federal
0
Pol luted Water
(miles)
0
Mi 11 si tes
0
Private
0
Mine Dunps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed land
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
Highwalls
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(number)
0





Subsidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nuirber)
0





Other
(units)
0
Uraniun
Overburden
Mines
0
Federal
0
Polluted Water
(miles)
0
Mi I Isites
0
Private
0
Mine Dumps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Land
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
HighualIs
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(number)
0





Subsidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nunber)
0





Other
(uni ts)
0
Oil
Shale
Mines
0
Federal
0
Pol luted water
(miles)
0
Mi IIsites
0
Private
0
Wine Dunps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Land
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
Highual Is
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(nunber)
0





Subsidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nunber)
0





Other
(uni ts)
0
Other
(acres)
Mints
0
Federal
0
Polluted Water
(miles)
0
Mi 1Isi tes
0
Private
0
Mine Dumps
(acres)
0

Smelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Lend
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
HighualIs
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(number)
0





Subsidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nunber)
0





Other
(units)
0

-------
TOTAL
Mines
0
Federal
0
Pol luted Water
(mlles)
0

Millsites
0
Private
0
Mine Dirps
(acres)
0

Swelters
0
State
0
Disturbed Land
(acres)
0

Other
0
Other
0
Kighwalls
(miles)
0





Mine Openings
(runber)
0





Subsidence Prone
(acres)
0





Hazardous Structures
(nuiber)
0





Other
(iriits)
0
1.	Information wis obtained front an abandoned mine survey complied by staff based upon a 1979 field survey
updated in 1988.
2.	Sediment loading uere estimated based upon the standard soil loss equation.
3.	All land ownership is private property except for two sites owned by the State of Maryland totalling 24
acres.
4.	Polluted water is defined as not able to sustain life forms natural its native environment.
5.	Abandoned mine is defined as those lands mined and not reclaimed prior to July 1, 1977.
6.	Disturbed land is effected by mining or incidental to mining including roads, spoil piles, refuse piles,
tailings and land excavations.
Historical data obtained from Geography and Geology of Maryland by Harold E. Vokes and Jonath Edwards, Jr. 1957.

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m
CAMBRIAN (ftflft-AOO mil yra.*)
Mmeatnoe, ifntomHf, ahale. mi) aanH
rrAfrf	cffrtftif, /imf
lifihtwijlht (tMfrrgrtff
PALEOZOIC OflANITIC IflNROtTS
ROCKfl(420-KftQ mil. yni,f)
|Rlrm|^ fftrfci: qunrli rfUrllo ti (ranlle
CiiW mtane% httihiinm *ton*.
> iTS
pai.eozoic hamc fCNRoi;^ hock*
lnfru*lv* rnrlra: ffahhro. *erp*ntlnlt r
CntiM fnnt.
"WA
^ r  "^DORCHESTER
M
WICOMICO
WORCE


I QUATERNARY (0-1 mil. yi.#)
Sand. allt, |rwl, Hay, and pNl. Aonrf,
fravri, cfay, prni.
1 TERTIARY (Id mil yn.*)
S* earth. Orrrntamd.
I CRETACEOUS (M-19B mil. yra.*
Siid, |rifH, tilt, and Hay. Snttf, |>awf,
flay.
r0\ TRlASSfC (IRI 2.10 mn yr* >
M RH ihilf, red anditone, and mnftomrr-
ate. Intruded hy dlabaae allla and dllM*
(Indicated by N). Clay, rta/r.
rSRMfAK AND PENNflYLVANf AN
(2IMI0 mil. jrni.*)
Cyrlle aeqiiencr* of abate. alltatone,
- . Nndaloiit* Hay,llmtnitf, and fnal Cfld,
cAty, ta**1t*%e.
| MlSSISSirriAN (H10.M6 mil. yra.*)
Rfd	ahale, dltiton*. aandatontf.
and IbtMvtADt, Crushed Hmettnn*.
| t)RVOM!AN 0MS-4O4 mil. yt*>
Shalf), aMtatone, iandatone, llmmUi^,
and ehert. CntiM /rmMrw.
| ftlMIRtAN (40K-42C mil yta )
Shale, mudatofip, aandalnne, and llmf>
atone. C/l>,
and phyllllf. 1?en*hcit marhte, rrmrnt,
time.
, PRECAMRRIAN ()
(Wratrrn rMmonl) TuffarfotH and nn
toffaeenua phylflte, ufalf. and 
-------
A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE GEOLOGY OF MARYLAND
APPALA CH1AN
PLATEAU
i"1	w*-.
-H VALLEY
AND RIDGE
PI EDM ON T
BLUE RIDGE S
COASTAL ZPLAIN
Maryland is pan of three distinc: physiographic regions' (I) the
Coastal Plair Province, (2j the Piedmont Province, and 13) the Blue
Ridge, Valley and Ridge. and Appalachian Plateau Provinces These ex-
tend in belts of varying width alonf the eastern edge of the Nonh
American connntn: from Newfoundland to the Gulf or Mexico.
The Coasta' Plain Province is underlain by a wedge o' unconsolidated
sediments including gravel, sand, sit.; and da>. which overlaps the rocks
of ihr easiern Piedmont alonf an irregular line of contaci known as the
Fill Zone Eastward. this uedge of sediments thickens to more than S.OOO
Fee: fi the Atlantic coas: line Beyond this linr is tne Continent: Shelf,
the submerged continuation oT ihr Coasta Plain. hich extends east-
ward for ai leasi another 7? miles where thr sediments attain a maximum
thickness of aboul 40.000 fee;.
Thr sediments of the Coastal Piair dir eastward ai a io angle,
fcnera!l> less than one degree and range in age from Triassic to Quater-
nary. Thr younger formations crop out successive)? to the southeast
across Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore. A thin layer of Quater-
nary (ravel and sand covers the older formations throughout much of (he
area
Mineral resources of (he Coastal Plain are chiefly sand and grave!,
and are used as aggregate materials by the construct ion industry. Clav for
brick and other ceramic uses is also important. Small deposit! of iron ore
are of historical interest. Plentiful supplies of ground water are available
from a number of aquifers throughout much of the region.
Thr Piedmont Province is composed of hard, crystalline igneous and
metamorphic rocks and extendi froir the inner edge of the Coastal Plain
westward 10 Catoeiin Mountain, the eastern boundary of ihr Blue Ridge
Province. Bedrock in the eastern part of the Piedmont consists of schist,
gneiss, pbbro, and other highly metamorphosed sedimentary and ig-
neous rocks of probable volcanic origin. In severs! places these rocks have
been intruded by granitic plutons and pegmatites. Deep drilling has
revealed (hat similar metamorphic and igneous rocks underlie the
sedimentary rocks of the Coastal Plain. Several domal uplifts of Precam-
briar gneiss mantled with quaruile, marble, and schist are present in
Baltimore Counry and in parts of adjacent counties. Differential erosion
of these contrasting rock types has produced a distinctive topography in
this pan of the Piedmont.
The rocks of the western pan of ihe Piedmont are diverse and include
phyllite, slate, marble, ant! moderately to slightly metamorphosed
volcanic rocks. In central Frederick County the relatively flat Frederick
Valley is developed off Cambrian and Ordovician limestone and dolomite.
Gently undulating plains underlain by unmetamorphosed bedrock of
Triassic red shale, siltstone, and sandstone occur in three areas in (he
western Piedmon:.
The Piedmont Province contains a variety of mineral resources.
Formerly, building none, slate, and small deposits of non-metallic
minerals, base-metal sulfides, gold, chromite, and iron ore were mined.
Currcntl), crushed none is important for aggregate, cement, and lime.
Small to moderate supplies of ground water are available throughout lhe
region, but favorable geological conditions locally may provide larger
amounts.
Unlike thr Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces, the Blur Ridge.
Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau Provinces are underlain
mainly b> folded and faulted sedimentary rocks. Thr rocks of the blue
Ridge Province in western Frederick County are exposed in a large an-
ticlinal fold whose limbs are represeeied by Catoclir. Mountain Bnd South
Mountain. These two ridges are formed b> Lower Cambrian quamiie, a
rock which is very resistant 10 the attack of weathering and erosion, a
broad valley floored by Precambnan gneiss and voJcaoic rock lies in the
core of the anticline between the two ridges.
The Valley and Ridge Province between South .Mountain in
Washington County and Dans Mountain in western Allegan* County
contains strongly folded and faulted sedimentary rocks. In the eastern
par; of the region, a wide, open valley called the Great Vallet. o- in
Maryland, ihe Hagersiown Valley, is formed on Cambrian and
Ordovician limestone and dolomite. West of Powell Mountain, a more
rugged terrain has developed upon shale and sandstone bedrock which
ranges in age from Silurian to Mississippian. Some of the valleys tn this
region are underlain by Silurian and Devonian limestones.
For many years the limestonr formations have been uset ay local
sources of agricultural lime and building rone. Modem uses include
crushed sione for aggregate and cement. A pure, white sandsionc in thr
western region of ihe province is suitable for glass manufacturing.
The Appalachian Plateau Province includes that pan of Allegany
County west of Dans Mountain and all of Garrett County, the western-
most county in Maryland The bedrock of this region consists principally
of gently folded shale, siltstone, and sandstone. Folding has produced
elongated arches across the region which expose Devonian rocks at the
surface. Most of the natural gas fields in Maryland arc associated with
these anticlinal folds in ihe Appalachian Plateau. In Ibe intervening
synclinal basins, coal-bearing strata of Pennsylvanian and Permian ages
are preserved.
The sedimentary rocks of the Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, and Ap-
palachian Plateau Provinces yield small 10 moderate suppbes of ground
water. Under favorable conditions large amounts may occur.
Jonathan Edwards, Jr.	1981
Otologist	\
STATE OF MARYLAND
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Prepared by the
MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Johns Hopkins University
BaJiimore, Maryland 21218

-------
MISSISSIPPI

-------
TASK II
Inactive and Abandoned Hlne Lands
A Review and Summary
Prepared for the Interstate Mining Compact
by
The Surface Mining and Reclamation Division
Office of Geology
Department of Environmental Quality
State of Mississippi

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INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE DATA SUMMARY
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
Mining In Mississippi began prior to the Civil War when a
few families mined lignite for their own use. Most of these
small sites -have naturally reclaimed themselves and can no longer
be found.
Non-coal mining began with the use of some sandstone' for
building purposes on a localized scale with very little acreage
affected. All these small quarries vere abandoned prior to the
Civil War.
Around the turn of the century, mining of sand and gravel
for road construction began and shoved a rapid increase around
1910. As paved roads became common, use of sand and gravel
increased and the search for local cement sources began. No
cement plant was established until 1950. At that time, and again
in 1959, plants vere established to use rav materials from the
limestones of the Vicksburg Group in central Mississippi.
Mining and crushing of limestone and chalk for agricultural
purposes began in 1945 and continues today. Limestone from the
Vicksburg Group and chalk from the Upper Cretaceous furnish the
agricultural lime.
The search for metallic minerals in Mississippi has been for
the most part futile. Early settlers of course looked for
precious metals but found none. Some iron ore is present and a
number of small operators have mined this ore. Problems of

-------
transportation and marketing caused the last of the mines to
close around I960. A few hundred tons of ore vere smelted on the
site and some ore vas shipped to Birmingham. There was little or
no Impact on the environment although no reclamation vas done.
Local potteries mined small amounts of clay prior to and
after 1900. Brick plants began production around the turn of the
century. In 1939 bentonite mines vere opened in Smith County in
central Mississippi and later in Itavamba and Monroe Counties in
northeast Mississippi. These mines are still in operation. Ball
clay has been mined in north central Mississippi since 1952.
Some of the clay pits operated by the bentonite companies vere
reclaimed but many of the clay pits have been only naturally
reclaimed.
The only underground mine in the state is a small silica
mine in the northeast corner of the state. It vas abandoned
shortly after World War I.
Health anfl Safety Impacts
There has been little impact on health by non-coal mining in
Mississippi. Flooded excavations have been a safety hazard vlth
quite a number of drownings having occurred in abandoned gravel
and clay pits and highvay borrow pits. There may have been
slight health problems caused by sand and gravel and clay and
limestone mining operations. There was one unsubstantiated
report of silicosis from one vorker at a silica mine.

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As In all mining opecations there have been Instances o
vehicles falling into pits vhile mining, and a few wall collapses
have been reported but only one death has been attributed to
mining.
There has been no mining vhich has caused toxic wastes or
chemically dangerous runoff.
Environmental Impact
Impact on the environment from surface mining has not been
as great in Mississippi as in states which have toxic waste or
chemical runoff. Surface mining operations have changed drainage
flows and increased sediment load in some streams. Removal of
vegetation has also occurred on a rather wide scale. No doubt
there has been damage to flora and fauna. There is minor damage
from fugitive dust.
Almost all damage to the environment and to health and
safety took place prior to the enactment of lavs regulating
mining. Existing laws have reduced damage to the environment to
a minimum. There are some problems in revegetation in some clay
mining operations and still problems from exempt and
"Grandfathered" mines.
Mlnlno Lavs in Mississippi
Prior to 1977, there were no lavs regulating mining in
Mississippi unless some public nuisance had been created or if
the air and vater vere polluted.

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The Mississippi Air and Water Pollution Control Commission
vas created In 19S7 and now operates In the Department of
Environmental Quality.
Lavs controlling this agency are from the Mississippi Code,
1972/ Sections 49-17-1 through 49-17-43, and the lavs creating
the Department of Natural Resources (later, Department of
Environmental Quality) from the Mississippi Code, 1972, Sections
49-2-1 through 49-2-21.
Additional regulations have been promulgated by the
Pollution Control Commission to meet all Federal and State
requ irements.
The Pollution Control Commission did not have sufficient
staff to inspect mining operations and exercised little control
of these operations. Action vas taken on rare occasions vhen
citizen complaints called attention to a violation.
Under the Antiquities Lav of Mississippi, 1970, Mississippi
Code, 1972, Section 3-9-7, the State Archives and History
Division of Historic Preservation stopped one mining operation on
the grounds that the operations endangered an historical site.
The Mississippi Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1977,
Mississippi Code, 1972, Section 33-7-1 et seq., gave the State
Its first control of mining. This lav is administered by the
Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Geology, Division
of Surface Mining.
The Office of Geology promulgated rules and regulations to
implement the act and also made certain changes to complement the

-------
passage of the Mississippi Surface Coal Mining and Reclamation
Act of 1979, Mississippi Code, 1972, Section 53-9-1 et seq.
Permits are required for the mining of sand, gravel,
limestone, fill material and all other materials. The materials
are divided into tvo groups: Class I includes bentonite,
dolomite and phosphate (the last tvo have not been mined in
Mississippi). Class II includes sand, gravel, soil, clay,
limestone, chalk and stone.
Certain operations are exempt from the permit and other
requirements of the statute and regulations. These operations
include:
(1)	Mining for any materials prior to April 15, 1978;
(2)	Mining for Class II materials affecting less than four
acres and more than 1,320 feet from an existing mine.
The Office of Geology requires notification of these
exempt operations;
(3)	Excavations made by a landowner for his own use, if
excavations do not exceed 1,000 cubic yards per year
and one acre of land or less is affected.
Recliffitlgn Ef
-------
responsible for the reclamation unless the bond Is forfeited, at
which time the State would use the bond to effect reclamation.
Since 1977 considerable acreage has been reclaimed with the.
reclamation bond being forfeited only one time. There has been
no reclamation of exempt mined land or mined land existing prior
to April 15, 1976, the date the act went into effect.
There are no Federal or State programs working in
Mississippi that could be used for reclamation. Due to the rapid
affects of erosion and natural revegetatlon, It would probably
not be feasible to reclaim much of the abandoned mined land.
Some areas of the State and some types of abandoned mines are
amenable to reclamation, should funds become available. In the
tables to follow, all lands not formally reclaimed are considered
to be naturally reclaimed In lands mined prior to April 15, 1978,
with a few exceptions, such as limestone pits which are still
much as they were when abandoned.

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Inventory Tables
Lands Mined Prior to April 15, 1978
*Some acreage still unreclaimed by any means
Mineral Type
Metallic Ores
Limestone
(Cement)
Limestone
(Agricultural)
Soil
Stone
Sand and Gravel
Clay
Bentonite
Number of Sites
4
3
4 ,000
5
20,000
250
12
Area Affected
	Acres	
200
500
500
20,000
100
100,000
4,000
5,000
Formally Reclaimed
	Ac res	
0
20
0
0
0
20
0
80
Naturally Reclaimed
	Acres	
200
200*
300*
20,000
50
98,980**
4,000
4,400*
Polluted Water (sediment fill) approximately 5 miles
Reclamation Costs $44,000
**Includes pits filled with water

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Lands Mined After April 15, 1978. Includes only abandoned lands.
Mineral Type
Metallic Ores
Limestone
(Cement)
Limestone
(Agricultural)
Soil
Stone
Sand and Gravel
Clay
Bentonite
Number of Sites
0
2
500
0
1,532
10
4
Area Affected
Acres	
0
50
40
25,000
0
21,600
720
110
Formally Reclaimed
	Acres	
0
50
20
10,000
0
9,600
150
90
Naturally Reclaimed
	Acres	
0
0
0
5,000
0
0
0
0
Cost of Reclamation
	(Dollars)	
0
50,000
40,000
5,000,000
0
5,860,000
75,000
50,000
Polluted Water (sediment fill) approximately 10 miles
There are no dangerous underground mine openings and no dangerous structures. There are very few high walls left
standing.
K*'
QP
CP

-------
NEW YORK

-------
NEW YORK SUMMARY TABLE
Participating State: New York
Representing Agency: Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Mineral
Resources
Agency Contact: Steven M. Potter, (518)457-0100
Address: 50 Wolf Road, Room 202, Albany, New York 12233-6500 	
PRTMARY MTNKRAT.fi MTNED: Leading mineral commodities in terms of value are crushed
stone, salt, cement, sand and gravel, zinc and wollastonite. Other minerals mined include clay,
garnet, gypsum, peat, lead, silver and talc. The majority of mining is accomplished using surface
mining or open quarry methods. Processing methods include crushing, screening, washing, gravity
separation (wollastonite) and other chemical methods associated with the processing of lead and
rinc.
STATE RECLAMATION LAWS: Mined Land Reclamation Law 0f 1975, amended 1991. It is
the policy of the State of New York to foster and encourage the development of domestic mineral
resources and reserves necessary to assure satisfaction of economic needs compatible with sound
environmental management practices. The legislature further declares it to be the policy of the
state to provide for the wise and efficient uses of the resources available for mining and to provide,
in conjunction with such mining operations, for reclamation of affected lands.
Abandoned as used in this title, means the cessation of mining and reclamation activities on land
affected by mining without prior notification to the department of such cessation of activities or
without describing such cessation in a Mined Land Use Plan approved by the Department, and
after opportunity to be heard.
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINE (IAM) RECIAMATION TO DATE: The Mined Land
Reclamation Law provides for the forfeiture of an operator's reclamation bond for failure to
reclaim a site. At the present time, no special account exists for this purpose. The majority of
iAM's would have been before 1975. To date, no reclamation of pre law !1975) abandoned lands
has been accomplished.
IAM INVENTORY ACREAGE: Not yet available as total figures. An inventory of pre-1975
mines is now being tabulated and summarized. Currently, there are approximately 30,040 acres of
land affected by mining under permit in New York State. Total value of reclamation financial
security on record is $48,121,801.05.
IAM REMEDIATION COST ESTIMATE: Not yet available.
INVENTORY CONFIDENCE LEVEL: N/A

-------
NORTH CAROLINA

-------
NORTH CAROLINA
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINED
LANDS
A Preliminary Assessment
Prepared For the Interstate Mining Compact Commission
In Conjunction With The Environmental Protection Agency's
Investigation Of Mine Wastes
April, 1991
Submitted by Charles H. Gardner, State Geologist and Director
Division Of Land Resources
North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources
With Assistance From
Stephen G. Conrad, Former State Geologist and Director
:)

-------
contents
Introduction
Mining and Milling Methods
Health and Safety Impacts
Environmental Impacts
laws and Regulations
Reclamation Efforts
Definitions
Explanation of Data Summary Sheet
Data Summary
References Cited
Appendix A
North Carolina Nonpoint Source Assessment Report
Appendix 6
Summary of Ore Knob Project
Appendix C
land Disturbed by Surface Mining .
Appendix D
North Carolina Mining Statistics
Appendix E
categories of North Carolina Mines

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NORTH CAROLINA
STATE MINE WASTE PROGRAM
TASK II
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED MINED LANDS (IAM)
Introduction
The discovery of gold in Cabarrus County, North Carolina in 1799, is
generally credited with ushering in mining as an important industry in
the United States. Prior to that time, mineral resources were utilized
primarily locally for limited purposes.
North Carolina contains a wide variety of rocks and minerals and
between forty and fifty varieties have been produced at one time or
another (Stuckey, 1965). Metallic ores, industrial minerals and
construction aggregates all occur in North Carolina in a wide range of
occurrences and economic importance.
Although metallic ores such as iron, copper, lead, zinc, tungsten and
precious metals have been mined in the past, North Carolina has never
been an important producer of metals. No metallic mines have operated
during the past twenty years, although there is potential for renewed
gold production and titanium (heavy minerals).
North Carolina has been and continues to be an important producer of
industrial minerals and construction aggregates (noncoal minerals). In
1989, the last year in which statistics are available, before value
added noncoal mineral production totalled $584 million and the state
ranked 19th nationally in the output of all minerals and 11th in
industrial mineral sales (White, 1989). Mineral commodities produced,
included clay (common and koalin), feldspar gemstones, lithium
minerals, mica, olivine, peat, phosphate rock, pyrophyllite, sand and
gravel (construction and industrial) and stone (crushed and dimension).
Clay, construction sand, gravel, and crushed stone accounted for about
60 percent of the mineral output in 1989 (White, 1989). North Carolina
ranked second to" Florida in the production of phosphate rock and
continued to lead the nation in the production of feldspar, mica and
pyrophyllite.
According to mining statistics compiled by the Land Quality Section of
the Division of Land Resources, North Carolina Department of
Environment, Health and Natural Resources in 1989, there were 653
active mining operations in North Carolina and 123 inactive, but
permitted mines. Total acres permitted were estimated to be 77,419 of
which 25,383 are affected but unreclaimed.
Mining and Milling Methods
Th6 three basic mining methods that have been employed to extract
minerals in North Carolina are underground, surface and placer

-------
mining.
Underground mining has been used mainly at metallic and precious metal
mines and to a limited extent at talc, pyrophyllite, feldspar and sheet
mica mines. Waste rock generated by underground mines was dumped at
the most convenient location adjacent to the mine, most often on side
slopes, but also in valley bottoms and heads of drainage.
Open pit surface mining has been the most widely used mining method in
North Carolina. This method consists of drilling and blasting the
rock, or simply excavating unconsolidated material, and hauling waste
material to a waste dump area and the ore to processing facilities.
Placer mining has been the least utilized mining method in North
Carolina. It was used extensively in the early days of gold mining and
in the recovery of monozite in some western Piedmont stream valleys.
Placer operations involve the use of floating dredges, hydraulic giants
and small washer plants. Presently, small floating dredges are limited
to sand mining operations.
Processing of metallic ores, precious metals and noncoal minerals has
involved a variety of methods. Early milling methods to recover gold
used chillian mills and stamp mills to crush and grind the ores.
Advances in the technology of crushing and grinding equipment resulted
in the development of rod and ball mills, jaw crushers and cyclone
crushers. Finely crushed ores were further concentrated by gravity
separation, mercury amalgamation, cyanidation and flotation.
Tailings and waste materials from mineral processing have been disposed
of in several ways. In earlier times, it was common practice to
discharge tailings and waste material directly to nearby streams or
other low points below the mill facility. This practice was
discontinued many years ago and tailings and waste materials are most
commonly stored in tailings impoundments or in some cases, hauled off-
site to disposal areas.
Smelting is the final beneficiation process for metallic ores. As
North Carolina has never been a large producer of metallic ores,
smelting facilities have not been constructed in the state. There may
be instances in the early days of copper mining where local roasting
facilities were used. However, in all cases in recent times metallic
ore concentrates were shipped to out-of-state smelters.
Health and Safety Impacts
The extent to which noncoal mining may have adversely affected the
health and safety of the public in North Carolina is not well
documented.
Physical hazards from inactive and abandoned mines include unprotected
mine openings (shafts), highwalls and water-filled excavations. There
have been a few isolated instances in which animals have fallen into
abandoned open mine shafts and one instance in which a murder victim^}
2

-------
body was disposed of in an abandoned mine shaft. There are also
recorded, but not tabulated cases of drownings at abandoned and
inactive sand and gravel pits and hard rock quarries.
Since 1986 there have been two fatalities related to mine accidents.
One was attributed to the collapse of a trench wall on mine property
and the other caused by the misfire of black powder at a dimension
stone quarry. The North Carolina Department of Labor reports that the
incident rate for accidents related to mining is below the majority of
other industries in North Carolina (personal communication).
There is no documentation of health hazards caused by ingestation,
inhalation or absorption of toxic metals or ores from abandoned or
inactive mines in North Carolina.
Environmental Impacts
Environmental impacts from abandoned and inactive mines can include
surface ana groundwater degradation and increased erosion and
sedimentation resulting from waste rock and tailings material
discharging into receiving waters. Environmental problems created by
abandoned and inactive mines in North Carolina are not well documented.
However, the Division of Environmental Management, Department of.
Environment, Health and Natural Resources has made a limited
investigation into abandoned gold and copper mines that may be causing
water quality problems. This report is attached as Appendix A.
In the western counties of Avery, Mitchell and Yancey, North Carolina,
the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has cited erosion from abandoned
mica, feldspar and clay surface mines and associated tailings disposal
sites as a major contributor to one of the ten most critical water
quality problems in the Tennessee Valley (Muncy and Bollinger, 1984).
Problems cited include the destruction by sediment of fish and aquatic
life in over 100 miles of stream, reduction of the original storage
capacity of the TVA Nolichucky Reservoir supplies in Tennessee, and
polluting the upper reaches of Douglas Reservoir.
Laws and Regulations
Beginning in the mid-to-late 1960's, the State of North Carolina, as
well as other states and the Federal government, began to enact and
implement various laws and regulations to protect and enhance the
quality of the State's water, air and land resources. The North
Carolina Mining Act of 1971, was enacted to ensure that adverse impacts
created by the extraction of vital mineral resources were minimized and
the land returned to a useful purpose after mining is completed. The
Mining Act of 1971, requires that any mining operation that disturbs
more than one acre, must first obtain a permit that is predicated on
filing an approvable post-mining reclamation plan and posting a
predetermined reclamation bond. Other environmental laws that directly
affect mining include Article 21. Water and Air Resources, G.S. 143-
215.1 and G.S. 143-215.108, and G.S., 130A-290 to G.S. 130A-310.22,
Solid Waste Management.
3

-------
Inactive and abandoned mines (IAMs) are considered to be. those sites
where t;iere is no coriiiiinuii.-g reclar.ia'cioii res>'^uiSibij.icy ~y an owner or
operator. However, the North Carolina Mining Act of 1971, as amended,
defines these terms somewhat differently. Prior to 1971, there was no
obligation on the part of mine owners or operators to reclaim mine
disturbances. Abandoned mine land that existed at the time of the
enactment of the Mining Act of 1971, is exempt from the requirements of
the law and considered to be abandoned, or are sometimes referred to as
orphaned mine land. Abandoned is also used to denote operations in
which the operator has defaulted or forfeited the bond and walked away
from the site without reclaiming it. Inactive means a permitted
operation that is not extracting or processing materials on site in any
given year. It may become active at some time during the permit
period.
Reclamation Efforts
A survey by the Soil Conservation Service in 1977, showed that about
If , 700 acres in BO counties in North Carolina were considered abandoned
or orphaned mined lands in need of reclamation.
As there is no established state funding program for the reclamation of
abandoned or orphaned mined lands (IAM), most of the reclamation that
has been accomplished on these lands has been by natural processes;.
This has been quite successful in many instances.
The most notable reclamation of abandoned mine lands in North Carolina,
was carried out in Avery, Mitchell and Yancey Counties by TVA in
cooperation with several state agencies, local government and mine
operators. Between 19S0-and 1985, about 590 acres of highly erosive
materials from abandoned mines and tailings disposal sites were
successfully reclaimed. Total costs and in-kind services, amounted to
$487,000 at an average cost of $825 per acre (Muncy, 19B5).
Water quality problems created by acid mine drainage from an abandoned
copper mine in Ashe County, Ncjrth Carolina, is being addressed by the
Division of Environmental Management", Department of Environment, Health
and Natural Resources. Section 319 of the Clean Water Act authorizes
states to use federal funds to conduct nonpoint source demonstration
projects. The Water Quality Section, of the Division of Environmental
Management has received approval from the US EPA, for a demonstration
project located at the Ore Knob mine, Ashe County (McGee, personal
communication). A low-cost, long-term technology developed by the
State of Tennessee to treat acid mine drainage will be used. The
technology involves intercepting acid drainage (typically with low
levels of dissolved oxygen) as it exits the tailings area, routing it
through limestone-filled trenches (capped with clay to maintain anoxic
conditions) to raise the pH, and then using a wetland system as a
retention area for oxidized and precipitated metals. The configuration
of the Ore Knob tailings area is suitable for this type treatment
system (McGee personal communication).
Some abandoned mine lands in North Carolina have been reclaimed by
private landowners and mining companies to develop recreational,
4

-------
residential and commercial properties. There is no documentation to
indicate the amount of* land reclaimed in this manner, but it is
believed to be relatively small.
5

-------
EEFINITXONS
Water Pollution- Means the man-made or man-induced alteration of the
chemical, physical, biological, or radiological integrity of the waters of
the State, including, but specifically not limited to, alterations
resulting from the concentration or increase of natural pollutants caused
by nan-made activities. GS 143-213(19)
Mine Dunps (Refuse)- Means all waste soil, rock, mineral scrap, tailings,
slimes, and other material directly connected with the mining, cleaning,
and preparation of substances mined and shall include all waste materials
deposited on or in the permit area from other sources. GS 74-49(14)
Disturbed land (Affected land)- Means the surface area of land that is
mined, the surface area of land on which overburden and waste is
deposited, and the surface area of land used for processing or treatment
plant, stockpiles, and settling ponds. GS 74-49(1)
Highwalls(l)- Means any abandoned mine-related land unprotected and
dangerous vertical or near vertical rock wall created by previous mining
activities.
Mine Cpenings(l) - Means any abandoned mine-related surface entrance to a
drift, tunnel, adit, or shaft, that is large enough for a child to fall
through, and is not adequately sealed or barricaded.
Subsidence Prcne(l)- Means any abandoned mine land surface expression
related to subsidence such as tension cracks, potholes, throughs, or
cavings.
Hazardous Structures(1)- Means any abandoned mine land related structure,
portion of a structure or facility that has the potential to pose a
physical hazard.
(1) Terms not defined in the North Carolina General Statutes or
Administrative Code. Definitions adopted informally for this report
only.
6

-------
Explanation of Data SuimHry Sheet
Data Sources
Data sources reviewed in preparing the Data Summary Sheet included
the Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS) furnished by the U.S. Geological
Survey? the Mineral Industry Location System (MILS) furnished by the U.S.
Bureau of Mines? and Erosion and Sediment Inventory for North Carolina, a
report prepared by the federal Soil Conservation Service.
Although the MRDS and MILS printouts contained numerous records of
active and abandoned mines and prospects in North Carolina, neither data
system contained any information on acreage. The Erosion and Sediment
Inventory for North Carolina was the wily source of data that included a
county listing of acres of abandoned surface mines needing reclamation.
Therefore, it was the single source of data used in compiling the Data
Summary Sheet for North Carolina.
Cost Analysis
The federal Soil Conservation Service data only included land
disturbed by surface mining. It did not include distinguishment by
mineral type or reference to health and safety problems or environmental
effects, other than to establish an erosion rate attributable to surface
mining on a state-wide bases.
The report listed 16,700 acres of abandoned surface mines in need of
reclamation and 7,000 acres of abandoned surface mines not in need of
reclamation. As the report did not distinguish mineral type, the writer
atterrpted to establish acreage attributable to metallic ores, construction
ores and industrial ores subjectively based on personal knowledge of the
mineral resources and mining industry in North Carolina. This breakdown
resulted in 834 acres(5 percent) attributed to metallic ores, 12,342
acres(74 percent) attributed to construction ores, and 3,524 acres (21
percent) attributed to industrial ares.
In 1987, the land Quality Section of the Division of land Resource
(NCNR&CD) conducted a state-wide study to establish an estimated
reclamation cost per acre of the several categories and types of mining in
North Carolina (see Appendix E). This study was conducted to assist the
North Carolina Mining Commission in establishing a revised bonding
schedule for permitted mining operations.

-------
Based on this information an average cost of $1,500 per acre was
chosen for reclaiming metallic ore mines, $1,200 per acre for reclaiming
construction ore mines, and $1,850 per acre for reclaiming industrial ore
mines.
Deficiencies of Data
The source of abandoned mine land data used in this report was
corpiled in 1977 and may be out-of-date. Furthermore, it was part of a
much broader study to establish erosion rates for a wide range of land
uses and was not a single focus study. The writer has applied subjective
interpretations to the data and therefore the resulting cost analysis may
be in substantial error.
8


-------
NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES1
Stare of North Carolina	
Agency Contact Land Resources	
Telephone (919) 733-3833	
DATA SUMMARY"
WXDULTYK (Mr
M2HINC m (ra)
OWNDtSQy
RATDKO (aiD) (W)
Metallic Ores
Gold
Copper
Iron
Others
Mfacs

hM

feUuard Wma*

(<)"
MiUrna

PliiMi
834
M w Dvpf1
()

Smtkn

Seut

DiraM Land"
(5 834
1.251.000


OOmr3

Hijbnlk"
(mOa)





Mn Opc&iapu
(nw&be')





Sufemdcna Prom"
()





Samjirm*
(uattm)

 '



Ote"
(*>)

Consaucrion
Ores
Crushed Stone
Sand & Gravel
Dimensions
Stone
Others
Mirm
1?34?
ftdml

Mliatd Wtttr
(mOa)

Milinm

Prrrtu
12342
Mia Dtepi
(ton)

Snufcm

Sou

DisaM Ltad
imt) 12342
K,810,400
OOicr
"
Oibcr

Hifbxlk
(da)





MiatOpsiap
(tBBtar)





S*adeePieei
(tow)





KastaSanra
(taste)





Ote
(oBiB)

Industrial Ores
Clays
Feldspar
Mica
Pyrophyl1ite
Others
Maa*
3524
Unl

>uBi1 Vtt
<&)

Milku

Mm
3524
Mia> >imp
(M)

tMtn

Sou

DIhW Laarf
(m} 3524
6,519,400
Othar

OUwt

HiibwtOi
(nOa)





Mia* Cfaiiy
<~)






(n)





HorinSnsn
(Mte)





Oka
(*)

(1) Enough data was not available to differentiate types of features.
All AML lands included under "Disturbed Land.".
9

-------



DATA SUMMARY" - Page 2

KDaXM-TTTCCwV
tCNDC m
K)
cwxixsKxr (jsv)
Katvks
(uArti)
(cwt)
Phosphate Rock
Wirtn

FrdcrmJ

Mimed W*to/'

(con)'*
HOliaa
V
^ri*u

Mm Dwt.0>*


Swollen

Suit

Diwbr J l^ndM
()


Oihrr

OiHrr*

llijhw.lb1'
(TuinJ






Miat Opninp"
(number)






SubmdcwT Pium"
(em)






Hmariom Smrfun>"
(lumber)






oa*9
(u*i)

Uranium
Mina

Frtfi/fcJ

PoUurt wma
(mte)

Overburden
M3k um

Prtw

Miai Danp



5rwbrri

5ui

DwwM l*ad
(!


OOmt

00*0

HlffcnDi
(aJa)


 *



Uk Ope*Jrja
(uAbe)






jtWknm Pn
(n|






Suuciunc
(nmnbvr)






Olka
(tsaj)

Oil ShaJe
M*ci

Mem.'

Mkurf War
(tlo;


MOtea

Pnvm#

Umt taw
(era)


Smchri

Sou

MaW Lud
(xm)


OJsrr



Hiilmlb
(mid)






MfcvOpanp
(somber)







(m)







(winter)







(]. .

Other (acres)7
Mum

FcdvmJ

FillWma
lo^Cl)


WiDrui

Mm

W Tlwmft
(*a)


Sttim

Boer

DiMtdlad
(on)


OAer

Otim-


(da)






riiii "| mi
(U*0)






Trfiiiin'iliin Piim
()






KsEErdoei Susnra
(UBbv)






Ote
(unto)

TOTAL
Mm
16700
Unl

MMri Wk
(>)


Mlkui

Privu
16700
kteDa^
(m)


SbwIuti

SttU

DnewM ud
() 15700
22.580.800

Otto

OcWr

ICjfc &
(niki)






	tmiit
(.*
-------
References Cited
McGee, Beth, 1991, Summary of the Ore Knob mines project, personal
communication, Department of Environment, Health, and Natural
Resources, Raleigh.
Muncy, Jack A., and Bollinger, Roger W. , 1984, "Orphans of the Valley,"
a status report on abandoned surface mines in the Tennessee Valley,
Vol. 1, Knoxville, P. 9-10.
	, 1985, Reclamation of abandoned mica, feldspar, and
kaolin mines and associated tailings disposal sites in western North
Carolina, a paper presented at the second annual meeting of the
American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation, Denver, Colorado,
Oct 8-10, 1985.
Soil Conservation Service, 1977, Erosion and sediment inventory for
North Carolina, Raleigh, Table 9.
Stuckey, Jasper L., 1965, North Carolina: It's geology and mineral
resources, N. C. Department of Conservation and Development, Raleigh,
p. 273.
White, Doss H., Jr., 1989. The mineral industry in North Carolina in
1989, Mineral industry surveys, Bureau of Mines, Washington.
11

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APPENDIX A
NONPOINT SOURCE ASSESSMENT
REPORT
APRIL 1989
FINAL REPORT
NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH,
AND NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
WATER QUALITY SECTION
REVISED DECEMBER IS89
This report has been approved for release:	(_
Paul wilm
Director
James G. Martin
Governor
William w. Cobey, Jr.
Secretary

-------
APPENDIX a
heavy industrial development where availability of municipal
sewer systems is limited.
Frc.T tv,e 795 ry i*	f ' v.\ *. -.i 1; t i?. v- - ;'
for detailed study of theiV impact on ^rouudwater. oi-~c-ion
these facilities was based on gepgraphic region, type of
facility, age,, and agreement to cooperate in the research
project. The' chosen facilities are a good cross-section of the
different types of facilities inventoried.
In conjunction with Water Quality staff, plans are being
developed to monitor the effects of golf courses on
groundwater quality. Monitoring wells will be installed at four
courses to monitor pesticides and nutrients. An
environmental fate model (PRZM) viil be used to predict the
behavior of pesticides used on golf courses.
A plan to monitor the impact of agricultural pesticide use or.
groundwater quality is being developed in cooperation with an
interdepartmental coordinating comnittee. Completion of the plan
in 1989 will assist in providing information on the impact of
pesticide application on groundwater and lead to improved
pesticide application practices where problems are identified.
ABANDONED GOLD AND COPPER MINES
Of the several types of abandoned mines in North Carolina,
orphan gold mines may present a significant toxicant problem.
Former gold mining practices involved using mercury as an
amalgamation substance. Mercury combines with and adheres to geld
fragments, increasing, the weight of those fragments and thus
facilitating separation from other particles. The use of liguic
mercury in past mining methods often led to its being lost to
the stream in formidable quantities. The areal extent of residual
mercury in stream beds of the old gold districts is unknown but
thought to be considerable. Several of the Land Quality personnel
know of mercury existing in stream beds of previously worked
deposits. In fact, amalgamated mercury can actually be found when
panning for gold today.
Recently members of the Water Quality Section located severcl
abandoned gold mines to investigate impacts on streams in the
area from sediment, tailing piles, and former mining .practices.
Most of these sites have naturally revegetated. Wate* quality
samples were collected and analyzed for mercury and other metals
from several streams flowing through North Carolina's abandoned
gold mining districts. Fish tissue samples were also taken from
the same streams. Table 32 lists water quality data collected
from grab samples at several streams near abandoned gold mines
and an abandoned copper-zinc mine. Additional samples have been
taken at other sites and a complete report will be prepared once
these samples have been analyzed.
63

-------
APPENDIX A
The copper-zinc mine (Ore Knob, Gentry Creek, New River
basin, Ashe County) has low pH (2.8 to 2.9), and high level:
copper (up to 770 uc/1 compared to a vitor ~ur.lity rtandard"
ug/I) cr.C - (up to 850 vo/1 J p; v>_u _o ?. 2-v  ,
ug/1). The tailings pond has low pK and high zinc and cop'pe
well. Low pK is also suspected from two other mines (Table
In addition, areas of abandoned pyrophyllite mines may have
pH runoff but have not been thoroughly investigated.
Streams from two abandoned gold mine areas, Moore Count}
McDowell County areas, show no evidence of mercury and littl
evidence of other heavy metal pollution from a total of 12
samples.V Iron, aluminum, and manganese are the only elemeni
consistently above detection. These compounds are ubiquitoi
streams, but the levels are low.
In samples of sediment and water from South Muddy Creek
aluminum, iron, and manganese levels are higher (as expectec
which reflects levels of these elements in the stream sedim<
In addition, low levels of chromium, copper, zinc, and lead
also present in the stirred samples from the lowest station
the watershed. In the holding pond (no discharge, complete
recycle) at the Imperial Gravel Co. site where gold and mer<
are recovered from stream gravels and other ores, low level!
chromium, copper, and zinc were detected but not mercury. :
appears that heavy metal pollution of the water is not a pr<
in these McDowell County abandoned gold mine areas.
Samples from the Second French Broad River below Vein
Mountain Church, South Fork of Muddy Creek, Bear Creek, and
Creek revealed that low levels (or none in the case of Cabi:
Creek) of mercury were present in fish.tissue. All samples
less than the FDA action level for mercury (1.0 mg/kg). Ho-
mercury levels were somewhat higher than statewide averages
indicates that mercury entered these watersheds in the past
is persisting in the fish. Additional work is planned at a
site to confirm these conclusions.
Table 33 lists mines thought likely to be causing water
quality problems. Several of these were site-visited and w
quality problems are noted. The most obvious problem (pend
results of the mercury work discussed above) is sediment
(tailings and/or larger stones) which have filled in portic
these streams making them unsuitable for aquatic life. Sir
these mines were abandoned well before enactment of the Mir
Act in North Carolina (1971), they are orphaned and not sul
to the Act. There is no abandoned mine reclamation fund ir
Carolina.
4
64

-------
Table 32
Hater Quality Saipllng (grab) fron Selected Abandoned Mine Streams
Ore Knob mine
(ccpper-z inc mine)
~stent
fjuijl
rtno
Moore County area
(gold mines)
M: Ocwell County area
(gold mines)
Gentry
Discharg Octk
Second Gravel 00 Seoond	South MxJdy Credt
Simlln Cabin Ck UT Cabin Broad FV Settling Broad fV lowest station middle station upper stat
Crotk nr Dry (k Creek up gravel co. pond dk gravel 00 Clear Stirred Clear Stirred Clear Stii'
Date sarrpled 9/29/87 9/29/87 9/29/87 6/7/88
6/7/88
5/27/80
6/0/01
PH
2.8
2.9
-
7.0
7.1
-
7.5
Cadniun ug/1
<10
<10
<10
<2.0
<2.0
<2.0
<2.0
Oironiun ug/1
<3
<25
<25
<25
bnganese ug/1
-
-
-
130
45
1.100

-------
Table 33



Abandoned Mines Likely Causing Water Quality Problem

Mine fhre
River Basin
Ccurty
ftcelvlng Strewn
Index f
foments
Citation
u+crxxn
Watauga

Watauga
laurel Fork Crexk
8-)0
active and abandonotf
Mickey, 1900
urfcncwn
Watauga

frscry
Cranberry Crock
8-22-16
imgnetlte mine, sedlnent Dr. Gjllatan ASU
Iteiry Knob
Catawba

Gastcn
LTT S. Fork Crowders Crod<
11-135-10-0.5
In S.C., acidic
aa
Ore Knob
few

Ashe
Little ft&k and Gentry Crwks 10-1-35-4
acidic, Zh, Qj
cm, cem
Flk Knob



Little Crrrk
10-1-10-1
acidic, Qj
K Irkel, 1967



Ashe
Three Top Cns*
10-2-13

Mickey, 15)80
rtwle
Cataxba

Uhlcn
E. Fork TkoIvh Milo Crock
11-138-2

Pardee A Park, 1940
various mines Cn=9)
CSpo Fear

. Kbore
Gib In, Dry, M?t frocks
17-26-5-1
ttj, sedirant
Pardee A Park, 1940
Garrher Hill
Ope Fear

Guilford
Fteddlcks Crock
17-6
Pardee A Park, 1940
Gbtton
Ope Fear

Mxre
Dorp River
17(31)

Pardee 4 Park, 1948
Thorp sen
Yad< In-Poo
Dee .
Stanley
Maintain Crock
13-28

CSrperrter, 1976
Sliver Hill
Yad<1n-Ftee
Doe
Davidson
Battlo Brnck
12-121

Pardee 4 Park, 1518
Ocnrad Hill -Dodge Hill
Yad*lcw Crock
L3-1/-14

f'.irdco 4 fork, 19<10
thlcn copper
Yack Irt-ffee
Deo
Ibtan
Little Ofir Oed<
13-17-61-5-1

C&rpcnter, 1776
Hish
Yad<1n-ft
Doe
Cabarrus
UT Dutch Buffalo Crock
13-17-11(5).5

Pardee 4 Park, 1948
Dlxlo Cbocn
Yacfc Irt-fVn
OOo
Obarrus
UT Andorscn Crock
13-17-13-1

PanVr) A Park, 19^0
Clegg
Ope Fear

Lee



CSrpcnter, 1976
Blue King

Granville



Carpenter, 1976
Cross Cut


Porscn



Girpcnter, 1976
Urssell
Yad
-------
APPENDIX A
XI. REFERENCES
Cr Hah?"..	1908. Pe-sc--'.! r v 15 c. ? t\ i c r.. "PT' "S v. r
^ ^ N"  C.*
Carpenter, A.P.,HI- 1976. Metallic Mineral Deposits of the
Carolina Slate Belt. North Carolina Bulletin "84. NCDNRCD, DLR,
Geologic Survey Division.
Doucette, W.H. and J.A. Phillips. 1978. Overview: Coastal Land
Drainage for Agriculture and Forestry in the North Carolina
Coastal Zone. Report No. 8. Center for Rural Development, NCSU.
Raleigh, N.c.
Hefner, John M. and James D. Brown. 1984. Wetland Trends in the
Southeastern United States. USFWS, Atlanta. Wetlands, Vol 4:1-11.
Kinkel, Arthur R. Jr. 1967. The Ore Knob Copper Deposit, North
Carolina, and other Massive Sulfide Deposits of the Appalachians.
Geologic Survey PPS558.
Mickey, J.K. 1988. Personal communication. Inland Fisheries, North
Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Winston-Salem.
Moorhead, K.K. 1988. The National Wetlands Inventory in North
Carolina. Proceedings of the Symposium on Coastal Water Resources.
American Water Resources Association. Wilmington, N.C.
NCDNRCD Division of Environmental Management, Water Quality
Section. 1985. Assessment of Surface Water Quality in North
Carolina. Report No. 85-01. Raleigh, N.C.
NCDNRCD Division of Environmental, Water Quality Section. 1986.
Water Quality Progress in North Carolina, 1984-1985 305-b Report.
Raleigh, N.C.
NCDNRCD Division of Environmental Management, Water Quality
Section. 1988. ' Water Quality Progress in North Carolina,
1986-1987 305-b Report. Report No. 88-02 Raleigh, N.C.
NCDNRCD Division of Environmental Management, Water Quality
Section. 1989. North Carolina Nonpoint Source Management Program.
Raleigh, N.C.
\
Omernik, J.M. and A.L. Gallant. 1986. Ecoregions of the Pacific
Northwest. EPA/600/3-86/033.
Pardee, J.T. and C.F. Park, Jr. 1948. Gold Deposits of the Southern
Piedmont. United States Geologic Survey. PP213.
t
77

-------
APPENDIX A
U.S. rsp.ir tr'-nt "of" r.~:-r.v?:-r:e, National Ocearrc ?nd Atmospheric
Aominisui'&L.ioi', ISbS . <. _-		I ... 
Washington, D.C.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1987. Nonpoint Source Guidam
Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington
D.C.
78

-------
appendix b
Summary of Ore Knob Mine Project
Section 319 of the Clean '=?.rt authorir.rd Crimes Vc ur-3
The Division of Environmental Management (DEh), Water Quality
Section, has received approval from US EPA for a demonstration
project located at Ore Knob Mine in Ashe County.
This demonstration project will address acid drainage from an
abandoned metal mine in Ashe County. Abandoned in the 1960's,
the mine has been unaffected by reclamation requirements of the
N.C. Mining Act of 1971. There has been much public concern over
the acid drainage from this site.
The State of Tennessee has been involved in the development of a
low-cost, long-term technology to treat acid mine drainage. Using
this method, called anoxic alkaline drains, they have
successfully treated acid mine drainage from coal mines and
documented biological recovery in receiving surface waters. The
technology involves intercepting acid seepage (typically with low-
levels of dissolved oxygen) as it exits the tailings area,
routing it through limestone-filled trenches (capped with clay to
maintain anoxic conditions) to raise pH, and then using a wetland
system as a retention area for oxidized and precipitated metals.
Tennessee estimates that a high grade limestone will remain
effective for greater than 20 years. The configuration of the
Ore Knob tailings area is suitable for this type treatment
system.
179

-------
APPENDIX c
r::rdRB~D by 5*j: F/.r-.
North Carolina


2/
Total Surface
2/


1/
Abandoned Surface
Mines
Abandoned Surface
Total

Active Mining
Mines Needing
Need ing
Mines Not Needing
Distur

Under Permit
Reclama tion
Reclama tion
Reclama t ion
Sur fac
County
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acr
Alamance
124
2
126
15
14
Alexander
5
10
15
5
2
A1leghany
16
0
16
0
1
Arson
283
2,514
2,797
300
3,05
Ashe
9
10
19
8
2
Avery
147
78
225
0
22
Beaufort
1,121
5
1,126
60
1.16
Bertie
50
100
150
50
17
 laden
66
0
66
10
7
Brunswick
12
27
39
9C
12
Buncombe
ISA
113
297
4
3C
Burke
58
50
108
488
59
Cabarrus
159
285
444
15
45
Caldwell
22
0
22
250
27
Carnder.
4
10
14
20
J
Carteret
0
0
0
0

Caswei1
47
0
47
25
7
Ca tavka
7A
A5
119
3
i;
Cha tharr.
179
110
28S
200
4f
Cherokee
74
25
99
17
11
Chowar,
0
48
48
51
c
Clay
12
17
29
4
J
Cleveland
51
6
57
78
1;
Columbus
16
150
166
150
31
Craven
231
50
281
50
3:
Cumberland
219
615
83A
54
Bf
Currituck
37
30
67
60
i:
Dare
1A
3
17
6
i
Davidson
370
60
430
82
5;
Davie
36
0'
36
0
.*
Duplin
A 6
5
51
0
c
Durham '
1A0
AO
180
0
11
Edgecombe
187
80
267
408
6:
Forsyth
128
0
128
20
l*
Franklin
39
10
49
0
L
Gaston
157
30
187
0
it
Gates
2
1
3
0

Graham
0
2
2
3

Granville
A3
10
53
30
i
Greene
0
68
68
100
k
Guilford
321
96
A17
58
4:
Ha lifax
38
A75
513
. 0
5:
Harnett
1,377
1,210
2,587
125
2,7:
Haywood
16
31
47
31

1_/ Active surface mines under permit required by N.C. Mining Act of 1971. Data suppl:
Land Quality Section, N.C. Department of Natural Resources & Concnunity Development
March 18, 1977.
2/ Data obtained by individual county survey by Soil Conservation Service field perso
January 1974.	} 

-------
appendix c
Page 2 of J
North Carolina


V
Total Surface
2/


1/
Abandoned Surface
Mines
Abandoned Surface
Total Land

Active Mining
Mines Needing
Needing
Mines Not Needing
Disturbed By

Under Permit
Reclama tion
Reclamation
Reclama tion
Surface Minim
Countv
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Henderson
175
90
265
50
315
Hertford
55
6
61
12
73
Hoke
0
15
15
12
27
Hyde
0
0-
0
1
1
Iredell
83
100
183
0
1E3
Jackson
43
20
63
0
63
Johns ton
164
3,500
3,664
100
3,764
Jones
26
o 
26
10
36
Lee
261
1
262
0
262
Lenoir
73
26
99
0
99
Lincoln
0
0 -
0
45
45
McDowell
132
70
202
408
610
Macon
91
133
224
74
298
Madison
29
0 .
29
0
29
Martin
0
50
50
0
50
Mecklenburg
238
AO
278
40
318
Mitchell
180
1,312
1,492
80
1,572
Montgomery
128
225
353
150
503
Moore
286
944
1,230
235
1,465
Nash
81
67
148
45
193
New Hanover
521
100
621
50
671
Nor thainpt on
29
510
539
350
889
Onslow
60
0 -
60
9
69
Orange
51
5
56
7
63
Pamlico
0
0 
0
0
0
Pasquotank
4
15
19
45
64
Pender
11
15
26
10
36
Perquimans
0
3
3
7
10
Person
0
3
3
3
6
Pitt
122
25
147
125
272
Polk
9
0 
9
0
9
Randolph
58
35
. 93
332
425
Richmond
119
16
135
2
137
Robeson
6
o-
6
0
6
Rockingham
229
0v
229
15
244
Rowan
205
450
655
100
755
Rutherford
16
28
44
28
72
Sampson
67
40 -
107
50
157
Scotland
18
100
118
100
218
Stanly
168
2
170
65
235
Stokts
32
0 ^
32
3
35
Surry
156
110
266
110
376
Sva in
0
15
15
0
15
Transylvania
13
3
16
0
16
.1/ Active surface mines under permit required by N.C. Mining Act of 1971. Data supplied by
Lend Quality Section, K.C. Department of Natural Resources & Community Development,
Harch IB, 1977.
2/ Data obtained by individual county survey by Soil Conservation Service field personnel,
January 1974.

-------
APPENDIX C
Page 3 oi
North Carolina


1/
Total Surface
V


\!
Abandoned Surface
Mines
Abandoned Surface
Total 1

Active Mining
Mines Needing
Needing
Mines Not Needing
Disburl

Under Permit
Reclamation
Rec lama t ion
Reclama tion
Sur fac<
County
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acres
Acr<
Tyrrel1
0
1
1
1

Union
106
154
260
134
39*
Vance
69
0
85
0
8'
Wake
231
113
344
449
79-
Warren
0
0
0
0

Washington
0
3
3
7
U
Wa teuga
19
4 0
59
200
25'
Wayne
ICS
500
608
468
1,09
Wilkes
36
125
163
125
28'
Wilson
220
150
370
50
42
Yadkin
26
5
31
3
3'
Yancey
136
1 .114
1.250
0
1,25
TOTAL FOR





NORTH CAROLINA
11,005
16,700
27,705
7,000
34,70
l! Active surface rrines under perr.it required by N.C. Mining Act of 1971. Data suppli<
Land Quality Section, N.C. Department of Natural Resources it Community Development,
March 18, 1977.
2/ Data obtained by individual county survey by Soil Conservation Service field person
Jer.ua ry 1974.
C O
i-	r-o.

-------
appendix d
1'VVl	<"Ar01 ! '!.*.
* 'ACTlVLv AN'.') TNAC.TTV)7. M1 N E .V
NET /iCPES TOT. ACRES TOT. ACKES ST. OF
NO. OF r>l r.TURnr.D KECT./KEL. AFFECTED s TOT. ACRES
COMMODITY '	PERMITS IN 1909 IN 1389" -NK1CLA;HED TERMITTlD
Clay/Shale(CLAY)
64
5
51
J 780
9504
Crushed Stone(CS)
129
120
4S7
7320
26792
Dimension Stone(DS)
23
0
6
231
137 7
Feldspar(FELD)
r
0
11
10^
.*,37
Cemstone(GEM)
J 5
0

62
23 J
Lithium(LI)
2
0
22
622

Mica(MICA)
6
0
>
34 9
9'JO
Olivine (01.)
5
0
?)
.92
57.3
Other(OTHER)
15
3
19
125
499
Feat(PEAT)
3
0
7949
197
3745
Pyrophyllite (PYRP)
7
1
3
119
64 9
Phosphate(PHOS)
2
140
0
8400
13420
Sana/Gravel(SG)
431
167
3S9
S846
1B051
Gold(AU)
3
3.1
0
r.i
17 3
TOTALS
776
4 67
8937
253S3
77419
* Statistics sre based upon Annual Reclamation Reports submitted by 
each mine operator and validated by our regional office field staff.
As validations are still in the process of being inputed into our
statewide computer database from which these statistics are derived,
these figures should be considered approximate.
** This does not reflect reclamation in progress.
TOTAL NUMBER OF MINES ON INVENTORY
YEAR	ACTIVE	INACTIVE RELEASED	TOTAL
2988	603	126	365	1094
1989	653	123	373	1149

-------
appendix d
10S9 NORTH CAROLINA MINING STATISTICS
NO. lif" t ifi'UlIi &? CiJ^ML'lilI's
r;
u
I
L.
c<
>.TiO

200 -
100 -
v 
L-a !4%2i
x fY a nr-
P" 7]
Ftl.n GEtf
T
kiC*. 01.
COMMODITY
e-y-n IS'/l
GTrti'R Pt fiJ PYRP PHC1S
I
53G

1969 NORTH CAROLINA WINING STATISTICS
no. or- r*Rwrrs py commodity
*U v0 4?:) ^	CL'Y (2?)

-------
CATEGORIES OF NORTH CAROLINA MINES
0
CATEGORY - TYPE
I. Qu; ry
A.	Crushed Stone
B.	Industrial
C.	Dimension Stone
II. CL \> Mines
A. Triassic Sed-
imentary Bock
Orgin
E. Weathered from
underlying met-
anorphic origneous
rock
III. C i & Gravel
A Borrow Pits
(Sandrock)
L "Eastern Sard Pits
C. Piedmont River
Sand Operations
MINING CHARACTERISTIC RELATIVE TO BONDING
Deep excavation in rock, slew lateral expansion; gen-
erally, separate overburden pile (often extensive);
processing plant; stockpile, haulage, and plant
area are well compacted requiring subsoiling before
revegetation but useful for oonmercial/industrial use.
Lateral expansion for dimension stone quarries is even
slower. Minimum of waste.
Processing confined to separate industrial site
Generally little overburden waste; sediment
basins often required; usually relatively shallow
excavation relative to size of disturbance; nature
of operation often requires large areas to remain
active to provide various blends of ore or to
weather to a usuable form.
Often steep-sided and near residential areas;
maximum depth approximately 40 feet. Little waste;
differential weathering of material forces operator
to leave ivou'id- like islands of .rock scattered
within pit.
Located east of the "fall line," usually less than 10
acres, arxi less than 25 feet deep; internal drainage;
usually pit becomes pond but may be very shallow if
clay pan encountered.
Mostly dragline but sometimes dredge operating
intermittenly; little onsite processing other
than screening; river bank vegetation removed;
some river bank erosion; disturbed areas generally
revegetate naturally within two years.
ESTIMATED RECLAMATION POST
A.	$1,500.00 - 2,500.00
B.	$1,500.00 - $2,500.00
C.	$1,500.00 - $2,500.00
A.	$1,500,00 - $2,000.00
B.	$1,500.00 - $2,000.00

A. $1,500.00 - $2,000.00
B. $1,000.00 - $1,500.00
C. $800.00 - $1,200.00

-------
1989 NORTH CAROLINA MIMING STATISTICS g
TOf.AC. AlYECILD VS. fOT.AC. PERMUTED
U
i
i  i
2u
1 G
I 4
10
a
/\
/\
/\
/\
/\
/\
/\
4
/ \
2
DS TLLD GEM LI MICA Ql OTHER PEAT PYRP PHOS SG
0
AU
(Z2fJ TOl. AC.
AFFECTED
COMMODITY
IV\) EST. TOT. AC. PER.

-------
D. Piedmont Sand &
Gravel Pits
Located in the vicinity of "fall line."
Often large scale operations with large
processing plants and settling ponds.
Rapid lateral expansion.
?>
CO
H
$1,200.00 - $2,000.00
L. Western Alluvian
Sand & Gravel
IV. G...i'.jtone
V. Pe.;:
VI. Phvphate
located in flooc^plain of high velocity
streams; highly flood-prone.
3nall scale tourist mines; sufficient waste
and overburden to completely backfill mine
excavation.
Large Scale-shallow excavations in low-lying
coastal areas requiring extensive site drainage .
for mining and reclamation for agriculture; nature
of mining leaves relatively level areas which will
readily revegetate naturally; typical reclamation
plan calls for agricultural (row crops) use to follow
mining.
Large scale deep excavation in coastal area requiring
large plant and settling ponds and extensive ground-
water pumping; nature of operation economically
permits only large operations to mine.
$1,200.00 - $2,000.00
$800.00 - $1,200.00
Unknown-but relatively low
cost per acre. Drainage cost
may also be included.
Unknown-backfilling of old pit
associated with stripping of
new mine areas.

-------
OIHO

-------
Inactive 4 Abandoned Mine Data
State of Ghio Barrative Sumary
Introduction
Minerals mining in the State of Ohio began by aboriginal
peoples with the excavation of flints & clays and the production
of salt from brine seeps in areas now designated as Licking,
Jackson, and Washington Counties. With the migration of European
settlers into Ohio, many mineral industries came into being
starting in 1788 with brick making in Washington County.
Although flint production today is used mostly in the creation of
jewelry, the salt industry has developed to over 3.5 million tons
in 1988.
Non-coal mining in Ohio has produced a variety of mineral
commodities including metallic, construction, and industrial
ores. Although iron ore production in Ohio lead the country
during the Civil War, this industry no longer exists.
Construction ores include limestone, sandstone, and sand &
gravel. Industrial ores include limestone sand, clay, shale,
gypsum, and silica. Almost 98.5 million tons of minerals were
producted in 1989. Limestone was the leading producer in Ohio
and in the nation in 1990.
Mining
Three basic mining methods have been employed in Ohio to
extract noncoal minerals. They include underground, surface, and
dredging. Underground mines for salt, gypsum, and limestone
involves the development of shafts, adits, and tunnels to access
the mineral. Waste rock generated from these mines is either
spoiled within the underground portion of the mine or hauled and
dumped at the^-mosi^convenient location adjacent to the mine.
These dumps are located on a variety of terrain including both
flat land and hillside. Open pit surface mining has been
utilized in the production of both metallic deposits and most
construction and industrial ores. This method of mineral
extraction consists of drilling and blasting the ore, excavating
an open pit or cut, and hauling waste ore to a waste dump or
using it as backfill in the reclamation process and taking the .
ore to the processing area. Dredging operations involve the use
of floating dredges, dragline, hydraulic back hoe, and slackline
cableway.
Processing of iron ore through the use of furnaces ceased
sometime after the civil war and the furnaces today are only of
historic value. Processing of construction and industrial ores
have not changed much in the process although equipment today is
much more refined.

-------
Tailings and waste materials which resulted from mineral
processing were disposed of in a variety of ways. The majority
were disposed of in the most convienent manner without any
thought to reclamation. Typically, waste materials ended up in
stream channels or other low points down slope from the
processing area. If water was necessary to the process, then
some operations constructed impoundments in order that water
would be recycled in the process, but these operations were in
the minority.
Health and Safty Impacts
Non-coal mining methods have created some of the most severe
safety hazards in Ohio. Physical hazards including unprotected
mine openings, highwalls, flooded excavation, hazardous
structures, and subsidence features which threaten public safety
across the state. Health hazards are relatively minimal although
inhalation of blowing dust from unreclaimed fines piles could
have some effect.
Inactive/abandoned mine areas in Ohio have multiple use such
as residential hunting or all terrain vehicles. The public is
exposed to unprotected mine openings and subsidence features.
Abandon mine structures often appear structurally intact but
rotten wood, rusty metal, and deteriorated foundations have
weakened many of the structures. Cave-ins, collapse of unstable
slopes, drowning at flooded excavations and careless people have
claimed numerous lives.
Health hazards are minimal as the majority of old mining
areas have established volunteer vegetation and are not
contributing heavily to air pollution.
Environmental Impacts
Abandoned mines in Ohio have impacted thousands of acres of
residential, commercial, recreational and agricultural land in
two ways. First, because of the lack of reclamation, these areas
have not been returned to land uses which existed prior to
mining, and secondly they have had an effect on lands adjacent to
their location. Contaminants are transported in the environment
through air, ground water, and surface water pathways. Sources
of this environmental pollution include acid mine drainage, air
borne particulates, and sediments.
Surface and groundwater at inactive/abandoned mines are
impacted by leaching and increased sedimentation resulting from
waste materials discharging into receiving streams. Rain and
snow melt percolating through and eroding waste materials
transport dissolved metals to receiving groundwater and surface
waters. Elevated metal concentrations in receiving streams have
impacted fisheries populations and aquatic ecosystems in many
drainages in the eastern and southeastern parts of the State.

-------
Acid mine drainage from underground workings and surface
excavations located in the coal bearing counties in Ohio has had
a major impact on surface water courses in those areas.
Oxidation of sulfide bearing ores causes the formation of
sulfuric acid which in turn solubilize high concentrations of
metals. This condition has a severe effect on all aquatic life
in receiving streams. To a much lesser extent there have been
some high pH impact on aquatic life in the area of limestone
quarries in the northwestern part of Ohio, especially where
agricultural lime was manufactured.
Air resources in the vicinity of unvegetated waste dumps
have been impacted from fugitive dust emissions. Wind blown
deposits/ such as sand, and fugitive dust from elevated dumps can
affect offsite flora and fauna as well as contribute foreign
particulate of respirable size for human inhalation. The affects
of fugitive dust is seasonally dependent and does not represent a
continual source for impact to air quality.
Another impact which occurs in Ohio is the deposition of
sediments on lands and in streams which are adjacent to abandoned
mine areas. The movement of surface material, due to water
transport, affects drainages and adjacent flood plain areas by
clogging streams and turning useable (agricultural) lands into
wetlands. Land surfaces adjacent to waste piles can also be
impacted by the downward migration of materials. Except for
processing areas, most sand & gravel operations as well as
limestone quarries have inward drainage thus minimizing
environmental impact.
Laws and Regulations
The unrestricted mineral development on Ohio prior to 1974
led to significant safety and environmental hazards at and
adjacent to mining areas in general across the state. Today Ohio
does not have an inventory of how much inactive and abandoned
mineral operations there are in the state. Prior to 1974, except
of some coal mining laws, there were no environmental statutes
which regulated the industrial minerals industry. The mining
laws promulgated in 1974 did not apply to previously mined areas
except for those lands which were affected or reaffected by
mining after 1974. Processing plants were not included in the
1974 legislation, thus benefication or processing of such ores
are still not regulated under the mining laws.
In the past IB years, various laws and regulations have been
enacted to ensure impacts from resources extraction,
beneficiation, and processing are minimized and the quality of
State air and water are maintained. (Ohio Surace Mine Law;
15140RC, Ohio Water Pollution Law or Clean Water Act? 6111 ORG,
Federal Clean Water Act; PL52-500, Ohio Air Pollution Law; 3704
ORC, Federal Clean Air Act; PL101-549).

-------
Inactive mines are defined as those areas affected by mining
which are located adjacent to active mines that have not been
reclaimed or would require some additional work to be returned to
a useable land form and do not fall under current regulations.
Abandoned mine lands are defined as lands where mining has
occurred, reclamation has not been completed, and where there is
no continuing reclamation responsibility by an owner or
operator. These sites, both inactive and abandoned, primarily
include disturbances created prior to 1975 when the Surace Mine
Law (Chapter 1514 Ohio Revised Code) was implemented. This
reclamation act requires operators to develop a reclamation plan
and secure reclamation bonding before the State will issue a
mining permit. There are exceptions to chapter 1514 which allow
for unregulated operation where:l-test or exploration is
occurring? 2-underground mining? 3-extraction by a landowner for
his own noncommercial use in an unprocessed form on the same
tract of land; 4-borrow pits for highway construction where
reclamation requirements are substantially the same as 1514 ORC;
5-removal of minerals incidental to construction where a valid
building permit is held? and 6-removal of minerals to a depth of
not more than 5 feet where not more than 1 acre of land is
disturbed within a twelve month period. These exempted areas do
not contribute significantly to the IAM problem.
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has determined a
number of hazardous waste sites which are located in abandoned
mine sites. The designation of hazardous was not given because
of the mineral that was mined but because of the materials
brought into the site and deposited there. Portions of these
areas will be reclaimed by the OEPA through the use of it's own
funds and monies received the federal Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1960 (CERCLA).
Many of the States IAM problems consist of physical hazards
which threaten public safety. There is an extensive program to
address these hazards under Chapter 1513 Ohio Revised Code in
conjunction with PL 95-87, Federal Surface Mine Law under SMCRA
in the coal regions of Ohio but to date there are no mining
statutes which address abandoned non-coal mines. Road
authorities do have some backing if these safety hazards exist
within an unsafe distance to a public road or private citizens
can pursue civil suits against adjacent property owners if a
hazard threatens their wellbeing.
Reclamation Efforts
Non-coal reclamation in Ohio has been performed by the
Division of Reclamation (DOR) of the Ohio Department of Natural
Resources in cases where an operator has forfeited his bond on an
existing permit. This work has been minimal and accounts for
only about four sites since 1975. Approximately $100,000.00 have
been expended in these efforts. There are another fifty-five
(55) sites which fall in the forfeiture category. Although these
areas could be identified as IAM sites, the responsibility for

-------
the reclamation falls under the jurisdiction of the State and
have had a reclamation requirement under a state statute.
The most reclamation of IAM sites fall under the category of
active mining. Numerous operations now exist in old abandoned
mine areas where for whatever reason, previous operators stopped
mining and left the ground unreclaimed. Since the resource still
existed, new operators moved in and commenced reaffecting old
works. These operators are now regulated, thus the mining has
"reclaimed" many old abandoned areas.
There is no organized program within the State of Ohio to
address the reclamation of inactive and abandoned sites which
were mined prior to 1975. No sets of cost figures have been
developed which would reflect the cost of non-coal sites,
although some inferences could be made by reviewing the cost per
acre figures developed by the coal AML section.
G 3

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NGN-OCAL INVBfPORY .
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MIKES
State of Ohio
DATA SlMlAR3t^
HZNTOAL TYPE
MIING TYPE6

OWNERSHIP
FEATURES
ACRES3
DQBI
Metallic
Ores
Iron*
Mines
Millsites
Smelters
Other^
3
3
Federal
Private
State
Other
3
Mine OpeningsC#)
Disturbed Land
3

Construction
Ores
Limestone
Sandstone
Sand & Gravel
Mines.
Other
247
9
Federal
Private
Other
256
Mine Openings(#)
Disturbed Lands
9
5400+

Industrial
Ores
Salt*
Clay
Shale*
Conglomerate*
Coal & Clay*
Coal & Lime*
Gypsum
Silica
Mines
Other**
39
231
Federal
Private
State
Other
H
II
n
3
31
5
231
F-10
P-215
S-6
Mine Openings U)
Disturbed Lands
231
300+

Other^







Processing
Plants
Millsites
14+
Private
14
Disturbed Lands
75+

Total







Surface &
Underground
Mines
Millsites
Other^
286
14
243
Federal
Private
Other
13
519
11
Mine Openings(#)
Disturbed Lands
243
5775
19 '


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Inactive & Abandoned Mine Data Suunary
Ohio Reference Guide
ODHR-Division of Reclamation (DOR), Industrial Minerals Sec.
Mining permits are issued by this agency for industrial
and construction minerals commodities mined using
surface mining methods. Chapter 1514 of the Ohio
Revised Code (1974) requires mining operations to post
reclamation bonds to cover the cost of restoring the
land after mining has ceased. Pre-law estimated by DOR
staff are the source of estimates presented in the data
summary. The following persons have used professional
judgement and report this data with a 10% confidence
level.
Patricia Fagan - Supervisor/Inspector
Juanita Farley - Inspector
Craig Simonson - Supervisor/inspector
Richard Pennington - Inspector
William Boyle - Supervisor/Inspector
James Williamson - Inspector
Dave Clark - Supervisor/Inspector
Wayne Schalk - Inspector
ODNR-Division of Reclamation, Abandoned Mine Lands Section
This section has the responsibility of reclaiming coal
abandoned mine lands on the state level as well as in
conjunction with the Department of Interior, Office of
Surface Mines. This section also administers the state
bond forfeiture program which sees to the reclamation
of lands affected after 1975 (industrial minerals) and
1972 (coal). The following persons contributed to data
sited in this report:
Robert Baker - Nat'l Resources Administrator
David Stroh - Nat'l Resources Administrator
ODNR -Geological Survey-
The Division of Geological Survey provides the public
with maps and technical data on geology and mineral
resources in Ohio. Information from this Division was
obtained from records of abandoned underground minerals
mines and from the annual minerals reports. Persons
contrbuting to the data were:
Doug Crowe11 - Coordinator
Sherry Lopez - Geologist
C 5

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4. US Fbrest Service, Wayne National Forest
The Forest Service has the responsibility of
administering the Wayne National Forest, located in
south and southestern Ohio, for multi-use purposes.
One area i9 the inventory of different types of land
uses established on the Wayne. Presently they have an
inventory which includes inactive and abandoned mine
lands. The following persons contributed information
for the data cited in this report.
Don Coulter - Civil Engineer - Wayne Nat'l
Forest
Robert Moss - Hydrologist - Wayne Hoosier
Nat'l Forest
5.	U.S. Bureau of Mines-Interaountain Field Operation Center
Denver.
This office provided information from the Bureau's
Minerals Availability System database. This
information was concerning past producers and format 5
of the ONELINER program was used. Person contributing
to this report was:
Michael B. Sawyer - Physical Scientist
6.	Ohio Enviroonental Protection Agency-Water Pollution Control
Section.
This agencies has the responsibility for administering
air and water pollution laws in Ohio. The range of
activity starts with investigation through permitting
to enforcement. It also has the responsibility'to deal
with circumstances which create an imminent and
substantial endangerment to human health and the
environment as a result of actual or potential exposure
to hazardous substances, contaminants, and
pollutants. The following person was contracted for
information which could be applicable to this report:
John Morrison - Unit Supervisor, Industrial
Permitting
 c C
i/

-------
Inactive fc Abandoned Mine Inventory Sunary
State of Chio
Footnotes
1.	Inactive/abandoned mines (IAM's) have been defined as
properties where there is no continuing reclamation
responsibility of the owner or claimant/lessee to remediate
the impact of past noncoal mining. Sites reported in this
data summary are not covered by any mining permits,
reclamation bonds, state or federal licenses or any
reclamation contracts.
2.	Included with this report package is a Reference Guide which
consists of the Data Summary Table and accompanying text.
3.	The acreage listed for each mineral type included the
disturbed or impacted land resulting from
mining/milling/smeltering activities within the IAM noncoal
site. The acreage total listed is only a very loose
estimate of what exists as there are very few recorded
figures available. These totals are reported with a 2%
confidence level.
4.	The "other" mining type reported in each category refers to
underground mining operations. An astericE (*) also
highlighted the ores which were produced underground.
5.	The OTHER category listed under Mineral Type refers strictly
to processing plants which stand alone and are not
physically connected to a mining operation.
6.	Millsites and smelters - The Division has never regulated
these type operations and therefore has no data on them.
Locating other agencies who may have had control or
gathering information about these areas is beyond the scope
of what DOR can accomplish at this time.
7.	No cost figures are available as no program has been
instituted to deal with this type reclamation.
i S 7

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Mineral Resources Data Svstem
Rsoon Tilla Minsral Rafcourcas Data System sila records lor Oklahoma Numbs in St of 8
Rtcerd Numbsr W 0 0 2 S 9 S Fridav. Mareh 1. 1991	17 4 7 22	 Prints! ol 6
Rseord Ttos X 1 U
Rsoort Oats
Rsoortsr
Rsoortsr
Silt Nams
73 00
COX. DENNIS P.
usos
MANGUM PROSPECT
Into Soures
Location Information
Countrt	UNITED STATES
Slif*	OKLAHOMA
Co urtfr	OREER
Phnioaraohie	07 GREAT PLAINS
Drainaos Arsa	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Ouadranols	LAWTON
Latitats	34-S0 N
Lanaituds	099-32- W
Accuracy	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Countrv Cots
Stats Cods
Seals
Dseimal Lat
Dscimal Lone
U S
OK
250000
34.13333
91.93333
Commodity Information
Commoditisa CU AG
Non-Prod Uain C U
Ors Uatsrialt SECONDARY SULFIDE AND SECONDARY OXIDE
Oeeurrina CU
Non-Prod Minor A G
AG
Production
Eioloratlon and Oavaloomant
N o
Status
Naturs of Dili
Proaoact.
Ill Dalinad
Actlva
Dsooait Tvos
Dsoctit Siis
 Oaooilt OaaerlDtlon
SE0IMENTARY
Madlum
 Worklnaa Daaerlntlon
- Gi
Grada
- Raaarvaa Onlv 
Item	Aee Amount Thoua Yaar
ORE CU EST 40500.	ST	1973
CU	EST 450.000 ST	1973
AG	EST 5.00000 ST	1973
Rsav Command ORE fl AG OZ/TON. 1 * CU. 90 X RECOVERY)
Paos 1
188

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Mineral Resources Data System
Rteort Tills Mineral Rosourcas Data System site records for Oklahoma
Racord Nvmbtr W 0 0 1 9 4 I	Fridav. March 1. 1991	1 7 4 6 1 5
Numbi in St el 6
Print*6 ol 8
Rteord Tvoa
Raoort Dila
Raoortar
Raoortar
Siia Stmt
X 114
73 01
FORCE. ERIC R.
USGS
LAKE LAWTONKA
Fit Link ID
Info Souica
TI
1
PLACER
Location Information
Countr*	UNITED STATES
S/af#	OKLAHOMA
Count*	COMANCHE
Phttioartohic	05 INTERIOR LOWLANDS
Dtainaoa Arts	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Ouadranala	LAWTON
lalituda	J4-45* N
Lonoituda	0M-30- W
Aeeuraer	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Country Co da
Slalt Cod*
Sctla
Dacimal 1st
Decimal Lena
U S
OK
250000
3 4.73
 91.5
 Commodity Information
Commodiliai Tl PE
Polantitl T I
Ota Uatarialt ILMENITE
Production
ExDloratlon and Dovaloemant 
No	Siatui
Occurranca
 Oaeoalt Daicrlotlon -
Daooait Trot POSSIL PLUVIAL PLACER
Daooaii Siia Small
 Worklnoa Oaaerlotlon 
 Qaoloov
Host Rock Am TERRACE SANDS
Rifranca CHASE 1BS2 OKU GEOL SURV CIRC. 30
- ftaaarvaa and Roaoureaa -
Itam	Aee Amount Tbouo Yaar
SDG Tl EST S000.	TONS 4%
Oridt
Paoa 1

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Mineral Resources Data System
Raoort Title Mineral Rosoureas Dala System jit rocorts lor Oklahoma A/umt> in Set ol 8
Record Number POO 2 8 6 0	Friday Ma^ih 1 1991	17:4$-1Q	PrinreS ot 8
Record Tyoe X 1 U
Raoort Date
Reoortet
Reoortar
Site Nama
WILLIAM
77 01
HASLER.
USGS
WOLFRIDQE MINERALS
Fila Link ID
Into Source
OME 6707
4
District Name
Counirv
Siata
County
Phrtioaraohic
Drainaoa Area
Ouadianole
Quadrangle 2
Latitude
longitude
Accuracy
Townthio
Section
Ran oe
Meridian
Location Information
P AO LI
UNITED STATES
OKLAHOMA
GARVIN
05	INTERIOR LOWLANDS
11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
ARPUORE
PAOLI
34-52- N
087-I4* W
UNKNOWN PRECISION
0	04 N
07 13 IS 19
001	E
INDIAN
Country Code
Stata Coda
Scale
Seala
Eltvthon
Decimal Lai
Decimal Lono
U S
OK
250000
24 000
1000 FT
3 4.16666
7.23333
Commodity Information
Commoditiaa CU AO
Ort Utteriab CHALCOClTE. BORNITE
 lioloratlon and Oavalosmant
Production Mo	Status
Oecurranca
- Oaooalt Oaaertotlon 
Daooait Tve RIB IKD COPPER. CONCRETIONS. LENSES
Daootrt Sue N
Worklnaa Daacriotlon
Oaoloav -
Most Rock Aaa PERU
Hoar Rode Twoa WELLINGTON AND
STRATPORO SANDSTONES
Paoa 1


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Mineral Resources Data System
Reoorl Title MinaraJ Resources Dala System site records (or Oklahoma
Record Number W 0 0 1 3 4 7	Friday Mirefi 1. 1991	1 7 4 4:07
Numbe in Sat of B
Prime* p( 6
Record T rot
Rtoorl Data
Raoorter
Reooner
Sita Name
XI M
73 01
FORCE. ERIC R.
usas
OTTER CREEK PLACER
File Link ID
Into Source
Location Information
Country	UNITED STATES
Star*	OKLAHOMA
Counlv	KIOWA. TILLMAN
Phraiooraehic	05 INTERIOR LOWLANDS
Drainage Area	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Ouadranale	LAWTON
latitude	34-31- N
Lonaitude	099-00- W
Accuracy	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Country Code
State Code
Seale
Decimal Lai
Decimal Lona
U S
OK
250000
34.63 333
- 9 9
Commodity Information
Commoditiet T I
Potential T I
Ota Materials ILMENITE
Eioloratlon and Oavaioomam -
Production No	Statui
Oeeurranea
 Oaooalt Oaaerloilon 
Deooiit Tree MODERN FLUVIAL PLACER
Deoetit Site N
Worklnoa Oaaerlotlon
Qaaioav -
Host Rock AmCLATIY IAND
Reference HAHN 1960 U. 5. BU Ml R. I. 5S77
- ftaaanraa
Ita m	A cc Amount
SDG T1 EST 370000.
and Raaoureaa --
Thoua Yaar
TONS 1.24%
Qrada
Paoe 1

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Mineral Resources Data System
Resort Title Mineral Resources Data System site records (or Oklahoma
Record Number W 0 0 1 3 4 T	Fridav. Marc7\ 1 1991	17:44:07
Numbs in Sal cl 8
Printei el 8
Record Tvoe	X 1 M
Reoon Date	73 01
Reoorter	FORCE. ERIC R.
Reoorter	U 5 C S
Site Name	OTTER CREEK PLACER
File Link ID
Info Source
T I
1
Location Information
Country	UNITED STATES
Srr*	OKLAHOMA
Countv	KIOWA. TILLMAN
Phviiooraohic	05 INTERIOR LOWLANDS
Drainaoe Area	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Quadrangle	LAWTON
Latitude	34-38- N
Lonoitude	099-00- W
Accurecv	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Countrv Code
State Code
Scale
Decimal Lit
Decimal Lono
U S
OK
250000
3 4.63333
- 9 9
Commodity Information
Commodities T I
Potential	T I
Ore Uatarials ILMENITE
Eioloratlon and Davaloomanl
Production No	Status
Occurrence
 Oaooalt OiaerlDilon -
Deoosit Tvoe MODERN FLUVIAL PLACER
Deoosit Siie N
Worklnoa Daserlotlon ..
- Qaoloov 
Hotl Rock Aoe CLAYEY SAND
Reference HAHN I960 U. S. BJ Ml R. I. 5577
- Raairvea and Raaourcaa -
Mam	Acc Amount Thoua	Year
SOG Tl EST 370000. TONS	1.24%
Grid*
Pa oe t

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Mineral Resources Data System
Rtoort Title Minaral Rasourcas Da:a System site records for Oklahoma Numbe in Set of 8
Record Number D 0 0 2  6 0	Friday. March 1. 1991	17:4510	PrinteS of 8
fit cord Tvoe
Rtoort Date
Raoortar
Raoortar
Silt Namt
XI M
77 0
HASLER. J. WILLIAM
USQS
WOLFRIDQE MINERALS
Filt Link ID
Info Sourct
OME 6707
4
Dillriet Ntmt
Country
State
Count*
Phtsioaraohic
Drtinaot Area
Ouadranale
Ouadranale 2
Latitude
Lonoitudt
Accuracy
Townthio
Section
Ranoe
Ueridian
Location Information 
P AOLI
UNITED STATES
OKLAHOMA
GARVIN
OS INTERIOR LOWLANDS
11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
ARPMORE
PAOLI
34-52- N
097-14- W
UNKNOWN PRECISION
00	4 N
07 13 18 19
001	E
INDIAN
Country Codt
Stilt Codt
Scale
Scale
Elevation
Decimal Lat
Decimal Long
U S
OK
250000
24 000
1000 FT
3 4.86666
-97.23333
Commodity Information
Commodities CU AO
On Ualtrials CHALCOCITE. BORNITE
- EiDloratlon and Davaloomant 
Production No	Status
Occurrence
- Oaooalt OaaerlDtlon 
Dtooait TVer REO BED COPPER. CONCRETIONS. LENSES
Daoosil Sin N
 Worklnaa OaaerlDtlon
Host Rock A at PERM
Host Rock 7Y WELLINGTON AND STRATFORD SANDSTONES
Paot 1
<>1 C- O
G* V --J

-------
Mineral Resources Data System
fitoori Til 11 Mineral Resources Data System trie records for Oklahoma Numbs in St of 6
Record Number W 0 0 1 3 4 I Friday. March i. 1991 '-17:46:15 	Printed of 8
Record Tiot X 1 M
Reoon Date
Reeorter
Reooner
'Site Name
73 01
FORCE. ERIC A.
uses
LAKE LAWTONKA
PLACER
File Link ID
Mo Source
T!
1
Location Information
Countrv	UNITED STATES
State	OKLAHOMA
Count*	COMANCHE
PhvaioorabMc	05 INTERIOR LOWLANDS
Drainaoe Area	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Qusdranote	LAWTON
Latitude	34-45- N
Lonoitude	091-30- W
Accurac*	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Country Code
State Code
U S
0 K
Scale	250000
Decimal Lat	3 4.75
Decimal Lono -86.5
Commodity Information
Commodities Tl FE
Potential T I
Ore Uaterials ILMENITE
Eioloratlon and Davaloomant
Production No	Status
Oecurrenca
 Dacoalt Daierlotlon 
Deoosit Tvoe FOSSIL FLUVIAL PLACER
Deposit Site Small
 Worklnoa Daaerlotlon
 Qtoloov
Host Rock Aoe TERRACE SANDS
Reference CHASE 1952 OKLA GEOL SURV CIRC. 30
 Raaervoa
Itam	Acc Amount
SDG Tl EST 8000.
and Reaourcea -
Thoita Year
TONS	4%
Grade
Paoe 1
204

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Mineral Resources Data Svstem
Reoort Tille Mineral Rasourcas Data System sit# records (or Oklahoma
Record Number W 0 0 2 6 9 I Fridav. Ma'ch 1. 1991	1 7:47 22
Numbe in St ol B
Primal of 8
Record TVoa
Reoort Date
Reporter
Reoorter
Site Name
X1 u
73 00
COX. DENNIS P.
usas
MANGUU PROSPECT
Mo Source
Leeatien Information
Countrr	UNITED STATES
Sfafa	OKLAHOMA
Counfir	GREER
Ptinioaraohie	07 GREAT PLAINS
Drainaoe Area	11	ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
Ouadranote	LAWTON
Latitude	34-30- N
Lonoitude	099-32- W
Accuracv	UNKNOWN PRECISION
Country Code
State Code
Scale
Decimal Let
Decimal Lorto
U S
OK
250000
3 4.13333
99.33333
Commodity Information
Commodities CU AO
Non~Prod Main C U
Ore Materials SECONDARY SULFIDE AND SECONDARY OXIDE
Occurrino CU AG
Non-Prod Minor A G
Eiolontlon and Davaloomant
Production No	Status	Proaoaet.
Nature of Disc III Dalinad
Activa
Daooalt Daacrloilon
Deoosit Troe SEDIMENTARY
Deoosit Size Medium
- Worklnoa Daacrlotlan
-- Reaervaa Onlv 
Itam	Aec Amount Thoua Yaar Grade
ORE CU EST 40500.	ST	1973
CU	EST 450.000 ST	1973
AG	EST 5.00000 ST	1973
Res* Comments ORE M AG OZ/TON. 1 % CU. 90 * RECOVERY!
Paoe 1

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Mineral Resources Data System
Reoort Title Mineral Resources Data System site records for Oklahoma
Record Number K 0 0 2 9 0 2	Fridav. March 1 1991	17:4 8:31
Numbs in Sal ol 6
Print e e of 8
Record Tvoe X 1 M
Reoori Date
Reoorter
Reoorter
Site Name
75 04
WEDOW
uses
PICHER FIELD
HELMUTH
Info Source
1 4
District Name
Country
Stete
Count*
Physiographic
Drainaoe Area
Quadranole
Latitude
Lenaitude
Accuracy
Location Information
PICHER FIELD
UNITED STATES
OKLAHOMA
OTTAWA
INTERIOR LOWLANDS
ARKANSAS-WHITE-RED
05
11
TULSA
36-59- N
394-50- W
UNKNOWN PRECISION
Country Code
State Coda
Scale
Decimal lat
Decimal Lono
U S
OK
250000
3 6.91333
94.53333
Commodity Information
Commoditiet PB ZN
Uaior	ZN
Ore Materials SPHALERITE. GALENA. MARCASITE. A LITTLE PYRITE AND CHALCOPYRITE. SPARSE
ENARGITE.
Commod	ONE OF THE MAJOR ZINC AND LEAD DISTRICTS OF THE WORLD. BUT IS NOW
APPROACHING EXHAUSTION. THIS. THE LATEST DISCOVERED SUBDlSTRICT IN THE
GREAT TRI-STATE DISTRICT. WAS DISCOVERED EARLY IN THE PRESENT CENTURY.
BEGAN PRODUCING IN 1904. REACHED ITS PEAK 1917-1930. AND HAS GRADUALLY
DECLINED WITH PROGRESSIVE DEPLETION SINCE THEN. THOUGH THE DETAILS OF
PRODUCTION HAVE FOLLOWED ECONOMIC CONDITIONS VERY CLOSELY. THERE WAS A SAG
IN PRODUCTION IN THE EARLY 193CS. FOLLOWED BY A RESURGENCE IN THE LATE
1930S AND 1940'S. THROUGH 1947. IN SPITE OF WORLD WAR II STIMULATION. THE
RESURGENCE PEAK WAS REACHED IN 1941 AND PRODUCTION DECLINED PROGRESSIVELY
TO 1947. LEVELED OFF THROUGH 1952. AFTER WHICH IT DROPPED PRECIPITATELY. THE
1957 PRODUCTION. THOUGH STILL RANKING HIGH AMONG ZINC-LEAD' "DISTRICTS. IS THE
LOWEST SINCE 1915. (MCKNIGHT. 19607. UNPUBLISHED DATA )
Year 1st
Eioloratlon and Dtvaloomant
Status
Oeeurranee
1 904
Deoosit Tvoe
Daooill Dcrlotlon -
REPLACEMENT AND SHEET GROUND
Paoe 1
'2 I

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Appendix 5 Photographs
o.


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OKLAHOMA TIEASURE AND
TALES by
ty of Oklal-
Aft
ttve VilsoT
oma Press J 197(

KICNftt MOUNTAINS
BILITABY RESCRVATfON
'i HtFUOE
1 *>*
The Wichita Mountains ' '

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In 1903. Dr. S. J. Hardin, of the Shawnee Mining Company, erected this eight-
thousand-dollar smelting plant at his Lost Lead Mine, a rue east of Mount 5hendan.
near Meers The mine. left, reached a depth of 10S feei. 2nd was cased with square-
sawed timbers. From Joe B. Baker. Souvenir 0/ Lawton. Oklahoma. 1907
Between 1903 and 1909. Hardin spent more than $19,500 at his Lost Lead Mine A
steanvengine-powered windlass lowered miner and ore bucket more than one hundred
feet into the solid-granite shaft. Courtesy Western History Collections. University of
Oklahoma Library.

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Mount Sheridan looms above the seven-foot-square shaft of the Lost Lead Mine.
Today nothing remains but a gaping hole and a mound of tailingstestimony to the
gold seeken who lived and worked there during the Wichita gold rush.
9 1 s
JL .v

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CratcTvilJe. just north of Cache, at the entrance to the Wichita Mountains, was one of
several gold camps established when the Comanche-Kiowa Apache Reservation was
opened to settlement in 1901.
Lawton News=Republican.
Mi' . -  \ > - .	. I ito,
Dili THIVSUVES
BOOM IS NOW 0
3
It
Afler the Lumber Trusts
Eighteen Tons of Ore Shipped to Colorado Smelters by
Lavton People Sells For S1I.60 Per Ton.
PEOPLE ARE EXCITED
Ms Hi Assays are Bsat lane Tliai
Omte fe Ore Shippsd. .  
SWARM TO MOUNTAINS
The told Fern His SiniU the Peepl: ui H*dreds
ci Prtf|Kmrs Hivr Jin4 (tie Jtlrcks Ufft
Sesktr if 'Piooter" liaerstold is There.
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"The Boom Is Now On." announced the Lawton News-Republican on September 24. 1903

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Oklahoma Treasures and Treasure Tales
In 1905. after nine months and thirty-five hundred dollars. John Pearson completed
this rweniy-five-ton firebrick smeker at Camp Homestead, at the foot of Mount Sher-
man. near Golden Pass From his mine came enough ore to yield several bars of coppe:
and silver From Mineral Kingdom. October 12. 1905
154
News of the Wichita go'.d camps drew front page coverage over Oklahoma Territory
Excitement ran high when the Pearson smelter yielded bncks of bullion.

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mer
Vol. 1.
MEERS, OKLAHOMA. THURSDAY. AUGUST 25. 1904.
No. 3
AN UPEBT IN NAME ONLY.
A PWiliuJ "Ml" ir4 ftig Siltry lii
Only QwlifiniiB.
We clip the. following "roast"
Irom the columns of the Sterling
SUr. The editor of that enterpris-
ing paper seems tc recognize a
fraud when he Bees it:
"At this particular time there is
much comment, both in the press
and out of it. relative to the official
report of one J. F. Bain as to the
mineral hearing of the Wichita
Mountains. As is well known, this
man Bain is the Government ex-
pert < 9) geologist who was sent to
the mountains for the purpose of
malfinv invocftirafiA^t	raisAp4.
delved in the bowels of the earth
as a business and knows nothing
else, having followed it as his life's
work, knowing the ae.ls, rocks.
straUs. etc.. by actual and con-
tinued observation and experience,
is the man that should be recog-
nized as the one who knows what
he is talking aboutthe very man
who obtained his information and
knowledge with a pick, hammer
and drill, at his side: while the so-
called expert obtained his knowl-
edge by reading what same other
fellow has written, while smoking
a ten-cent cigar, and the smallest
portion of his anatomy projecting,
above a three-inch linnen collar,
and the largest portion adomed
their experience and knowlecje.
are the men whose judgement is to
be relied upon, in nearly every
caee; and when this great army,
augmented by the number of assay-
ers who corroberate their opinion
agree that there is mineral beneaih
the jagged ridges of our mountains,
then we believe the report, it mat-
ters not what may be said to the
contrary by our fashionable high-
collared "expert" from Washington.
We are not from Missouri, but wn
know enough to be from that granJ
old state, and that being the case,
the Missouri rule inversely applies
in our case, that is if there is no
mineral in the Wichitas we will in-
sist on being shown that fact, for
i	Kivb	n tn* mnrh alrPA/lv tft
For a time. Meers even boasted a daily, published by twenty-one-year-old Frank C
Davis (also the town druggist, an assayer. a charter member oi Aurum Mining Com-
pany. and president of the Chandler Mining District and Protective Association).
In 1904, Sam RemeT built his massive smelter southwest of Mount Sheridan on Blue
Beaver Creek to refine ore from his nearby Snake Mine. From Mineral Kingdom.
January 12. 1905.

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Of all the Wichita gold camps only this lone store at Meers survives From its back
rooms once rolled the weekly Ml Sheridan Miner.
162

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}
t
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c!
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Begun in 1904. this fifty-ton cyanide processing plant one mile south of Wildman was
erected by Wildman's founder. E. A. Williams, at a cost of seventeen thousand dollars.
The tramway led from the ore mill to the Gold Bell Mine, a quarter of a mile away
Courtesy Hugh Corwin.
163

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The miners of Wildman founded the first post office on the Comanche-Kiowa Apache
Reservation several months before the land was opened to white settlement. The
town's founder. E. A Williams, stands at the right of the door. Courtesy Mrs. Frank R.
Wildman.
The Lyon Lode was sunk within the townsite of Wildman. While digging the shaft, the
miners discovered still older diggings from previous gold seekers. Williams stands in
front of the boiler in the background. Courtesy Mrs. Frank R. Wildman.

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*. -r c3^ 'i .	  - 
Mounds of mine tailings and a deep shaft re,a:n of
Wildman's Gold Bell Mine, abandonee in 1910
Nest Egg Mountain looms behind the foundation ruins
of Wildman, a once-bustling gold camp boasting a
two-story hotel and saloon and a population of about
three hundred.
5=4

*ir+trmr^ r*
1iV\S#;
> ^
V-f!..

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fef


Today only massive concrete steps and a deep circular trough remain of Wildman's
cvanide mill.
*
w:
David Crockett mining Company
I F8LLY PAID |"	I	"'-I
Wti, (irtt/tL*
J A n hi ONE DOLLAR /?/ ^	^
Eiitu ErwStf UTirtisi Cce^sjev,
/>"m/tirt/'h '//// '/> //tt	//tr	/y Mr Atdtrt
/! 
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The last smelter erected in the Wichita Mountains was built at the head of Faun Creek
Canyon, near Elk Mountain, in 1906. Miners T. E. Cook and his son. Ben. recovered a
slug of gold the size of a 38-caliber bullet from the ore of the Bonanza Mine at the
head of the tramway Courtesy Ber: Cook.
Virtually every mining camp in the Wichitas had its own furnace for smelnng ore. In
1906, Olive Wells completed this four-ton. nir*j-foot-high test smelter at Golden Pass,
north of Cache. Courtesy Bert Cook.

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Between 1901 and 1907 more than twenty-five hundred shafts were sunk in the Wichita Moun-
tains. Most were crowned with horse-powered hoisTs and shaft houses, such as this one near
Snyder. Courtesy Western History Collections. Universiiy of Oklahoma Library.
The Gold Blossom, or Campbell, Mine at the north base of Mourn Scott in the Wichitas was sunk
sudy-five feet deep with a thirty-foot tunnel. Courtesy Oklahoma Historical Society

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The Mount Scott Post Office, just north of the mountain, did a brisk business during
the gold-rush activity in the Wichitas Courtesy Museum of the Great Plains.
As late as 1917 placer gold was dredged from the streams south of Snyder..in Kiowa
and Tillman counties, where grains of yellow metal could be panned or trapped :
sluice boxes Courtesy Western History Collections. University of Oklahoma Librar
r
Keith Walker examines the rums of a miner's log cabin near Treasure Lake in the	& rC \'j
Wichita Mountains.


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Relics of Oklahoma's gold-rush days are still found scattered among the rocks where
prospencrs once grubbed for precious metals These picks, pans, crucibles, bottles. .
stove parts, and firebricks are among the artifacts picked up in the Wichitas.
H
'
The 110-foot long Pennington tunnel in West
Cache Creek Canyon, on the south s:de of
the Wichitas. sold for five thousand dollars a
half interest in 1903. The tunnel was dug into
solid granite.

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The entrance to Pennington tunnel which remains on amartior for \r.sitor5 to the
Wichitas. Left to right Linda Wilson. Ellen Jahnke. Lillian Ewing. and Ken jahnke
In 1901. William Larue, known as "Dutch Bill." who mined thirty years in the West and
Msmco. built this Spanish-type arrastra just east of Mourn Shendan on Cedar Creek.
It is typical of many crude ore grinders found over the state. The rock was crushed by
drag stones pulled round and round by burros

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Above: The author examines the remains of a Spanish-type arrastra built by gold
seekers on Panther Creek in 1905. Below Another view of the arrastra 3urros har-
nessed to a cedar crossbeam pulled a drag stone around the tTOugh, crushing ore in
preparation for separating gold and silver with mercury- Photographs by Ruth Gartland



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.Sail l.ierk (unyun (nnilli |mk) liM>Liii|> xmlliia-l limn |i>|i <>l III	 i m .11 ihii. ih
in bcr. 23, 1. 1H N., I(. 12 W. Tile trriiiiMin Sail I'lain is a|i|iii>Minairly 2IMI-2SO
(crt liclim I lir lop u( I lie lllaiiit- t">l|nl.il< il I	 sail wait r
lliiwmg (rum many ball	in llir H..wi:r|H.I Slialt- jlxnil MM li el Ih-Iiiw I III- liasi-
I lie lllaint h urinal mil. Tlir Sliiiurr liypMiin  a|is I In liill 1111 lln- Irll anil lln:
limuiinint Nrscalunga Gypsum (urius lln- nt-il Inner l- .lpi , 'III I. . I I.. Ii.w llir ^liiim 1
Tlie Meilirini' LinlgK gypsum is Imri ly ilisriiuililr .il>ul III ln-1 l.ilnw lln
Nrs4:ulllllf:il li'ilgc.
I'lliiltiia|ill liy Myiun K. Mikiuli)
OKLAHOMA CFOLOGICAL SURVEY
Carl C. Branson, Director
ItULLKTIN 89
and Mim ical Hksouiicks
4II-- Itl.AINh CoilNTY, OkI.AIIOMA
Part I.Si*avk;haihy and General Geology of Rlaine County
by
Robert O. Fay
Part II.Economic Geology and Petrology i: Gyi>sum and
Aniiyphiti: in IIi.aine Coiiniy
by
William E. Ham
Part III.Petroleum Geology of Ri.aine Oiunty
' by
John T. IUdo and Louise Jordan
The University of Oklahoma
Norman
September 1062

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HECENT SINKHOLES
05
ginning of the Pleistocene Epoch, the Pleistocene river cutting down
another 100 feet and filling in bottom portions of the vallev belcw
the escarpment.
One feature of the drainage on the northeastern side of the
river is the pattern produced by ephemeral and intermittent streams
thac do not reach the main rivers. Most of these streams are less
than a mile long and end in a small sink or depression with a lake
in the middle. Many sand Junes cover the region and account for
some of this pattern, but recently formed sinkholes also contributed
to the development of this pattern (Fay, 1958. p. 58-64). Many
sinkholes have developed in historic time in this region, probablv
due to solution of the underlying Blaine Formation (fig. 33). The
average modern sinkhole is about 20 or 30 feet deep and 50 to 200
feet across. The overlving gravel and sand deposits act as an
aquifer, supplying water to the formations below. The water prob-
ably dissolves out the gypsum and soluble salts, flowing out east-
ward in the Blaine escarpment to form gypsum- and salt-water
springs at lower elr anons (fig. 34).
figure 33. Rivt-ntU	 inklmle .n Anna FmN*v (jfm. n*r L	1 %
-t*. J. T l> V. H. W.. in iho PU-UitM-rnc	ir i-	 l*t :ani	jmi m* probablv lrnieJ In j
01 jIi< rmntrf	wlurli i* jJmhii I i J i^.*i l^lnw ih^ uroumi My iul*
am I Mr?.	<'urtin. ***litor l Hi ffatonsn
Hrpuolican i* Man.nnt Mow,
SetuLce *	e<) frS

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Figure $6. Vij* \%uir. Cm., rouuunl. -Imuiu- ^;p,un
vi.it.	jijtl j Ww vsirLt*yurri < *o
5 Oll'LA *. Bulletin ftQ OtJ.fc.Gul

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tipmr -12. I'laiil n| tUmcrwil Alia* Oiim-iii (j. ui llm-ltrr viilini!
The gypsum betl lies 'flat ami is worked by open-face methods
(fij- 41). After shale overburden is strip|>cd and discarded, the
face is shot from vertical blast holes, drilled to a depth one font
above the basal Magpie Dolomite. Hroken stone from the face is
hauled by dump trucks to the crusher plant where it is reduced
In I'.j-inch size through two roll crushers and loaded into o|rii
gondolas for rail shipment (fig. 42). All the stout is used as re-
larder in the manufacture of portland cement by 15 Universal Alias
Cement plants in the south-central part of the United States. The
small amount of anhydrite locally present is worked with the gyp-
sum as mill run feed, for it is not sufficiently abundant to be ob-
jectionable for use of the gypsum as rctardcr.
As much as 10 acres of overburden is stripped in advance of
the working face (fig. 43), and approximately l(M),(NN) tons of stone
is shot at one time. The thickness of shale overlying the gypsum
is as much as 3H feet, up to the Southard Dolomite, but in practice
not more than 25 feet is removed ln/cause here, just as in the South
ard area, the percentage of anhydrile increases excessively in the
worked ledge where the overburden is thicker. Underground min-
ing was practiced at an early date but was abandoned in I9JH.
Gypsum outcrops in the Klaine l-'ormation at Huclier on the
Frisco Railway have been worked for 50 years. The Monarch
6s Buutnio a.*}
Piaster Company operated a gypsum-products mill at Watonga in
1913 (Snider, 1913. p. 74), shipping stone to the mill from the same
deposits in sec. 27. T. 17 N R. II VV. that are now worked by
Uni .ersal Alias. Production was doubtless small, and the plant did
litM survive into the 1920s. The property was aajuired in 1925 by
Universal Alias and since then has Inxn continuously active, yield-
ing the second largest production in Oklahoma.
S. A. Walton and Son
The partnership of S. A. Walton and Son, 805 N. 8th St., Fair-
view, Oklahoma, has produced crude gypsum since 1947 from
properties hi die central part of sec. 35, T . 19 N., R. 12 W. Located
two miles northeast of Southard, at Gyp siding of the St. Louis and
San Francisco Railway, the plant also is close to State Highway 51
and has excellent transportation facilities for the sale and distribu-
tion of crushed gypsum for use as rctardcr in the manufacture of
portland cement and of ground gypsum for soil conditioner. Most
of ilie gypsum lor cement rctardcr is sold to the plant of the Dewey
Portland Cement Company, Dewey, Washington County, Okla-
homa.
From the opening of the plant iu April I91cS, through I956,
the Medicine Lodge (iypsuui was worked by open face methods
from the bench surrounding a small buttc in NW'^ SE|4 sec. 35.

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PENNSYLVANIA

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COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
FINAL RIKRT
NARRATIVE SUHftRY - NCNOQAL HINERAL INVEKlUKy
INIRXIUCnON
The nonooal mining industry in Pennsylvania began in early colonial days.
The earliest record of iron ore mining in Pennsylvania was in 1692, while snail
scale quarries for building stone were started scmmhat earlier by the original
Swedish and Qiglish colonists. A thriving iron industry developed by the mid-
seventeen hundreds, based on abundant iron ore, limestone, forests for charcoal,
and water power. By this tine, the forests and iron mines in England had been
greatly depleted and the abundant resources of the colonies could fill that gap.
Mines and quarries expanded in number and size to nveet the needs of the growing
colony. Pennsylvania had produced a wide variety of metallic minerals including
iron, copper, zinc, chranium, and lead along with minor production of silver,
gold, nickel, cadmium, and molybdenum. Nonooal minerals used for construction or
industrial purposes include limestone, dolomite, clay, shale, sandstone, sand, and
gravel.
MEXHODS OF MINING
Both underground and surface mining methods have been used in Pennsylvania
for both metallic and nonmetallic mining. Surface mining methods have been used
to a far greater extent than underground mining for nonooal minerals in
Pennsylvania, especially during the 20th century.
Processing of iron ore in colonial days involved the locating of the
furnace in close proximity to the ore. Most iron ore in the state is located near
a limestone source, and forests were abundant at the time. This combination
resulted in numerous self-sufficient iron production facilities through ituch of
the 1700's and 1800's. When the more abundant and richer Minnesota iron ore
became available, along with improved transportation, small scale iron mining in
Pennsylvania declined. Most of the overburden was dumped locally, as was the
slag. With the expansion of the railroad system, nuch of the slag was used for
ballast. As the rail transportation became available, most ore was shipped to
oentralized mills in the growing cities. By the 20th century, only a handful of
the larger iron mines were working in Pennsylvania. The size and scope of mining
of minerals for construction purposes continued to grow along with the population
and rapidly expanding industry.
Two additional methods of mining are used in Pennsylvania for nonooal.
There is a limited amount of dredging for sand and gravel conducted in the
Allegheny River. Sand and gravel is also dredged by the clamshell method along
stream terraces.
At the present time, there is no metals-mining in Pennsylvania. The
Cornwall magnetite iron mine stopped production in 1972 after 234 years of
continuous production. Three mines - Cornwall (iron), Graoe (iron), and
Freidensville (zinc) had a greater production than all other metals mines in
Pennsylvania combined.

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NCNOQAL LAWS AND RECLAMATION
Noncoal raining in Pennsylvania is regulated under the Noncoal Surface
Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act and The Pennsylvania Clean Streams Law.
Regulation of noncoal mining began in 1972 when the Surface Mining Conservation
and Reclamation Act (SMZRA) was amended to include noncoal surface mining. Die
Noncoal 2CKA was passed in 1984.
Since 1972, noncoal operations have been required to obtain permits from
the Bureau of Mining and Reclamation, provide for reclamation of the mine site,
and post bond to ensure reclamation.
Highwalls established above the regional water table prior to 1972 require
no reclamation unless they are reaffected for production purposes after that date.
Noncoal mines with sufficient overburden are required to backfill to
approximate contour after the extraction of minerals. Noncoal mines with
insufficient overburden normally are required to slope the highwall to an average
of 35 for areas above the water table. Revegetation of disturbed area is also
required. Effluent standards are set for likely pollutional parameters. Any
public or private water supply affected by contamination, interruption, or
diminution due to noncoal surface mining activities must be restored or replaced
with an alternate source of water adequate in quantity and quality for the
purposes served by the supply.
Hie majority of large noncoal mines in Pennsylvania intercept the regional
water table and, after mining and reclamation is completed, will result in the
creation of a lake with vegetated slopes.
BQTIVEyABANDCNED MINES - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
.	Minftfr
All metals surface mining in Pennsylvania had oeaspri prior to the
effective date of nonooal regulation in the state (1972). The vast majority of
the small scale metals mines had ceased operation prior to 1900. In conjunction
with this study, the Bureau of Mining and Reclamation locked at impacts of metals
mining in three counties (Cumberland, Lehigh, and Northampton), which account for
approximately 50% of the past metals mining in the state. The Bureau looked at
water quality (surface and groundwater) in those areas to assess the impacts.
Lehigh and Northampton Counties are adjacent to each other and represent
the greatest concentration of past metals mining in Pennsylvania. Extensive iron
ore mining was conducted in this area from the early 1800's until World War I.
None of the iron ore mines have been active since that time. The mines ranged in
size frcm 40 acres to less than 1/4 acre. Many of the mines were small and cannot
even be located on aerial photos - many are now merely a shallow area in the
center of a cornfield. The larger mines which operated below the water table are
now waterfilled impoundments, with scne used for recreational purposes. The water
is of good quality with wells in the area and the streams draining the area,
meeting EPA drinking water standards for iron and manganese. A well, formerly
used at the now inactive Freidensville zinc mine, is being used as a public water
supply and meets EPA primacy drinking water standards. The old tailing pile at
the site is currently being mined for its lime for use in gypsum wallboard, with
no adverse affects on the well quality.

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In Cumberland County, over twenty old iron ore mines are located in the
watershed of the Yellow Breeches Creek, which is one of Pennsylvania's most
popular trout streams. The largest of the old iron ore mines in this area is now
a recreational lake (swimming, row boating, and fishing) as part of the
Pennsylvania State Parks System. Several other old iron ore mines in the area are
used for private recreational purposes and are surrounded by cottages. The water
quality of the wells and streams in the area are of good quality.
Construction and Industrial Minerals
The major construction type minerals in Pennsylvania are limestone, sand
and gravel, argillite, shale and sandstone. Dimension stone (various types),
flagstone, and cut slate are also produced. Water quality associated with lime-
stone mining is usually of excellent quality. Water associated with argillite,
and sand and gravel is usually of good quality. Water quality associated with
shale and sandstone is normally of good quality except those mined in the coal
measures and associated with an acid-producing coal seam.
Clay, which is usually mined for industrial purposes, exhibits good water
quality unless the clay is mined in association with an acid-producing coal seam.
frir
Air quality does not tend to be a problem at abandoned noncoal mines since
most disturbed areas, other than areas of bare rock (which is not prone to pro-
ducing air pollution, is quickly covered by natural vegetation due to the moist '
temperate climate and the alkaline nature of the materials.
Inactive/Abandoned Mine Reclamation
Nonooal mines in Pennsylvania which oeased operation prior to 1972 have no
reclamation responsibility. The majority of the inactive/abandoned nonooal mines
were inactive by 1900. Noncoal mines developed prior to extensive use of modern
explosives had the working faces or highwalls developed at the angle of natural
repose for the type of material being mined. Nonooal mines mined in more recent
times in consolidated rock were developed with high angle highwalls. Slopes
developed at the angle of natural repose usually remain stable. Highwalls
developed in consolidated rock in most cases remain stable. The highwalls in
existence at inactive/abandoned noncoal mines do not ccsnpare with the reclamation
standards required in Pennsylvania since 1972. However, these highwalls would
meet the present reclamation standards required in many states which allow
vertical highwalls in most cases if the highwall is stable.	*
Accidents involving old highwalls have been few. Many inactive highwalls
near urban areas have been fenced.
Mills and Plants
The database available during the study contained no data regarding
whether the inactive/abandoned mine site had on-site mills or plants. The data
does indicate that there are 28 off-site inactive/abandoned mills or plants. In
regard to on-site mills and plants, there are numerous abandoned iron ore furnaces
throughout the state which have not been active during the 20th century. Many of
these are considered to be of historic significance, and seme have been restored
and included under both state and local park systems.

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Bond Forfeiture and Reclamation
Since 1972, nonooal nines have had reclamation responsibilities and
reclamation bonds, only five nonooal mines have had bond forfeiture in which
Pennsylvania will have to use the forfeited bonds to provide for reclamation.
Seven other sites that have been abandoned have been reclaimed by the bonding
company or the site has been repermitted by another mining company. The five
sites with bond forfeiture are now under study for reclamation under
Pennsylvania's abandoned cone land program.
Costs and Acreage - Inactive/Abandoned Nonooal Mines
Pennsylvania has listed most data information an the Data Sumnary as the
number of mine sites, rather than by acreage, since there is insufficient data to
list these by acreage. The only acreage data available to us is from the Soil
Conservation Service. This data is listed as total acreage of land needing
 reclamation and which was not required by any law. The data is listed by county
and is broken down into three catagories (ooal mines, sand and gravel, and other
mined areas). The totals for Pennsylvania are:
Coal - 240,000 acres
Sand and Gravel - 11,000 acres
Other Mined Areas - 20,500 acres
These figures would amount to a total of approximately 31,500 acres of
land disturbed and abandoned by nonooal mining in Pennsylvania for which
reclamation is not required by any law. The information available contained no
data identifying acreage on any individual nonooal sites. In addition to the
31,500 acre figure, the available data shows that there are 1309 nonooal sites
abandoned prior to the regulation of nonooal mining in Pennsylvania.
The cost to reclaim abandoned nonooal mines in Pennsylvania would depend
on the condition of the individual mine site. An average cost figure of approx-
imately $7000 per acre has been established for reclamation of surface ooal sites
in Pennsylvania. A similar average cost figure for nonooal in reasonable. Most
sand and gravel sites would require a lower figure, vftile consolidated rock sites
nay require a higher figure, based on site conditions.
The major site condition affecting reclamation cost of a consolidated rock
quarry is the height and slope of the highwall. As noted previously in this
report, the majority of the inactive/abandoned nonooal sites in Pennsylvania were
inactive prior to 1900. Vertical or high angle highwalls were not developed at
that time since modern drilling and explosive equipment and technology were not
available. The highwalls were generally developed at a 45 slope in bedrock.
After the water pumping at the pit ceased, the water table returned to its normal
level and the abandoned pit became a lake with 45 slopes. Over the years,
natural revegetaticn occurred and the slopes were covered by hardwood forest. In
the early years of this century, the larger nonooal operations started to develop
vertical highwalls. These methods gradually were phased into smaller nonooal
sites, although many small local sites continued to develop 45 highwalls into the
1950's. Most of the nonooal surface mines which were developed at 45% and
abandoned have been reclaimed through natural processes.

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Sand and gravel mining in Pennsylvania involves both wet and dry sites.
The wet sites are usually on a flood plain of a river or large stream and involve
the dredging of sand and gravel below the shallow water table. The operations
result in the creation or expansion of a lake with slopes at the angle of natural
repose for sand. In most cases, affected areas around the pit will become
naturally vegetated. The dry sand and gravel site are usually shallow pits on old
river terraces or in glacial drifts. The slopes on these were maintained at the
angle of natural repose. Host abandoned dry sand and gravel will also be covered
by a natural vegetative growth, but at a slower rate than the wet sand and gravel
sites.
Many of the abandoned ncncoal surface mine sites in Pennsylvania have been
reclaimed through the way in which they were developed and the climate and natural
fertility of the land. Most of the abandoned consolidated rock noncoal mines
developed at 45 would need no further reclamation work. The majority of
abandoned sand and gravel sites would also require no further reclamation. There
are abandoned noncoal mine sites v*uch were developed with vertical high angle
highwalls. Most of these noncoal mine sites are located on private property and
were abandoned prior to noncoal mine regulation in Pennsylvania. Although the
Bureau of Mining and Reclamation has no jurisdiction over these sites, many of the
possible safety problems at these sites have been taken care of through actions of
the landowner and/or local government agencies. Many have safety fencing to
prevent access to the pit area. Scroe have been developed for commercial uses -
private fishing clubs, skin diving schools, water supply reservoirs, etc.
Due to the mining methods of many of these old abandoned noncoal sites, a
large percentage of the affected and abandoned 31,500 acres of noncoal mining
would need no further reclamation.
We have included several photographs showing the natural reclamation which
has taken place at a number of abandoned noncoal sites. Rvotographs of abandoned
vertical highwalls are also included.

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REFERENCE GUIDE
1.	Data for mining type was obtained primarily from the following sources:
a)	U.S. Bureau of Mines - Minerals Availability System Domestic Deposit
Listing (MAS).
b)	U.S. Geological Survey - Mineral Resource Data System fMRDS).
c)	Pennsylvania Geologic Survey - Mineral Resources Report 50.
d)	U.S. Department of Agriculture (Soil Conservation Service) - The
nf Land Disturbed by Surface Mining in the United States.
Hie quality of data listed an the Data Summary 2ieet is rated at a 75%
accuracy rating. Due to acreage figures not being available for most sites
in the data sources, mining type has been listed as site numbers instead of
acres.
The number of millsites and smelters located at abandoned mining sites could
not be obtained fron the data available.
2.	The data sources for ownership are listed in 1. a, b, c, and d.
The ownership is listed as site numbers rather than by acreage due to lack
of acreage data.
Ownership listed as "other" indicates no ownership was available for the
mine site.
3.	Uhder features, the data available was insufficient to provide a listing and
was therefore insufficient to provide cost estimate. Both of these items
will be addressed further in the narrative.
4.	In ocnsidering the data for construction Ores and Industrial Ores, some
ncnooal minerals are used for both construction and industrial purposes
(such as lime- stone). Since there is no data available as to which use
such minerals wear produced for, we have listed limestone and other multiple
use minerals under construction since this is the more frequent use. Sites
listed under Industrial Ores are far minerals used only for industrial
purposes (i.e. clay).
5.	There is no mining of phosphate, uranium, or oil shale in Pennsylvania.
6.	Insufficient data available.
7.	The totals only include inactive/abandoned ncncoal mines which are not
covered by permits and reclamation requirements under the Pennsylvania
Ncnooal Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act. Ncncoal mines with
permits which are abandoned illegally are addressed in the narrative. A
separate reclamation narrative on cost and acreage has been provided for the
1 nart* i vp /ahafyWvari mi nM
JLI Qw U* Vy/ CU> -"li MJI WU IILLl BP 

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NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES1
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Ag*m ref.l

ref. 2 I
ft*
ref .3
ref.2 I
ref. 1
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ref. 2
ref.l
ref. 3
ft
REFERENCE GUIDE ATTACHED

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NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES1
Coouiionwfalth of Pennsylvania
AgencyContact Ernest Glovannittl
Ttltphoni (717) 787-S10S
DATA SUMMARY^
M1NIN0
Tift lnuibr)
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See narrative on Costs and Acreage

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NOTES TO TABLE
Some Slates have already performed Inactive/Abandoned Mine (!AM) inventories.
These Stales may have different definitions for 1AM features. Because this is a small
scoping project to gather existing information, we are not attempting to Impose a
common set of definitions on the States. However, in interpreting the results, it is
vital that the reader clearly understand each State's definition,
1.	Provide a description of your State's definition of inactive/abandoned mines used
in the table, e.g, do you include permitted mines which may be inadequately
reclaimed under existing laws?
2.	Footnote carefully your sources of data for each topic, e.g, data compiled from
State surveys, State employees (listed) and review of federal data bases, Mineral
Industry Location System of the Federal Bureau of Mines (MILS) and/or Mineral
Resource Data System CMRDS) of the U.S. Geological Survey.
3.	Describe the quality of your data. Is ii 95% accurate or a different figure?
Discuss basis for the estimate.
4.	Define the aaes listed for each MINERAL TYPE. Does it include entire mine site
or just the environmental or health/safety feature?
5.	Describe any 'other- MINING TYPE.
6.	Describe any 'other* OWNERSHIP, local government or TribaL
7.	Describe any'other* MINERAL TYPE.
8.	Provide your definition of POLLUTED WATER.
%
9.	Provide your definition of MINE DUMPS, e.g., including heap leach pads, ore
dumps, waste dumps, and mill tailings.
10.	Provide your definition of DISTURBED LAND and associated environmental
problems.
11.	Provide your definition of hazardous H1GHWALLS.
12.	Provide your definition of hazardous MINE OPENINGS. .
13.	Provide your definition of SUBSIDENCE PRONE areas, e.g., included are areas
where subsidence occurrence potential Is great.

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14.	Provide your definition of what constitutes HAZARDOUS STRUCTURES.
15.	Describe any "other" FEATURES.
16.	List COST factors, eg, dollar cost per mile of polluted stream or acre of disturbed
land. Provide basis for cost factors, e.g., best engineering practice, past practice but
not EPA 'supeifuiuf 
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INACTIVE/ABANDCNED MINE INVHflCRY SLMftRY
Ocnracnwealth of Pennsylvania
Response - Notes to Table
1.	Pennsylvania defines inactive/abandoned nonooal mines, for the purposes of
this study, as noncoal mines where mining was conpleted prior to the
regulation of such mining under the Pennsylvania Surface Mining
Conservation and Reclamation Act (effective January 1, 1972). Prior to
this date, nonooal mines had no reclamation responsibility in Pennsylvania.
Noncoal mines which have been abandoned illegally since 1972 are included
under the category of "other".
2.	A reference guide to the Data Summary Sheets has been included in this
package compiling the data and references used for this report.
3.	The quality of the data (as a % accuracy) is addressed in the reference
guide and the text for different data used.
4.	lhe data available on inactive/abandoned noncoal mining for Pennsylvania in
most cases contains no listing for acres for individual mine sites. There
is, however, data available for total acreage by county. Due to this data
being unavailable for individual mine sites, we have listed mining type fcy
number of site rather than by acreage.
5.	For the category "other", for the purposes of this study, we are listing
permitted noncoal mining which has been illegally abandoned without
completion of reclamation, and the reclamation bends have been forfeited.
6.	The term "other", in reference to ownership, will be defined as unknown
ownership on the database available.
7.	This description is addressed in Number 5 above.
8.	"Pollution" shall be construed to mean contamination of any waters of the
Ocranonwealth such as will create or is likely to create a nuisance or to
render such waters harmful, detrimental or injurious to public health,
safety or welfare, or to domestic, municipal, commercial, industrial,
agricultural, recreational, or other legitimate beneficial uses, or to
livestock, wild animals, birds, fish or other aquatic life, including but
not limited to such contamination by alteration of the physical, chemical
or biological properties of such waters, or change in temperature, taste,
oolor or odor thereof, or the discharge of any liquid, gaseous, radio-
active, solid or other substances into such waters. The Department shall
determine when a discharge constitutes pollution, as herein defined, and
shall establish standards whereby and vfterefrcn it can be asoertained and
determined whether any such discharge does or does not constitute pollution
as herein defined.
9.	Mine dumps, for the purpose of this study, will include slag piles, waste
rock, railings, ponds, waste materials fron processing, and overburden
stock piles.

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10. Disturbed land is defined as any area affected in the process of the mining
operation. "This includes both the pit and the support areas (haul roads,
waste dumps, etc.)
11.	A higftwall is defined as a high angle face in a pit or open cut which would
include both the exposed mineral and overburden.
12.	Mine opening is defined as any mine entryway, ventilation shaft, pumping
borehole, or any other opening to an underground mine which would permit
human entrance to the mine. Abandoned mine openings which have not been
sealed or have human access blocked oould be hazardous.
13.	Subsidence prone areas are defined as areas located over underground mine
workings having inccsnpetent roof rock and overburden which may be subject
to collapse in the future. This situation is most prevalent in shallow
mine workings.
14.	Hazardous structures are defined as structures used to support noncoal
mining activities (buildings, conveyors, foundations, etc.) which were
abandoned and present a safety hazard to the public.
15.	Due to the small number of bond forfeitures and the great variation in
noncoal sites, an average cost figure is not yet available for nonooal
reclamation by Pennsylvania. It can be assumed that the average per acre
figure may be similar to that of the coal program which is approximately
$7,000 per acre.

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Abandoned limestone quarry (circa 1920's). This quarry was developed with
45 or less highwalls and abandoned. The water table returned to normal after
punping ceased, and natural vegetation developed on the sloped highwalls. This
area is now used for reclamation by the newly erected adjacent corporate center.
1

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Ircnton Iron Mine. The meadow in the background was part of the mine and
is now used far grazing cattle.
2

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Abandoned Irontcn Iron Mine (circa 1860-1890). Hie nine covered an area of
2200 x BOO feet with higftwalls developed at approximately 45. The water table is
now at normal elevation and forested areas have developed on the slopes. A housing
development ($250,000 - $400,000 range) has been built just beyond the tree line.
3

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Figure 7-5. Pine Grove iron on pit circa 1875. The view is
to the northwest. (Ponograph courtesy of the Cumberland CoaitY
Historical Society.)

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Abandoned iron mine developed with 45 higfrwalls. This area is presently a
state park - Fuller lake.
5

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Abandoned limestone quarry with vertical highwalls. The area is now used
as a fishing and boating lake.
6

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Abandoned sand and gravel operation,
for duck hunting and fishing (Piice).
Ibis area is now a wetlands area used
Abandoned iron mine. Ihis area is new a private fishing club. This site
was active in the 1890's.
7

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limestone quarry (circa 1950) with highwalls developed at approximately
45. The highwall slopes shown In this photograph would have developed a natural
growth of hardwood trees if abandoned. This quarry is still active, however, and
has greatly expanded using vertical highwalls. under Pennsylvania law, the
vertical highwalls will be blasted down to 35 and the slopes will be vegetated.
9

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Figure V The top of ihe southerly dippinj diabase sheet at the ore footwali look-
inj: we\i. (Photo courier Beihlchem Steel Corp )
Oomwall iron Mine operated for 235 years until it closed in the
1970 s. The mine was developed at approximately 45.
ivtfy, i-
Preserrt photograph of the Cornwall Iron Mine showing natural rise of the
water table and growth of vegetation on the slopes.
10

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svxai

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STATE OF TEXAS
NONCOAL INVENTORY - INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES
Prepared by
RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS
SURFACE MINING AND RECLAMATION DIVISION
Melvin B. Hodgkiss, P.E., Director
Telephone (512) 463-6900
June 1991

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
NARRATIVE SUMMARY
PAGE
Introduction
Mining and Processing
Health and Safety Considerations
Environmental Impacts
Laws and Regulations
Reclamation Efforts
DATA SUMMARY REFERENCE GUIDE
DATA SUMMARY TABLE
6-7
Definitions
8
Data Sources
10
Data Deficiencies
11
References
12

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NARRATIVE SUMMARY

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INTRODUCTION
Texas contains an abundance of noncoal mineral resources. Location and production of these
commodities has influenced the settlement and economy of Texas for over 200 years. The Salt Lakes
of Trans-Pecos Texas have served the needs of ranchers and miners since the 1750's (Price and others,
1983). Production of, and exploration for, metallic ores including copper, silver, lead, zinc, tin, and
tungsten brought people to far West Texas in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the Big Bend
region the Shafter silver district and Terlingua mercury district created prosperous mining communities-
until the 1950's. After World War II, it was do longer economically feasible to mine the deposits.
Today the Terlingua area is frequented by many tourists passing through enroute to Big Bend National
Park and Big Bend Ranch State Natural Area. The mining areas are well known and generate
considerable interest among tourists, especially those interested in mining and mineral collecting.
Production of building stone from the Central Texas mineral region continues today as reserves
of limestone, granite, marble and sandstone are quarried. Construction ores such as limestone, sand and
gravel, caliche and clay are produced all over the state, especially in Central and East Texas near
population centers. Other mineral resources from around the state include fluorspar, talc, iron ore,
sulfur, barite, gypsum, gold, gem stones, manganese, molybdenum, rhyolite, serpentine, shell, celestite,
graphite, and mica.
MINING AND PROCESSING
Both underground and surface mining techniques have been used successfully in Texas. The
underground workings associated with mineral development in Trans-Pecos Texas are extensive. Surface
mining of construction and industrial ores have left thousands of pits, quarries, and strip mines throughout
the state.
Processing of ore has taken place at the mine site as well as in centralized facilities of varying
distances from the mines. In several localities abandoned smelting and milling equipment, and tailings
from silver, mercury, limestone, and sand and gravel production have been observed. Smelters in El
Paso and along the Texas Gulf Coast are still processing both foreign and domestic ores. Currently
operating facilities include those processing talc, gypsum, graphite, building stones (marble, granite,
sandstone, limestone), uranium, clay, salts, and sand and gravel.
1

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HEALTH AND SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Unstable underground workings, unmarked vertical shafts, highwalls, and impoundments at
abandoned mine sites in Texas pose serious health and safety hazards to the general public. In Trans-
Pecos Texas there are many underground mine sites containing open shafts located on state and federal
park lands and in close proximity to other public use areas. Some of the shafts (particularly near
Terlingua and Study Butte) are readily accessible to the public and have been responsible for fatalities
in the past.
Throughout the state there are abandoned mine lands located in close proximity to public
roadways. There are reports of accidents involving motorists who fail to negotiate roadways near
abandoned mine sites and suffer serious injuries as a consequence. The abandoned sites commonly
contain water resulting in increased risks to individuals that inadvertently end up in the pits.
Recreational use of the impoundments (swimming, diving, and fishing) has resulted in a number
of accidental deaths in Texas. Informal interviews with landowners and city/county officials in East and
South Texas corroborate many reports of fatal and near-fatal accidents associated with hazardous
conditions commonly found in many abandoned mines.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Environmental effects of mining, milling, and smelting activities in Texas persists long after a
site is abandoned. Accelerated soil erosion from bare or poorly vegetated areas results in soil loss,
stream sedimentation, and air quality degradation. Overburden commonly contains elements that can be
highly toxic to fish and wildlife exposed to ninoff from the site. Acid mine drainage at some sites causes
a decrease in pH, resulting in leaching of metals contained in the spoil. Metal concentrations can
accumulate and cause problems with water quality downstream. Processing facilities use additional
substances that can be extremely hazardous to fish and wildlife as well as the public. In many cases, sites
that pose no significant threat to the environment, in and of themselves, become significant environmental
hazards because of waste disposal on the sites. The EPA lists several such sites on their National Priority
List.
2

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There are potentially beneficial impacts of mining in Texas as well. Many surface pits and
quarries serve as ground water recharge basins. In the South Texas uranium mining district surface
water resources are very limited and abandoned uranium mines in the area contain water of sufficient
quality to be beneficial to livestock, fish and wildlife. Abandoned sand and gTavel mines along streams
and rivers in Texas significantly increase the wetland habitat available for fish and wildlife.
LAWS AND REGULATIONS
In 1975, the 64th Texas Legislature approved the Texas Surface Mining and Reclamation Act
giving the Texas Railroad Commission responsibility for regulation of coal and uranium mining in the
state. The Surface Mining and Reclamation Division was created to regulate the industry and to ensure
the proper and timely reclamation of lands impacted by mining activities. In 1983 the Texas Legislature
gave the Railroad Commission further jurisdiction over iron ore mining by amending the Texas Surface
Mining and Reclamation Act. The passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act
(SMCRA) in 1977 by the 95th U.S. Congress established a national system of coal mining regulation
under the jurisdiction of the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, U.S. Department
of the Interior. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act established a program for the
reclamation of mine lands abandoned prior to 1977 through the Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Fund.
There was no legal responsibility for reclamation of mines abandoned prior to the passage of the Act in
1977. Fees are levied on coal mined in the state and a percentage of the funds are available for use by
state Abandoned Mine Land (AML) programs through reclamation grants administered by the Federal
Office of Surface Mining.
Abandoned coal mine reclamation projects are highest priority as the coal mining industry remains
the sole source of funding for the A ML Program. The Texas A ML Program is currently reclaiming the
last eligible abandoned coal mine site at the Sandow Mine in Milam County. Funds are available on an
emergency basis for noncoal reclamation if sufficient public health and safety hazards exist on the site
and a request is made by the governor of the state. To date, the Texas Abandoned Mine Land Program
has reclaimed seven ooncoal mine sites in Brewster, El Paso, and Karnes Counties at the request of the
Governor. With the completed reclamation of all eligible abandoned coal mine sites, the Texas AML
Program will become certified for noncoal reclamation and will no longer require a request from the
governor to reclaim noncoal sites. Federal funding for the AML Program was to expire in 1992 but was
extended until September of 1995 by the recent passage of the 1991 Federal Budget by the United States
Congress.
3

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There have been several attempts in the Texas Legislature to address further regulation of noncoal
mining activities. The most recent proposed legislation deals with the erection of safety features (such
as benns and barricades) along abandoned sites that are in close proximity to public roadways. A school
bus accident in September of 1989 near Alton, Texas resulted in the drowning deaths of several students
when the bus in which they were riding collided with a tractor-trailer at an intersection. The bus went
over a highwall into an impoundment created by a caliche mining operation. After the bus accident, there
was concern in the legislature for additional regulation of the mining industry to insure public health and
safety. With the exception of uranium and limited iron ore mining, there is no current regulation of
noncoal mining activities in the State of Texas.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)is administering the investigation and
remediation of hazardous waste disposal sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Several abandoned noncoal mine sites are on the
USEPA National Priority List (NPL) because of hazardous waste disposal at the sites.
RECLAMATION EFFORTS
The Texas Abandoned Mine Land Program has reclaimed a total of seven noncoal abandoned
mine sites over the eight year period from 1983 to the present. Each noncoal reclamation project has
been requested by the Governor of Texas to eliminate public health and safety hazards. A total of 134
mine shafts have been capped or backfilled in the Terlingua mercury district in Brewster County. Two
abandoned surface uranium mines have been reclaimed in Karnes County and thirteen tin mine shafts have
been reclaimed in El Paso County. As the last eligible abandoned coal mine lands are being reclaimed,
environmental assessments, engineering design, and grant applications are being prepared for three high
priority abandoned uranium mines in Karnes and Live Oak Counties.
The Abandoned Mine Land Program is presently conducting a mine land inventory of West Texas
that will, upon completion, be used in the prioritization of other noncoal abandoned mine land
reclamation projects in Texas. The inventory identifies and catalogs all noncoal and non-uranium mine
lands as indicated on United States Geological Survey 7.5 minute quadrangle maps, aerial photographs,
and field visits. Information for each site greater than two acres includes latitude and longitude, a size
estimate, and mined commodity. Interpretation of aerial photographs provides further information
regarding size, type of mining, active/abandoned status, presence of a highwall or wetland, and
propinquity to a public road. For abandoned, non-reclaimed sites within one-half mile of a residential
4

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area, park or school, and with evidence of a high wall and/or a wetland, a site visit is made to verify
status of mining and to evaluate the site for health, safety, and environmental features. All information
is recorded in the Texas Mine Land Database.
The inventory is complete for the southern and eastern portions of the state. The northern and
western areas of the state are currently under investigation. Site data is available for 6221 sites greater
than two acres in size from the South and East Texas inventories. To date, only location and size
information are available for 3200 sites greater than two acres in West Texas. A total of 11,183 sites
less than two acres have been identified statewide. The statewide inventory is expected to be complete
by 1992.
5

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DATA SUMMARY TABLE

-------
NON-COAL INVENTORY - INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES
State of TEXAS
RAILROAD COMMISSION OF TEXAS
SURFACE MINING AND RECLAMATION DIVISION
Melvin B. Hodgkiss, P.E., Director
Telephone (512) 463-6900
DATA SUMMARY

Mmerml Type (acrci)
MINING TYPE (acres)
OWNERSHIP (Kid) 1
FEATURES
(uajta)
(coat)
Metallic Orea
Copper, Ooid, Iran,
Lead, Mtt|oe*e.
Mercury, Motytxtanira,
Silver. Tio, Tuf ateo.
Zac
Mines
630
Federal
10
Polluted Water
(mfleal N/A
N/A
MiOiitcs

Private
i
Mine Dumps
(acre*) 400
d
Snellen
8 sites
Sate
62
Disturbed Land
(acres) 630
4,095.000
Other

Other
551
Hah vails
(miles) -0-
0-




Mae Oseomn
(n umber) 744
5.580.000




Subsidence Prone
(seres) N/A
N/A




Hazardous Summits
(araber) N/A
N/A





funit>	
	
Construction Ore*
Baaatt, Caliche, Clay,
Ooioaite, Oranjle,
Oypwu, UdciIok,
1 Mna
152,046
Federal
70
Polluted Water
(miles) N/A
NA
MUlsites
53 aitee
Private
i
Mine Dump*
(acrci) 7.603
ta
1 Smelted

Stile
60
Disturbed Land
(acre*) 152,044
958.300.000
Maitte, Fertile, Rhyotoe,
Sand mi Orwvd,
Stodnooc,
ck.i* o^n
Other

Other
151,916
Kifliwalla
(mfles) 1.013





Mine Opemscs
(number} -O-
-0-




Subsidence Prone
(terca) -O-
-0-




Hazardous Structures
(number) 31
N/A



1 Other

_
Industrial Ores
1 Mines
806
Federal
-0- 1 PoOtded Water
(miles) N/A
N/A
Banlc, CcicjUtc, Clay,
Fhnnpar, Onptute,
Mica, S*Jt, SUto, Trie
Mfflsites
24 she*
Private
l
Mine Ikons*
(acres) 40
M
Smellers

Stale
-0-
Diiturbod Land
(acrea) 806
5.239,000
Otter

Other
106
HithwaOt
(miles) 1





Mioe Oceans
(number) -0-
-0-




Subsidence Prone
(ecresVO-
-0-




Hazardous SuuUuiea
(sumber) 1
N/A







*' Private Ltndi incJuded la other category
Disturbed land includes mine dumps, Ugbwalb and all land disturbed by n in log. Reclamatloo costs are based
on this acreage.
N/A Not Available
6

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DATA SUMMARY  Page 2



OWVESSH3
SJiis-
FEATURES
funiu)
	fcfifll	
Phosphate Rock
N/A

l




MiUjite*
1 Private

Mine Dump*
(aereal

Sneltm
fl Suie

1 Difturbed Lad
(aerea)

CHbcr
1 Other
1 Hitbwilli
(mika)


1
fl Msk Openinta
(number)


|
| Sufcaidenee Prone
(aerea)


|
r Hazardoua
(number)


1
1



Umnium
Overburden
'
Mmea
1.582 1 Federal
_
PoOuted Water
(mika) N/A
N/A
Millirtea
4 lite* I Prrvale
1,582
Mine Dumpi
(acres) 797
J
SaeReri
N/A H State

Dianufeed Laid
(aerea) 1.512
23.730.000
Other
N/A
Other

HkbwaOi
(mDei) 15.7
i




Mine Omini
(number) -0-
-0-




Subsidence Prone
(acrta) -0-
-0-




Hmrdaui
(number) -0-
-0-




ffihn	

_
Oil Shile
N/A
Mine*

Fedenl

PoOuted Water
(milea)

MiUlitei

Private

Mine Dumot
(acres)

Smelten

State

Diatuifeed Land
(aerea)

Other

Other

HkbwaOa
(mika)





Miae Ommst -
(Bunber)






Subsidence Prone
(aerea)





Hiantau
(number)





Other	


Other (acre*)
N/A







Mills itc*

Private

Mae Damn
(acrei)

Smelten

State

Diaturbed Land
(aerea)

Other

Other

Hithwalli
(milea)





Mine Oprairai
(aerea)





Sublicence Prone
(aerea)





Kazardoua






Other
(uutfl)

TOTAL







Millaitea
81 lice*
Private
1.512 '
Mine Dtanpt
(aerea) 8,840
I


1 tile*
State
m
Diaturbed Laid
(aerea) 155.064
1.021.364.000

Other
	
Other
153.280
Hicbwafla
(milea) 1,037
>




1 Mine Ooounzi
(number) 744
5.580.000



R Suhndeoee Prone
(aerea) N/A
N/A



U Humnknu
(number) 32
N/A


H rWifr
(uniU)	
	
7

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DATA SUMMARY REFERENCE GUIDE

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DEFINITIONS
The following definitions should be taken only in the context of this report as they are tailored specifically
for this report.
Inactive/Abandoned Mine Lands:
Lands affected by noncoal mining and/or noncoal mining related activities that are not presently
being mined and for which no legal responsibility exists for reclamation.
Mine activity was determined by interpretation of aerial photographs for South and East Texas, and
during low-altitude flyovers for North and South Texas. If no evidence of recent excavation, milling,
or processing was observed, the site was classified as inactive/abandoned.
Polluted Water:
Water resources adversely impacted by mining related activities.
The Texas Water Commission's biennial report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in
accordance with Section 305(b) of the federal Clean Water Act fails to distinguish water quality problems
related to mining activities from other impacts to water quality.
Mine Dumps:
Overburden, spoil, and other waste material removed during mining and discarded on the surface.
Mine dumps were calculated to be 95% of disturbed area for underground mines and 5% of the disturbed
area for surface mines.
Disturbed Land:
All land disturbed by noncoal mining activities including: excavations, roads, mine dumps, spoil,
and areas impacted by mine land runoff.
8

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Disturbed land was calculated from general size estimates listed in the Mined Lands Inventory as
follows:
Below threshold 1.5 acres
Small	10 acres
Medium	two thirds at 20 acres
one third at 150 acres
Large	220 acres
Underground	0.5 acres/opening
Prospects	0.5 acres
Reclamation costs of approximately $6500 per acre includes reduction of highwall, regrading, soil
amendments, and revegetation/reforestation.
Hlghwalls:
An excavated face of a mining operation that has a slope greater than 45 degrees
Highwall length was calculated based on Mine Land Inventory commodity and size estimates as follows:
Small sites	2640 linear feet of highwall
Medium sites	6624 linear feet of highwall
Large sites	12380 linear feet of highwall
Highwall height was not included in the calculation due to incomplete data.
Mine Openings:
A shaft or adit in which the depth exceeds the width.
Remediation costs for mine openings are based on three types of closures utilized by the Texas A ML
Program. The three closure types and their average costs (based on previous mine opening remediation
projects) are as follows:
Fence  $500/opening
Backfill @ $6,500/opening
Cap/Gate/Grate 515,000/opening
9

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Tola] cost of mine opening remediation was estimated assuming each closure type would be used for
approximately one-third of the total number of openings.
Subsidence Prone:
Mined lands with underground workings which exhibited evidence of instability.
There were no data available for subsidence prone mine lands as the inventory of underground mines in
West Texas is incomplete.
Hazardous Structures;
Abandoned facilities or equipment associated with previous mining activities.
There were a small number of structures noted in the East and South Texas Inventories.
DATA SOURCES
*	Mined Lands Inventory
*	South Texas Uranium District Abandoned Mine Land Inventory
*	Mineral Producers Lists
10

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DATA DEFICIENCIES
The Mined Lands Inventory is not complete for North and West Texas so estimates regarding the
total number, sizes and commodities of sites were made from published literature (Kier and others, 1977;
McBride and others, 1987; McBride and others, 1988; and Smith, 1974) and county soil surveys. The
active/abandoned status of mine sites in South and East Texas are only as current as the aerial
photography examined. Photos interpreted included those from the National High-Altitude Aerial
Photography Program (scale 1:58,000; 1981, 1983, 1985); Texas State Highways and Public
Transportation (scale 1:24,000; 1979-1990); Lower Colorado River Authority (scale 1:12,000; 1982);
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (scale 1:60,000; 1987); United States Geological Survey
(USGS) Border Color Image Maps (scale 1:25,000; 1982) and National Aerial Photography Program
(scale 1:40,000; 1989-90). For North and West Texas, identification of sites is more dependent on the
USGS 7.5 minute topographic maps and soil surveys as the cost of purchasing aerial photography for the
entire survey area was prohibitive. However, the status of mine sites in North and West Texas will be
more accurately determined as all sites will be surveyed by low altitude flyovers. With the recent
changes in the Texas economy during the 1980's, it is possible there are many recently abandoned
operations.
Calculations of disturbed areas, highwalls, and mine dumps were all made based on the size
category of each site in the Mine Lands Inventory. No actual measurements have been made for these
features.
The number of mill sites and smelters is underestimated as the only available data is from the
mineral producers lists which were not compiled until the late 1970's. No data on the acreages disturbed
by ore processing were available.
Cost estimates were based on coal, uranium, mercury, and tin mine reclamation projects
completed by tbe Texas A ML program. Construction and administrative costs were combined to
approximate the total expenditure for each project. Costs per feature were determined by total acreage
and total number of mine openings reclaimed. No specific cost data were available for mine dumps and
highwalls. These features were included in the per acre reclamation cost.
11

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REFERENCES
Jackson, M.L.W., R.H. Blodgett, and W.R. Kaiser. 1989. Mined lands inventory, industrial minerals,
South Texas. Contract report prepared for the Railroad Commission of Texas under Interagency
Cooperation Contract No. IAC (88-89)-0979. University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of
Economic Geology. 57 pp. 5 appendices. 9 maps.
Jackson, M.L.W., R.H. Blodgett, and W.R. Kaiser. 1990. Mined lands inventory, industrial minerals,
East Texas. Contract report prepared for the Railroad Commission of Texas under Interagency
Cooperation Contract No. IAC (90-91)-0492. University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of
Economic Geology. 79 pp. 5 appendices. 9 maps.
Kier, R.S., L.E. Garner, and L.F. Brown Jr. 1977. Land resources of Texas. University of Texas at
Austin. Bureau of Economic Geology. 42 pp. 4 maps.
McBride, M.W., W.T. Pickens, and B. Stengl. 1987. Computer-generated list of inactive Texas
mineral sites (exclusive of oil and gas). University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic
Geology.
McBride, M.W., and B. Stengl. 1988. Computer-generated list of Texas mineral producers (exclusive
of oil and gas). University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic Geology.
Price, J.G., C.D. Henry, and A.R. Standen. 1983. Annotated bibliography of mineral deposits in
Trans-Pecos Texas. University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic Geology. Mineral
resource circular No. 73. 108 pp.
Sharpe, R.D. 1980. Development of the mercury mining industry: Trans-Pecos Texas. University of
Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic Geology. Mineral resource circular No. 64. 32 pp.
Smith, G.E. 1974. Depositional systems, San Angelo Formation (Permian), North Texas-facies
control of red-bed copper mineralization. University of Texas at Austin. Bureau of Economic
Geology. Report of investigations No. 80. 84 pp.
12

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VIRGINIA
~

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Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
Orphaned Mineral Mine Inventory
Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy
Contents
HISTORY
1
DATA SOURCES RESEARCHED
7
IMPACTS OF PAST MINING ON THE
1
DEFINITIONS
8
ORPHANED LAND PROGRAM
2
DATA SUMMARY SHEETS
9
OIP PROGRAM INSERTS
4
DATA ANALYSIS
10
EXPLANATION OF DATA SUMMARY
5
MINING & MILLING TECHNIQUES
11
COST
6
ADDITIONAL DATA
11

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Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy
April 1991
	Commonwealth of Virginia	
Orphaned Mineral Mine Inventory
HISTORY
Mining in Virginia has taken place in one form or another since man's initial habitation of the
land Early mining in Virginia began with the retrieval of flint and stone by American Indians for use
as tools, and will) the mining of bog iron ore near Jamestown in 1609. The first ironworks were set up
in 1619 about 66 miles above Jamestown on the James River. The Virginia Ironworks were small lo-
cal operations using local sources of ore for raw material. The only other metal of any Importance in
colonial America was lead, which was used mostly for bullets. The Austinville Lead/Zinc Mine In
Wythe County, Virginia operaied in the 1700's and was important in the Revolutionary War.
Salt mines, located in the town of Saltville, were utilized for preservation purposes during the
Civil War. In the 1800's numerous gold mines existed in Virginia. Shafts were sunk and drifts driven
to explore and mine the deposits of gold, copper, iron, lead, and silver. As the mineral deposits in the
western U.S. were discovered and found to be richer, Virginia's metal mines began to close down.
The majority of the gold mines in Virginia closed during the Civil War with only minor attempts to
reopen them after the war. Other metal mines in Virginia remained viable during this period; the
Crimora Mine, the largest producer of manganese in the United States, operaied until 1958.
The materials mined in the 1900*5 included the only arsenic mined east of the Mississippi River,
the Brinton Mine, which operated from 1912-1917. Manganese and Iron mining continued
throughout the state until production ceased for the most pari in the 1950*s. Barite production
began in Fauquier County in 1845 and continued also until the mid-1950's. Titanium ore mining and
processing continued from the 1940's to the early 1970*$. The mining of construction materials, which
was first documented in the late 1800's, continues today and includes sand and gravel, granite,
limestone, gneiss, sandstone, etc. for crushed stone, dimension sione, gypsum, clay, and others. At
one time or another, over 50 minerals have been mined in Virginia, contributing greatly to the state's
economy but also causing advene impacts on the public's health and safety, and the environment.
IMPACTS OF PAST MINING ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY
The impacts of past mining on the environment and the public's health and safety are present in
varying degrees throughout the state. These impacts are defined as follows:
 Environmental pollution is defined as any condition which poses existing
or potential hazards to the environment. The major environmental
problems associated with inactive/abandoned mine sites is stream
sedimentation from unvegetated soils, acid drainage, tailing* and waste
piles, ground water depletion, and trash dumps.
Page 1

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Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
 Hazards to the public health and safety are defined as any conditions
which have the potential, now or is the future, of posing a danger to the
public. The major public health and safely problems associated with
inactive/abandoned mine sites in Virginia are fall hazards from highwails,
shafts and other mine openings, and the unauthorized and unsupervised
use of mine sites as recreational areas.
Cold, pyrite, zinc, and copper mines in the eastern, south-central, and southwest portion of the
state pose public safety hazards due to hazardous open mine shafts at many of the mines, and environ-
mental hazards from addic drainage, mine waste, and stream sedimentation. In this same region of
the state, inactive/abandoned sand and gravel provide potential sources of non- point and point
source pollution of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. The entire stale is host to hundreds of
acres of denuded landscape resulting from manganese and iron mining prior to 1950. These mines
continue to pose threats 10 state waters through increased stream sedimentation. In ihe western
region of the state, shafts from ibe mining of zinc, and stream sedimentation from manganese and
iron is prevalent. Across the state abandoned quarries pose numerous dangers to public health and
safety. Orphaned mine sites were often used as trash dumps and/or for recreational activities. (Over
1000 PCB contaminated capacitors were found inside a plant buUding on one orphaned mine site).
As a result, people have fallen from highwails at old quany sites, drowned in bodies of water left by
mining operations, and suffered serious injuries while riding ATV's and other off-road vehicles. The
actual number of injuries resulting from persons frequenting mine sites is not known due to the age of
the old mines, the vast amount of mining throughout the state, and the lack of reporting data.
ORPHANED LAND PROGRAM
Orphaned lands are those areas disturbed by the mining of all minerals, except coal, which were
not required by law to be reclaimed or have not been reclaimed. Reclamation laws were enacted by
Virginia's General Assembly in 1968 to minimi?^ the adverse effects of mining on the environment.
Recognizing that past mining practices bad left many orphaned or unreclaimed mine sites, a proposal
was made to study the extent of orphaned mines in Virginia.
As a result of a proposal by the mining industry, legislation was enacted in 1978 which established
a non-coal orphaned land reclamation program. Funds for the reclamation of orphaned mines are
obtained from interest monies earned from a stale managed industry self-bonding program. Mine
operator* participating in^the program make payments into the Minerals Reclamation Fund based on
the acreage disturbed by their operations. The fund assures that active mines will be reclaimed and
participation is mandatory under Virginia's Mineral Surface Mining Law.
Once identified, an orphaned mine site is evaluated for its potential hazards to the environment
and the public's health and safety. This evaluation includes soil and water investigations, studies on
the feasibility of reclaiming the site, cost analysis, and seeking the landowner's consent to allow
reclamation to proceed
An Orphaned Land Advisory Committee composed of Individuals from the Division of Mineral
Resources, the mineral mining industry, Virginia Tech Crop & Soil Environmental Sciences
Department, Virginia Department of Transportation, U.S. Soil Conservation Service, State Water
Control Board, Virginia Aggregates Association, and private citizens assist the Division of Mineral
Mining (DMM) in evaluating the sites and prioritizing reclamation.
Page 2

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Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
Following approval for reclamation by the Orphaned Land Advisory Committee, the orphaned
land site is surveyed and mapped, further studies are conducted, and a plan for reclamation is
developed. Reclamation of the site is then contracted through a competitive bidding process.
The first orphaned land site was reclaimed in 1981. Since then, 49 orphaned land projects have
been completed encompassing 392.9 acres at a cost of $1,104,910.20. The average cost of reclamation
per acre has been 52,812.19.
In 1987, additional emphasis was placed on developing an inventory of orphaned mine sites.
Fifty-four sites are currently on Virginia's Orphaned Land Inventory which does not include the
twenty-eight sites reclaimed from 1981-1986.
Pago 3

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Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
OLP PROGRAM INSERTS
	Insert A: Orphaned Land Summary by year  A listing of Virginia's
Orphaned Land Projects completed to date.
	Insert B: Orphaned Land Inventory Listing  Priority of reclamation is
established by the Orphaned Land Advisory Committee.' A* priority is
the highest. N/A means reclamation not recommended.
	Insert C: Orphaned Land Cost by Year.
	Insert D: Current Site Investigation Form - This form has been used to
inventory projects to date.
	Insert E: Revised January 1991 Site Investigation Form  this form will
be used to inventory future orphaned land projects.
	Insert F: Virginia's Orphaned Land Program Brochure
	Insert G: Map - 'Mineral Resources of Virginia"
Page 4

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INSERT A
ORPHANED LAND SUMMARY

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CRP4A.VED LAM) Sl^t'ASY BY YEAR

Project No.
Project Kane
County
Mineral
Per Acre/Cost
Total
Cot tractor
1.
GLP-81-01
Red Mill
Rockbridge
line stone
2.5 ac/$6,400.00
$16,000.00
Echols Brothers
2.
CLP-81-02
Sugar Crove
Sayth
sandstone
2.0/ac/$4,938.00
9,875.00
New River Construction
3.
CLP-81-03
Good Tuck
Northumberland
sand & gravel
3.3 ac/$5,017.00
16,555.00
Virginia Excavating
4.
CUP-81-04
Jack Mountain

linestone
8.0 ac/$2,063.00
16,500.00
Anderson Sand tbrks
5.
0LP-82-01
Short Maintain
Ifeshington
manganese
7.5 ac/$3,023.00
22,675.00
Sowers Construction Co.
6.
CLP-82-02
Jordan Point
Prince George
sand
3.5 ac/*2,771.00
9,700.00
W. T. Ojrd Ccrpany
7.
0LP-32-03
Hilfonl
Carolina
sand & gravel
13 ac/$1.037.00
13,487.00
John V. Leu-is Construction
8.
0LP-83-0I
Brays Fork
Essex
sand
2.0 ac/$3,498.00
6,995.00
Rock and Raines
9.
0LP-83-02
Little Fall &eek
Pittsylvzrda
granite
13 ac/$1.527.00
19,851.44
Sovrts Construction Co.
10.
CLP-83-03
New Jfcket
Roddr^vaa
lirestone
7.0 ac/$3,357.00
23,500.00
Eavers Brothers Excavating
11.
0LP-83-04
Radford
Montgomery
lWstone
6.0 ac/S3,045.00
18.271,31
Scr_=rs Construction Co.
12.
0LP-83-05
9iady Grove
Vfeshington
lfnpstone
3.0 ac/$3.433.00
10,300.00
Slnpson Construction Co.
13.
CLP-Si-02
Sand Hxintain
Wythe
sand
6.0 ac/*2,623.85
15.743.10
Ifoodyard Brothers, Inc.
14.
GLP-84-03
Mt. Cra-tford
RocJdrghasi
UrKStcne
23 ac/$l,497.39
34,440.00
J & W Landscaping
15.
CJLP-84-04
0. T. Borner
Pittsylvzila
fill dirt
6.0 ac/$l,Q41.33
11,648.00
H & H Grading
16.
0LP-84-05
Kazelvood Tract
Caroline
sand
16 ac/$2,121.87
33,950.00
J. L. Kant & Sons
17.
0LP-84-06
Bugg's Island
Mecklenburg
linestone
17} ac/<1.256.45
21,938.00
John V. lewis Construction
18.
OLP-84-07
Short Mxntain II
Vfeshington
manganese
8.5 ac/Sl.941.18
16,500.00
Cave Spring Excavating
19.
0LP-85-01
Genlte Mills
Povkatan
stone
7.0 ac/$3,375.71
23,630.00
F. W. Vaugjin Landscaping
20.
CLP-85-02
New Post
Spotsylvania
sand & gravel
10 ac/$l,960.00
19,600.00
John W. Levis Construct 1cm
21.
0LP-85-03
Barrlcks Mtll
Middlesex
sand
3.5 ac/$l,528.57
5,350.00
Aylett Sand and Crsvel
22.
CLP-86-01
Jerry's Creek
Sbyth
manganese
5.5 ac/$2,960.00
14.800.00
Vbodyard Brothers, Inc.
23.
0LP-86-02
Broun Project
Augusta
manganese
3.6 ac/S4,958.34
17,850.00
Etemis Bays Excavating
24.
CLP-86-03
Hinting Creek
Bedford
feldspar
5.0 ac/$4,037.40
20,187.00
Crews Construction Co.
25.
GUP-86-04
Pall Run
Stafford
borrow pit
15* ac/$I,941.671
29,125.00
John W. Lewis Construction
26.
CLP-86-05
Cobhaa Park
Richmond
sand
1.0 ac/$4,850.00
4,850.00
Patrick A. ?i?uchok
27.
CLP-86-06
Bracey Project
Mecklenburg
granite
5.0 ac/$l,870.00
9,350.00
John V. Lewis Construction
28.
OLP-S6-07
Rye Hill
Bedford
fill dirt
4.0 ac/$4,997.75
19,991.00
Joe DeUrre Excavating

-------
0P7RANTD LAND	BY YEAR

Prelect
Project Kane
County
Mineral
Per acre/cost
Total
Contractor
29.
GLP-87-01
Goshen Pass
Rockbridge
s*lfra
20.0/$4,508.10
$ 90,162.00
Vbcdyard Brothers, Inc.
30.
GLP-87-02
N. tt. Brick
Aigusta
shale
5.5/ 4,545.28
24,999.00
Vbodvard Brothers, Inc.
31.
0LP-87-03
Drapers Maintain
Rilaski
Iron
3.5/ 3,731.59
13,060.55
Vfoody2rd Brothers, Inc.
32.
OLP-87-04
Sand Pit
Gloucester
SoTferHnese
Ajgusta
mar3nese
6.0/ 4,050.00
24,300.00
IbodyErd Brothers, Inc.
AO.
0LP-83-04
Pennsylvania Sand
Scott
sand
1.0/ 9,800.00
9,800.00
Hart grove Construction Con., Inc.
41.
OLP-89-Ol
Goshen Pass
Rockbridge
sD-lca
10.0/ 4,479.90
44,798.99
Wbodyard Brothers, Inc.
42.
OLP-89-02
Vesuvius Mine
A^sta
cargznese
30.0/ 3,560.00
106,800.00
Nu-Valley General Contractors
43.
CLP-90-01
Bovcsn Mine
Scott
zinc
1.0/10,550.00
10,550.00
Ubodyard Brothers, Inc.
44.
CLP-90-02
Vesuvius Mine
Aigusta
inar.ganese
30.0/ 150.00
4,500.00
Ron Ifele t/a (listen Tree
45.
CLP-90-03
Goshen Pass
Rockbridge
silica
18.0/ 3,853.60
69,365.00
Vllklns Construction Co.
46.
CLP-90-04
WUderress Mine
Orange
gold
00.50/ 175.83
8,791.50
Bruce V. Boxley Construction
47.
0LP-90-05
Vesuvius Mine
Augusta
norgsnese
6.00/3,134.83
18,809.00
Vbodyard Brothers, Inc.
48.
OLP-90-06
Crlrrira Msrganese
Aigusta
nenganese
8.00/5,556.69
44,453.50
Ubodyard Brothers, Inc.
49.
CLP-90-07
Wilderness Mine
Orange
gold
00.50/ 196.33
9,816.65
Bruce V. Boxley Construction

-------
INSERT B
ORPHANED LAND INVENTORY LISTING

-------
LIST INVENTORY LISTING BY INV.NO ID.SUP
IPTR 09:55
10 01-34-91
PAGE
1

NUMER5
NAME	
COUNTY
MINFRAL
SI
PRIORITY
A
PK0JFC1 NO	
F7/8H/89/3M3
Al'bf S
11
GOSHEN SILICA
RO
130.33
0?
NORTH NT BRICK
AG
SH
A
67-D?
5.50
0703
DRAPFRS KCUNTAIN
PU
FE
A
87-03
. 3.50
9704
SAND PIT
GL
5T
A
P7-0C
?.03
8705
CRANES CORNER
ST
FID
A
87-05
18.00
*706
HUDSON FELDSPAR
BF
FLD
A
87-06
4.00
8707
VALENTINE TRACT
CA
Fl
A
87-07
?.00
8708
LESTER SAND
NO
5A

87-08
1.00
8739
CRAIGHEAD FELDSPAR
BF
FLO


4 . CO
8710
BLUE RIDGE IRON
Bu
FE
b

3.D3
5711
RIVER'CNT CLAY
CH
CL
A

?J0
Ml?
BRITON ARSENIC
FL
AS
A

3.00
9713
VESUVIUS NINE
AG
MN
A
SS/S0-02-05
30.00
Mil
REED CREFK
MY
S>A
A
88-0?
7.00
8715
VILLAGE 5AN0 NINE
NO
SA
N/A

3.3C
*716
LYTHFS SAND
NF
SA
C

1.00
8717
TRIVIA PUn.JECT
An
MN
A
98-03/SC-06
?0.00
8736
RED8ANK GOI.O
HA
All
C

1.03
8H8
CHESTNUT MT IRON
AP
FE


0.50
8819
RIVERVILLE, H, ?, 3
AH
CU
*

? 00
?!?0
STONEnAlL CREEK
AP
ru
r.

?.oo
?8?1
SIMS FELDSPAR
PF
FLD
A
OLP 91-0?
1 CO
88??
NASSAPONAX CRfEK SAND
SP
SA
C

30,00
88?3
STFVENS CITY QUARRY
FR
ST
C

20.no
88?4
PONHATAN MICA
PO
M|C


1.00
"?5
NFW JERSEY ZINC
HY
ZI
N/A

o.co
j?6
CONTRARY CREEK
LO
PYR
A

?3.03
88?7
GOOOHYN MINF
SP
AU
0

!.C0
88?8
MITCHELL GOLD MINE
SP
AU
A

5:03
88?9
VAUCLUSE POLP MINE
OR
AU
A

o.oo
8830
PAGE CO GRAVEL PIT
PA
51
N/A

10 03
8831
VAL/INCO MINE
SP
ZI
a'
N/A
?0.00
883?
BONMAN MINE
SC
71
A
90-01
?. 00
8833
PENNSYLVANIA SAND ANp GRAVEL
SC
SI
A
8K-0
? .00
- 8834
MfOONALD MINE
WY
GR
N/A

4 CO
88.3*
NATIONAL CARBIDE
WY
GR
N/A

10.33
8837
NATIONAL PARK SANO
SP
SA
A

1.00
8838
WILDERNESS MINE
OR
AU
A
90-04
1.00
8939
8UCHNER RUN GRANITE
GR
V
A

0.50
8940
AMERICAN CYANAMID MOOD PIT
AM
Tl
C

5.00
8941
CHALK MINE RUN
RO
CH
A
91-01
5.00
Ml?
ALLEN CREEK MINE
NE
Tl
C

ZD.00
8943
COVINGTON SHALf
AL
SH
A

15.00
1944
GUSLER-AUSTIN MINE'
BO
BA
C

1.00
8945
PICO CUARRY
80
GR


5.00
8946
HOLLY8IWK
BL
iKN
A
91-03
3C.00
8947
WINDY QUARRY
RO
iLI


10.011
8949
ROANOKF QUARRY
RD
LI
F

15 00
8949
COFER PROSPECT
LO
W
A

10.00
8950
RIVERVILLE SHAFTS
AM
CU
A

3.00
^51
ASHLAND GRAVEL
NA
GR
N/A

10.00

-------
t,ST INVENTORY LISTING BY INV.NO ]0.SUP LPTR 09:55:
NUKPfRS	NAME			COUNTY
7	JOHNSON SANn R1NE	IS
(53	COLES FELOSfAR	FE
"(001	PFNNfTT MINF	PI
SCO?	JEFFFRSCN n.f. manganese	sm
I 0l-?-91	PAfi.r	?
MINERAL	PRIORITY PROJECT NO	 ACRES	
SA	0	10.CC
FLO	C	:o 03
M	10.CO
MN
55 recoros listed..

-------
INSERT C
ORPHANED LAND OOST by YEAR

-------
DEPARTMENT OF MINES, MINERALS AND ENERGY
DIVISION OF MINERAL MINING
Orphaned Land Summary Costa
Year	&	Reclamation Cost	Cost/per acre
1981	15.8	$ 58,930.00	$ 3,730.00
1982	24.0	45,862.00	1,911.00
1983	31.0	78,917.75	2,546.00
1984	77.0	134,269.10	1,743.75
1985	20.5	48,580.00	2,369.76
1986	38.6	96,162.00	2,491.25
198)	56.0	223,319.55	3,987.85
1988	26.0	100,749.16	3,874.97
1989	40.0	151,834.99	3,795.87
1990	64.0	166,285.65	2,598.21
TOTALS	392.9	1,104,910.20	2,812.19
Revised 06/29/90
ses

-------
INSERT D
CURRENT SITE INVESTIGATION FORM

-------
COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF MINES, MINERALS AND ENERGY
DIVISION OF MINERAL MINING
P. 0. BOX 4499
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 24502
Telephone: (804) 239-0602
ORPHANED MINED LAND SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Inventory No.:
Mineral Mined:
Quadrangle:	
Latitude: 	
Location: 	
Name of Mine:
County	
Longitude:
Name of Property Owner: 	
Address: 	
Telephone: 	
Estimated Acreage Involved: 	
Environmental Hazards: 	
Erosion:	
Hlghwall:
Acidic Drainage:
Acidic Soil Conditions:
Lack of Vegetation: 	
Eyesore: 	
Trash Dump: "	
Toxic Materials:
Ground Water Contamination: ~
Destruction of Aquatic Habitat:
Other: 	
DMM-1Z1
Rev. 8/88

-------
ORPHANED LAMP SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Receiving stream name: 	
Page 2 of 5
Field pH and appearance: _
Were samples taken? 	
If yes, give results:
If available, give groundwater Information and potential hazards to:
Public health and safety hazards:

-------
ORPHANED LAND SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Page 3 of 5
Surrounding site conditions:
How far is mine from main road7 	nearest comnun1ty?_
Is mine visible from main road? 	nearest community?]
Surrounding topography: 	]
Elevation:
Any archaeological or h1stor1cal~s1te(s)~nearbv7
Average temperature: 	Annual rainfall:	
Spring frost free date:	Fall kill frost date:	
Land use of surrounding area: 	
Estimated number of homes 1n general vicinity:
Soil conditions at site: 		
Field pH: 	
General history of mlneslte:
(Supplement Information attached?)	Yes	No

-------
ORPHANED LAHD SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Page 4 of 5
Is there any hazardous material on-site?
If yes, describe: 	
Is there any marketable material on-s1te7
If yes, describe: 	
Other pertinent Information:
General plan of reclamation:

-------
ORPHANED LAND SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Paoe 5 of 5
Estimated Cost of Reclamation
Equipment needed: 	
Total grading cost:
Seed requirements: 	
Total seeding cost:
Other cost: 	
TOTAL ESTIMATED COST:

-------
INSERT E
REVISED 01-15-91 SITE INVESTIGATION FORM

-------
COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF MINES, MINERALS AND ENERGY
DIVISION OF MINERAL MINING
P. 0. BOX 4499
LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 24502
ORPHANED MINED LAND SITE INVESTIGATION REPORT
Inventory No.:	
Name of Mine:	
Mineral Mine: ________________ County:
Quadrangle:
Latitude: 	Longitude: 	
Location:	,	;	
Name of Property Owner:
Address:
Telephone: 	
Estimated Acreage Involved:
Surrounding Site Conditions:
How far is mine from main road? _____ nearest community?
Is mine visible from main road?	nearest community:
Surrounding topography: 	
Elevation:	""
Any archeoloqical or historical site(s) nearby?
Land use of surrounding area:
Estimated number of homes within 1/4 mile:
Circle: 0-10	11-100 over 100
Receiving Stream Name: 	
Field pH and appearance: 	

-------
Page two
Environmental Hazards:
Erosion:	yes no
if yes, explain: _
Acidic Drainage:
yes
no
P.H.
Acidic Soil Conditions:
yes
no
P.H.
Lack of Vegetation:
yes
no
No. of acres
Eyesore:
yes
no

Trash Dump:
yes
no
No. of truckloads .
Hazardous/Toxic Materials:
yes
no
Tvoe. Ouantitv
Ground Water Contamination:
yes
no
Source
Surface Water Contamination:
yes
no
Exolain
Other:
Public Health and Safety Hazards:
Highwall:	yes no
Portals/Shaft: yes no
Dangerous Impoundment:
Recreational water body:
Slides:
Equipment or facilities:
length ft.
#wet	
height ft.
#caved^
yes no
Dimensions:
yes no
Dimensions:
yes
yes
no
no
# dry
_ # accessible
P.H. 	
P.H.
Dimension
If yes, explain:
Subsidence:	, , yes
i
Mine dumps:	yes
Is there evidence of site visitation?
Is there a fence around the site?
Is there water in the pit?
Estimated volume? 	
no
no
Lx W x H
No. & size 	
yes	no
yes	no
yes	no

-------
 Page three
P.H. of water: 	Appearance?		
Is the site readily accessible?	yes	no
Have there been complaints on the site?	yes	no #
If a quarry, how big is pit?		
Date abandoned:
General history of minesite: 	
Other pertinent information?
Inspector:
Date:
DMM-121
REV. 1/91

-------
NOTE: Insert F ("Virginia's Orphaned Land Program Brochure)
and Insert G (Map - "Mineral Resources of Virginia")
are not included in this report but are available from the
Interstate Mining Compact or from the Virginia
Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy.

-------
Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
EXPLANATION OF DATA SUMMARY SHEET
ELIGIBILITY:
Inactive/abandoned mines for which there are do (federal, state or local government) reclamation
responsibility are included in the inventory.
Inactive/abandoned mines existing within the boundaries of active mine permits, unpatented min-
ing claims and EPA Superfund mine sites are included in Virginia's Orphaned Land Program
Inventory. EPA Superfund sites are included for tracking purposes only. The cost of reclamation is
not included in the cost projections.
Future plans to mine over and reclaim hazardous or environmental problems are not grounds for
exclusion from the inventory but will be taken under consideration in the prioritization stage of the
program.
All orphaned lands as defined in the definitions are eligible for inclusion in Virginia's Orphaned
Land Inventory. Sites reclaimed are not removed from the inventory in order that follow up evalua-
tions will continue.
DEFICIENCIES OF DATA;
The data researched in completing the Data Summary Sheet does not accurately describe the en-
vironmental and public health and safety problems associated with Virginia's non-coal
inactive/abandoned (orphaned) mines, "hie data pertained primarily to geologic conditions and al-
though some records noted shafts, pits, dumps, and other surface features still present they did not
identify environmental and public health and safely hazards. The records were not written for the pur-
pose of identifying environmental and safely hazards therefore they did not serve that purpose
adequately. Records reviewed, where the sites have been inventoried under the Orphaned Land
Program, were found to be deficient in that the records did not note the large disturbed areas, hazard-
ous high walls, severe erosion, acid mine drainage, dangerous shafts or other hazards to the environ-
ment and the public health and safely which were present on these sites. Other deficiencies noted
were:
 (1) The information provided in this report was derived from existing
data and did not involve field work with the exception of the use of the
Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy's Orphaned Land
Inventory. Reports on 2,161 of the 3,067 mine sites reviewed
(approximately 70%) included information on location only. Others in-
cluded only information that a number of pits etc. were present without
giving size or other pertinent data. Below is a breakdown of the data
deficiencies in each category:
METALLIC ORES - Reports on 466 of the 1,104 sites reviewed in-
cluded only location information. The data on copper, lead, zinc and
gold mines was the most detailed, including descriptions of the workings
such as the data mentioned when a shaft was water filled, or that
numerous shafts or pits were present, structures were present etc..
Information on environmental and safety hazards was deduced from
Page 5

-------
Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
these descriptions. Where the information stated there were several pits
it was assumed this meant three. Where the information slated there
were numerous pit, shafts etc. this was assumed to mean four. When
water was noted it was assumed to be polluted. Water and mine dumps
were listed as occurrences as the miles and acres were not given. There
were 498 copper, lead, zinc, and gold sites with descriptive data of the
workings. There was no information given on 224 of 282 iron mines, 154
of 234 manganese mines, 16 of 21 titanium, 3 of 10 pyriie, 4 of 4 kyanite,
1 of 2 cobalt, 2 of 2 tin, or 4 of 6 aluminum mines.
	(2) CONSTRUCTION ORES -1,388 of the 797 records researched did
not give data other than location coordinates. The only information
given on the 101 other records was the number of pits. The size of the
pits was not addressed.
	(3) INDUSTRIAL ORES - 307 of the 415 records researched did not
give data other than location coordinates. There was no information
given on 38 of 43 feldspar mines, 128 of 133 mica mines, 43 of 149 Sarlte
mines, 67 of 67 clay mines, 1 of 3 graphite, nor on any of the other min-
erals listed. As with the metallic ores, polluted water and mine dumps
were listed as occurrences. The most information on an industrial min-
eral available was on barite and generally listed the number of pits,
openings, and a general description of the site workings.
Overall, data collected and reviewed, thus far, provided valuable information on location
coordinates. The accuracy of the data given on the number of shafts is 90% accurate due to the as-
sumptions made. All the other information such as polluted waters, etc. is not 8t all accurate because
of the lack of adequate field data. The number of minesites which fit into the definition of an or-
phaned mine under Virginia's program is presumed to be 90% accurate. There is convincing evidence
that more mines exist which have not been noted. This is true in Bedford County where the number
of known feldspar mines exceeds the number noied in records reviewed. Also, in the coastal plain
province of eastern Virginia, there are numerous unlocated sand and gravel pits which immediately
become tTash dumps following abandonment
It can be deduced from the data that Virginia has a large number of inactive/abandoned mine sites
which have the potential of being hazards to the environment and the public's health and safety.
COST
Cost estimates on the Data Summary Sheet are based on guidelines for estimating Abandoned
Mine Land reclamation costs from the AML Inventory Update Manual, Office of Surface Mining.
	POLLUTED WATER  510,000 per occurrence.
	REVEGETATION OF MINE DUMPS, PITS, DISTURBED
ACREAGE  estimated to cost 55,000/acre. This figure assumes each
site is one acre and requires significant grading, conditioning, and ground
cover. These assumptions were made to obtain a minimal cost estimate.
Page 6

-------
Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
	HIGHWALLS - S5.00 per HLP (height, length, product).
 MINE OPENINGS - S5,000/occurrence.
	HAZARDOUS STRUCTURES - SS.OOO/stnicture. This figure is not
based on the guidelines. This is an estimate based on reclamation to date
on orphaned land projects with structures. The structures have histori-
cally been small, therefore, the lower estimate.
DATA SOURCES RESEARCHED
(1)	MRDS SYSTEM -Mineral Resources Data System, The U. S. Geological
Survey
(2)	MILS SYSTEM -Minerals Industry Location System, Bureau of Mines
(3)	Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, Division of Mineral Mining
Orphaned Land Inventory
(4)	Virginia Topographic Maps
Page 7

-------
Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
DEFINITIONS
ORPHANED LANDS:
Orphaned lands are ihose areas disturbed by ihe surface mining of minerals, not including coal,
which were not required by law to be reclaimed or have not been reclaimed. Virginia's Mineral
Mining Reclamation Law was enacted in 1968. Mine sites not adequately reclaimed may be con-
sidered under the auspices of Virginia's Orphaned Land Program.
POLLUTED WATER:
All surface or ground waters which do not meet water quality standards (especially add or
alkaline conditions) because of orphaned mine land related impact.
MINE DUMPS:
Refuse, waste, or other unmerchantable material which has been deposited on the land surface.
DISTURBED LAND:
Land impacted by the mining of minerals other than coal (especially land that has not revegeiated
to a condition where environmental problems no longer exist).
HIGHWALLS:
Any orphaned land related, unprotected, and dangerous highwalL The proximity of the highwall
to a populated area, public road, or other public use area is documented.
MINE OPENINGS:
Any orphaned land related surface entrance to a drift, tunnel, adit, or shaft regardless of proximity
to populated areas, that is large enough for a child to fall through, and is not adequately sealed or
barricaded.
SUBSIDENCE PRONE:
Any surface expression of orphaned land related subsidence such as tension cracks, potholes,
troughs, or caving.
HAZARDOUS STRUCTURES:
Any orphaned land related structure, portion of a structure, or facility which has the potential to
pose a hazard.
PITS:
Mine workings or excavations open to the surface including quarries, trenches, eic_
Page 8

-------
Commonwealth of Virginia		ApriMflgi
DATA SUMMARY SHEETS
	Insert A  Data Summary Sheet.
	Insert B - Orphaned Land Program Summary Sheet: This sheet was
completed to identify the data deficiencies in the Data Summary Sheet.
This information was collected in the field and, while not all inclusive,
the information reflects what eiisi on Virginia's orphaned land sites.
	Insert C- Combination Data Summary Sheet information extrapolated
from the Data Summary Sheet and the Orphaned Land Inventory
Summary Sheet.
Page 9

-------
INSERT A
DATA SUMMARY SHEET

-------
NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ABANDONED MINES'
Slate of
VIRGINIA
Agency Contact ALLEN BISHOP
Telephone W-239-0tC2
I
11
fe"
J 8
Is


1 DATA SUMMARY^
[	-	
1 Mtttuuirm (/
HMNCTINtaBl
OMNUCdUr (an)
NAlUSOi (MM)  I
Metallic Ores
OOPPER
ZDC
GOLD
IRON
TTTASIW
PYPITE
MANGANESE
alimnum-lead
TIN COBALT _
H1m
1 U5
FalHM
50
MM 57 (bJb)
570,00(j
HOteM
7

1101
WmO*.,.' 534 Oa| (anal
2,670.0oJ
Syn
31
Sim
1


210,00$
(W

W


i'5
990,0001




Mub n^np"
. 913
4,565.000 |





(M)





HihiMiim Snowi'
(-> 80
400,000 |
 



(W
1.895
9,475,000 |
Construction
Ores
02AYT7E
SKXE
MALE
SLATE
SAND & OZAVEL
LIMESIONE
swdsidke
Gi'SUM

1489
fmnnl
l>li< tar 
1^.1

UUfeM

Bum
1489
kba Dmi)
(ml

taiim

Wh


(~l



DM

* 1^






niw
.1






(mrm)





.U.*
I - |
.


takni

OUM
20i
1,020,000
Industrial Ores
BARTIE
CLAY
picmrr
FELDSPAR
FLURINE GiAPHm
LI7KHM TALC
SULfHJR SILICA
MICA EMERY
KYAN1TE ARSENIC

425
7
NMta 5 OCT

50,000

1
h*M
419
rwr 30 OCC
(	(
150,000
* m

fa.

Umd
(	, .

OUm



N<|kMk
.75
495.000




awa f>	mp

445,000





(>






<>





OlM
i* 424
2.120,000
ACT EXXXX MO AVAILABLE
OCCURRENCES

-------
Data SUMMAIlV^  Page 2
TOTAL
i 2,r)23

-------
INSERT B
ORPHANED LAND PROGRAM SUMMARY SHEET

-------
NON-COAL INVENTORY
INACTIVE/ADaNDONCD MINES'
Stare of vtcttkta
	ALLEN BI3CP
Agency Concacc	-
80^-239-0002
.Telephone __________
1 ORfflANED LAND INVENTORY DATA SUMMARY"
MIEMMt TYf* |ar 1
KIWIMT mi (Ml |
....
OwNucdur () ]
NaHMA (MBit
M^ralLic Orel 1
M \mm
26
fmJnml
3. I
LCC * ^
MMIlMf' **-
<<*>120,GOO

tatUlMM

fnMi
23 1
M*a Dwpt*

4,^0 1
1
iHkMI

SlM*
1
UuMbd Ul"

i,23J,UUO |

" 2.iror
t V/.
|




1
Oyn*p*
r. 25
125,U0L)'





.    - -
1





- 	
r. ) 6
30,000






(ji n
nn.nm
h.iMa

hii 
45
Mlaa Uwfi
(ii ~

-ii 2,5fD0'
(M.i .49





Mka 0 p
(MHni 2
10,000 |




- -  -
fauwi 
. 1





(I 13
65.000 




CkM
(J 58
290.000
Indiucrial Ores

12
wnl


0- 7
70,000
' MJkaai

Fnaw
8
khfl Dh*(0
jMi 	

' ' - -


k

, 302
510,000
Q*m

Our

ii.,^ 1,630'
t~-i .X






(MM.I 6
30,000


i
1

 - - -
(>





 w -
< 6
30,OJO





ii 7
35,000

-------
INSERT C
COMBINATION DATA SUMMARY SHEET

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(jJhtilfMTICW DATA SLWtARY 3ETS
data summary*1  Page 2
utaifcd. rm(r
Phosphate [lock
Uranium
Overburden
mmuc TTN M	OMUajy# mJ

Uiifn
CktoV
Gil Shale'
Othtr (acrcj)'
TOTAL

1 O^a*



Hi



OfcMV
!>)




Htfta
(*}

lM|
564 occ






(r1
U-0*
] J 65 occ

1 2C.376
(~mm, i .002

-22L
.1 2.523
i/,650,000
131,880,000
5.01U.OOU
4,606,666'
- TUTAL
153.140,000

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Commonwealth of Virginia
April 1991
DATA ANALYSIS
The data inventory indicated there were 3,067 mines. Virginia's Orphaned Land Program has
field inventoried 83 mines or 2.7%.
	Polluted Water:
Data research indicated 62 occurrences or polluted water in 3,067 mines
or 2.00%. Field inventory indicated 32 occurrences in 83 mines or 38%
of the mines had polluted water. This indicated that 38% or 1,165 occur-
rences of polluted water may be found on the 3,067 mines.
	Mine Dumps:
Data research indicated that there were 564 occurrences of mine dumps
(24% of the mine sites had mine dumps). The field inventory of 83 ran-
dom mine sites indicated 10% of the mine sites had mine dumps located
on them. This is not a good indicator of what exist as mine dumps have
historically been pan of the disturbed area on orphaned mine sites and
have not been documented to a major extent.
	Disturbed Land:
Research data showed minimal (42 acres) disturbed land. The field in-
ventory indicated 714.9 acres for the 83 sites or 8.6 acres/mine site. This
figure is most indicative of acreage that would, on the average, be dis-
turbed in the reclamation of an orphaned mine site in Virginia. It may be
concluded from this that 26,376 acres of disturbed land exist.
	Highwalls:
Data researched and field data were both deficient in that length of high-
walls has seldom been measured on abandoned mine sites.
	Mine Openings:
Data research indicated 32% or 1,002 of the 3,067 mine sites had mine
openings. Field inventory indicated that 39% or 33 mine openings oc-
curred on the 83 mine sites. It is assumed from this data that the mine
openings figure is fairly accurate.
	Subsidence Prone:
Seven incidents of subsidence exist on one mine site in the field
inventory.
Page 10

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I
Commonwealth of Virginia	April 1991
	Hazardous Structures:
Data researched indicated 2.6% or 80 hazardous structures on 3,067 mine
sites. Field inventory indicated 30% or 25 hazardous structures on 83
mine sites. Foundations were included in this figure. It may be deduced
that 920 structures exist on orphaned mines in Virginia.
	Pits:
The data research indicates 2,523 pits on 3,067 mines. The field inven-
tory revealed 87 pits on 83 mines. The two are consistent. Pits have been
included with disturbed acreage on the field inventory.
MINING & MILLING TECHNIQUES
During Virginia's rich and varied mining history, over 50 minerals have been mined using both
surface and underground methods and numerous mining and milling techniques. The majority of the
metallic ores employed underground mining melhods while the construction and industrial mineral
mining was predominately surface pit and quarry.
Milling techniques used to produce the primary consumer derivatives included crushing, grinding,
pulverizing, sizing, concentrating, washing, drying, sawing and cutting stone, heat expansion, roasting
pelletizing, sintering, evaporating, calcining, kiln treatment, retorting (mercury leaching), leaching,
and briquetting.
The majority of the milling historically has taken place on the larger mine sites with material from
other sites trucked in. With Virginia's varied mining history, every conceivable mining and milling
technique applicable to each specific mineral has probably been utilized to some extent.
ADDITIONAL DATA
Using topographic maps of Virginia, 743 additional sites were identified by location.
Predominate symbols were for sand and quarries which made designating a category difficult It is su-
spected that a portion of the mines designated as construction minerals were in fan barite, feldspar,
iron, manganese, titanium ore, and several other more commonly surface mined minerals. Field ex-
amination of these additional sites would be the only way to delineate the mineral mined in most
cases. These additional sites bring Uie total number of orphaned (inactive/abandoned) mineral mine
sites in Virginia to be 3,067 plus or minus 10%.
The explanation of data summary sheets, the data summary sheets, and data analysis have been
changed to reflect this increased number of sites.
Page 11

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50272-101
REPORT DOCUMENTATION
PAGE
1. REPORT NO.
EPA530-R-92-005^ Q_y
4. Title and Subtitle
INACTIVE AND ABANDONED NONCOAL MINES - VOLUME III - APPENDIX: STATE REPORTS
5. Report Date
AUGUST 1991
7. Author(s)
8. Performing Organization Rept. No
WGA/OSU
9. Performing Organization Name and Address
U.S. EPA
Office of Solid Waste
401 M. Street SW
	Washington. DC 20460	
10.	Project/Task/Work Unit No.
11.	Contract(C) or Grant(G) No.
(C)
(G)
CX-816270-01 -0
12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address
WGA
13. Type of Report & Period Covered
I 1*.
15. Supplementary Notes
16. Abstract (Limit: 200 words)
T
-------