'^vSmartWay
Transport Partnership
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
2017 SmartWay Barge Carrier
Partner Tool:
Technical Documentation
U. S. Version 2.0.16 (Data Year 2016)
www.epa.gov/smartway
SmartWay-/
vvEPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency

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"^^SmartWay
Transport Partnership
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
2017 SmartWay Barge Carrier
Partner Tool:
Technical Documentation
U. S. Version 2.0.16 (Data Year 2016)
Transportation and Climate Division
Office of Transportation and Air Quality
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
United States
Environmental Protection
^1	Agency
Office ofTransportation and Air Quality
EPA-420-B-17-008
February 2017

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2017 SmartWay Barge Carrier Partner Tool:
Technical Documentation
Version 2.0.16 (Data Year2016)
United States
2-3-17
1.0	Emission Factors and Associated Activity Inputs
Emission factors form the basis for the emission calculations in the Barge Tool. The
Tool uses the latest and most comprehensive emission factors available for marine
propulsion and auxiliary engines. The following discusses the data sources used to
compile the emission factors used in the Tool, and the fleet characteristic and activity
data inputs needed to generate fleet performance metrics.
1.1	Available Emission Factors
Propulsion Engines
CO2 emissions are calculated using fuel-based factors, expressed in grams per gallon
of fuel. Available fuel options include marine distillate (diesel - both low and ultra-low
sulfur), biodiesel, and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The Barge Tool uses the same
gram/gallon fuel factors for CO2 that are used in the other carrier tools (Truck, Rail, and
Multi-modal), as shown in Table 1. These factors are combined directly with the annual
fuel consumption values input into the Tool to estimate mass emissions for propulsion
and auxiliary engines. (The fuel consumption inputs are summed across both of these
engine types). The factors for biodiesel are a weighted average of the diesel and B100
factors shown in the table, weighted by the biodiesel blend percentage.
Table 1. CO2 Factors by Fuel Type*

g/gal
Source1
Diesel
10,180
(i)
Biodiesel (B100)
9,460
(ii)
LNG
4,394
(iii)
* 100% combustion (oxidation) assumed
The Barge Tool uses emission factors expressed in g/kW-hr to estimate NOx and PM
emissions. For marine distillate fuel, the Tool uses EPA emission factors developed to
1 i) Fuel economy calculations in 40 C.F.R 600.113 available at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/cfr_2004/julqtr/pdf/40cfr600.113-
93.pdf.
ii) Tables IV.A.3-2 and 3-3 in A Comprehensive Analysis of Biodiesel Impacts on Exhaust Emissions, available at
http://www.epa.eov/oms/models/analvsis/biodsl/pQ2001.pdf
iii) Assuming 74,720 Btu/gal lower heating value (http://www.afdc.energv.gov/afdc/fuels/properties.html). and 0.059 g/Btu.
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support its recent marine vessel rules. The NOx and PM10 emission factors for main
propulsion engines using low (500 ppm) and ultra-low (15 ppm) sulfur distillate fuel are
a function of year of manufacture (or rebuild), as well as Engine Class (1 or 2 for
tugs/tows), and rated engine power (in kW). These factors, presented in Tables A-1
and A-2 in the Appendix, are combined with estimated engine activity in kW-hrs to
estimate mass emissions, as described in Section 2. The PM10 factors are multiplied by
0.97 to obtain PM2.5 estimates, consistent with the conversion factors used by the EPA
NONROAD model.
NOx and PM emission factors for biodiesel were based on the findings from an EPA
study, A Comprehensive Analysis of Biodiesel Impacts on Exhaust Emissions (EPA420-
P-02-001, October 2002). This study developed regression equations to predict the
percentage change in NOx and PM emission rates relative to conventional diesel fuel,
as a function of biodiesel blend percentage, expressed in the following form:
Equation 1
% change in emissions = {exp[a x (vol% biodiesel)] -1} x 100%
Where:
a = 0.0009794 for NOx, and
a =-0.006384 for PM
For example, the NOx reduction associated with B20 is calculated as follows
- [Exp(0.0009747 x 20)-1 ] x 100 = 1.9%
To obtain the final NOx emissions the unadjusted NOx is multiplied by (1-0.019) =
0.991,
Using Equation 1, adjustment factors were developed for biodiesel blends based on the
percentage of the biofuel component, and then these adjustment factors were applied to
the appropriate conventional diesel emission factors in Appendix A. Ultra-low sulfur
diesel fuel (15 ppm sulfur) is assumed as the basis for adjustments.
Emission factors were also developed for LNG derived from a variety of data sources
including EPA, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Swedish EPA, and the
California Energy Commission. The following emission factors were assumed,
corresponding to slow-speed engines operating on natural gas.
	5.084 g NOx/kW-hr
	0.075 g PMio/kW-hr
Note that for LNG, emission factors are assumed to be independent of model year and
engine size. In addition, as LNG PM emissions are primarily the result of lube oil
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combustion, the Barge Tool assumes PM2.5 emissions equal 97% of PM10 emissions,
consistent with the conversion used for diesel fuel.
Auxiliary Engines
NOx and PM emissions associated with diesel auxiliary engine operation are calculated
in the exact same fashion as propulsion engine emissions, assuming all auxiliary
engines fall into EPA engine Category 1. Separate PM factors are used for low and
ultra-low sulfur fuel. Alternative fuels and retrofits are not allowed for auxiliary engines
at this time.
1.2 Activity Data Inputs
The Barge Tool requires Partners to input vessel and barge characterization and activity
data. The input data required to calculate emissions and associated performance
metrics include:
	Total number of barges and tugs
	Vessel-specific information -
o Propulsion engine model/rebuild year
o EPA Engine Class (1 or 2)
o Fuel type (diesel - 15 or 500 ppm, biodiesel, and LNG)
o Retrofit information (technology and/or % NOx and/or PM reduction, if
applicable)
o Annual fuel use (gallons or tons) - Total for propulsion and auxiliary
engines
o Vessel towing capacity (tons)2 - optional input
o Propulsion engine operation
	# engines (1, 2 or 3)
	Total rated power (HP or kW - sum if two engines)
	Hours of operation per year (underway and maneuvering)
o Auxiliary engine operation (for each engine)3
	Engine age
	Rated power (HP or kW)
	Hours of operation per year
	Barge operation information
o Barge type (hopper, covered cargo, tank, deck, container, other)
o Barge size, by type (150, 175, 195-200 and 250-300 feet in length)
o For each type/size combination
	Number
2	Used to establish upper bound validation limit for total payload ton-mile entries. Not expressed in Bollard Pull since that unit
does not uniquely correspond to payload.
3	Note - the Barge Tool assumes all auxiliary engines are diesel powered.
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	Average cargo volume utilization (%) - for each size/type
combination
	Average annual loaded miles per barge (nautical)
	Average annual empty miles per barge (nautical)
	Average loaded payload per barge (short tons)
 Total annual fleet activity (used for validation - must match totals calculated from
barge operation information to within 5%)
o Ton-miles
o Loaded barge-miles
o Unloaded barge-miles
Vessel and barge characterization and activity data are needed for three reasons:
1.	To convert the hours of engine operation to kilowatt-hours, it is necessary to
know the kilowatt or horsepower rating of the vessel's propulsion and auxiliary
engines. Given hours of operation, the Tool can then calculate kilowatt-hours 
which is compatible with the available emission factors for both engine types.
2.	To classify which regulations the vessel is subject to. EPA engine class is
required to identify the correct NOx and PM emission factors for propulsion
engines. Rated power is used to determine the appropriate emission category
for auxiliary engines.
3.	To combine mass emission estimates with barge-mile, ton-mile and volume-mile
activity to develop fleet and company-level performance metrics. (Note, total
emissions are also calculated and reported at the vessel-specific level.)
The following section describes how the activity data inputs and the emission factors
are combined to generate mass emission estimates and associated performance
metrics.
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2.0 Emission Estimation
The following sections discuss how emissions are calculated, beginning with selection
of emission factors.
2.1 CO2 Calculation
Annual vessel-specific fuel consumption values may be input in the Barge Tool in
gallons or tons. Entries in tons are converted to gallons using the following factors:
	Diesel - 284 gallons/ton4
	Biodiesel (B100) - 271 gallons/ton5
	LNG - 632 gallons/ton6
Once all fuel consumption values have been converted to gallons, CO2 mass emission
estimates are calculated for each vessel using the factors shown in Table 1, converted
to short tons (1.1023 x 10~6 short tons/gram), and summed across vessels to obtain tons
of CO2 per year for the entire vessel fleet.
2.2 NOx and PM Calculations
NOx and PM are calculated based on kW-hr activity estimates. This approach allows
emission calculations to account for the size of the vessel's propulsion engine as well as
auxiliary engines and the amount of time a vessel spends maneuvering in port and
underway. Equation 2 presents the general equation for calculating NOx and PM
emissions for each propulsion engine using diesel fuel.7
Equation 2
EMpo  Pw * 0.7457 * Hro * LFo/100 * EFcykasp/1,102,300
Where:
EMpo = Marine vessel emissions for pollutant (p) and operation (o)
(tons/year)
Pw	= Sum of the power ratings for each of the vessel's propulsion
engines (hp or kW)8
4	http://www.extension.iastate.edu/agdm/wholefarm/html/c6-87.html
5	for soy-based B100 at 70 degrees F: http://www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/pdfs/43672.pdf
6	Midwest Energy Solutions. Energy Volume & Weight, http://www.midwestenergvsolutions.net/cng-resources/energy-
volume-weight
7	Note: the PM emission factors used in the Barge Tool estimate direct or "primary" PM produced as a result of incomplete
combustion. Estimates do not include indirect PM emissions associated with sulfur gas compounds aerosolizing in the
atmosphere.
8	This approach assumes that multiple propulsion engines are of the same type, power, and age, and operate in tandem.
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0.7457 = Conversion factor from horsepower to kilowatts, if needed
(kW/hp - Perry's Chemical engineer's Handbook)
Hr0	= Total annual hours of operation for the propulsion engines in
operating mode o (hr)
LF	= Load factor for operating mode o - see Table 2 (percentage)
EFcykap = Emission factor for operation mode o, fuel type a, engine
category c and pollutant p (grams/kW-hr) - see Tables A-1
and A-2
1,102,300 = Conversion factor from grams to short tons
subscripts -
o	= Operation (underway or maneuvering)
c	= EPA Engine Category (1 or 2)
y	= Year of manufacture
k	= Kilowatt rating
a	= Fuel type (low or ultra-low sulfur distillate)
p	= Pollutant
If the vessel's power is provided in terms of kilowatts, then the conversion from
horsepower to kilowatts is not needed.
The load factors used in the above equations are provided in Table 2 below. These load
factors were compiled from a variety of sources and disaggregated into vessel
categories used in this project. The data sources include: EPA's Regulatory Impact
Analysis: Control of Emissions of Air Pollution from Locomotive Engines and Marine
Compression Ignition Engines Less than 30 Liters Per Cylinder (EPA, 2008);
Commercial Marine Port Inventory Development 2002 and 2005 Inventories (EPA,
2007b); Current Methodologies In Preparing Mobile Source Port-Related Emission
Inventories (EPA, 2009); and European Commission/Entech study (EC, 2002).
Table 2. Marine Vessel Engine Load Factors (%)
Engine
Type
Load Factor (%)
Maneuvering
Underway
Propulsion
20
80
Auxiliary
179
If biodiesel is used, NOx and PM emissions are calculated assuming ultra-low sulfur
diesel fuel as the basis, with the emission factors adjusted according to the fuel blend
percentage as described in Section 1.1.
9 Average auxiliary engine load factor for cruise operation, from ICF International, Current Methodologies in Preparing Mobile
Source Port-Related Emission Inventories, Final Report, prepared for USEPA, April 2009. Cruise conditions are assumed most
prevalent; to the extent that auxiliary engines are also used during maneuvering and hotelling, load factors and emissions will
be higher.
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If LNG is used, NOx and PM emissions are calculated by simply multiplying the g/kW-hr
factors presented in Section 1.1 by the effective kW-hrs of operation (hours of use x
load factor), summed across operation type (underway and maneuvering).
Retrofit Effectiveness
The Barge Tool allows the user to select from a variety of propulsion engine retrofit
options. Options were only identified for diesel marine engines, and were based on
emission adjustment factors developed for EPA's MARKAL model.10 The reduction
factors assumed for each of these control options are presented in Table 3. The Barge
Tool only allows the user to specify one retrofit for a given propulsion engine -
combinations are not permitted at this time.
Table 3. Diesel Propulsion Engine Retrofit Reduction Factors
Control
Reduction Factor
NOX
PM
Fuel Injection Engine Improvements
0.12
0.12
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)
0.8
0
Common rail
0.1
0.1
Diesel Electric
0.2
0.2
Humid Air Motor (HAM)
0.7
0
Hybrid Engines
0.35
0.35
Diesel Oxidation Catalyst
0
0.2
Lean NOx Catalyst
0.35
0
Barge Tool users may also specify details and assumed emission reductions for other
control measures not listed in the table above, although detailed text descriptions
should be provided justifying the use of any alternative factors.
If retrofit Information has been entered for a vessel, the NOx and PM emissions
calculated above are adjusted by the factors shown in Table 3.11 For example, a 20%
reduction in PM emissions associated with a diesel oxidation catalyst would require an
adjustment factor of 1 - 0.2 (0.8) to be applied to the calculated PM values.
Finally, NOx and PM emissions are summed across all vessels and source types
(propulsion and auxiliary) to obtain fleet and company-level mass emission estimates.
10	Eastern Research Group, "MARKAL Marine Methodology", prepared for Dr. Cynthia Gage, US EPA, December 30, 2010.
11	The Barge Tool assumes that retrofits are only applied to main propulsion engines, not auxiliary engines.
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3.0 Comparison Metrics
The Barge Tool is designed to apply the calculated emissions to a variety of operational
parameters. This provides performance metrics that are used as a reference point to
evaluate a Partner's environmental performance relative to other SmartWay Partners
across different transportation modes. In this way the metrics presented here are made
comparable to the metrics used in the other carrier tools.
For these comparisons to be most precise, it may be necessary to group the data into
comparable operating characteristic bins to ensure that similar operations are being
compared. For example, open-water barge operations may need to be considered
separately from river barge operations because these vessels and their activities are
very different. For this reason the Barge Tool collects a variety of vessel and barge
characteristic information that may be used to differentiate barge operations in the
future.
The following summarizes how the Barge Tool performance metrics are calculated for a
given pollutant. Note: all distances are reported in nautical miles.12
Grams per Barge-Mile
Equation 3
grams / (loaded + unloaded barge-miles - from Total Fleet Activity entry)
Grams per Loaded Barge-Mile
Equation 4
grams / (loaded barge-miles - from Total Fleet Activity entry)
Grams per Ton-Mile
Equation 5
grams / (total ton-miles - from Total Fleet Activity entry)
Grams per 1,000 Total Cubic Foot-Miles
Equation 6
grams / [b (# barges x # of 1,000 cubic feet per barge x (annual loaded + annual
unloaded miles per barge))]
121 nautical mile = 1.15 statute miles.
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where b indicates summation over all barge type/size combinations (i.e., the
individual rows in the Barge Operations screen of the Barge Tool.)
Barge volumes were estimated for each barge type/size combination using
standardized assumptions regarding depth and width. Volumes are summarized below
in Table 4.
Table 4. Barge Capacity by Type/Length Combination (1,000 cubic feet)

Barge Volume ( 1,000 cubic feet)
Barge Type*
250-300'
195-200'
175'
150'
Hopper Barge
182
90
81
69
Covered cargo barge13
165
82
74
63
Tank Barges
160
56
48
41
Deck Barges
182
90
81
69
Container Barges
218
82
65
49
* "Other" barge types require volumes input by the user
Volumes for articulated/integrated barges were derived from a listing of 134 bluewater
units protected by US cabotage law, 114 of which included volume estimates.14 Four
barge size groupings were defined as shown in Table 5.
Table 5. Articulated/Integrate Barge Capacity by Volume Category (barrels)
Size Category
Average Volume
< 100,000
373,591
100,000 < 150,000
683,827
150,000 < 200,000
944,121
200,000 +
1,583,898
Grams per 1,000 Utilized Cubic Foot-Miles
Equation 7
grams / [ b (# barges x # of 1,000 cubic feet per barge x (annual loaded miles per
barge x average volume utilization))]
where b indicates summation over all barge type/size combinations (i.e., the
individual rows in the Barge Operations screen of the Barge Tool.)
13	Assumed maximum volume for covered cargo barge for 250-300 was 265 ft long 52 ft wide and 12 feet deep = 165,360; 195-
200 was 195 long 35 ft wide and 12 ft deep; 175 and 150 had the same width and depth of the 195 ft barge.
14	US Maritime Administration data compiled by Tradeswindsnews.com; provided by Terrence Houston, American Waterway
Operators, December 15, 2016.
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Fleet Average Calculations
The Barge Tool calculates fleet-level average payloads and volumes for use in the
SmartWay Carrier Data File. In order to calculate average payload the Tool first
calculates total ton-miles for each row on the Barge Operations screen as follows:
Row-Level ton-miles = Average Payload Value * Avg Loaded Miles * Number of Barges
Next, the Tool sums the row-level ton-miles as well as the total barge miles (Avg
Loaded Miles * Number of Barges) across all rows. The tool then divides the summed
ton-miles by the summed total miles to obtain the fleet average payload.
Calculating Average Volume follows the same process, substituting "payload" and
"volume" in the above equations. However, since volume is not input on the Barge
Operations screen (with one exception - see below), Table 4 is used the correct volume
(in 1,000 cubic feet) for each row on the Barge Operations screen.
However, if the Barge Type selected by the user is "Other", then the Tool uses the
volume(s) entered.
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4.0 Data Validation
At this time the Barge Tool employs limited validation to ensure the consistency of
Partner data inputs. Cross-validation of barge and ton-mile inputs are conducted on the
Barge Operations screen. These checks ensure that the values entered in the Fleet
Totals section of the screen for total ton-miles, loaded and unloaded barge-miles are
consistent with the data entered at the row level for the different barge type/size
combinations. Specifically, these three values must be within 5% of the totals
calculated as follows:
Equation 8
Total Ton-miles = [b (number of barges x Annual Loaded Miles per Barge x Average Loaded
Payload per Barge)]
Equation 9
Loaded Barge-Miles = [b (number of barges x Annual Loaded Miles per Barge)]
Equation 10
Unloaded Barge-Miles = [b (number of barges x Annual Empty Miles per Barge)]
The Barge Tool performs one other validation check, ensuring that the fleet's total
payload, as determined from the Barge Operations screen, does not exceed the
maximum possible payload based on the reported towing capacities reported on the
Vessel Operations screen.
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5.0	Future Enhancements
The following enhancements are being considered for future versions of the Barge Tool:
	Develop validation ranges for barge-mile, ton-mile, payload, towing capacity,
rated power, and other inputs based on Partner data submissions and/or other
sources.
	Compile list of common data sources for vessel and barge data, based on
Partner data submissions.
	Expanding the list of pollutants to include methane and other greenhouse gases
including black carbon, and SOx.
	Add option for dual-fuel propulsion engines.
	Allow user-specified engine load factors (propulsion and auxiliary).
	Alternatively, refine auxiliary engine load factors to reflect average values for
hotelling, maneuvering, and cruising operation modes.15
	Develop default average volume utilization and payloads based on commodity
type and other Partner data.
15 The Barge Tool currently assumes a single load factor for auxiliary engines of 17%, corresponding to the estimated value for
cruising operation.
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5.0 References
American Waterway Operators website:
http://www.americanwaterwavs.com/industrv stats/fleet data/index, htm I.
Center for Ports and Waterways, Texas Transportation Institute, Modal Comparison of
Domestic Freight Transportation Effects on The General Public, Houston, Texas, March
2009.
Coosa-Alabama River Improvement Association (CARIA), Barges and Towboats,
(viewed August 1, 2009), http://www.caria.org/barqes tuqboats.html.
Dunn and Bradstreet - Hoover, Inland Barge Transport, Viewed March 2010,
http://www.hoovers.com/inland-barqe-transport/-ID 226-/free-ind-fr-profile-
basic.xhtml.
East Dubuque (ED) Local Area History Project, Barges and Tows, April 2000,
http://www.edbqhs.org/District/LocalAreaHistorv/BarqesandTowslah.htm.
Hines Furlong Line, Tank Barges 2013, http://www.hinesfurlongline.com/equip_tank.htm
Ingram Barge Company, Barge Register, 2010.
International Maritime Organization (IMO) Updated Study on Greenhouse Gas
Emissions from Ships, April 2009.
McDonough, Deck Barge Fleet,
2013. http://www.mcdonoughmarine.com/pdf/deck barge fleet.pdf
Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), and the Center for Ports and Waterways, A Modal
Comparison of Domestic Freight Transportation Effects on the General Public, 2007.
U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, 2007.
www, iwr. usace.armv. mil/NDC/data/datalink. htm.
U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, North American
Freight Transportation, Washington D.C., June 2006.
U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration's National Energy
Modeling System. Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release: Report #:DOE/EIA-
0383. December 2008. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/index.html.
U.S. EPA, Category 2 Vessel Census, Activity and Spatial Allocation Assessment and
Category 1 and Category 2 in-Port/At-Sea Splits, February 16, 2007a.
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U.S. EPA, Current Methodologies in Preparing Mobile Source Port-Related Emission
Inventories - Final Report, April 2009.
U.S. EPA, Federal Marine Compression-Ignition (CI) Engines - Exhaust Emission
Standards. 2016. http://www3.epa.gov/otaq/standards/nonroad/marineci.htm
U.S. EPA NEI Marine Vessel PM Methodology,
2009. http://www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/eiip/techreport/volume09/commrnves.pdf
U.S. EPA, Regulatory Impact Analysis: Control of Emissions of Air Pollution from
Locomotive Engines and Marine Compression Ignition Engines Less than 30 Liters Per
Cylinder, May 2008.
Wright International, Barge Brokerage, http://www.wriqht-international.com/brokeraqe-
barqes.php.
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Appendix A: Marine Propulsion and Auxiliary Engine Emission Factors16
16 Emission factors are consistent with EPA's 2008 locomotive and marine Federal Rulemaking -
http://www.epa.gov/otaq/marine.htm.

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Table A-1. Category 1 Distillate Emission Factors
Category
Engine Size
Model Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
1
<600kW
2018+
4.66
4.66
0.06
0.08
1
<600kW
2017
4.66
4.66
0.07
0.08
1
<600kW
2016
4.66
4.66
0.07
0.08
1
<600kW
2015
4.66
4.66
0.07
0.08
1
<600kW
2014
4.66
4.66
0.07
0.08
1
<600kW
2013
5.64
5.64
0.10
0.12
1
<600kW
2012
5.95
5.95
0.12
0.13
1
<600kW
2011
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
<600kW
2010
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
<600kW
2009
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
<600kW
2008
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
<600kW
2007
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
<600kW
2006
6.34
6.34
0.14
0.16
1
<600kW
2005
6.34
6.34
0.14
0.16
1
<600kW
2004
6.49
6.49
0.15
0.17
1
<600kW
2003
9.72
9.72
0.35
0.36
1
<600kW
2002
9.72
9.72
0.35
0.36
1
<600kW
2001
9.72
9.72
0.35
0.36
1
<600kW
2000
9.72
9.72
0.35
0.36
1
<600kW
pre-2000
10.00
10.00
0.25
0.26
1
600
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Table A-1. Category 1 Distillate Emission Factors (Cont.)
Category
Engine Size
Model
Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO, Weighted EF g/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
1
6001400
2016+
1.30
1.30
0.03
0.05
A-3

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Table A-1. Category 1 Distillate Emission Factors (Cont.)
Category
Engine Size
Model
Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO, Weighted EF g/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
1
kW>1400
2015
4.81
4.81
0.07
0.09
1
kW>1400
2014
4.81
4.81
0.07
0.09
1
kW>1400
2013
4.81
4.81
0.07
0.09
1
kW>1400
2012
4.81
4.81
0.07
0.09
1
kW>1400
2011
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
kW>1400
2010
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
kW>1400
2009
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
kW>1400
2008
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
kW>1400
2007
6.00
6.00
0.12
0.14
1
kW>1400
2006
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2005
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2004
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2003
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2002
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2001
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
2000
9.20
9.20
0.29
0.31
1
kW>1400
pre-2000
11.00
11.00
0.19
0.21
A-4

-------
Table A-2. Category 2 Distillate Emission Factors
Category
Engine Size
Model Year
NO, Weighted EFg/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO, Weighted EFg/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
2
<600kW
2013+
5.97
5.97
0.11
0.13
2
<600kW
2012
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2011
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2010
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2009
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2008
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2002
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
<600kW
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
2
600<=kW<1000
2018+
1.30
1.30
0.03
0.05
2
600<=kW<1000
2017
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
600<=kW<1000
2016
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
600<=kW<1000
2015
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
600<=kW<1000
2014
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
600<=kW<1000
2013
5.97
5.97
0.11
0.13
2
600<=kW<1000
2012
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2011
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2010
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2009
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2008
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
A-5

-------
Table A-2. Category 2 Distillate Emission Factors (Cont.)
Category
Engine Size
Model Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
2
600<=kW<1000
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2002
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
600<=kW<1000
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
2
1000<=kW<1400
2017+
1.30
1.30
0.03
0.05
2
1000<=kW<1400
2016
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
1000<=kW<1400
2015
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
1000<=kW<1400
2014
1.30
1.30
0.11
0.13
2
1000<=kW<1400
2013
5.97
5.97
0.11
0.13
2
1000<=kW<1400
2012
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2011
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2010
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2009
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2008
5.97
5.97
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2002
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1000<=kW<1400
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
2
1400<=kW<2000
2016+
1.30
1.30
0.03
0.05
2
1400<=kW<2000
2015
6.17
6.17
0.16
0.17
2
1400<=kW<2000
2014
6.17
6.17
0.16
0.17
2
1400<=kW<2000
2013
6.55
6.55
0.16
0.17
2
1400<=kW<2000
2012
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2011
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
A-6

-------
Table A-2. Category 2 Distillate Emission Factors (Cont.)
Category
Engine Size
Model Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
2
1400<=kW<2000
2010
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2009
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2008
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2002
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
1400<=kW<2000
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
2
2000<=kW<3700
2016+
1.30
1.30
0.03
0.05
2
2000<=kW<3700
2015
1.30
1.30
0.18
0.20
2
2000<=kW<3700
2014
1.30
1.30
0.18
0.20
2
2000<=kW<3700
2013
8.33
8.33
0.19
0.20
2
2000<=kW<3700
2012
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2011
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2010
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2009
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2008
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2002
10.55
10.55
0.00
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
2000<=kW<3700
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
A-7

-------
Table A-2. Category 2 Distillate Emission Factors (Cont.)
Category
Engine Size
Model Year
NO. Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
NO, Weighted EFg/kW-hr
(Distillate 500 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate -15 ppm)
PM10 Weighted EF g/kW-
hr (Distillate 500 ppm)
2
kW>=3700
2017+
1.30
1.30
0.05
0.06
2
kW>=3700
2016
1.30
1.30
0.05
0.06
2
kW>=3700
2015
1.30
1.30
0.05
0.06
2
kW>=3700
2014
1.30
1.30
0.18
0.20
2
kW>=3700
2013
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2012
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2011
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2010
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2009
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2008
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2007
8.33
8.33
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2006
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2005
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2004
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2003
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2002
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2001
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
2000
10.55
10.55
0.31
0.33
2
kW>=3700
pre-2000
13.36
13.36
0.21
0.23
A-8

-------