FY 2018
EPA Budget in Brief
United States Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.gov

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United States Environmental Protection Agency
Office of the Chief Financial Officer (271 OA)
Publication Number: EPA-190-K-17-001
May 2017
www.epa.gov
Printed with vegetable-oil-based inks and is
100-percent postconsumer recycled material, chlorine-free-processed and recyclable.

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Budget in Brief
Table of Contents
PAGE
Overview	1
Summary Resource Charts
EPA's FY 2018 Budget by Appropriation	7
EPA's Resource History	8
EPA's Resources by Major Category	9
Overviews
Overview 1: Improving Air Quality	11
Overview 2: Ensuring Clean and Safe Water	15
Overview 3: Cleaning up Land	17
Overview 4: Ensuring the Safetyof Chemicals	21
Overview 5: Enforcing Laws and Assuring Compliance	25
Appendices
Program Projects by Program Area	31
EPA's Resources by Appropriation	41
Categorical Grants	43
Categorical Grants by NPM	45
Estimated SRF Obligations by State (FY 2016 - FY 2018)	49
Infrastructure/STAG Financing	53
Trust Funds	57
Eliminated Programs	61
Major Program Changes	67
List of Acronyms	71

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Overview
The EPA's Mission
The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect human health and the
environment. In carrying out its mission, the EPA works to ensure that all Americans are protected
from exposure to hazardous environmental risks where they live, learn, work, and enjoy their lives.
The agency guides national efforts to reduce environmental risks, based upon on-going research
and scientific analysis.
The agency's FY 2018 budget lays out a comprehensive back-to-basics and foundational strategy
to maintain core environmental protection with respect to statutory and regulatory obligations.
This budget provides the direction and resources to return the EPA to its core mission of protecting
human health and the environment. This can be accomplished by engaging with state, local, and
tribal partners to create and implement sensible regulations that also work to enhance economic
growth.
The EPA works to ensure our future generations will inherit a better and healthier environment.
Environmental stewardship while growing our economy is essential to the American way of life
and key to economic success and competitiveness. Regulation and policy will incorporate robust
input from the public through formal and informal mechanisms to seek full understanding of the
impacts of proposed policy on public health, the environment, the economy, jobs, families, and
our communities. We will build on progress to date by focusing on three core philosophies for
carrying out the EPA's mission:
	Rule of law: Administering the laws enacted by Congress and issuing environmental rules
tethered to those statutes, relying on agency expertise and experience to carry out congressional
direction and to ensure that policies and rules reflect common sense and withstand legal
scrutiny.
	Cooperative federalism: Recognizing the states and tribes, as applicable, as the primary
implementers and enforcers of our environmental laws and programs, and partnering with them
to engender trust and maximize environmental results to protect human health and
environment.
	Public participation: Fulfilling obligations to conduct open and transparent rulemaking
processes, engaging with and learning from the diverse views of the American public, and
addressing stakeholder input on the impacts of rules on families, jobs, and communities.
The EPA is proud to be a good steward of taxpayer resources and to deliver environmental
protection efficiently. To learn more about how the agency accomplishes its mission, including in-
formation on the organizational structure and regional offices, please visit:
http://www.epa.gov/aboutepa/.
FY 2018 Annual Performance Plan
The EPA's FY 2018 Annual Performance Plan and Budget of $5,655 billion is $2.6 billion below
the FY 2017 Annualized Continuing Resolution funding level for the EPA. This resource level and
the agency FTE level of 11,611 supports the agency's return to a focus on core statutory work and
recognizes the appropriate federal role in environmental protection. The budget addresses our
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Overview
highest environmental priorities and refocuses efforts toward streamlining and reducing burden.
Responsibility for funding local environmental efforts and programs is returned to state and local
entities, while federal funding supports priority national work. Funding is provided for
infrastructure and includes accelerating the pace of work in clean water and drinking water
infrastructure as well as at Brownfield and Superfund projects. Resources also are focused on
efforts to improve and protect air quality and to ensure the safety of chemicals. In FY 2018,
increased resources will support the agency's significant continuing and new responsibilities for
ensuring that new and existing chemicals are evaluated in a timely manner for introduction in
commerce and do not present unreasonable risks to human health or the environment. The agency
will work across all of our programs to unite varied interests and stakeholders to focus attention
and leverage federal, state, local, and non-governmental resources in a coordinated effort to
address the nation's greatest environmental challenges.
Infrastructure
The infrastructure of the nation is not limited to roads and bridges. The infrastructure needs of our
communities are broader and include making improvements to drinking water and waste water
infrastructure as well as cleaning up contaminated land. Focused efforts in the Superfund and
Brownfields programs can lead to tangible benefits for communities: a cleaner environment and
the redevelopment of sites back to beneficial use and new economic development.
A priority for the agency is modernizing the outdated water infrastructure on which the American
public depends. While most small systems consistently provide safe and reliable drinking water,
many small systems face challenges with aging infrastructure, increasing costs and decreasing
rates bases. Funding is provided for critical drinking and wastewater projects. These funding levels
support the President's commitment to infrastructure repair and replacement and would allow
states, municipalities, and private entities to finance high priority infrastructure investments. The
FY 2018 budget includes $2.3 billion for the State Revolving Funds and $20 million for the Water
Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) program. Under WIFIA, the EPA could
potentially provide up to $1 billion in credit assistance, which, when combined with other funding
sources, would spur an estimated $2 billion in total infrastructure investment.1 This makes the
WIFIA program credit assistance a powerful new tool to help address a variety of existing and new
water infrastructure needs.
The cleanup and reuse of contaminated lands often can play a role in economically revitalizing a
community. The EPA's cleanup programs, including Superfund and Brownfields, protect human
health and the environment and also return sites to productive use, which is important to the
economic well-being of communities. Working collaboratively with partners across the country,
the EPA engages with communities in site cleanup decisions, fosters employment opportunities in
communities during and after remedy construction, promotes the redevelopment of blighted areas,
and protects human health and the environment. For example, Superfund properties are often
reused as commercial facilities, retail centers, government offices, residential areas, industrial and
manufacturing operations, and parks and recreational areas. The agency will look for program
efficiencies to increase the pace of projects and reduce often heavy administrative costs. The EPA
also invests in communities through Brownfields grants so communities can realize their own
1 This approximation is based on notional calculations. Subsidy cost is determined on a loan-by-loan basis.
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Overview
visions for environmental health, economic growth, and job creation. As of April 2017, the
Brownfield grants have led to over 67,000 acres of idle land made ready for productive use and
over 124,300 jobs and $23.6 billion leveraged.2
Improving Air Quality
In FY 2018, the EPA will perform activities in support of the National Ambient Air Quality
Standards (NAAQS) and implementation of stationary source regulations, supporting state, local,
and tribal air quality programs. The agency will continue its Clean Air Act mandated
responsibilities to administer the NAAQS and will provide a variety of technical assistance,
training, and information to support state clean air plans. The EPA will continue to prioritize CAA
and court-ordered actions. A focus will be placed on states achieving attainment, looking for
improved process for SIPS and implementation options. In addition, in FY 2018, the EPA will
continue to conduct risk assessments, to determine whether the Maximum Achievable Control
Technology (MACT) rules appropriately protect public health.
In FY 2018, the Federal Vehicle and Fuels Standards and Certification program will focus its
efforts on certification decisions. The agency will perform its compliance oversight functions on
priority matters, where there is evidence to suggest noncompliance, and conduct testing activities
for pre-certification confirmatory testing for emissions and fuel economy for passenger cars.
The Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program requires mandatory greenhouse gas emissions reporting
to inform the annual GHG inventory, a U.S. treaty obligation. The program will focus on
implementing already-finalized regulatory revisions across multiple sectors to address stakeholder
concerns associated with collection and potential release of data elements considered to be
sensitive business information; aligning the database management systems with those regulatory
revisions; and conducting a targeted Quality Assurance/Quality Control and verification process
through a combination of electronic checks, staff reviews, and follow-up with facilities when
necessary.
Air monitoring, which provides information to states used to develop clean air plans, for research,
and for the public, will continue to be a focus of the Administration. In FY 2018, the EPA will
provide grants to state, local, and tribal air pollution control agencies to manage and implement
their air quality programs.
This budget supports implementation of the Energy Independence Executive Order which directs
agencies responsible for regulating domestic energy production to identify, and propose measures
to revise or rescind, regulatory barriers that impede progress towards energy independence.
Clean and Safe Water
The EPA will continue to partner with states, drinking water utilities, and other stakeholders to
identify and address current and potential sources of drinking water contamination. These efforts
are integral to the sustainable infrastructure efforts as source water protection can reduce the need
2 The EPA's ACRES database (https://cfext.epa.gov/acres/)
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Overview
for additional drinking water treatment and associated costs. As progress has been made, work
remains for existing and emerging issues.
The EPA will continue to provide scientific water quality criteria information, review and approve
state water quality standards, and review and approve state lists of impaired waters. In FY 2018,
the agency will continue to work with states and other partners on Total Maximum Daily Loads
(TMDLs) as required by the Clean Water Act, as well as on other waterbody restoration plans for
listed impaired waterbodies. The EPA also will continue to implement and support core water
quality programs that control point-source discharges through permitting and pre-treatment
programs.
Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
The EPA's toxics program will maintain its 'zero tolerance' goal for preventing the introduction
of unsafe new chemicals into commerce. In FY 2018, $65 million is requested for the TSCA
Chemical Risk Review and Reduction Program to support the agency's significant continuing and
new responsibilities for ensuring that chemicals in commerce do not present unreasonable risks to
human health or the environment. New chemicals will be evaluated and decisions will be based on
best available science and the weight of evidence. For chemicals in commerce, the EPA will
maintain an ambitious schedule for initiating and completing chemical risk evaluations and, where
risks are identified, for initiating and completing regulatory actions to address those risks. The
EPA also will implement the new mandates related to determinations on claims for confidentiality
for chemical identities.
In FY 2018, the agency will continue implementing TSCA activities not amended by the Frank R.
Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act. The agency also will provide firm and
individual certifications for safe work practices for lead-based paint abatement and renovation and
repair efforts, as well as provide for the operation and maintenance of the online Federal Lead-
Based Paint program database (FLPP) that supports the processing of applications for training
providers, firms and individuals.
Identifying, assessing, and reducing the risks presented by the pesticides on which our society and
economy rely is integral to ensuring environmental and human safety. Chemical and biological
pesticides help meet national and global demands for food. They provide effective pest control for
homes, schools, gardens, highways, utility lines, hospitals, and drinking water treatment facilities,
while also controlling vectors of disease. The program ensures that the pesticides available in the
U.S. are safe when used as directed. In addition, the program is increasing the focus on pollinator
health, working with other federal partners, states, and private stakeholder groups to stem
pollinator declines and increase pollinator habitat.
In FY 2018, the EPA will invest resources to improve the compliance of pesticide registrations
with the Endangered Species Act. A portion of the funding also will ensure that pesticides are
correctly registered and applied in a manner that protects water quality.
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Overview
Agency Strategic Plan and Performance Measures
The FY 2018 annual performance measures and provisional targets and the FY 2016 EPA Annual
Performance Report (APR), which includes performance measures and related information from
FY 2011 to FY 2017, are included in the appendixes to the FY 2018 Annual Performance Plan and
Budget rhttps://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/fv20181.
Eliminated Programs
Programs eliminated in the FY 2018 budget total $983 million. Details are found in
rhttps://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/fy20181. The Administration is committed to creating a
leaner, more accountable, less intrusive, and more effective Government. The FY 2018 budget
eliminates programs that are duplicative or those that can be absorbed into other programs or are
state and local responsibilities.
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Summary Resource Charts
Environmental Protection Agency's
FY 2018 Budget by Appropriation
Total Agency: $5,655 Million*
Dollars in Millions
STAG
$2,733
48.3%
~ Science & Technology
~ Environmental Programs & Management
~ Inspector General
 Buildings & Facilities
~ Inland Oil Spill Programs
~ Hazardous SubstanceSuperfund
~ Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
~ State & Tribal Assistance Grants
~ Water Infrastructure Finance & Innovation Program

Notes: Totals may not add due to rounding.
"Totals and percentages include a proposed $369 million cancellation of funds
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Summary Resource Charts
EPA's Enacted Budget FY2009 to 2018
$12.0
$10.0
$8j0
$6.0
$4j0
$2.0
$0j0
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Fiscal Year
Notes:
All agency totals include applicable rescissions.
FY 2009 Enacted excludes ARRA funding.
FY 2013 Enacted excludes Hurricane Sandy Relief supplemental funding.
FY 2017 is reported at the Annualized Continuing Resolution funding level.
FY 2018 President's Budget Request includes a proposed $369 M cancellation of funds.
EPA's FTE* Ceiling History
20,000
18,000
16,000
14,000
12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
0
* FTE (Full Time Equivalent) = one employee working full time for a full year (52 weeks X 40 hours = 2,080 hours),
or the equivalent number of hours worked by several part-time or temporary employees.
Reimbursable FTE are included.
~ President's Budget  Enacted Budgets ~ Continuing Resolution
$10.3
Fiscal Year
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Summary Resource Charts
Environmental Protection Agency's
Resources by Major Category
(Dollars in Billions)
~ Infrastructure Financing BTrust Funds BOperating Budget ~ Categorical Grants
$12.0
$10.0
(A
C
| $8.0
m
c
S2
j| $6.0
o
o
T3
a>
| $4.0
Q.
s
Q.
Q.
<

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Overview: Improving Air Quality
Improving Air Quality
Introduction
As part of its mission to protect human health and the environment, the EPA is dedicated to improving the
quality of the nation's air. To address these concerns, the agency works in cooperation with states, tribes,
and local governments to design and implement standards and programs, and to share information. This
cooperative federalism underpins all aspects of the National Air Program. Strong cooperative partnerships
are needed to make and sustain improvements in air quality in accordance with the Clean Air Act. The
National Air program will focus on implementing core programs where a federal presence in required by
statute. Regulation and policy will be based upon the clear direction given by Congress in the Clean Air
Act, follow the rule of law, and incorporate robust input from the public. States and tribes intimately
understand their air quality problems and are therefore best positioned to develop solutions.
From 1970 to 2015, aggregate national emissions of the six common air pollutants dropped an average of
70 percent while gross domestic product grew by over 246 percent. Despite this progress, in 2015,
approximately 120 million people (about 40% of the U.S. population) lived in counties with air that did not
meet EPA's regulations for at least one pollutant.
The EPA's criteria pollutant programs are critical to continued progress in reducing public health risks and
improving the quality of the environment. However, listening to and working with states to set and
implement standards is key. The criteria pollutant program first sets National Ambient Air Quality
Standards (NAAQS) which are then implemented by the states who have primary responsibility under the
CAA for developing clean air plans. The EPA provides a variety of technical assistance, training and
information to support state clean air plans and air permits to assist states with achieving attainment with
air quality standards.
The air toxics program develops and implements national emission standards for stationary and mobile
sources and state/local air agency actions to address local air toxics problems in communities. The EPA
reviews air toxics emissions standards, required every eight years under the Clean Air Act, to determine if
additional emission control technologies exist and, if so, the EPA proposes more effective emission control
technologies based on these reviews.
The EPA also implements the U.S. Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program, which requires mandatory
greenhouse gas emissions reporting covering over 8,000 facilities from 41 large industrial source categories
in the U.S. The data are shared with industry stakeholders, state and local governments, the research
community, and the public to better understand emissions, inform opportunities, and communicate progress
of actions. They also inform the annual GHG Inventory, a U.S. treaty obligation.
The EPA develops, implements, and ensures compliance with national emission standards to reduce mobile
source related air pollution from light-duty cars and trucks, heavy-duty trucks and buses, nonroad engines
and vehicles, and from their fuels. The program also evaluates new emission control technology and
provides information to state, Tribal, and local air quality managers on a variety of transportation programs.
On March 15, 2017 the EPA and Department of Transportation announced that the EPA intends to
reconsider the Final Determination, issued on January 12, 2017, that recommended no change to the
greenhouse gas standards for light duty vehicles for model years 2022- 2025. In order to provide the
technical foundation for an agency decision, the program will undertake an assessment of factors such as
technological feasibility, costs impacts, impacts on air quality and public health, and other relevant issues.
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Overview: Improving Air Quality
The EPA must make any modifications to the existing rule through a notice-and-comment rulemaking,
including the issuing of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and a Final Rulemaking.
The agency also measures and monitors ambient radiation and radioactive materials and assesses
radioactive contamination in the environment. The agency supports federal radiological emergency
response and recovery operations under the National Response Framework (NRF) and the National Oil and
Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan(NCP).
Highlights of the FY 2018 President's Budget:
FY 2018 resources include $447.7 million and 1,312.2 FTE to improve air quality. Highlights include the
following.
National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS)
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to perform key activities in support of the NAAQS and implementation
of stationary source regulations, supporting state, local, and tribal air quality programs. The agency will
continue its CAA-mandated responsibilities to administer the NAAQS by reviewing state plans and
decisions consistent with statutory obligations, taking federal oversight actions such as approving State
Implementation Plan / Tribal Implementation Plan (SIP/TIP) submittals, and by developing regulations and
policies to ensure continued health and welfare protection during the transition between existing and new
standards. The budget request includes $100.4 million to provide federal support for state and local air
quality management.
Air Toxics
The EPA will continue to prioritize CAA and court-ordered obligations. Section 112 of the CAA requires
that the emissions control bases for all Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards be
reviewed and updated, as necessary, every eight years. In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to conduct risk
assessments, to determine whether the MACT rules appropriately protect public health. The program will
tier its work with an emphasis on meeting court ordered deadlines to align with priorities and capacity.
Federal Vehicle and Fuel Standards and Certification Program
In FY 2018, the budget includes $76 million for the Federal Vehicle and Fuels Standards and Certification
program, which will focus its efforts on certification decisions. The agency will continue to perform its
compliance oversight functions on priority matters, where there is evidence to suggest noncompliance. The
EPA will continue to conduct testing activities for pre-certification confirmatory testing for emissions and
fuel economy for passenger cars. In FY 2018, the EPA anticipates reviewing and approving about 5,000
vehicle and engine emissions certification requests, including light-duty vehicles, heavy-duty diesel
engines, nonroad engines, marine engines, locomotives, and others.
Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program
In FY 2018, the budget provides for $8.5 million to continue to implement the Greenhouse Gas Reporting
Program. The program focus will include:
Implementing already-finalized regulatory revisions across multiple sectors to address stakeholder
concerns associated with collection and potential release of data elements considered to be sensitive
business information;
Aligning the database management systems with those regulatory revisions; and
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Overview: Improving Air Quality
Conducting a targeted Quality Assurance/Quality Control and verification process through a
combination of electronic checks, staff reviews, and follow-up with facilities when necessary.
Radiation
In FY 2018, the EPA's Radiological Emergency Response Team (RERT) will maintain essential readiness
to support federal radiological emergency response and recovery operations under the National Response
Framework (NRF) and National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). The
EPA will design essential training and exercises to enhance the RERT's ability to fulfill the EPA's
responsibilities and improve overall radiation response preparedness. The agency will continue to operate
RadNet, the agency's fixed ambient environmental radiation monitoring network for the U.S
Grants for State, Local and Tribal Air Quality Management
In FY 2018, the EPA will provide grants to state, local, and tribal air pollution control agencies to manage
and implement their air quality programs. Air monitoring, which provides information to states used to
develop clean air plans, for research, and for the public, will continue to be a focus of the Administration.
The budget includes $168.4 million in grants to states, localities and tribes to support air quality
management work. Community scale air toxics monitoring will be funded by states and communities.
Research
The funding request of $30.6 million for Air and Energy (A&E) research program will support five related
topic areas that include research projects that support the EPA's mission to protect human health and the
environment, fulfill the agency's legislative mandates, and advance cross-agency priorities. The A&E
program will work to measure progress toward environmental health goals, and translate research results to
inform communities and individuals about measures to reduce impacts of air pollution. In addition, research
personnel will analyze existing research data and publish scientific journal articles to disseminate findings
associated with these data. The A&E research program relies on successful partnerships with other EPA
research programs, offices, academic and industry researchers, state, local and private sector organizations,
as well as key federal agencies.
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Overview: Ensuring Clean and Safe Water
Ensuring Clean and Safe Water
Introduction
Protecting the nation's water from pollution and contaminants relies on cooperation between the EPA, states
and tribes. This cooperative federalism guides and underpins all aspects of the National Water Program.
Strong partnerships between states, tribes, and the EPA are needed to make and sustain improvements in
water quality. States and tribes intimately understand their water quality problems and are therefore best
positioned to develop localized solutions to protect their waters.
The National Water Program will focus on implementing core programs where a federal presence is
required by the statute. The decisions and priorities of the National Water Program will be based upon the
clear direction given by Congress in the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act. Following the
rule of law, all regulation and policy will be based on what the law directs and incorporate robust input
from the public. Input from the public will help make our water policy beneficial to both the environment
and the economy.
While much progress in water quality has been made over the last two decades, challenges remain to protect
America's waters, particularly as it relates to aging infrastructure. In FY 2018, the National Water Program
will focus its resources on supporting the modernization of outdated water infrastructure; creating
incentives for new water technologies and innovation; and funding the core requirements of the Clean Water
Act and Safe Drinking Water Act while providing states and tribes with flexibility to best address their
particular priorities.
Highlights of the FY 2018 President's Budget:
FY 2018 resources include $2,873 billion and 1,778.8 FTE. Resources and FTEhave been targeted to focus
on core water programs authorized by statute. Funding for the categorical grants to states and tribes to
support core water programs is $250 million.
Water Infrastructure Investments
A top priority for the National Water Program is modernizing the outdated water infrastructure on which
the American public depends. Robust funding is provided for critical drinking and wastewater
infrastructure. These funding levels further the President's ongoing commitment to infrastructure repair and
replacement and would allow states, municipalities, and private entities to continue to finance high priority
infrastructure investments that protect human health and the environment. The FY 2018 budget includes
$2.3 billion for the State Revolving Funds and $20 million for the Water Infrastructure Finance and
Innovation Act (WIFIA) program. Under WIFIA, the EPA could potentially provide up to $1 billion in
credit assistance, which, when combined with other funding sources, would spur an estimated $2 billion in
total infrastructure investment.1
Categorical Grants to States and Tribes
In addition to the State Revolving Funds described above, the FY 2018 budget provides funding for the
following categorical grants that support state and tribal implementation of the Clean Water Act and the
1 This approximation is based on notional calculations. Subsidy cost is determined on a loan-by-loan basis.
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Overview: Ensuring Clean and Safe Water
Safe Drinking Water Act: Public Water System Supervision (PWSS), Pollution Control (Sec. 106),
Underground Injection Control (UIC), and Wetlands Program Development Grants. The EPA will work
with states and tribes to target the funds to core requirements while providing states and tribes with
flexibility to best address their particular priorities.
Safe Drinking Water
The FY 2018 budget requests $83.7 million for Drinking Water Programs, including science and technology
programs. The EPA will continue work to revise the Lead and Copper Rule, providing certainty to states
and Tribes, and to develop regulations to implement the Water Infrastructure Improvement for the Nation
Act and the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. In addition, the EPA will continue work with states
to develop the next generation management and reporting tool used by the majority of state drinking water
programs. The new Safe Drinking Water Information System tool will provide the following benefits:
improvements in program efficiency and data quality, greater public access to drinking water data,
facilitation of electronic reporting, reductions in reporting burdens on laboratories and water utilities,
reductions in data management burden for states, and ultimately reduction in public health risk.
Clean Water
The FY 2018 budget requests $175 million for Surface Water Protection and $18.1 for Wetlands. The FY
2018 budget supports the following core Surface Water Protection program components: water quality
criteria, standards and technology; National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES); water
monitoring; Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs); watershed management; water infrastructure and
grants management; core wetlands programs and Clean Water Act Section 106 program management. In
FY 2018, the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers will work to implement the President's Executive
Order directing the Administrator of the EPA and the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works to
review the 2015 Clean Water Rule and publish for notice and comment a proposed rule rescinding or
revising the rule, as appropriate and consistent with law.
Homeland Security
In FY 2018, the EPA will propose a targeted set of activities and outreach in its role as the sector specific
agency for the water sector critical infrastructure. Outreach and technical assistance will be provided for
the highest priority areas. Under Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity,
the EPA, in FY 2018, will continue to coordinate water sector specific cybersecurity risks with DHS.
Research
The EPA's Safe and Sustainable Water Resources (SSWR) research program is funded at $68.5 million in
the FY 2018 President Budget. The SSWR research program uses a systems approach to develop scientific
and technological solutions for the protection of human health and watersheds. The research is conducted
in partnership with other EPA programs, federal and state agencies, academia, non-governmental agencies,
public and private stakeholders, and the scientific community. This approach maximizes efficiency,
interdisciplinary insights and integration of results.
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Overview: Cleaning up Land
Cleaning up Land
Introduction
The EPA works to improve the health and livelihood of all Americans by cleaning up and restoring our
land, preventing contamination, and responding to emergencies. Approximately 166 million people -
roughly 53 percent of the U.S. population and 55 percent of children under the age of 5 - live within three
miles of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or
Superfund), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action, or a Brownfields site
that received EPA funding1. Collaborating with and effectively leveraging efforts of other federal agencies,
industry, states, tribes, and local communities, the EPA uses its resources to enhance the livability and
economic vitality of neighborhoods in and around hazardous waste sites.
The EPA partners with states, tribes and industry to prevent and reduce exposure to contaminants.
Superfund and RCRA provide legal authority for the EPA's work to protect and restore the land. The agency
and its partners use Superfund authority to clean up uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous waste sites,
allowing land to be returned to productive use. Under RCRA, the EPA works in partnership with states and
tribes to address risks associated with the generation, transportation, treatment, storage, or disposal of waste
as well as works to clean up contamination at active sites.
The EPA works collaboratively with international, state, Tribal, and local governments to reach its goals
and consider the effects of decisions on communities. The EPA will continue to work with communities to
help them understand and address risks posed by intentional and accidental releases of hazardous substances
into the environment and ensure that communities have an opportunity to participate in environmental
decisions that affect them. The EPA's efforts are guided by scientific data, tools, and research that alert us
to emerging issues and inform decisions on managing materials and addressing contaminated properties.
The EPA ensures federal environmental laws are implemented in Indian country. In situations in which
tribes are not administering Tribal environmental programs, the EPA generally directly implements those
programs to ensure protection of Tribal health and the environment. At this time, EPA directly implements
the majority of federal environmental programs in Indian country. The EPA seeks to ensure that federal
environment statutes are as effective inside Indian county as they are outside Indian country.
In FY 2018, the agency requests $1 million and 5.0 FTE to focus on analyzing the economic and regulatory
impacts on the largest manufacturing sectors of the U.S. economy, streamline permitting processes and
provide technical assistance to communities. The EPA will build constructive relationships with the largest
manufacturing sectors of our economy. The goals are to ensure that the agency understands the needs of
our customers, the regulated community, and states; identifies collaborative and innovative solutions to
overcome barriers that prevent job creation and economic growth; and provide for better-informed
rulemakings, reduced burden, increased transparency about environmental performance, and develop
efficient, effective, consensus-based solutions to environmental problems.
Highlights of the FY 2018 President's Budget:
The FY 2018 request is $992.2 million and 2,255.1 FTE. The EPA will focus on implementing core
programs where a federal presence is required by the statute. Decisions and priorities will be based upon
^.S. EPA, Office of Land and Emergency Management Estimate 2015. Data collected includes: (1) site information as of the end
of FY13; and (2) census data from the 2007-2013 American Community Survey.
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Overview: Cleaning up Land
the clear direction given by Congress. Following the rule of law, all regulation and policy will be based on
what the law directs and incorporate robust input from the public. Input from the public will help make our
policy beneficial to both the environment and the economy.
Restoring Contaminated Sites to Productive Use, Creating Jobs and New Economic Opportunities
The EPA's cleanup programs (i.e., Superfund Remedial, Superfund Federal Facilities, Superfund
Emergency Response and Removal, RCRA Corrective Action, and Brownfields) work cooperatively with
state, Tribal, and local partners to take proactive steps to facilitate the cleanup and revitalization of
contaminated properties. Cleanup programs protect both human health and the environment and return sites
to productive use, which is important to the economic well-being of communities.
In FY 2018, the EPA is looking to identify efficiencies and reduce administrative costs to accelerate the
pace of cleanups. The agency will continue to help communities clean up and revitalize once productive
properties by: removing contamination; enabling economic development; taking advantage of existing
infrastructure; and maintaining, and improving quality of life. There are multiple benefits associated with
cleaning up contaminated sites: reducing mortality and morbidity risk; preventing and reducing human
exposure to contaminants; making land available for commercial, residential, industrial, or recreational
reuse; and promoting community economic development.
Working collaboratively with partners across the country, the EPA engages with communities in site
cleanup decisions, fosters employment opportunities in communities during and after remedy construction,
promotes the redevelopment of blighted areas, and protects human health and the environment. Superfund
properties are often reused as commercial facilities, retail centers, government offices, residential areas,
industrial and manufacturing operations, and parks and recreational areas. The reuse often can play a role
in economically revitalizing a community
EPA works in partnership with states, having authorized 44 states and one territory to directly implement
the RCRA Corrective Action program2. This program is responsible for overseeing and managing cleanups
at active RCRA sites. States have been challenged in the cleanup program, and through worksharing, the
agency serves as lead or support for a significant number of complex and challenging cleanups in both non-
authorized and authorized states.
The UST program has achieved significant success in addressing releases since the beginning of the
program and will continue to do so with a request of $11,976 million. End of year FY 2016 data shows that,
of the approximately 532,000 releases reported since the beginning of the UST program in 1988, more than
461,000 (or 86.7 percent) have been cleaned up. Approximately 71,000 releases remain that have not
reached cleanup completion. The EPA is working with states to develop and implement specific strategies
and activities applicable to their particular sites to reduce the UST releases remaining to be cleaned up.
By awarding Brownfields grants, the EPA is making investments in communities so that they can realize
their own visions for environmental health, economic growth, and job creation. As of April 2017, the grants
awarded by the program have led to over 67,000 acres of idle land made ready for productive use and over
124,300 jobs and $23.6 billion leveraged.3
2	State implementation of the CA Program is funded through the STAG (Program Project 11) and matching State contributions
3	The EPA's ACRES database.
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Overview: Cleaning up Land
Chemical Facility Safety
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $10 million for the State and Local Prevention and Preparedness program.
States and communities often lack the capacity needed to prepare for and/or respond to these emergencies
or to prevent them from happening, and the EPA fills valuable role in filling this gap.
The program establishes a structure composed of federal, state, local, and Tribal partners who work together
with industry to protect emergency responders, local communities, and property from chemical risks
through advanced technologies, community and facility engagement, and improved safety systems. In FY
2018 the program will inspect Risk Management Plan (RMP) facilities to ensure compliance with accident
prevention and preparedness activities. There are approximately 12,500 chemical RMP facilities that are
subject to inspections in the program. Of these, approximately 1,900 facilities have been designated as high-
risk based upon their accident history, quantity of on-site dangerous chemicals stored, and proximity to
large residential populations.4
Strategic Environmental Management
In FY 2018, the agency will focus on streamlining the permitting processes, which impact environmental
protection and economic development in many sectors of the economy. This work will be done in
conjunction with and in support of the Presidents' Memorandum Streamlining Permitting and Reducing
Regulatory Burdens for Domestic Manufacturing.5 While the EPA's permits will continue to protect human
health and the environment, the more efficiently the agency works with state partners and the regulated
industry, the more quickly permits can be issued, fostering greater environmental protection and economic
development.
RCRA Waste Management
The FY 2018 budget provides $41.1 million to the RCRA Waste Management program. In FY 2018, RCRA
permits for approximately 20,000 hazardous waste units (such as incinerators and landfills) at 6,600
treatment, storage, and disposal facilities will be issued, updated or maintained. The EPA will focus on
PCB cleanups and providing work-sharing and leadership assistance to the states and territories authorized
to implement the permitting program and directly implements the entire RCRA program in two states.
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest
On October 5, 2012, the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act was enacted, requiring
the EPA to develop and maintain a hazardous waste electronic manifest system. The system will be
designed to, among other functions, assemble and maintain the information contained in the estimated five
million manifest forms accompanying hazardous waste shipments across the nation. When fully
implemented, the electronic hazardous waste manifest (e-Manifest) program will reduce the reporting
burden for industry by approximately $75 million annually. In FY 2018, the system will go into service and
will transition into a fee-funded program.
Oil Spill Prevention
The inland oil spills can threaten human health, cause severe environmental damage, and create financial
loss to industry and the public. The Oil Spill program helps protect the American people by effectively
4	For additional information, refer to: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-01-13/pdf/2016-31426.pdf
5	For more information: httos://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/24/presidential-memorandum-
streamlimng-permitting-and-reducing-regulatorv
19

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Overview: Cleaning up Land
preventing, preparing for, responding to, and monitoring inland oil spills. The EPA serves as the lead
responder for cleanup of all inland zone spills, including transportation-related spills, and provides technical
assistance and support to the U.S. Coast Guard for coastal and maritime oil spills. In FY 2018, the EPA
requests a total of $12.1 million for the Oil Spill Prevention, Preparedness and Response program.
Homeland Security
The EPA's Homeland Security work is an important component of the agency's prevention, protection, and
response activities. The FY 2018 budget submission includes $15 million to maintain agency capability to
respond to incidents that may involve harmful chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) substances.
Resources also will allow the agency to develop and maintain expertise and operational readiness for all
phases of consequential management following a CBR incident.
Environmental Protection in Indian Country
The EPA Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) provides financial assistance to tribes
to assist with capacity building and the development of environmental protection programs in Indian
country. In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to fund the GAP grants which will allow tribes to develop
media-specific environmental programs and also will ensure adequate resources for grantees to successfully
implement the EPA-Tribal Environmental Plans (ETEPs) that outline their environmental program
priorities and goals at the local level. Tribal resources are essential to address long-standing challenges to
recruit and retain qualified environmental professionals to remote Indian country locations and will assist
tribes with the implementation of environmental regulatory programs.
The magnitude of Tribal environmental and human health challenges reinforces the importance of the
EPA's commitment to maintaining strong environmental protections in Indian country and to working with
other federal agencies to effectively leverage resources. The EPA, the Department of the Interior, the
Department of Health and Human Services (Indian Health Service), the Department of Agriculture, and the
Department of Housing and Urban Development have worked through several Memoranda of
Understanding (MOUs) as partners to improve infrastructure on Tribal lands. The Infrastructure Task Force
will build on prior partnership success, including improved access to funding and reduced administrative
burden for Tribal communities, through the review and streamlining of agency policies, regulations, and
directives, as well as improved coordination of technical assistance to water service providers and solid
waste managers through regular coordination meetings and web-based tools.
Research
In FY 2018, the Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) program is funded at $60.7 million and will
prioritize efforts to continue to support the EPA's program offices and state and Tribal partners in protecting
and restoring land, and providing community decision makers with decision tools to support community
health and well-being. In FY 2018, the EPA research personnel and associated support staff will analyze
existing research data and publish scientific journal articles to disseminate findings associated with these
data.
The SHC program also will continue to develop or revise protocols to test oil spill control agents or products
for listing on the National Contingency Plan Product Schedule, including dispersants' performance and
behavior in deep water and arctic conditions. Additional research outcomes include improved
characterization and remediation methods for fuels released from leaking underground storage tanks.
20

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Overview: Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
Introduction
Chemicals are present in our everyday lives and products. They are used in the production of everything
from our homes and cars to the cell phones we carry and the food we eat. Chemicals often may be released
into the environment as a result of their manufacture, import, processing, use, and disposal.
The budget ensures the agency has the resources to address the safety of new chemicals and existing
chemicals through the implementation of new Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).
Under authorization by TSCA, as amended, on June 22, 2016, by the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety
for the 21st Century Act, the EPA is charged with the responsibility of assessing the safety of commercial
and industrial chemicals and acting upon those chemicals if they pose significant risks to human health or
the environment. The new law requires that an affirmative determination be made by the EPA on whether
a new chemical substance will present, may present, or is not likely to present an unreasonable risk (or that
available information is insufficient to enable any of these determinations to be made) before the chemical
substance can proceed to the marketplace. The EPA also will maintain an ambitious schedule for initiating
and completing in a timely manner risk evaluations of existing chemicals and, where risks are identified,
for initiating and completing regulatory actions and increased communications with manufacturers to
address risks. Work on the first 10 chemicals to be evaluated began in December 2016. By law, there must
be 20 evaluations ongoing by the end of 2019. In addition, most claims of confidentiality for chemical
identity must be reviewed in 90 days, as well as 25 percent of all other claims for confidentiality.
The EPA's pesticide licensing program evaluates new pesticides before they reach the market and ensure
that pesticides already in commerce are safe when used in accordance with the label as directed by the
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act
(FFDCA), and the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). The EPA will register pesticides in a manner that
protects consumers, pesticide users, workers, children, and other populations who may be exposed to
pesticides. The program also will continue the registration review process for older pesticides. For all
pesticides in review, the EPA will evaluate potential impacts on the environment.
The EPA has a long history of collaboration to address a wide range of domestic and global environmental
issues. The EPA envisions that environmental actions in cooperation with international partners can
catalyze even greater progress toward protecting our domestic environment. The EPA's work with
international organizations is essential to successfully addressing transboundary pollution adversely
impacting the U.S., strengthening environmental protection abroad so that it is on par with practices in the
United States, and supporting the foreign policy objectives outlined by the White House, the National
Security Council, and the Department of State.
The EPA research programs of Chemical Safety for Sustainability (CSS), Human Health Risk Assessment
(HHRA), and Homeland Security underpin the analysis of risks and potential health impacts across the
broad spectrum of EPA programs and provide the scientific foundation for chemical safety. In FY 2018,
the EPA will further strengthen its planning and delivery of science by continuing an integrated research
approach that tackles problems systematically.
Highlights of the FY 2018 President's Budget:
In FY 2018, the agency expects to review over 1,000 new chemical submissions, take appropriate testing
and risk management actions and make affirmative determinations in a timely manner and as close to the
21

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Overview: Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
90-day review as possible. The program also will evaluate the data submitted from Section 5 Consent
Orders and address submitted Notices of Commencement (NOCs). In FY 2018, the EPA's toxics program
will maintain its 'zero tolerance' goal for preventing the introduction of unsafe new chemicals into
commerce.
Chemical Safety
In FY 2018, $65 million is directed to the TSCA Chemical Risk Review and Reduction Program. This
increase in funding will support the agency's significant continuing and new responsibilities for ensuring
that chemicals in commerce do not present unreasonable risks to human health or the environment. As
authorized by the amendments to TSCA, the agency expects to collect TSCA Service fees beginning in FY
2018 in support of certain responsibilities under the new law.
Review of new chemicals will be prioritized. Scheduling will reflect a need for the agency to eliminate the
backlog of reviews in order to ensure chemicals go to market in a manner that better promotes economic
development. Timely evaluation will be based on the intended use of chemicals.
For chemicals in commerce, the EPA will maintain an ambitious schedule for initiating and completing
chemical risk evaluations and, where risks are identified, for initiating and completing regulatory actions
to address those risks. In FY 2018, the agency will be working to advance the first 10 chemicals that will
undergo risk evaluations through the draft, peer review/public comment and final stages. In FY 2018, the
agency plans to commence the process for identifying an additional 10 chemicals for which risk evaluation
will be initiated during 2018-2019, to have 20 risk evaluations underway by the end of 2019. The EPA may
require testing on up to 12 chemicals in connection with the prioritization and risk evaluation processes,
where such testing is needed. Under TSCA section 6(h), there is a new fast-track process to address certain
PBT chemicals; the EPA has begun risk management actions to address five of these Persistent
Bioaccumulative Toxic (PBTs) within the prescribed period mandated by the law. The agency expects to
publish an Alternative Testing Methods Strategy by June 2018, two years after the date of enactment, as
required by the new law. In FY 2018, the EPA will finalize the designation of chemical substances on the
TSCA inventory as either "active" or "inactive" in U.S. commerce. And throughout the fiscal year, the
EPA will implement the new mandate to make determinations on claims for confidentiality for chemical
identities and 25 percent of all other claims for confidentiality.
The agency also will provide firm and individual certifications for safe work practices for lead-based paint
abatement and renovation and repair efforts, as well as provide for the operation and maintenance of the
online Federal Lead-Based Paint program database (FLPP) that supports the processing of applications for
training providers, firms and individuals.
Identifying, assessing, and reducing the risks presented by the pesticides on which our society and economy
rely is integral to ensuring environmental and human safety. Chemical and biological pesticides help meet
national and global demands for food. They provide effective pest control for homes, schools, gardens,
highways, utility lines, hospitals, and drinking water treatment facilities, while also controlling vectors of
disease. The program ensures that the pesticides available in the U.S. are safe when used as directed. The
agency's pesticide program is increasing its focus on pollinator health as well, working with other federal
partners, states, and private stakeholder groups to stem pollinator declines and increase pollinator habitat.
In addition, the program places priority on reduced risk pesticides that, once registered, will result in
increased societal benefits.
In FY 2018, $99.4 million in appropriated funding is provided to support the EPA's pesticide registration
review and registration program. The EPA will invest resources to improve the compliance of pesticide
registrations with the Endangered Species Act. A portion of the funding also will ensure that pesticides are
22

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Overview: Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
correctly registered and applied in a manner that protects water quality. The EPA will continue registration
and reregistration requirements for antimicrobial pesticides. Together, these programs will minimize
exposure to pesticides, maintain a safe and affordable food supply, address public health issues, and
minimize property damage that can occur from insects, pests and microbes. The agency's worker protection,
certification, and training programs will encourage safe application practices. The EPA also will continue
to emphasize reducing exposures from pesticides used in and around homes, schools, and other public areas.
The EPA will continue to work to improve pollinator health by performing laboratory analyses of
honeybees and related resources, such as hive structures. The EPA will continue to assess the effects of
pesticides, including neonicotinoids, on bee and other pollinator health and take action as appropriate to
protect pollinators, engage state and Tribal agencies in the development of pollinator protection plans, and
expedite review of registration applications for new products targeting pests harmful to pollinators.
International Priorities
To achieve our domestic environmental and human health goals, international partnerships are essential,
including those with the business community, entrepreneurs and other members of society. Pollution is
often carried by wind and water across national boundaries, posing risks to human health and ecosystems
many hundreds and thousands of miles away. In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to engage both bilaterally
and through multilateral institutions to improve international cooperation to prevent and address the
transboundary movement of pollution. In particular, the Office of International and Tribal Affairs (OITA)
will continue technical and policy assistance for global and regional efforts to address international sources
of harmful pollutants, such as mercury.
In FY 2018, the agency also will maintain a targeted set of efforts to reduce environmental threats to U.S.
citizens. In particular, the EPA will continue technical and policy assistance for global and regional efforts
to address international sources of harmful pollutants, such as mercury. Because 70% of the mercury
deposited in the U.S. comes from global sources1, both domestic efforts and international cooperation are
important to address mercury pollution.
Research
The EPA research programs of Chemical Safety for Sustainability (CSS), Human Health Risk Assessment
(HHRA), and Homeland Security underpin the analysis of risks and potential health impacts across the
broad spectrum of EPA programs and provide the scientific foundation for chemical safety and pollution
prevention. In FY 2018, the EPA will further strengthen its planning and delivery of science by continuing
an integrated research approach that tackles problems systematically.
Research: Chemical Safety for Sustainability (CSS)
In FY 2018, EPA is requesting $61.7 million for the CSS research program. These resources will: 1)
incorporate advances in computational chemistry to allow use of information from chemical structures with
known bioactivity to other structures with less data (i.e. read-across) in concert with growing international
efforts; 2) use the high-throughput hazard and exposure information to begin to evaluate cumulative risk of
chemical exposures; and 3) demonstrate how the ToxCast/Tox21 data can be used to develop high-
throughput risk assessments, in particular for data-poor chemicals. The EPA also will utilize resources to
research responsibilities under the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act that
support new assessment and chemical review capabilities, as directed by the law.
1 http://www.epa.gov/international/toxics/mercury/mnegotiations.html; www.mercuryconvention.org;
23

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Overview: Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals
FY 2018 presents an opportunity to further enhance and broaden the application of the CSS computational
toxicology research to agency activities across diverse regulatory frameworks. New emerging applications
can add significant efficiency and effectiveness to agency operations. The applications complement efforts
of the agency's Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention program to apply high throughput and other 21st
Century exposure information to Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical prioritization.
Additionally, the CSS program will continue to apply computational and knowledge-driven approaches to
amplify the impact of its research on engineered nanomaterials and on evaluation of emerging safer
chemical alternatives. Results of this research will provide guidelines for evaluating potential impacts of
emerging materials from the molecular design phase throughout their lifecycle in their applications to goods
and products in commerce. These research directions are in keeping with the environmental health and
safety research needs identified by the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Through specific case studies,
CSS will further evaluate the impact of nanomaterial exposures through ubiquitous use in consumer
products and lifecycle impacts, including discharge to wastewater or impact to biosolids.
Finally, the CSS research program is the lead national research program for the agency's Children's
Environmental Health (CEH) Roadmap. Transforming EPA's capacity for considering child-specific
vulnerabilities requires that the program apply advanced systems science and integrate diverse emerging
data and knowledge in exposure, toxicology, and epidemiology to improve understanding of the role of
exposure to environmental factors during early life on health impacts that may occur at any point over the
life course.
Research: Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA)
In FY 2018, the agency's Human Health Risk Assessment Research Program will continue to develop
assessments and scientific products that are used extensively by EPA programs and regional offices and the
risk management community to estimate the potential risk to human health from exposure to environmental
contaminants. These include:
Integrated Risk Information System health hazard and dose-response assessments;
Integrated Science Assessments of criteria air pollutants;
Community risk science; and
Advancing analyses and applications.
Research: Homeland Security Research Program (HSRP)
The Homeland Security Research Program (HSRP) will continue to enhance the nation's preparedness,
response, and recovery capabilities for homeland security incidents and other hazards by providing
stakeholders and partners with valuable detection and response analytics for incidents involving chemical,
biological, or radiological agents. The program will continue to emphasize the research needed to support
response and recovery from wide-area attacks involving radiological agents, nuclear agents, and biothreat
agents such as anthrax.
In FY 2018, $108.2 million is directed to the Chemical Safety and Sustainability, Human Health Risk
Assessment, and Homeland Security Research programs.
24

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Overview: Enforcing Laws and Assuring Compliance
Enforcing Laws and Assuring Compliance
Introduction
The EPA's enforcement program is focused on assuring compliance with our nation's environmental laws.
Consistent regulatory enforcement also levels the playing field among regulated entities, ensuring that those
that fail to comply with the law do not have an unfair advantage over their law-abiding competitors. The
EPA works in partnership with state and Tribal agencies to achieve this objective and to ensure that our
communities have clean air, water, and land. To improve compliance, the EPA works to provide accessible
tools that help regulated entities, federal agencies, and the public understand these laws and find efficient,
cost effective means for putting them into practice. The EPA's enforcement program prioritizes inspections
and other monitoring and enforcement activities based on the degree of health and environmental risk. The
program collaborates with the Department of Justice, states, local government agencies, and Tribal
governments to ensure consistent and fair enforcement of all environmental laws and regulations.
Highlights of the FY 2018 President's Budget:
Compliance Monitoring
The Compliance Monitoring program provides the critical infrastructure to promote compliance with the
nation's environmental laws and protect human health and the environment. Compliance monitoring is
comprised of a variety of tools and activities that states and the EPA use to identify whether regulated
entities are in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and permit conditions. In addition, compliance
monitoring activities such as inspections and investigations are conducted to determine whether conditions
exist that may present imminent and substantial endangerment to human health and the environment.
In FY 2018, the EPA's compliance monitoring activities such as field inspections, data tools, and assistance
will focus on those programs that are not delegated to states, while providing some targeted oversight and
support to state, local, and Tribal programs. The agency will prioritize work with states to develop methods
that successfully leverage advances in both monitoring and information technology.
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to maintain ICIS access to the agency, states, and the public, and
implement the NPDES Electronic Reporting Rule covering e-reporting rule permitting requirements for the
EPA and states on an adjusted schedule. In FY 2018, the EPA will work with states to prioritize next steps
for the development of electronic reporting tools that support states. The EPA's electronic reporting tools
save the states a significant amount of resources in development and operations and maintenance costs. In
FY 2018, the proposed budget for compliance monitoring is $87.2 million.
Civil Enforcement
The Civil Enforcement program's overarching goal is to maximize compliance with the nation's
environmental laws and regulations in order to protect human health and the environment. The program
collaborates with the Department of Justice, states, local agencies, and Tribal governments to ensure
consistent and fair enforcement of all environmental laws and regulations. The program seeks to strengthen
environmental partnerships with co-implementers in the states, encourage regulated entities to rapidly
correct their own violations, ensure that violators do not realize an economic benefit from noncompliance,
and pursue enforcement to deter future violations.
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Overview: Enforcing Laws and Assuring Compliance
In FY 2018, recognizing the role of states as primary implementers, the EPA will focus resources on direct
implementation responsibilities and the most significant violations. Direct implementation responsibilities
include programs that are not delegable or where a state has not sought or obtained the authority to
implement a particular program. Examples include the Clean Air Act mobile source program, pesticide
labeling and registration under FIFRA, enforcement on Tribal lands, and enforcement of non-delegated
portions of various other laws, including RCRA, the Clean Water Act, and stratospheric ozone under the
CAA, among others. The EPA also will continue to pursue enforcement actions at federal facilities where
significant violations are discovered. The agency will refocus efforts from areas where significant progress
has been made (and which no longer require as active an enforcement presence) toward areas that address
the most substantial impacts to human health. In FY 2018, the proposed budget for civil enforcement is
$143.3 million.
Criminal Enforcement
The EPA's Criminal Enforcement program enforces the nation's environmental laws through targeted
investigation of criminal conduct, committed by individual and corporate defendants, that threatens public
health and the environment. In FY 2018, the Criminal Enforcement program will focus its resources on the
most egregious cases (e.g., significant human health, environmental, and deterrent impacts), while
balancing its overall case load across all environmental statutes. The EPA's Criminal Enforcement program
plays a critical role across the country, since states have a very limited capacity to prosecute environmental
crimes. The Criminal Enforcement program within our resource levels will continue to collaborate and
coordinate with the Civil Enforcement program to ensure that the EPA's Enforcement program responds to
violations as effectively as possible. In FY 2018, the proposed budget for Criminal Enforcement is $44.5
million.
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
In FY 2018, the EPA will work with OMB, CEQ, and other federal agencies to coordinate, streamline, and
improve the NEPA process.1 The EPA will work with agencies as they implement FAST-41, which sets
out requirements to streamline infrastructure permitting project reviews.2 The EPA also will work to
implement the Executive Order: "Expediting Environmental Reviews and Approvals for High Priority
Infrastructure Projects"3 The program expects to achieve some efficiencies by expediting environmental
reviews and approvals for high priority infrastructure projects.
During FY 2018, the EPA will focus resources on the most significant proposals for major federal actions.
As a component of this effort, the program will use and promote NEPAssist, a geographic information
system (GIS) tool developed to assist users (the EPA, other federal agencies, and the public) with
environmental reviews. In FY 2018, the proposed budget for NEPA is $13.5 million.
Forensics Support
The Forensics Support program provides specialized scientific and technical support for the nation's most
complex civil and criminal enforcement cases, as well as technical expertise for agency compliance efforts.
The work of the EPA's National Enforcement Investigations Center (NEIC) is critical to determining non-
compliance and building viable enforcement cases. The NEIC maintains a sophisticated chemistry
laboratory and a corps of highly trained inspectors and scientists with a wide range of environmental
1	For additional information, refer to: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-l 14publ94/pdf/PLAW-l 14publ94.pdf.
2	For additional information, refer to: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-l 14publ94/pdf/PLAW-l 14publ94.pdf.
3	For additional information, refer to: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/24/executive-order-expediting-
environmental-reviews-and-approvals-high
26

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Overview: Enforcing Laws and Assuring Compliance
scientific expertise. In FY 2018, NEIC will provide high-quality forensics work within our resource levels
in support of the highest priority investigations. Initiatives to stay at the forefront of environmental
enforcement in FY 2018 will include improvements in inspection methods used at regulated hazardous
waste facilities and utilizing existing technologies, such as advanced remote sensing for on-site air and
water sampling for toxic and non-conventional pollutants. In FY 2018, the proposed budget for Forensics
Support is $11.2 million.
Superfund Enforcement
The EPA's Superfund Enforcement program protects communities by ensuring that responsible parties
conduct cleanups, preserving federal dollars for sites where there are no viable contributing parties. The
EPA's Superfund Enforcement program ensures prompt site cleanup and reuse by maximizing the
participation of liable and viable parties in performing and paying for cleanups. In both the Superfund
Remedial and Superfund Emergency Response and Removal programs, the Superfund Enforcement
program obtains potentially responsible parties commitments to perform and pay for cleanups through civil,
judicial, and administrative site actions.
In FY 2018, the agency will prioritize its efforts on the most significant sites in terms of environmental
impact and potential cost liability to the government. The agency will continue its efforts to establish special
accounts (site-specific, interest-bearing accounts funded by the potentially responsible party under a
settlement agreement for cleanup and enforcement activities at the site for which it received the money).
Since special account funds may only be used for sites and uses specified in the settlement agreement, both
special account resources and annually appropriated resources are critical to the Superfund program to clean
up Superfund sites.
In FY 2018, the EPA will focus its resources on the highest priority federal sites, particularly those that
may present an imminent and/or substantial endangerment, and on resolving formal disputes under the
Federal Facility Agreements (FFAs). In FY 2018, the EPA is requesting to merge the Superfund Federal
Facilities Enforcement program with the Superfund Enforcement program. The agency will optimize the
resources between the two programs. In FY 2018 the proposed budget for the Superfund Enforcement
program is $94.4 million.
Partnering with States and Tribes
In FY 2018, the Enforcement and Compliance Assurance program will sustain its environmental
enforcement partnerships with states and Tribes and work to strengthen their ability to address
environmental and public health threats. In FY 2018, the Enforcement and Compliance Assurance program
will provide $14.5 million in grants to the states and Tribes to assist in the implementation of compliance
and enforcement provisions of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Federal Insecticide,
Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). These grants support state and Tribal compliance activities to
protect human health and the environment from harmful chemicals and pesticides. Under the Pesticides
Enforcement Grant program, the EPA will continue to provide resources to states and Tribes to conduct
FIFRA compliance inspections and take appropriate enforcement actions. The Toxic Substances
Compliance Grants protect the public and the environment from PCBs, asbestos, and lead-based paint.
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28

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Appendices
29

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30

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Program Project by Program Area
Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2018 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification
PROGRAM PROJECTS BY PROGRAM AREA
(Dollars in Thousands)
Science & Technology
n 20l(.
WIimK
n 201"
\niuiiili/ril ( U
n 20IX
l'iv liuil
20IK I'n-v liuil
w 201 "
\iiiiu:ili/ril ( U
Qean Air
Clean Air Allowance Trading Programs
GHG Reporting Program
Federal Support for Air Quality Management
Federal Vehicle and Fuels Standards and Certification
Subtotal, Clean Air
$8,149.6
$8,824.2
$6,234.3
$85,613.6
$108,821.7
$7,793.0
$8,003.0
$7,453.0
$93,070.0
$116,319.0
$5,739.0
$0.0
$3,959.0
$76,010.0
$85,708.0
($2,054.0)
($8,003.0)
($3,494.0)
($17,060.0)
($30,611.0)
Indoor Air and Radiation
Indoor Air: Radon Program
Radiation: Protection
Radiation: Response Preparedness
Reduce Risks from Indoor Air
Subtotal, Indoor Air and Radiation
$378.9
$2,064.5
$3,716.5
$260.4
$6,420.3
$172.0
$1,831.0
$3,774.0
$209.0
$5,986.0
$0.0
$0.0
$3,339.0
$0.0
$3,339.0
($172.0)
($1,831.0)
($435.0)
($209.0)
($2,647.0)
Enforcement
Forensics Support
$13,949.7
$13,643.0
$10,444.0
($3,199.0)
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Critical Infrastructure Protection
Homeland Security: Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery
Homeland Security: Protection of EPA Personnel and
Infrastructure
Subtotal, Homeland Security
$9,807.2
$26,800.2
$551.0
$37,158.4
$10,497.0
$26,004.0
$551.0
$37,052.0
$0.0
$22,597.0
$500.0
$23,097.0
($10,497.0)
($3,407.0)
($51.0)
($13,955.0)
IT / Data Management / Security
IT / Data Management
$2,892.6
$3,083.0
$2,725.0
($358.0)
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Workforce Reshaping
Subtotal, Operations and Administration
$71,332.8
$0.0
$71,332.8
$68,209.0
$0.0
$68,209.0
$68,339.0
$10,995.0
$79,334.0
$130.0
$10,995.0
$11,125.0
Pesticides Licensing
31

-------
Program Project by Program Area
201S I'iv- liuil
n 2UI0	I N 201-	n 20IX	\-. 201 -
WIimK	\iiiiii:ili/cil ( U	I'll - liuil	\iniiiiili/ril ( U
Pesticides: Protect Human Health from Pesticide Risk
$3,772.1
$3,122.0
$2,274.0
($848.0)
Pesticides: Protect the Environment from Pesticide Risk
$1,737.5
$2,324.0
$2,195.0
($129.0)
Pesticides: Realize the Value of Pesticide Availability
$427.4
$570.0
$527.0
($43.0)
Subtotal, Pesticides Licensing
$5,937.0
$6,016.0
$4,996.0
($1,020.0)
Research: Air and Energy




Research: Air and Energy
$104,407.9
$91,731.0
$30,592.0
($61,139.0)
Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources




Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources
$114,874.9
$107,230.0
$68,520.0
($38,710.0)
Research: Sustainable Communities




Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities
$154,349.4
$139,709.0
$54,211.0
($85,498.0)
Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability




Human Health Risk Assessment
$36,007.0
$37,530.0
$22,516.0
($15,014.0)
Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability




Endocrine Disruptors
$15,980.1
$0.0
$10,122.0
$10,122.0
Computational Toxicology
$23,937.4
$0.0
$17,165.0
$17,165.0
Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability
(other activities)
$53,405.9
$89,158.0
$34,386.0
($54,772.0)
Subtotal, Research: Chemical Safety and
Sustainability
$93,323.4
$89,158.0
$61,673.0
($27,485.0)
Subtotal, Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability
$129,330.4
$126,688.0
$84,189.0
($42,499.0)
Water: Human Health Protection




Drinking Water Programs
$3,975.8
$3,512.0
$3,657.0
$145.0
Congressional Priorities




Water Quality Research and Support Grants
$10,378.5
$14,073.0
$0.0
($14,073.0)
Total, Science & Technology
$763,829.4
$733,251.0
$450,812.0
($282,439.0)
Environmental Program & Management




Clean Air




Clean Air Allowance Trading Programs
$17,343.4
$16,112.0
$12,791.0
($3,321.0)
GHG Reporting Program
$106,864.3
$95,255.0
$13,580.0
($81,675.0)
Federal Stationary Source Regulations
$21,958.0
$22,899.0
$16,653.0
($6,246.0)
Federal Support for Air Quality Management
$138,050.2
$124,506.0
$96,456.0
($28,050.0)
Stratospheric Ozone: Domestic Programs
$5,195.6
$4,906.0
$3,687.0
($1,219.0)
Stratospheric Ozone: Multilateral Fund
$8,907.0
$8,911.0
$0.0
($8,911.0)
Subtotal, Clean Air
$298,318.5
$272,589.0
$143,167.0
($129,422.0)

-------
Program Project by Program Area
Indoor Air and Radiation
Indoor Air: Radon Program
Radiation: Protection
Radiation: Response Preparedness
Reduce Risks from Indoor Air
Subtotal, Indoor Air and Radiation
n 20l(.
Vi'liul"
$2,759.3
$8,371.0
$2,047.1
$12,972.9
$26,150.3
n 201 ~
Amiiiiili/cd ( U
$2,904.0
$8,427.0
$2,545.0
$13,707.0
$27,583.0
n 2ois
I'lV- lillll
$0.0
$0.0
$2,257.0
$0.0
$2,257.0
20IS I'iv- liuil
\-. 201"
\iiiiu:ili/ril ( U
($2,904.0)
($8,427.0)
($288.0)
($13,707.0)
($25,326.0)
Brownfields
Brownfields
Compliance
Compliance Monitoring
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
Criminal Enforcement
Environmental Justice
NEPA Implementation
Subtotal, Enforcement
$24,718.6
$103,713.4
$174,120.9
$47,844.7
$7,347.6
$15,761.3
$245,074.5
$25,544.0
$101,472.0
$171,051.0
$46,225.0
$6,724.0
$16,179.0
$240,179.0
$16,082.0
$86,431.0
$140,470.0
$40,341.0
$0.0
$13,496.0
$194,307.0
($9,462.0)
($15,041.0)
($30,581.0)
($5,884.0)
($6,724.0)
($2,683.0)
($45,872.0)
Geographic Programs
Geographic Program: Chesapeake Bay	$77,543.8	$72,861.0
Geographic Program: Gulf of Mexico	$5,392.3	$4,473.0
Geographic Program: Lake Champlain	$4,395.0	$4,391.0
Geographic Program: Long Island Sound	$3,935.6	$3,932.0
Geographic Program: Other
Lake Pontchartrain	$947.0	$0.0
S. New England Estuary (SNEE)	$4,975.0	$0.0
Geographic Program: Other (other activities)	$1,460.0	$7,379.0
Subtotal, Geographic Program: Other	$7,382.0	$7,379.0
Great Lakes Restoration	$288,091.8	$299,430.0
Geographic Program: South Florida	$1,733.0	$1,701.0
Geographic Program: San Francisco Bay	$4,600.7	$4,810.0
Geographic Program: Puget Sound	$28,046.3	$27,947.0
Subtotal, Geographic Programs	$421,120.5	$426,924.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
($72,861.0)
($4,473.0)
($4,391.0)
($3,932.0)
$0.0
$0.0
($7,379.0)
($7,379.0)
($299,430.0)
($1,701.0)
($4,810.0)
($27,947.0)
($426,924.0)
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Communication and Information
Homeland Security: Critical Infrastructure Protection
$4,025.3
$627.1
$3,870.0
$970.0
$3,512.0
$0.0
($358.0)
($970.0)
33

-------
Program Project by Program Area



n 2HI(i
WIiijK
n 201"
\iiiiii;ili/('il ( U
n 201s
I'll - lillll
20IS I'iv- liuil
\-. 201"
\llllll:ili/ril ( U
Homeland Security: Protection of EPA Personnel and
Infrastructure
$4,987.0
$5,336.0
$4,986.0
($350.0)
Subtotal, Homeland Security
$9,639.4
$10,176.0
$8,498.0
($1,678.0)
Information Exchange / Outreach




State and Local Prevention and Preparedness
$15,044.1
$15,289.0
$10,011.0
($5,278.0)
TRI / Right to Know
$13,292.4
$13,856.0
$8,680.0
($5,176.0)
Tribal - Capacity Building
$14,056.3
$14,358.0
$11,731.0
($2,627.0)
Executive Management and Operations
$47,798.4
$46,930.0
$37,106.0
($9,824.0)
Environmental Education
$10,138.8
$8,685.0
$0.0
($8,685.0)
Exchange Network
$17,066.5
$16,984.0
$11,784.0
($5,200.0)
Small Minority Business Assistance
$1,464.0
$1,667.0
$0.0
($1,667.0)
Small Business Ombudsman
$2,378.0
$1,995.0
$1,965.0
($30.0)
Children and Other Sensitive Populations: Agency
Coordination
$6,252.7
$6,535.0
$2,018.0
($4,517.0)
Subtotal, Information Exchange / Outreach
$127,491.2
$126,299.0
$83,295.0
($43,004.0)
International Programs




US Mexico Border
$2,913.7
$3,057.0
$0.0
($3,057.0)
International Sources of Pollution
$6,345.0
$6,418.0
$4,051.0
($2,367.0)
Trade and Governance
$6,231.3
$5,896.0
$0.0
($5,896.0)
Subtotal, International Programs
$15,490.0
$15,371.0
$4,051.0
($11,320.0)
IT / Data Management / Security




Information Security
$27,152.6
$28,132.0
$11,997.0
($16,135.0)
IT / Data Management
$83,883.2
$83,790.0
$70,069.0
($13,721.0)
Subtotal, IT / Data Management / Security
$111,035.8
$111,922.0
$82,066.0
($29,856.0)
Legal / Science / Regulatory / Economic Review




Integrated Environmental Strategies
$13,429.0
$11,469.0
$9,151.0
($2,318.0)
Administrative Law
$4,984.0
$4,765.0
$4,141.0
($624.0)
Alternative Dispute Resolution
$1,442.1
$1,043.0
$0.0
($1,043.0)
Civil Rights Program
$11,216.7
$10,052.0
$8,266.0
($1,786.0)
Legal Advice: Environmental Program
$49,227.0
$48,473.0
$42,565.0
($5,908.0)
Legal Advice: Support Program
$14,692.6
$15,450.0
$15,548.0
$98.0
Regional Science and Technology
$1,602.1
$1,529.0
$0.0
($1,529.0)
Science Advisory Board
$4,203.8
$3,875.0
$3,567.0
($308.0)
Regulatory/Economic-Management and Analysis
$15,218.6
$14,546.0
$15,208.0
$662.0
Subtotal, Legal / Science / Regulatory / Economic Review
$116,015.9
$111,202.0
$98,446.0
($12,756.0)

-------
Program Project by Program Area
Operations and Administration
Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Acquisition Management
Fluman Resources Management
Financial Assistance Grants / IAG Management
Workforce Reshaping
Subtotal, Operations and Administration
n 2HI(i
Vi'linl"
$70,707.8
$304,456.9
$30,174.3
$40,756.0
$27,202.6
$0.0
$473,297.6
n 2111"
\miii:ili/ril ( U
$72,047.0
$310,948.0
$30,406.0
$43,185.0
$25,248.0
$0.0
$481,834.0
n 20IK
I'lV- lillll
$64,709.0
$301,001.0
$24,978.0
$40,512.0
$18,564.0
$46,719.0
$496,483.0
20IS I'iv- liuil
\-. 201"
\iiiiu:ili/ril ( U
($7,338.0)
($9,947.0)
($5,428.0)
($2,673.0)
($6,684.0)
$46,719.0
$14,649.0
Pesticides Licensing
Science Policy and Biotechnology	$1,362.5	$1,172.0	$0.0	($1,172.0)
Pesticides: Protect Fluman Flealth from Pesticide Risk	$57,708.1	$57,699.0	$48,568.0	($9,131.0)
Pesticides: Protect the Environment from Pesticide Risk	$39,651.4	$37,222.0	$31,930.0	($5,292.0)
Pesticides: Realize the Value of Pesticide Availability	$7,727.5	$6,074.0	$5,028.0	($1,046.0)
Subtotal, Pesticides Licensing	$106,449.5	$102,167.0	$85,526.0	($16,641.0)
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
RCRA: Corrective Action
RCRA: Waste Management
RCRA: Waste Minimization & Recycling
Subtotal, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
(RCRA)
$37,967.0
$57,022.8
$8,510.8
$103,500.6
$36,860.0
$58,986.0
$8,832.0
$104,678.0
$31,947.0
$41,146.0
$0.0
$73,093.0
($4,913.0)
($17,840.0)
($8,832.0)
($31,585.0)
Toxics Risk Review and Prevention
Endocrine Disruptors
Pollution Prevention Program
Toxic Substances: Chemical Risk Review and
Reduction
Toxic Substances: Lead Risk Reduction Program
Subtotal, Toxics Risk Review and Prevention
$6,035.4
$11,982.4
$56,030.4
$13,051.2
$87,099.4
$7,539.0
$13,115.0
$58,443.0
$13,250.0
$92,347.0
$0.0
$0.0
$65,036.0
$0.0
$65,036.0
($7,539.0)
($13,115.0)
$6,593.0
($13,250.0)
($27,311.0)
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
LUST/UST
Water: Ecosystems
National Estuary Program / Coastal Waterways
Wetlands
Subtotal, Water: Ecosystems
$11,083.4
$25,862.3
$21,065.5
$46,927.8
$11,273.0
$26,672.0
$21,025.0
$47,697.0
$5,612.0
$0.0
$18,115.0
$18,115.0
($5,661.0)
($26,672.0)
($2,910.0)
($29,582.0)
Water: Human Health Protection
35

-------
Program Project by Program Area
Beach / Fish Programs
Drinking Water Programs
Subtotal, Water: Human Health Protection
n 2UI0	n 201 -
WIiijK	\iniu;ili/iil ( k
$1,779.8	$1,978.0
$96,372.2	$96,341.0
$98,152.0	$98,319.0
n 20IS
l'iv liinl
$0.0
$80,044.0
$80,044.0
20IS I'iv- liinl
w 201-
\lllllliili/ril ( U
($1,978.0)
($16,297.0)
($18,275.0)
Water Quality Protection
Marine Pollution
Surface Water Protection
Subtotal, Water Quality Protection
$10,757.8
$202,080.5
$212,838.3
$10,142.0
$199,875.0
$210,017.0
$0.0
$174,975.0
$174,975.0
($10,142.0)
($24,900.0)
($35,042.0)
Congressional Priorities
Water Quality Research and Support Grants
Total, Environmental Program & Management
$12,678.0	$12,676.0
$2,650,794.7	$2,630,269.0
$0.0	($12,676.0)
$1,717,484.0	($912,785.0)
Inspector General
Audits, Evaluations, and Investigations
Audits, Evaluations, and Investigations
Total, Inspector General
$39,802.3
$39,802.3
$41,410.0
$41,410.0
$37,475.0
$37,475.0
($3,935.0)
($3,935.0)
Building and Facilities
Homeland Security
Homeland Security: Protection of EPA Personnel and
Infrastructure
$7,366.2
$6,664.0
$6,176.0
($488.0)
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Total, Building and Facilities
$37,184.2	$35,573.0
$44,550.4	$42,237.0
$33,377.0	($2,196.0)
$39,553.0	($2,684.0)
Hazardous Substance Superfund
Indoor Air and Radiation
Radiation: Protection
$2,194.2
$1,981.0
$0.0
($1,981.0)
Audits, Evaluations, and Investigations
Audits, Evaluations, and Investigations
>,975.4
$9,920.0
$3,900.0
($6,020.0)
Compliance
Compliance Monitoring
$844.1
$993.0
$605.0
($388.0)
Enforcement
Criminal Enforcement
Environmental Justice
$6,883.7
$681.7
$7,110.0
$544.0
,161.0	($2,949.0)
$0.0	($544.0)
36

-------
Program Project by Program Area
Forensics Support
Superfund: Enforcement
Superfiind: Federal Facilities Enforcement
Subtotal, Enforcement
n 2HI(i
WIimK
$1,739.3
$154,117.5
$6,217.9
$169,640.1
n 201"
\llllll:ili/cil ( U
$1,087.0
$150,342.0
$6,976.0
$166,059.0
n 20IS
l'iv liuil
$708.0
$94,418.0
$0.0
$99,287.0
20IS I'iv- liuil
\-. 201"
\llllll:ili/ril ( U
($379.0)
($55,924.0)
($6,976.0)
($66,772.0)
Homeland Security
Flomeland Security: Preparedness, Response, and
Recovery
Flomeland Security: Protection of EPA Personnel and
Infrastructure
Subtotal, Homeland Security
$36,411.9
$833.6
$37,245.5
$35,209.0
$1,084.0
$36,293.0
$16,457.0
$542.0
$16,999.0
($18,752.0)
($542.0)
($19,294.0)
Information Exchange / Outreach
Exchange Network
$1,291.4
$1,325.0
$838.0
($487.0)
IT / Data Management / Security
Information Security
IT / Data Management
Subtotal, IT / Data Management / Security
$6,008.0
$14,968.1
$20,976.1
$6,071.0
$13,776.0
$19,847.0
$3,186.0
$8,213.0
$11,399.0
($2,885.0)
($5,563.0)
($8,448.0)
Legal / Science / Regulatory / Economic Review
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Legal Advice: Environmental Program
Subtotal, Legal / Science / Regulatory / Economic Review
$486.5
$652.4
$1,138.9
$674.0
$577.0
$1,251.0
$0.0
$349.0
$349.0
($674.0)
($228.0)
($902.0)
Operations and Administration
Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Acquisition Management
Human Resources Management
Financial Assistance Grants / IAG Management
Workforce Reshaping
Subtotal, Operations and Administration
$21,331.2
$69,168.0
$22,129.0
$4,908.5
$2,845.0
$0.0
$120,381.7
$22,084.0
$74,137.0
$22,418.0
$6,333.0
$2,889.0
$0.0
$127,861.0
$12,226.0
$59,072.0
$14,036.0
$4,580.0
$1,591.0
$10,437.0
$101,942.0
($9,858.0)
($15,065.0)
($8,382.0)
($1,753.0)
($1,298.0)
$10,437.0
($25,919.0)
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities
$13,622.3
$14,005.0
$5,655.0
($8,350.0)
Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability
Human Health Risk Assessment
$2,751.4
$2,838.0
$5,305.0
$2,467.0
Superfund Cleanup
37

-------
Program Project by Program Area
Superfund: Emergency Response and Removal
Superfund: EPA Emergency Preparedness
Superfund: Federal Facilities
Superfund: Remedial
Subtotal, Superfund Cleanup
Total, Hazardous Substance Superfund
n 201 f,
Vi'liul"
$210,668.5
$8,148.1
$21,799.4
$539,387.1
$780,003.1
$1,159,064.2
n 201"
\llllll:ili/cil ( U
$180,961.0
$7,622.0
$21,085.0
$500,048.0
$709,716.0
$1,092,089.0
n 20IS
l'iv lillll
$147,212.0
$7,216.0
$19,553.0
$341,803.0
$515,784.0
$762,063.0
20IS I'iv- liuil
w 201-
\lllllliili/ril ( U
($33,749.0)
($406.0)
($1,532.0)
($158,245.0)
($193,932.0)
($330,026.0)
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
$758.0
$619.0
$559.0
($60.0)
Operations and Administration
Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Acquisition Management
Subtotal, Operations and Administration
$426.0
$785.2
$152.5
$1,363.7
$423.0
$782.0
$145.0
$1,350.0
$423.0
$785.0
$138.0
$1,346.0
$0.0
$3.0
($7.0)
($4.0)
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
LUST / UST
LUST Cooperative Agreements
LUST Prevention
Subtotal, Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
$9,159.3
$55,832.9
$26,273.2
$91,265.4
$9,222.0
$54,935.0
$25,321.0
$89,478.0
$6,364.0
$38,840.0
$0.0
$45,204.0
($2,858.0)
($16,095.0)
($25,321.0)
($44,274.0)
Research: Sustainable Communities
Research: Sustainable and Flealthy Communities
Total, Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$315.5	$319.0
$93,702.6	$91,766.0
$320.0	$1.0
$47,429.0	($44,337.0)
Inland Oil Spill Programs
Compliance
Compliance Monitoring
$143.3
$139.0
$124.0
($15.0)
Enforcement
Civil Enforcement
$2,444.0
$2,408.0
$2,266.0
($142.0)
Oil
Oil Spill: Prevention, Preparedness and Response
$14,553.9
$14,382.0
$12,144.0
($2,238.0)
Operations and Administration
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
$679.6
$583.0
$680.0
$97.0
38

-------
Program Project by Program Area
201S I'iv- liuil
n 201(1	n 201"	n 20IS	201"

WIiijK
Amiiiiili/cd ( U
I'lV- lillll
\iiiiu:ili/ril ( U
Research: Sustainable Communities




Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities
$862.0
$663.0
$503.0
($160.0)
Total, Inland Oil Spill Programs
$18,682.8
$18,175.0
$15,717.0
($2,458.0)
State and Tribal Assistance Grants




State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG)




Infrastructure Assistance: Alaska Native Villages
$19,499.9
$19,962.0
$0.0
($19,962.0)
Brownfields Projects
$88,874.4
$79,848.0
$69,000.0
($10,848.0)
Infrastructure Assistance: Clean Water SRF
$1,350,884.4
$1,391,237.0
$1,393,887.0
$2,650.0
Infrastructure Assistance: Drinking Water SRF
$853,752.7
$861,592.0
$863,233.0
$1,641.0
Infrastructure Assistance: Lead Infrastructure1
$0.0
$100,000.0
$0.0
($100,000.0)
Infrastructure Assistance: Mexico Border
$10,345.6
$9,981.0
$0.0
($9,981.0)
Diesel Emissions Reduction Grant Program
$53,750.5
$49,905.0
$10,000.0
($39,905.0)
Targeted Airshed Grants
$9,934.4
$19,962.0
$0.0
($19,962.0)
Subtotal, State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG)
$2,387,041.9
$2,532,487.0
$2,336,120.0
($196,367.0)
Categorical Grants




Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319)
$166,177.0
$164,601.0
$0.0
($164,601.0)
Categorical Grant: Public Water System Supervision
(PWSS)
$100,104.1
$101,769.0
$71,238.0
($30,531.0)
Categorical Grant: State and Local Air Quality
Management
$227,533.6
$227,785.0
$159,450.0
($68,335.0)
Categorical Grant: Radon
$8,114.2
$8,036.0
$0.0
($8,036.0)
Categorical Grant: Pollution Control (Sec. 106)




Monitoring Grants
$18,838.3
$0.0
$12,470.0
$12,470.0
Categorical Grant: Pollution Control (Sec.
106) (other activities)
$214,316.1
$230,367.0
$148,787.0
($81,580.0)
Subtotal, Categorical Grant: Pollution Control (Sec.
106)
$233,154.4
$230,367.0
$161,257.0
($69,110.0)
Categorical Grant: Wetlands Program Development
$13,562.2
$14,633.0
$10,243.0
($4,390.0)
Categorical Grant: Underground Injection Control
(UIC)
$10,053.6
$10,486.0
$7,340.0
($3,146.0)
Categorical Grant: Pesticides Program Implementation
$12,841.3
$12,677.0
$8,874.0
($3,803.0)
Categorical Grant: Lead
$14,694.6
$14,022.0
$0.0
($14,022.0)
Categorical Grant: Hazardous Waste Financial
Assistance
$98,994.1
$99,503.0
$69,652.0
($29,851.0)
Categorical Grant: Pesticides Enforcement
$17,845.0
$18,016.0
$11,050.0
($6,966.0)
Categorical Grant: Pollution Prevention
$5,417.7
$4,756.0
$0.0
($4,756.0)
Categorical Grant: Toxics Substances Compliance
$5,220.0
$4,910.0
$3,437.0
($1,473.0)
1 Section 196 (a) of P.L. 114-254 provided an additional one-time $100 million to address lead infrastructure in communities with declared emergencies
relating to public health threats associated with lead in drinking water. The full amount was allocated to Flint, MI.
39

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Program Project by Program Area
Categorical Grant: Tribal General Assistance Program
Categorical Grant: Underground Storage Tanks
Categorical Grant: Tribal Air Quality Management
Categorical Grant: Environmental Information
Categorical Grant: Beaches Protection
Categorical Grant: Brownfields
Categorical Grant: Multipurpose Grants
Subtotal, Categorical Grants
n 2HI(i
Vi'luiil"
$67,888.7
$1,495.4
$13,104.5
$9,696.4
$9,487.0
$48,465.8
$20,642.7
$1,084,492.3
n 201 -
\iniu;ili/i il ( k
$65,352.0
$1,495.0
$12,805.0
$9,628.0
$9,531.0
$47,654.0
$20,960.0
$1,078,986.0
n 201s
I'll - lillll
$45,746.0
$0.0
$8,963.0
$6,739.0
$0.0
$33,358.0
$0.0
$597,347.0
20IS I'iv- liuil
\-. 201"
\lllllliili/ril ( U
($19,606.0)
($1,495.0)
($3,842.0)
($2,889.0)
($9,531.0)
($14,296.0)
($20,960.0)
($481,639.0)
Congressional Priorities
Congressionally Mandated Projects
Total, State and Tribal Assistance Grants
$13,302.0	$0.0
$3,484,836.2	$3,611,473.0
$0.0	$0.0
$2,933,467.0	($678,006.0)
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
RCRA: Waste Management
Total, Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System
Fund
$2,910.2
$2,910.2
$3,667.0
$3,667.0
$0.02
$0.0
($3,667.0)
($3,667.0)
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Fund
Water Quality Protection
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Total, Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Fund
$0.0
$0.0
$20,000.0
$20,000.0
$20,000.0
$20,000.0
$0.0
Cancellation of Funds
SUB-TOTAL, EPA
$0.0	($40,000.0)	($369,000.0)	($329,000.0)
$8,258,172.8	$8,244,337.0	$5,655,000.0 ($2,589,337.0)
Hurricane Sandy Supplemental
$238.8
$0.0
$0.0
$0.0
TOTAL, EPA
$8,258,411.6	$8,244,337.0
$5,655,000.0 ($2,589,337.0)
*For ease of comparison, Superfund transfer resources for the audit and research functions are shown in the Superfiind account.
The EPA requests an appropriation of $3.67 million in FY 2018 that will net to $0 through offsetting collections of E-Manifest system user fees. The
appropriation will cover necessary costs to implement and operate the E-Manifest system.
40

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Resources by Appropriation
Summary of Agency Resources by Appropriation
(Dollars in Thousands)
Appropriation
FY 2016
Enacted
FY 2017
Annualized CR
FY 2018
Pres Bud
Delta
FY 18 PB-
FY 17 ACR
Science & Technology (S&T)
$734,648
$733,251
$450,812
($282,439)
Environmental Program & Management
(EPM)
$2,635,279
$2,630,269
$1,717,484
($915,785)
Inspector General (IG)
$41,489
$41,410
$37,475
($3,935)
Building and Facilities (B&F)
$42,317
$42,237
$39,553
($2,684)
Inland Oil Spill Programs (Oil)
$18,209
$18,175
$15,717
($2,458)
Hazardous Substance Superfund (SF)
-	Superfund Program
-	Inspector General Transfer
-	Science & Technology Transfer
$1,094,169
$1,065,380
$9,939
$18,850
$1,092,089
$1,063,355
$9,920
$18,814
$762,063
$745,728
$3,900
$12,435
($330,026)
($317,627)
($6,020)
($6,379)
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST)
$91,941
$91,766
$47,429
($44,337)
State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG)
-	Categorical Grants
-	State Revolving Funds
-	All Other STAG1
$3,518,161
$1,081,041
$2,257,120
$180,000
$3,611,473
$1,078,986
$2,252,829
$279,658
$2,933,467
$597,347
$2,257,120
$79,000
($678,006)
($481,639)
$4,291
($200,658)
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Program (WIFIA)
$0
$20,000
$20,000
$0
E-Manifest
$3,674
$3,667
$02
($3,667)
Cancellations
($40,000)
($40,000)
($369,000)
($329,000)
Agency Total
$8,139,887
$8,244,337
$5,655,000
($2,589,337)
Notes: 1) S&T and IG totals do not include Superfund transfers - see the Superfund line items for annual amounts.
2) As part of the FY 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 114-113), the EPA received $27 million for
cybersecurity activities, of which $5.4 million was allocated to the Superfund Appropriation and $21.6 million was
allocated to the Environmental Programs Management Appropriation as part of the agency's FY 2016 Enacted
Budget.
1 Section 196 (a) of P.L. 114-254 provided an additional one-time $100 million in FY 2017 to address lead infrastructure in
communities with declared emergencies relating to public health threats associated with lead in drinking water. The full amount was
allocated to Flint, Ml.
2The EPA requests an appropriation of $3.67 million that will net to $0 through offsetting collections of E-Manifest system user fees.
The appropriation will cover necessary costs to implement and operate the E-Manifest system.
41

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42

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Categorical Grants
Categorical Program Grants
by National Program and State Grant
(Dollars in Thousands)
NPM/ Grant
FY 2016
Actuals
FY 2017
ACR
FY 2018
Pres Bud
Delta
FY 2018 PB-
FY2017ACR
Change
FY 2018 PB-
FY 2017 ACR
Air & Radiation





State and Local Air Quality Management
$227,534
$227,785
$159,450
($68,335)
-30.0%
Tribal Air Quality Management
$13,105
$12,805
$8,963
($3,842)
-30.0%
Radon
$8,114
$8,036
$0
($8,036)
-100.0%

$248,753
$248,626
$168,413
($80,213)
-32.3%
Water





Pollution Control (Sec. 106)
$223,154
$230,367
$161,257
($69,110)
-30.0%
Beaches Protection
$9,487
$9,531
$0
($9,531)
-100.0%
Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319)
$166,177
$164,601
$0
($164,601)
-100.0%
Wetlands Program Development
$13,562
$14,633
$10,243
($4,390)
-30.0%

$422,380
$419,132
$171,500
($247,632)
-59.1%
Drinkina Water





Public Water System Supervision (PWSS)
$100,104
$101,769
$71,238
($30,531)
-30.0%
Underground Injection Control (UIC)
$10,054
$10,486
$7,340
($3,146)
-30.0%

$110,158
$112,255
$78,578
($33,677)
-30.0%
Hazardous Waste





Hazardous Waste Financial Assistance
$98,994
$99,503
$69,652
($29,851)
-30.0%
Brownfields
$48,466
$47,654
$33,358
($14,296)
-30.0%
Underground Storage Tanks
$1,495
$1,495
$0
($1,495)
-100.0%

$148,955
$148,652
$103,010
($45,642)
-30.7%
Pesticides & Toxics





Pesticides Program Implementation
$12,841
$12,677
$8,874
($3,803)
-30.0%
Lead
$14,695
$14,022
$0
($14,022)
-100.0%
Toxics Substances Compliance
$5,220
$4,910
$3,437
($1,473)
-30.0%
Pesticides Enforcement
$17,845
$18,016
$11,050
($6,966)
-38.7%

$50,601
$49,625
$23,361
($26,264)
-52.9%
Multimedia





Environmental Information
$9,969
$9,628
$6,739
($2,889)
-30.0%
Multipurpose Grants
$20,643
$20,960
$0
($20,960)
-100.0%
Pollution Prevention
$5,418
$4,756
$0
($4,756)
-100.0%
Tribal General Assistance Program
$67,889
$65,352
$45,746
($19,606)
-30.0%

$103,646
$100,696
$52,485
($48,211)
-47.9%
Total Categorical Grants
$1,084,493
$1,078,986
$597,347
($481,639)
-44.6%
Notes 1.) Totals may not add due to rounding
2.) FY 2018 proposed cancellation not shown
43

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44

-------
Categorical Grants
Categorical Grants
(Dollars in millions)
$1,078 $1,095 $1,116 $1,104 $1,089 $1,032 $1,054 $1,054 $1,081 $1,078
S597
$1,400
$1,200
$1,000
$800
$600
$400
$200
$0 -L	^	-p,	I	-r	r~		r-	-r	-<
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
EN EN EN EN EN EN EN EN EN ACR PB
Note: EN - Enacted, ACR - Annualized Continuing Resolution, PB - President's Budget
Categorical Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests a total of $597 million for 13 categorical program grants for state, interstate
organizations, non-profit organizations, intertribal consortia, and Tribal governments. The EPA will continue
to pursue its strategy of building and supporting state, local, and Tribal capacity to implement, operate, and
enforce the nation's environmental laws. Most environmental laws were designed with a decentralized
nationwide structure to protect public health and the environment. In this way, environmental goals will
ultimately be achieved through the actions, programs, and commitments of state, Tribal, and local
governments, organizations, and citizens.
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to offer flexibility to state and Tribal governments to manage their
environmental programs as well as provide technical and financial assistance to achieve mutual
environmental goals. First, the EPA and its state and Tribal partners will continue implementing the National
Environmental Performance Partnership System (NEPPS). NEPPS is designed to allow states the flexibility
to operate their programs, while continuing to emphasize measuring and reporting of environmental results.
Second, Performance Partnership Grants (PPGs) will continue to allow states and tribes funding flexibility
to combine categorical program grants to address environmental priorities and, in some cases, to reduce
administrative burden.
HIGHLIGHTS:
State & Local Air Quality Management, and Tribal Air Quality Management
The FY 2018 request includes $168.4 million for grants to support State and Local, and Tribal Air Quality
Management programs. Grant funds for State and Local Air Quality Management and Tribal Air Quality
Management are requested in the amounts of $159.4 million and $9.0 million, respectively. These funds
45

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Categorical Grants
provide resources to multi-state, state, local, and Tribal air pollution control agencies for the development
and implementation of programs for the prevention and control of air pollution and for the implementation
of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set to protect public health and the environment. In FY
2018, the EPA will continue to work with state and local air pollution control agencies to develop and
implement state implementation plans (SIPs) for NAAQS, monitor industry compliance with EPA stationary
source regulations, develop plans for regional haze, and develop and operate air quality monitoring
networks.
The EPA will work with federally recognized Tribal governments nationwide to develop and implement Tribal
air quality management programs and to build Tribal air quality management capacity. Tribes are active in
protection of air quality for the land over which they have sovereignty and work closely with the EPA to
monitor and report air quality information.
Water Pollution Control (Clean Water Act Section 106) Grants
The EPA's FY 2018 request includes $161.3 million for Water Pollution Control grants to state, interstate,
and tribal water quality programs. These water quality funds assist state and tribal efforts to restore and
maintain the quality of the nation's waters through water quality standards, improving water quality
monitoring and assessment, implementing Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and other watershed-
related plans, and the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The EPA
will work with states to incorporate rules governing discharges and revise NPDES permits.
States and authorized tribes will continue to review and update their water quality standards as required by
the Clean Water Act. In FY 2018, the EPA requests $12.5 million of the Section 106 funding be provided to
states and tribes that participate in collecting statistically valid water monitoring data and implement
enhancements in their water monitoring programs.
Wetlands Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA request includes $10.2 million for Wetlands Program grants, which provide technical
and financial assistance to the states, tribes, and local governments. These grants support development of
state and tribal wetland programs that further the national goal of an overall increase in the acreage and
condition of wetlands. The Wetland Program Development Grants are the EPA's primary resource for
supporting state and tribal wetland program development. Grants are used to develop new or refine existing
state and tribal wetland programs in one or more of the following areas: monitoring and assessment,
voluntary restoration and protection, regulatory programs including Section 401 certification, and wetland
water quality standards.
Public Water System Supervision Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $71.2 million for Public Water System Supervision (PWSS) grants. These
grants provide assistance to implement and enforce National Primary Drinking Water Regulations to ensure
the safety of the Nation's drinking water resources and to protect public health. Through this funding, the
EPA will build on current efforts to identify, prevent, and protect drinking water from known and emerging
contaminants that potentially endanger public health. All these activities help address health based
violations, water supply shortages, and provide operational efficiencies that protect the nation's
infrastructure investment.
Underground Injection Control (UIC) Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $7.3 million for the Underground Injection Control (UIC) grants program.
Grants are provided to states that have primary enforcement authority (primacy) to implement and maintain
UIC programs. The requested funding allows forthe implementation of the UIC program including for states
and tribes to administer UIC permitting programs, provide program oversight, implementation tools, and
public outreach, and ensure that injection wells are safely operated. In addition, the EPA will continue to
process primacy applications and permit applications for Class VI geological sequestration wells. The EPA
46

-------
Categorical Grants
directly implements the Class VI geologic sequestration program, as no states have received approval for
Class VI primacy either through a state UIC program revision or through a new application from states
without any UIC primary enforcement authority.
Tribal General Assistance Program Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $45.7 million in General Assistance Program (GAP) grants to provide tribes
with a foundation to build their capacity to address environmental issues on Indian lands. This request will
assist the EPA's partnership and collaboration with tribes to address environmental program responsibilities
and challenges. Resources will support activities to help tribes transition from capacity development to
program implementation, and support the development of EPA-Tribal Environmental Plans (ETEPs) to
identify EPA and Tribal responsibilities for ensuring environmental and public health responsibilities in
Indian country. The grants will assist Tribal governments in building environmental capacity to assess
environmental conditions, utilize available federal and other information, and build and administer
environmental programs tailored to their needs.
Pesticide Enforcement and Toxics Substances Compliance Grants
The FY 2018 request includes $14.5 million to build environmental partnerships with states and tribes that
strengthen their ability to address environmental and public health threats from pesticides and toxic
substances. The compliance monitoring and enforcement state grants request consists of $11.1 million for
Pesticides Enforcement and $3.4 million for Toxic Substances Compliance Grants.
State and Tribal compliance and enforcement grants will be awarded to assist in the implementation of
compliance and enforcement provisions of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Federal
Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). The Toxic Substance Compliance Grants fund
activities which protect the public and the environment from hazards associated with exposure to
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos, and lead-based paint.
Under the Pesticides Enforcement Grant program, the EPA provides resources to states and Indian tribes
to conduct FIFRA compliance inspections, take appropriate enforcement actions, and implement programs
for farm worker protection. The program also sponsors training for state and Tribal inspectors through the
Pesticide Inspector Residential Program (PIRT) and for state and Tribal managers through the Pesticide
Regulatory Education Program (PREP).
These grants support state and Tribal compliance activities to protect the environment from harmful
chemicals and pesticides.
Pesticides Program Implementation Grants
The FY 2018 request includes $8.9 million for Pesticides Program Implementation grants. These resources
will assist states, tribes, and partners with outreach, training, technical assistance, and implementation of
various pesticide programs and issues including: pesticide worker safety, protection of endangered species
and water sources, bed bug issues, pollinator protection, spray drift reduction and promotion of
environmental stewardship approaches to pesticide use. The Pesticides Program Implementation grants
help state programs stay current with changing requirements.
Environmental Information Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $6.7 million for the Environmental Information Exchange Network (EN) grant
program. The EN grants provide funding to states, territories, federally recognized Indian tribes, and Tribal
consortia to support their participation in the EN. These grants help EN partners acquire and develop the
hardware and software needed to connect to the Network; use the EN to collect, report, access, and analyze
the data they need with greater efficiency; and integrate environmental data across programs. In
collaboration with the EPA, the states and tribes accept the EN as the standard approach for EPA and state
data sharing. The grant program provides the funding to make this approach a reality. Specifically, grants
47

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Categorical Grants
will be used to develop publishing services, develop desktop and mobile applications that can send and
receive data via the network, expand the network to new priority data systems, transition network services
to an EPA-hosted cloud-based node, increase data sharing among partners, bring electronic reporting into
compliance with the Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule (CROMERR) using EPA hosted shared
services as well as other priorities.
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to collaborate with our state, local, and Tribal partners to achieve benefits
that reach beyond the standardization and exchange of data. The EPA, states and tribes are making
progress on implementing business processes and systems to reduce reporting burden on regulated
facilities and improving effectiveness and efficiency of environmental protection programs. This work builds
on the successful state/EPA collaboration with the Environmental Information Exchange Network, a
partnership which is enabling the exchange and sharing of critical environmental data, leading to enhanced
analysis of environmental conditions and improved decision-making. In FY 2018, the agency will adjust
schedules and priorities to align with capacity.
Hazardous Waste Financial Assistance Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $69.7 million for Hazardous Waste Financial Assistance grants. Hazardous
Waste Financial Assistance grants are used for the implementation of the Resource Conservation and
Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste program, which includes permitting, authorization, waste
minimization, enforcement, and corrective action activities.
Brownfields Grants
In FY 2018, the EPA requests $33.4 million for the Brownfields grant program that provides assistance to
states and tribes to establish core capabilities and enhance their state and Tribal Brownfields response
programs. These response programs address contaminated brownfields sites that do not require federal
action but need assessment and/or cleanup before they can be ready for reuse. States and tribes may use
grant funding under this program to develop a public record, create an inventory of brownfields sites,
develop oversight and enforcement authorities, conduct public education and opportunities for public
participation, develop mechanisms for approval of cleanup plans and certification that cleanup efforts are
completed, capitalize a Revolving Loan Fund for brownfields-related work, purchase environmental
insurance, develop tracking and management systems for land use, and conduct site specific activities such
as assessments and cleanups at brownfields sites.
48

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SRF Obligations by State
Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Resources
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) Resources
State-by-State distribution of Actual and Estimated Obligations
Fiscal Years 2016 to 2018 - Dollars in Thousands
The following tables show state-by-state distribution of resources for EPA's two
largest State and Tribal Grant Programs, the Clean Water State Revolving Fund
and the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.
49

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SRF Obligations by State
Infrastructure Assistance:
Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF)
(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2018

ACT.
EST.
EST.
STATE
OBLIG.
OBLIG.
OBLIG.
Alabama
$15,091
$15,216
$15,245
Alaska
$8,077
$8,144
$8,160
American Samoa
$7,320
$7,375
$7,389
Arizona
$11,244
$9,191
$9,209
Arkansas
$8,829
$8,901
$8,919
California
$105,878
$97,320
$97,509
Colorado
$10,795
$10,885
$10,906
Connecticut
$16,573
$16,670
$16,703
Delaware
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
District of Columbia
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Florida
$45,911
$45,932
$46,022
Georgia
$22,819
$23,007
$23,052
Guam
$4,447
$5,336
$5,347
Hawaii
$10,368
$10,539
$10,559
Idaho
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Illinois
$60,943
$61,542
$61,662
Indiana
$32,525
$32,794
$32,858
Iowa
$18,266
$18,416
$18,452
Kansas
$12,182
$12,283
$12,306
Kentucky
$17,177
$17,319
$17,352
Louisiana
$14,836
$14,959
$14,988
Maine
$10,447
$10,533
$10,554
Maryland
$32,641
$32,911
$32,975
Massachusetts
$45,821
$46,200
$46,290
Michigan
$58,030
$58,509
$58,623
Minnesota
$25,029
$25,010
$25,059
Mississippi
$12,159
$12,260
$12,284
Missouri
$37,413
$37,722
$37,796
Montana
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Nebraska
$6,845
$6,960
$6,974
Nevada
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
New Hampshire
$13,487
$13,598
$13,625
New Jersey
$55,150
$55,606
$55,714
New Mexico
$8,174
$6,680
$6,693
New York
$149,678
$150,196
$150,485
North Carolina
$24,357
$24,558
$24,606
North Dakota
$6,656
$6,680
$6,693
Northern Mariana Islands
$3,402
$3,427
$3,434
Ohio
$75,977
$76,604
$76,753
Oklahoma
$11,435
$10,994
$11,015
Oregon
$15,246
$15,372
$15,402
Pennsylvania
$53,736
$53,901
$54,006
Puerto Rico
$176
$17,748
$17,782
Rhode Island
$9,062
$9,137
$9,155
South Carolina
$13,826
$13,940
$13,967
South Dakota
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Tennessee
$7,320
$19,767
$19,806
Texas
$61,685
$62,194
$62,316
Utah
$7,111
$7,170
$7,184
Vermont
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Virgin Islands, U.S.
$4,435
$4,280
$4,289
Virginia
$27,344
$27,848
$27,902
Washington
$23,470
$23,664
$23,710
West Virginia
$21,039
$21,212
$21,254
Wisconsin
$36,486
$36,787
$36,859
Wyoming
$6,625
$6,680
$6,693
Tribal Resources
$11,552
$30,000
$30,000
Non-state Resouces
$6,1231
$5002
$5002
Sandy Supplemental
$1723
$0
$0
TOTAL:
$1,351,765
$1,391,237
$1,393,887
Notes:
1.	Includes $5,362 million for an Interagency Agreement with the Indian Health Service to provide services to increase basic sanitation access by providing wastewater
infrastructure to Indian Tribes, $703 thousand for American Iron and Steel Management and Oversight, and $58 thousand for the Nebraska Loan and Grants Tracking
system.
2.	American Iron and Steel Management and Oversight. EPA is adjusting resource retention to more accurately reflect costs associated with AIS implementation as
stipulated byWRRDA
3.	Payroll attributed to the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (P. L. 113-2).
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SRF Obligations by State




Infrastructure Assistance:




Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (SRF)



(Dollars in Thousands)





FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2018


ACT.
EST.
EST.
STATE

OBLIG.
OBLIG.
OBLIG.
Alabama

$15,876
$15,994
$16,025
Alaska

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
American Samoa

$1,775
$1,449
$1,452
Arizona

$20,950
$15,119
$15,149
Arkansas

$12,719
$12,814
$12,839
California

$79,420
$78,797
$78,944
Colorado

$14,468
$14,576
$14,604
Connecticut

$8,423
$8,485
$8,502
Delaware

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
District of Columbia

$8,324
$8,374
$8,391
Florida

$30,403
$30,630
$30,689
Georgia

$18,123
$18,258
$18,294
Guam

$3,703
$3,731
$3,738
Hawaii

$16,672
$8,374
$8,391
Idaho

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Illinois

$34,630
$34,948
$35,015
Indiana

$13,484
$13,584
$13,611
Iowa

$12,382
$12,525
$12,550
Kansas

$9,473
$9,544
$9,563
Kentucky

$12,941
$13,038
$13,063
Louisiana

$11,396
$11,481
$11,504
Maine

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Maryland

$14,108
$14,213
$14,241
Massachusetts

$15,451
$15,567
$15,597
Michigan

$25,873
$26,066
$26,117
Minnesota

$14,875
$14,985
$15,015
Mississippi

$8,607
$8,671
$8,688
Missouri

$16,781
$16,906
$16,939
Montana

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Nebraska

$8,175
$8,374
$8,391
Nevada

$11,854
$11,943
$11,966
New Hampshire

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
New Jersey

$15,815
$15,933
$15,964
New Mexico

$9,421
$8,374
$8,391
New York

$41,590
$40,197
$40,275
North Carolina

$19,449
$19,594
$19,632
North Dakota

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Northern Mariana Islands

$3,208
$3,232
$3,238
Ohio

$23,107
$23,279
$23,324
Oklahoma

$13,919
$13,493
$13,519
Oregon

$11,815
$11,894
$11,918
Pennsylvania

$26,578
$26,776
$26,828
Puerto Rico

$0
$8,374
$8,391
Rhode Island

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
South Carolina

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
South Dakota

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Tennessee

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Texas

$60,104
$60,552
$60,668
Utah

$8,674
$8,738
$8,756
Vermont

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Virgin Islands, U.S.

$4,120
$4,151
$4,158
Virginia

$13,776
$13,874
$13,901
Washington

$18,553
$18,691
$18,727
West Virginia

$8,354
$8,374
$8,391
Wisconsin

$14,496
$14,604
$14,633
Wyoming

$8,312
$8,374
$8,391
Tribal Resources

$8,156
$20,000
$20,000
Non-state Resources

$5,3661
$4,1542
$4,1583
Sandy Supplemental

$674
$0
$0
Lead Infrastructure

$0
$100,000s
$0
TOTAL:

$855,510
$961,592
$863,233
Notes:
1.	Includes $1.140 million in UCMR set aside, $366 thousand for American Iron and Steel Management and Oversight, $3,547 million for an Interagency Agreement with the
Indian Health Service to increase basic drinking water access to Indian Tribes, $311 thousand for the Nebraska Loan and Grants Tacking System, and $2 thousand for
surface water treatment training for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.
2.	Includes $2 million for UCMR set aside and $2,154 million for American Iron and Steel Management and Oversight.
3.	Includes $2 million for UCMR set aside and $2,158 million for American Iron and Steel Management and Oversight.
4.	Payroll attributed to the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (P. L. 113-2).
5.	Section 196 (a) of P.L. 114-254 provided an additional one-time $100 million to address lead infrastructure in communities with declared emergencies relating to public
health threats associated with lead in drinking water. The full amount was allocated to Flint, Ml.
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Infrastructure Financing
Infrastructure /STAG Project Financing
Infrastructure and Special Projects Funds
The FY 2018 President's Budget requests a total of $2.36 billion for the EPA's Infrastructure programs,
including the State Revolving Funds (SRFs), Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grants, and Brownfields
Projects, in the State and Tribal Assistance Grant (STAG) account, in addition to the WIFIA program.
With funds provided to the SRFs and technical assistance funding through EPA's operating programs in
FY 2018, the EPA will continue its effort to build the capacity of local utilities, private investors, and existing
state programs to expand their contribution to the array of funding options to meet future infrastructure
needs. Infrastructure and targeted project funding under the STAG appropriation provides financial
assistance to states, municipalities, interstates, and tribal governments to fund a variety of drinking water,
wastewater, air, and brownfields environmental projects. These funds help fulfill the federal government's
commitment to help our state, tribal, and local partners comply with federal environmental requirements to
ensure public health and revitalize contaminated properties.
By providing STAG funds to capitalize SRF programs, the EPA enables the states to provide low-cost loans
to municipalities for infrastructure construction. All drinking water and wastewater projects are funded based
on state developed priority lists. Through SRF set-asides, grants are available to Indian tribes and U.S.
territories for infrastructure projects. The resources included in this budget will enable the agency, in
conjunction with the EPA's state, local, and tribal partners, to achieve important goals.
Capitalizing Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds
The Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund programs demonstrate a true partnership
between states, localities, and the federal government. These programs provide federal financial assistance
in the form of capitalization grants to states to protect the nation's water resources. These funds are used
for the construction of drinking water and wastewater infrastructure and treatment facilities. The state
revolving funds are two important elements of the nation's substantial investment in sewage treatment and
drinking water systems, which provide Americans with significant benefits in the form of reduced water
pollution and safe drinking water.
This federal investment also will support the continued work of the SRFs in ensuring that small and
underserved communities have tools available to help address their pressing water infrastructure and other
water quality needs. Many small systems face significant investment needs critical for the public health and
environmental safety of the towns and cities they serve. The EPA will focus on issues such as: financial
planning for future infrastructure investments (applications, exploring financing options, planning and
design); expanding current work with states to identify additional financing opportunities for small
communities; and enhancing collaboration with USDA on training, technical assistance, and funding
opportunities for small communities.
The EPA will continue to provide financial assistance for wastewater and other water projects through the
Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF). CWSRF projects include estuary, storm water, and sewer
overflow projects. The dramatic progress made in improving the quality of wastewater treatment since the
1970s is a national success. In 1972, only 78.2 million people were served by secondary or advanced
wastewater treatment facilities. As of 2012 (from the most recent Clean Watersheds Needs Survey), over
99 percent of Publicly Owned Treatment Works, serving 234 million people, use secondary treatment or
better. Water infrastructure projects supported by the program contribute to direct ecosystem improvements
by lowering the amount of nutrients and toxic pollutants in all types of surface waters.
The FY 2018 request includes $1,394 billion in funding for the CWSRF. Total CWSRF funding available for
loans from 1988 through June 2016 exceeds $120 billion. This total includes loan repayments, state match
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Infrastructure Financing
dollars, as well as other funding sources. The EPA estimates that for every federal dollar contributed, close
to three dollars are available to municipalities to fund infrastructure projects.
The FY 2018 request includes $863 million in funding for the DWSRF. Since its inception in 1997, the
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program has made $34.18 billion available to finance
12,881 infrastructure improvement projects nationwide, with an average of $1.80 made available to
localities for every $1 of federal funds invested. The DWSRF helps address the costs of ensuring safe
drinking water supplies and assists small communities in meeting their responsibilities.
The EPA will work to assist small and underserved communities with limited ability to repay loans. Through
the Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center, the EPA will work to promote public private
collaboration, and maintain an ongoing dialogue with the financial community to encourage investment in
the water market as well as innovative financing.
Tribal communities are in need of assistance given their sanitation and drinking water infrastructure lags
behind the rest of the country causing significant public health concerns. To help address this situation,
EPA is requesting a tribal funding floor of two percent, or $30 million for the CWSRF or $20 million for the
DWSRF, whichever is greater, of the funds appropriated in FY 2018.
For FY 2018, the EPA requests that not less than 10 percent but not more than 20 percent of the CWSRF
funds and not less than 20 percent but not more than 30 percent of the DWSRF funds be made available
to each state to be used to provide additional subsidy to eligible recipients in the form of forgiveness of
principle, negative interest loans, orgrants (or a combination of these). For FY 2018, the EPA will encourage
states to utilize the subsidy to assist small drinking water systems with standards compliance.
The EPA focuses on working with federal partners, states, and communities to develop systems that employ
effective utility management practices to build and maintain the level of technical, financial, and managerial
capacity necessary to ensure long-term sustainability. This policy emphasizes the need to build on existing
efforts to promote sustainable water infrastructure and to employ robust, comprehensive planning
processes to deliver projects that are cost effective over their life cycle, resource efficient, and consistent
with community sustainability goals. Through this policy, the EPA is helping to ensure that federal
investments, policies, and actions support water infrastructure in efficient and sustainable locations to best
aid existing communities, enhance economic competitiveness, and promote affordable neighborhoods. The
policy encourages that Federal dollars provided through the SRFs will act as a catalyst for efficient system-
wide planning and ongoing management of sustainable waterinfrastructure.
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Fund
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to fund Water Infrastructure and Finance Innovation Act (WIFIA) program.
The FY 2018 request of $20 million provides the necessary funds to provide WIFIA credit assistance to
finance drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects. The WIFIA program will accelerate
investment in our nation's water and wastewater infrastructure by providing supplemental credit assistance
to credit worthy nationally and regionally significant water projects. With $20 million in appropriations, the
EPA could potentially provide approximately $1 billion in credit assistance and, when combined with other
funding sources, help to finance an estimated $2 billion in total infrastructure investment.1 It is expected
that entities with complex water and wastewater projects will be attracted to WIFIA and the EPA will work
to provide assistance to a diverse set of projects.
Diesel Emissions Reduction Act Grants
The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) program authorizes funding to provide immediate, cost-
effective emission reductions from existing diesel engines through engine retrofits, rebuilds, and
replacements; switching to cleaner fuels; idling reduction strategies; and other clean diesel strategies.
1 This approximation is based on notional calculations. Subsidy cost is determined on a loan-by-loan basis.
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Infrastructure Financing
Retrofitting or replacing older diesel engines reduces particulate matter (PM) emissions up to 95 percent,
smog-forming emissions, such as hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx), up to 90 percent, and
greenhouse gases up to 20 percent in the upgraded vehicles with engine replacements. The FY 2018
President's Budget requests $10 million in DERA funding to continue to reduce diesel emissions in
communities and areas of highly concentrated diesel pollution. EPA will coordinate these diesel emissions
reduction efforts with the Department of Transportation and the Department of Energy. The Volkswagen
(VW) settlement includes an option to use trust funds for DERA projects. These resources, in addition to
the EPA's appropriated funding for diesel retrofits and replacements, will provide robust support for diesel
emissions reduction projects.
Brownfields Projects
The President's Budget requests $69 million for Brownfields projects. With the FY 2018 request, the EPA
plans to fund assessment cooperative agreements and direct cleanup cooperative agreements. The EPA
also will support the assessment and cleanup of sites contaminated by petroleum or petroleum products
and award an estimated $3.0 million in environmental workforce development and job training grants.
In FY 2018, the funding provided is expected to result in the assessment of 1,300 brownfields properties,
all of which are located in distressed communities. Using EPA grant dollars, the brownfields grantees will
leverage 5,865 cleanup and redevelopment jobs and $1.1 billion in cleanup and redevelopment funding,
and 4,500 acres of Brownfields will be ready for reuse.
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to foster federal, state, local, and public/private partnerships to return
properties to productive economic use in communities.
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56

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Trust Funds
Trust Funds
(Dollars in Millions)
Trust Funds Program
FY 2016
Enacted
Budget1
$ FTE
FY 2017
Annualized CR
$ FTE
FY 2018
President's
Budget
$ FTE
Superfund2
$1,065
2,523
$1,063
2,523
$746
1,987
Inspector General (Transfers)
$10
50
$10
50
$4
12
Research & Development
(T ransfers)
$19
72
$19
72
$12
49
Superfund Total
$1,094
2,645
$1,092
2,645
$762
2,048
LUST3
$92
54
$92
54
$47
41
Trust Funds Total:4
$1,186
2,708
$1,184
2,699
$809
2,089
1	As part of the FY 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 114-113), the EPA received $27 million for cybersecurity
activities, of which $5.4 million was allocated to the Superfund Appropriation and $21.6 million was allocated to the
Environmental Program and Management Appropriation as part of the agency's FY 2016 Enacted Budget.
2	FTE numbers include all direct and reimbursable Superfund employees, excluding Base Realignment and
Closure.
3	EPAct Grants for Prevention activities are included in the FY 2016 Enacted and the FY 2017 Annualized CR.
4	Trust Funds Total includes reimbursable FTE for Base Realignment and Closure as well as other Superfund
reimbursable FTE. The FY 2016 enacted budget includes 9.0 reimbursable FTE for Base Realignment and Closure.
Superfund
In FY 2018, the President's Budget requests a total of $762 million in discretionary budget authority and
2,048 FTE for Superfund. This funding level will address environmental and public health risks resulting
from releases orthreatened releases of hazardous substances associated with any emergency site, as well
as over 13,071 active Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) and non-NPL sites. It also provides funding
to pursue responsible parties for cleanup costs, preserving federal dollars for sites where there are no viable
contributing parties. As of April 2017, there are 1,729 sites on the NPL. 1,189 sites (69 percent) are
construction completed, 315 sites (18 percent) are undergoing cleanup construction, 221 sites (13 percent)
are pending investigation, being investigated or designed, and 4 sites are deleted or deferred to another
authority. The EPA will prioritize ongoing fund-lead investigation, design, and construction projects to bring
human exposure and groundwater migration under control. A significant statutorily required post-
construction activity is a Five-Year Review, which generally is necessary when hazardous substances
remain on-site above levels that permit unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. In FY 2018, the EPA plans
to conduct approximately 175-185 Five-Year Reviews.
Of the total funding requested for Superfund, $516 million and 1,164 FTE are for Superfund cleanups which
include the Superfund Remedial, Emergency Response and Removal, EPA Emergency Preparedness, and
Federal Facilities programs. The Superfund program protects the American public and its resources by
cleaning up sites which pose an imminent or long term risk of exposure and harm to human health and the
environment. In FY 2018, the agency will continue to respond to emergency releases of hazardous
substances, stabilizing sites, and mitigating immediate threats to keep our communities safe and healthy.
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Trust Funds
The Superfund Remedial program will continue to maintain focus on completing projects at various stages
in the response process and endeavor to maximize the use of site-specific special accounts. Special
account funds may not be used for sites or uses not specified in the settlement agreement, and as a result
both special account resources and annually appropriated resources are critical to the Superfund program.
Of the total funding requested, $99.89 million and 564.4 FTE are for Superfund enforcement-related
activities. One of the Superfund program's primary goals is to have responsible parties pay for and conduct
cleanups at abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. In FY 2016, the EPA reached a settlement
or took an enforcement action at 100 percent of non-federally owned Superfund sites with viable, liable
parties.
CERCLA authorizes the agency to retain and use funds received pursuant to an agreement with a
potentially responsible party (PRP) to carry out the purpose of that agreement. The EPA retains such funds
in special accounts and uses them to finance site-specific CERCLA response actions in accordance with
the settlement agreement, including, but not limited to, investigations, construction and implementation of
the remedy, post-construction activities, and oversight of PRPs conducting the cleanup. Through the use
of special accounts, the EPA ensures responsible parties pay for cleanup so that the annually appropriated
resources from the Superfund Trust Fund are conserved for sites where no viable or liable PRPs have been
identified. The use of special account funding is limited by the terms of the settlement agreements. Since
the inception of special accounts through the end of FY 2016, the EPA has collected more than $6.5 billion
from PRPs and earned approximately $446.1 million in interest. In addition, for those sites that had no
additional work planned or costs to be incurred by the EPA, the EPA has transferred approximately $29.1
million to the Superfund Trust Fund for future appropriation by Congress. As of the end of FY 2016,
approximately $3.2 billion has been disbursed to finance site response actions and approximately $464.6
million has been obligated but not yet disbursed. Of the special account funds made available through the
end of FY 2016, approximately 53 percent have been disbursed or obligated for response actions at sites
and plans have been developed to guide the future use of the remaining 47 percent of special account
funds.
The EPA's Homeland Security work is a component of the federal government's prevention, protection, and
response activities. The FY 2018 President's Budget requests $14.98 million within the Hazardous
Substance Superfund Account to: maintain capability to respond to incidents that may involve harmful
chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) substances; develop and maintain agency expertise and
operational readiness for all phases of consequential management following a CBR incident; and conduct
CBR training for agency responders to improve CBR preparedness.
The FY 2018 President's Budget also includes resources to support agency-wide resource management
and control functions. This includes essential infrastructure, contract and grant administration, financial
accounting, and other fiscal operations. Appropriated resources support both the activities accomplished
with special accounts and those funded with annual appropriations.
In addition, the agency provides funds for Superfund program research and for auditing. The President's
Budget requests $12 million and 49 FTE to be transferred to Research and Development. Research will
enable the EPA's Superfund program to accelerate scientifically defensible and cost-effective decisions for
cleanup at complex contaminated Superfund sites and support the development of decontamination
techniques for a wide-area CBR event. The Superfund research program is driven by program needs to
reduce the cost of cleaning up Superfund sites, improve the efficiency of characterizing and remediating
sites, identify effective remediation technologies, and reduce the scientific uncertainties for improved
decision-making at Superfund sites. The President's Budget also requests $4 million and 12 FTE to be
transferred to the Inspector General for program auditing.
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
The FY 2018 President's Budget requests $47 million and 41 FTE for the Leaking Underground Storage
Tank (LUST) Trust Fund program. The agency, working with states and tribes, addresses public health and
environmental threats from releases through cleanup activities. As required by law (42 U.S.C. 6991 c(f)),
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Trust Funds
not less than 80 percent of LUST funds appropriated to cleanup will be used for reasonable costs incurred
under cooperative agreements with any state to carry out related purposes.
The LUST Trust Fund financing tax was extended by Congress through September 30, 2022 in the Fixing
Americas Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act). While tank owners and operators are liable for the cost
of cleanups at leaking underground storage tank sites for which they have responsibility, EPA and State
regulatory agencies are not always able to identify responsible parties and sometimes responsible parties
are no longer financially viable or have a limited ability to pay. In those cases, the cost of the site cleanup
is distributed among fuel users through a targeted fuel tax, which is available for appropriation from
Congress to support leak prevention and the cleanup of sites addressed under the LUST program. For FY
2016, the Trust Fund received more than $202 million in tax receipts.
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Eliminated Programs
Eliminated Programs
Eliminated Program Projects
Alternative Dispute Resolution (FY 2016 Enacted: $1,720 M, 6.7 FTE)
This program provides alternative dispute resolution (ADR) services to the EPA Headquarters, the EPA
Regional Offices, and external stakeholders. This funding level eliminates the centralization of conflict
prevention and ADR program. Programs across the agency may pursue ADR support services and
training individually.
Beach / Fish Programs (FY 2016 Enacted: $1.982 M, 3.8 FTE)
This program provides science, guidance, technical assistance and nationwide information to state, Tribal,
and federal agencies on the human health risks associated with eating locally caught fish/shellfish or wildlife
with excessive levels of contaminants, as well as beach monitoring and notification programs. The agency
will encourage states to continue this work within ongoing core programs.
Categorical Grant: Beaches Protection (FY 2016 Enacted: $9,549 M, 0.0 FTE)
Grants authorized under the Beach Act support continued development and implementation of coastal
recreational water monitoring and public notification programs. After over 17 years of technical guidance
and financial support, state and local governments now have the technical expertise and procedures to
continue beach monitoring without federal support.
Categorical Grant: Lead (FY 2016 Enacted: $14,049 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program provides support to authorized state and tribal programs that administer training and
certification programs for lead paint professionals and contractors. Lead paint certification will continue
under the Chemical Risk Review Reduction program.
Categorical Grant: Multipurpose Grants (FY 2016 Enacted: $21,000 M, 0.0 FTE)
This program provides grants to states and tribes to assist with the implementation activities that
complement environmental programs. States can continue to fund work through the EPA's core grant
programs and statutes. The agency will work with states to target funds to address their priorities.
Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319) (FY 2016 Enacted: $164,915 M, 0.0 FTE)
This program provides grants to assist states and tribes in implementing approved elements of Nonpoint
Source Programs including: regulatory and non-regulatory programs, technical assistance, financial
assistance, education, training, technology transfers, and demonstration projects. The agency will continue
to coordinate with the United States Department of Agriculture on targeting funding where appropriate to
address nonpoint sources.
Categorical Grant: Pollution Prevention (FY 2016 Enacted: $4,765 M, 0.0 FTE)
The Pollution Prevention (P2) program is a tool for advancing environmental stewardship by federal, state
and Tribal governments, businesses, communities and individuals. In FY 2018 the EPA will focus its
resources on core environmental work.
Categorical Grant: Radon (FY 2016 Enacted: $8,051 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program provides funding for the development of state radon programs and disseminates public
information and educational materials. The program also provides information on equipment training, data
storage and management, and toll-free hotlines. For over 29 years the EPA's radon program has provided
important guidance and significant funding to help states establish their own programs.
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Eliminated Programs
Categorical Grant: Underground Storage Tanks (FY 2016 Enacted: $1,498 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program provides funding for petroleum and hazardous substance release prevention and detection
activities including: compliance assistance, state program approvals, and technical equipment reviews and
approvals. States could elect to maintain core program work with state resources rather than federal.
Endocrine Disruptors (FY 2016 Enacted: $7,553 M, 8.9 FTE)
The program develops and validates scientific test methods for the routine, ongoing evaluation of pesticides
and other chemicals to determine their potential interference with normal endocrine system function. The
ongoing functions of the program can be absorbed into the pesticides program.
Environmental Education (FY 2016 Enacted: $8,702 M, 11.1 FTE)
This program promotes delivery of environmental education through science-based methodologies that
promote public engagement. In recognition of the significant guidance and financial support the EE program
has provided to non-profit organizations, local education agencies, universities, community colleges, and
state and local environmental agencies, funding for some of the environmental stewardship activities could
be leveraged at the state or local level.
Environmental Justice (FY 2016 Enacted: $7,282 M, 40.3 FTE)
The program provides support to address environmental and human health concerns in minority, low-
income, Tribal, and other communities. Environmental Justice will continue to be supported in the work
done at the EPA, when applicable. EJ work impacting the entire agency will be incorporated into future
policy work within the Integrated Environmental Strategy program, which is a part of the EPA's Office of the
Administrator
Geographic Program: Chesapeake Bay (FY 2016 Enacted: $73,000 M, 39.9 FTE)
The program includes the States of Delaware, Maryland, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania, West Virginia,
the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay Commission, the EPA, and other federal partners working
together to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay's ecosystem. The EPA will encourage the six
Chesapeake Bay states and Washington D.C. to continue to make progress in restoring the Bay from within
core water programs.
Geographic Program: Gulf of Mexico (FY 2016 Enacted: $4,482 M, 14.3 FTE)
The program is a partnership of the five Gulf states, Gulf coastal communities, citizens, nongovernmental
organizations, and federal agencies working together to initiate cooperative actions by public and private
organizations to achieve specific environmental results. The EPA will encourage the five Gulf of Mexico
states to continue to make progress in restoring the Gulf of Mexico from within core water programs.
Geographic Program: Lake Champlain (FY 2016 Enacted: $4,399 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program creates a pollution prevention, control, and restoration plan for protecting the Lake Champlain
Basin. The EPA will encourage New York and Vermont to continue to make progress in restoring Lake
Champlain from within core water programs.
Geographic Program: Long Island Sound (FY 2016 Enacted: $3,940 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program supports the implementation of the Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for
the Long Island Sound National Estuary Program. The EPA will encourage Long Island Sound states and
local entities to continue to make progress in restoring the Sound from within core water programs.
Geographic Program: Other (FY 2016 Enacted: $7,393 M, 4.9 FTE)
The program provides funding to develop and implement community-based approaches to mitigate diffuse
sources of pollution and cumulative risk for geographic areas including: Lake Pontchartrain, Southeastern
New England Estuary (SNEE), and the Columbia River Basin. The EPA will encourage states and local
entities to continue to make progress in restoring these major aquatic ecosystems from within core water
programs.
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Eliminated Programs
Geographic Program: Puget Sound (FY 2016 Enacted: $28,000 M, 6.0 FTE)
The program works to protect and restore the Puget Sound, focusing on environmental activities consistent
with the State of Washington's 2020 Puget Sound Action Agenda. The EPA will encourage state, tribal, and
local entities to continue to make progress in restoring the Puget Sound from within core waterprograms.
Geographic Program: San Francisco Bay (FY 2016 Enacted: $4,819 M, 1.9 FTE)
The program is aimed at protecting and restoring water quality and ecological health of the San Francisco
Bay estuary through partnerships, interagency coordination, and project grants. The EPA will encourage
the state of California and local entities to continue to make progress in restoring the San Francisco Bay
from within core water programs.
Geographic Program: South Florida (FY 2016 Enacted: $1,704 M, 1.4 FTE)
The program leads special initiatives and planning activities in the South Florida region, which includes the
Everglades and Florida Keys coral reef ecosystem. The EPA will encourage state, tribal, and local entities
to continue to make progress in protecting and restoring sensitive aquatic ecosystems in South Florida from
within core water programs.
Great Lakes Restoration (FY 2016 Enacted: $300,000 M, 71.7 FTE)
The EPA and 16 federal agencies develop and implement a Great Lake Restoration Initiative to restore and
maintain the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. The EPA will encourage the eight Great Lakes states and tribal
and local entities to continue to make progress in restoring the Great Lakes from within core water
programs.
Homeland Security: Critical Infrastructure Protection (FY 2016 Enacted: $11,489 M, 23.1 FTE)
This program involves the EPA activities that help protect the nation's public infrastructure from threats and
intentional acts. Scientific exposure, hazard and risk data on hazardous chemicals is also provided to local
communities to directly support chemical emergency planning, response, and prevention programs. The
most critical program work will be performed in the S&T Preparedness, Response, and Recovery program.
Indoor Air: Radon Program (FY 2016 Enacted: $3,082 M, 10.6 FTE)
Within this program, the EPA studies the health effects of radon, assesses exposure levels, sets an action
level, provides technical assistance, and advises the public of steps they can take to reduce exposure to
radon. For over 29 years the EPA's radon program has provided important guidance and significant funding
to help states establish their own programs.
Infrastructure Assistance: Alaska Native Villages (FY 2016 Enacted: $20,000 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program supports wastewater and drinking water infrastructure projects in Alaska Native and rural
villages. The State Revolving Funds are a source of infrastructure funding that can continue to fund water
system improvements in Alaska.
Infrastructure Assistance: Mexico Border (FY 2016 Enacted: $10,000 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program provides for the planning, design, and construction of water and wastewater treatment
facilities along the U.S. Mexico border. The State Revolving Funds are a source of infrastructure funding
that can continue to fund water system improvements in U.S. communities along the border.
LUST Prevention (FY 2016 Enacted: $25,369 M, 0.0 FTE)
The program provides resources to states, tribes, territories, and intertribal consortia for their Underground
Storage Tank (UST) programs, with a focus on inspections, enforcement, development of leak prevention
regulations, and other program infrastructure. States could elect to maintain core program work with state
resources rather than federal.
Marine Pollution (FY 2016 Enacted: $10,161 M, 37.4 FTE)
The program funds the implementation of regulatory and support activities relating to ocean discharges and
related marine ecosystem protection activities. The EPA will seek opportunities to continue to meet statutory
mandates through the core national water program.
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Eliminated Programs
National Estuary Program / Coastal Waterways (FY 2016 Enacted: $26,723 M, 43.6 FTE)
The program works to restore the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of estuaries and coastal
watersheds. The EPA will encourage states to continue this work and continue to implement conservation
management plans.
Pollution Prevention Program (FY 2016 Enacted: $13,140 M, 58.1 FTE)
The program promotes environmentally sound business practices and the development of safer (green)
chemicals, technologies, and processes. Partners can continue the best practices that have been shared
through this program and continue efforts aimed at reducing pollution.
Radiation: Protection (FY 2016 Enacted: $12,263 M, 59.1 FTE)
This program includes activities for radiation clean up; federal guidance; risk modeling; radiation air toxics;
naturally-occurring radioactive material; radiation waste management; radioactive and mixed waste
operations and measurements, and radiation lab-related infrastructure expenses. The EPA will explore
alternatives to continue to meet its statutory obligation to implement its regulatory oversight responsibilities
for Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. The EPA also
will explore alternatives for its requirement under the Atomic Energy Act to establish health and
environmental protection standards for exposures to radiation.
RCRA: Waste Minimization & Recycling (FY 2016 Enacted: $8,849 M, 51.0 FTE)
The program establishes a framework for redirecting materials away from disposal and towards beneficial
uses, such as composting food waste, increasing the recycling of electronics, and reducing waste from
federal facilities. The EPA will focus its resources on core environmental work.
Reduce Risks from Indoor Air (FY 2016 Enacted: $13,942 M, 40.7 FTE)
This program addresses indoor environmental asthma triggers, such as secondhand smoke, dust mites,
mold, cockroaches and other pests, household pets, and combustion byproducts through a variety of
outreach, education, training and guidance activities. This is a mature program where states have technical
capacity to continue this work.
Regional Science and Technology (FY 2016 Enacted: $1.532 M, 2.0 FTE)
The program supplies laboratory analysis, field monitoring and sampling, and builds Tribal capacity for
environmental monitoring and assessment. Central approach will be replaced with ad hoc efforts.
Science Policy and Biotechnology (FY 2016 Enacted: $1,174 M, 5.4 FTE)
The Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) organizes and conducts reviews (typically six to ten each year) by
independent, outside scientific experts of science documents, science policies, and/or science programs
that relate to the EPA's pesticide and toxic program activities. Statutory requirements will be absorbed by
the pesticides and toxics programs.
Small Minority Business Assistance (FY 2016 Enacted: $1,670 M, 8.9 FTE)
This program provides technical assistance to small businesses, headquarters, and regional office
employees to ensure that small minority businesses, and minority academic institutions receive a fair share
of the EPA's procurement dollars and grants, where applicable. The agency will integrate its resources for
Small and Disadvantaged Business activities under the Small Business Ombudsman program.
Stratospheric Ozone: Multilateral Fund (FY 2016 Enacted: $8,928 M, 0.0 FTE)
This program promotes international compliance with the Montreal Protocol by financing the incremental
cost of converting existing industries in developing countries to cost-effective ozone friendly technology.
The EPA will continue domestic ozone-depleting substances reduction work.
Targeted Airshed Grants (FY 2016 Enacted: $20,000 M, 0.0 FTE)
This program offers competitive grants to reduce air pollution in the top five most polluted nonattainment
areas relative to annual ozone or PM2.5. This program is regional in nature, and affected states can
continue to fund work through the EPA's core air grant programs and statutes.
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Eliminated Programs
Toxic Substances: Lead Risk Reduction Program (FY 2016 Enacted: $13,275 M, 72.8 FTE)
The program addresses exposure to lead from lead-based paint through regulations, certification, and
training programs and public outreach efforts. Lead paint certifications will continue under Chemical Risk
Review Reduction program. Other forms of lead exposure are addressed through other targeted programs
such as SRF's to replace lead pipes.
Trade and Governance (FY 2016 Enacted: $5,907 M, 18.0 FTE)
This program promotes trade related activities focused on sustaining environmental protection while
growing the economy. In FY 2018 the EPA will focus its resources on core statutory work.
U.S. Mexico Border (FY 2016 Enacted: $3,063 M, 14.7 FTE)
The program addresses environmental protection of the U.S Mexico border in partnership with the ten (10)
Border States, U.S. Tribal government, and the Government of Mexico. This program is eliminated as part
of the effort to limit federal investment in lower priority activities and to focus resources on core
environmental work under core statutes.
Water Quality Research and Support Grants (FY 2016 Enacted: $26,800 M, 4.0 FTE)
The program focuses on the development and application of water quality criteria, the implementation of
watershed management approaches, and the application of technological options to restore and protect
water bodies. States have the ability to develop technical assistance plans for their water systems using
Public Water System Supervision funds and set-asides from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
(DWSRF).
Eliminated Sub-Program Projects
Greenhouse Gas Reporting (FY 2016 Enacted: Estimated $66,000 M)
Eliminated 15 voluntary partnership programs as part of the Administration's commitment to return EPA to
its core work. Certification programs like Energy Star have been and continue to be successfully
administered by non-governmental entities like industry associated and consumer groups. The eliminated
sub-programs are as follows:
AgSTAR, Center for Corporate Climate Leadership, Coalbed Methane Outreach Program (CMOP),
Combined Heat & Power Partnership (CHPP), ENERGY STAR, Global Methane Initiative,
GreenChill Partnership, Green Power Partnership (GPP), Landfill Methane Outreach Program
(LMOP), Natural Gas STAR, Responsible Appliance Disposal Program (RAD), SF6 Reduction
Partnership for Electric Power Systems (EPS), SmartWay, State and Local Climate Energy
Program, and Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP).
Global Change Research (Research: AE) (FY 2016 Enacted: $19,405 M, 47.3 FTE)
The program develops scientific information that supports policy makers, stakeholders, and society at large
as they respond to climate change. This elimination prioritizes activities that support decision-making
related to core environmental statutory requirements.
Office of Public Engagement (Executive Management) (FY 2016 Enacted: $1.795 M, 12.0 FTE)
The Office of Public Engagement leads and coordinates EPA programs to promote environmental literacy.
STAR Research Grants (Research: AE, CSS, SSWR, SHC) (FY 2016 Enacted: $39,058 M, 0.0 FTE)
The Science to Achieve Results, or STAR, funds research grants and graduate fellowships in environmental
science and engineering disciplines through a competitive solicitation process and independent peer
review. EPA will prioritize activities that support decision-making related to core environmental statutory
requirements, as opposed to extramural activities. Note that this total includes $3,533 million of Global
Change Research funding.
WaterSense (Surface Water Protection) (FY 2016 Enacted: $3,075 M, 8.0 FTE)
WaterSense is a voluntary partnership program to label water-efficient products as a resource for helping
to reduce water use.
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Major Program Changes
Major Program Changes
EPM Greenhouse Gas Reporting (Formerly Climate Protection Program)
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $95,255 M, FY 2018 PB: $13.580 M, FY 2018 Change: -$81.675 M)
In FY 2018, under this program the EPA will continue to implement the Greenhouse Gas Reporting program,
and will work to complete the annual Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Emissions and Sinks in order to fulfill
U.S. obligations under the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). Fifteen voluntary climate-
related partnership programs were eliminated and are outlined in the "Eliminated Programs" section.
Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) Grant Program
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $49,905 M; FY 2018 PB: $10.000 M, FY 2018 Change: -$39,905 M)
This program provides, cost-effective emission reductions from existing diesel engines through engine
retrofits, rebuilds, and replacements; switching to cleaner fuels; idling reduction; and other clean diesel
strategies. The Volkswagen (VW) settlement includes an option to use trust funds for DERA projects. These
resources, in addition to the EPA's appropriated funding for diesel retrofits and replacements, will provide
robust support for diesel emission reduction projects.
Hazardous Substances and Superfund
LUST Cooperative Agreements
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $54,935 M; FY 2018 PB: $38,840 M, FY 2018 Change: -$16,095 M)
LUST funding supports states in managing, overseeing, and enforcing petroleum cleanups at LUST sites.
Reduction reflects success of LUST cooperative agreement funding over the past decade to a position
where states can now undertake a more primary responsibility.
RCRA: Waste Management
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $62,653 M; FY 2018 PB: $41,146 M, FY 2018 Change: -$21,507 M)
This program helps support the EPA and its state partners issue, update, maintain, and oversee RCRA
controls for approximately 20,000 hazardous waste units (e.g., incinerators, landfills, and tanks) located at
6,600 treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. In FY 2018 the agency will prioritize work on
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) cleanup and disposal programs, while reducing support for technical
assistance to stakeholders on solid waste management programs.
Superfund: Enforcement
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $150.342 M; FY 2018 PB $94.418, FY 2018 Change: -$55,924 M)
This program protects communities by ensuring that responsible parties conduct cleanups, preserving
federal dollars for sites where there are no viable contributing parties. The program also ensures prompt
site cleanup and reuse by maximizing the participation of liable and viable parties in performing and paying
for cleanups. The merging of the Superfund Federal Facility Enforcement program into the Superfund
Enforcement program to better optimize both programs will result in savings in FY 2018.
Superfund: Remedial
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $500,048 M; FY 2018 PB: $341.803 M, FY 2018 Change: -$158.245 M)
This program addresses many of the worst contaminated areas in the United States by conducting
investigations and then implementing long term cleanup remedies, as well as overseeing response work
conducted by potentially responsible parties (PRPs) at National Priority List (NPL) sites. The EPA will
prioritize resources on NPL sites that present the highest risk to human health and the environment.
Toxic Substances: Chemical Risk Review and Reduction
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $61.243 M; FY 2018 PB: $65,036 M, FY 2018 Change: +$3,793 M)
The EPA has significant continuing and new responsibilities for ensuring that chemicals in commerce do
not present unreasonable risks to human health or the environment. TSCA fee collections, set to begin in
the second quarter of FY 2018, will fund 53.6 FTE that previously were funded by annual appropriations.
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Major Program Changes
In FY 2018, the EPA will continue to support certifications activities to ensure safe work practices for lead-
based paint abatement, renovation and repair efforts.
Enforcement and Compliance Assurance
Civil Enforcement
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $174,078 M; FY 2018 PB: $143,295 M, FY 2018 Change: -$30,783 M)
This program is responsible for maximizing compliance with 12 major environmental statutes, 28 distinct
programs under those statutes, and numerous regulatory requirements under those programs which apply
in various combinations to a universe of approximately 40 million regulated federal and private entities. In
FY 2018, the EPA will focus the program's resources on direct implementation and oversight responsibilities
and the most significant violations.
Better Prioritizing Research and Development
In FY 2018, the Office of Research and Development will prioritize activities directly tied to statutory
requirements and inquiries into environmental and human health sciences. Extramural activities such as
Science To Achieve Results (STAR) grants are eliminated due to duplicative programs in other federal
agencies (such as the Department of Energy) (see more about STAR in the "Eliminated Programs" section).
Research related to: Air and Energy; Chemical Safety and Sustainability; Safe and Sustainable Water
Resources; and Sustainable and Healthy Communities is streamlined to achieve goals and objectives and
prioritize the most important scientific research work to support the EPA's program offices.
Air and Energy
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $81,161 M; FY 2018 PB: $30,592 M, FY 2018 Change: -$50,569 M)
This research program provides scientific information to EPA Program and Regional Offices, supports the
analysis of research data, publishes scientific journal articles to disseminate findings, and translates
research results to inform communities and individuals about measures to reduce impacts of air pollution.
(Totals do not include STAR grant resources).
Chemical Safety and Sustainability- Human Health Risk Assessment
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $40,368 M; FY 2018 PB: $27,821 M, FY 2018 Change: -$12,547 M)
This research program is focused on the science of assessments that inform decisions made by the EPA
and its partners, including states and tribes. (Totals do not include STAR grant resources).
Chemical Safety and Sustainability- Other activities
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $82,888 M; FY 2018 PB: $61.673 M, FY 2018 Change: -$21.215 M)
This research program develops innovative and cost-effective approaches and tools to better inform
decisions to reduce harmful effects of chemicals on human health and the environment. (Totals do not
include STAR grant resources).
Safe and Sustainable Water Resources
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $102,132 M; FY 2018 PB: $68,520 M, FY 2018 Change: -$33,612 M)
This research program develops cost-effective, sustainable solutions to current, emerging, and long-term
water resource challenges for complex chemical and microbial contaminants. (Totals do not include STAR
grant resources).
Sustainable and Healthy Communities
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $141,110 M; FY 2018 PB: $60.190M, FY 2018 Change:-$80,920 M)
This research program develops and conducts research with a primary focus on; working with communities
to develop comprehensive approaches to become more sustainable, and developing decision analysis
methods, tools, models, data and metrics that support community sustainability. (Totals do not include
STAR grant resources).
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Major Program Changes
Categorical Grants
In FY 2018, the following categorical grant funding levels are adjusted in line with the broader strategy of
streamlining environmental protection. This funding is focused on the EPA's core statutory requirements.
The EPA will continue to offer flexibility to state and Tribal governments to manage their environmental
programs as well as provide technical and financial assistance to achieve mutual environmental goals.
Hazardous Waste Financial Assistance
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $99,503 M; FY 2018 PB: $69,652 M, FY 2018 Change: -$29,851 M)
This grant program provides funding to implement the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).
Through RCRA, the EPA and states protect human health and the environment by minimizing waste
generation, preventing the release of millions of tons of hazardous wastes, and cleaning up land and water.
This change in funding modifies timelines for reaching cleanup milestones, reviewing of facility data,
cleanup plans, permit notifications, and assistance to Tribal communities.
Pollution Control (Sec. 106)
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $230,367 M; FY PB 2018: $161,257 M, FY 2018 Change: -$69,110 M)
This grant program provides federal assistance to states (including territories and the District of Columbia),
tribes qualified under Clean Water Act Section 518(e), and interstate agencies to establish and maintain
programs for the prevention and control of surface and groundwater pollution from point and nonpoint
sources.
Public Water System Supervision
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $101.769 M; FY 2018 PB: $71.238 M, FY 2018 Change: -$30,531 M)
The program provides grants to states and tribes with primary enforcement authority (primacy) to implement
and enforce the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, as well as to build system capacity.
State and Local Air Quality Management
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $227,785 M; FY 2018 PB: $159.450 M, FY 2018 Change: -$68,335 M)
This program provides funding for state air programs, as implemented by multi-state, state, and local air
pollution control agencies.
Tribal General Assistance Program
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $65,352 M; FY 2018 PB: $45,746 M, FY 2018 Change: -$19.606 M)
This program provides grants and technical assistance to tribes to cover costs of planning, developing, and
establishing tribal environmental protection programs consistent with other applicable provisions of law
administered by the EPA. The EPA expects tribes will need to reprioritize their planning and implementation
efforts.
Other Major Changes
Homeland Security: Preparedness, Response, and Recovery
(FY 2017 Annualized CR: $61,213 M; FY 2018 PB: $39,054 M, FY 2018 Change: -$22,159 M)
This program helps the EPA lead and support many aspects of preparing for and responding to a nationally
significant incident involving possible chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents, as
mandated by the Executive Office of the President. In FY 2018 some resources have been restructured to
meet EPA's responsibilities as the water Sector-Specific Agency (SSA) implementing specific statutory and
Presidential directives relating to homeland security.
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Acronyms
Environmental Protection Agency
List of Acronyms
AA	Assistant Administrator
ACE	Air, Climate, and Energy
ACRES	Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System
ADR	Alternative Dispute Resolution
AFS	Air Facility System
ANCR	Annual Non-Compliance Report
ARA	Assistant Regional Administrator
ARRA	American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
ATSDR	Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
B&F	Buildings and Facilities
BOSC	Board of Scientific Counselors
BRAC	Base Realignment and Closure
CAA	Clean Air Act
CAFE	Corporate Average Fuel Economy
CAIR	Clean Air Interstate Rule
CAP	Clean Air Partnership Fund
CASTNet	Clean Air Status and Trends Network
CBP	Customs and Border Protection
CBR	Chemical, Biological, Radiological
CBRN	Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear
CCS	Carbon Capture and Storage
CCTI	Climate Change Technology Initiative
CEIS	Center for Environmental Information and Statistics
CERCLA	Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act
CERFA	Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act
COOP	Continuity of Operations
CRRR	Chemical Risk Review and Reduction Program
CWA	Clean Water Act
CWAP	Clean Water Action Plan
CWS	Community Water Systems
CWSRF	Clean Water State Revolving Fund
DERA	Diesel Emissions Reduction Act
DHS	Department of Homeland Security
DOD	Department of Defense
DOE	Department of Energy
DOI	Department of the Interior
DWSRF	Drinking Water State Revolving Fund
E3	Economy, Energy and Environment Partnership
EDSP	Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program
EELC	E-Enterprise Leadership Council
EIS	Environmental Impact Statement
EJ	Environmental Justice
ELP	Environmental Leadership Project
EMAN	Electronic Hazardous Waste Manifest System
EMANF	Electronic Hazardous Waste Manifest System Fee Fund
EN	Enacted (Budget)
EO	Executive Order
EPAct	Energy Policy Act of 2005
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Acronyms
EPM	Environmental Programs and Management
ERRS	Emergency Rapid Response Services
EU	European Union
FAN	Fixed Account Numbers
FASAB	Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board
FFDCA	Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act
FIFRA	Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act
FTE	Full-Time Equivalent
GHG	Greenhouse Gas
GHGRP	Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program
GIS	Geographic Information System
HHRA	Human Health Risk Assessment
HHS	Department of Health and Human Services
HS	Homeland Security
HSWA	Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984
IA	Interagency Agreements
IAQ	Indoor Air Quality
ICR	Information Collection Rule
IG	Inspector General
IPCC	Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
IPM	Integrated Pest Management
IRIS	Integrated Risk Information System
IRM	Information Resource Management
ISA	Integrated Science Assessments
LUST	Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
M&O	Management and Oversight
NAAEC	North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation
NAAQS	National Ambient Air Quality Standards
NAFTA	North American Free Trade Agreement
NCEA	National Center for Environmental Assessment
NEA	Nuclear Energy Agency
NESCA	National Enforcement Strategy for Correction Action
NEP	National Estuary Program
NEPA	National Environmental Policy Act
NEPPS	National Environmental Performance Partnership System
NESHAP	National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants
NHTSA	National Highway Transportation Safety Administration
NIPP	National Infrastructure Protection Plan
NOA	New Obligation Authority
NOAA	National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NPL	National Priority List
NPM	National Program Manager
NPS	Nonpoint Source
NRCS	National Resource Conservation Service
NVFEL	National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory
OA	Office of the Administrator
OAM	Office of Acquisition Management
OAR	Office of Air and Radiation
OARM	Office of Administration and Resources Management
OCFO	Office of the Chief Financial Officer
OCHP	Office of Children's Health Protection
OCSPP	Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention
OECA	Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance
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Acronyms
OECD
Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development
OEI
Office of Environmental Information
OEM
Office of Emergency Management
OGC
Office of the General Counsel
OIG
Office of the Inspector General
OIL
Inland Oil Spill Programs
OITA
Office of International and Tribal Affairs
OLEM
Office of Land Emergency Management
OPA
Oil Pollution Act of 1990
OPAA
Office of Planning, Analysis, and Accountability
ORD
Office of Research and Development
OSRTI
Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation
OW
Office of Water
PB
President's Budget
PBTs
Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins
PCBs
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
PC&B
Personnel, Compensation and Benefits
P2
Pollution Prevention
PM
Particulate Matter
PPIN
Pollution Prevention Information Network
PRIRA
Pesticide Registration Improvement Renewal Act
PWSS
Public Water System Supervision
RCRA
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RLF
Revolving Loan Fund
RPIO
Responsible Planning Implementation Office
RR
Reprogramming Request
SAP
Science Advisory Panel
SAB
Science Advisory Board
S&T
Science and Technology
SALC
Sub-allocation (level)
SARA
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986
SBO
Senior Budget Officer
SDWA
Safe Drinking Water Act
SDWIS
Safe Drinking Water Information System
SERC
State Emergency Response Commission
SF
Hazardous Substance Superfund
SHC
Sustainable and Healthy Communities
SIP
State Implementation Plan
SNEE
Southern New England Estuaries
SPCC
Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure
SRF
State Revolving Fund
SSWR
Safe and Sustainable Water Resources
STAG
State and Tribal Assistance Grants
STAR
Science to Achieve Results
STAR METRICS
Science and Technology in America's Reinvestment-Measuring

Effects of Research on Innovation, Competitiveness, and Science
STEM
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
SWP
Source Water Protection
SWTR
Surface Water Treatment Rule
TIP
Tribal Implementation Plan
TRI
Toxic Release Inventory
TRIO
Taskforce on Research to Inform and Optimize
TSCA
Toxic Substances Control Act
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Acronyms
UIC
Underground Injection Control

USDA
U.S. Department of Agriculture

UST
Underground Storage Tanks

WCF
Working Capital Fund

WF
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Program
WHO
World Health Organization

WIFIA
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Act
WIRFC
Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance
Center
WTO
World Trade Organization


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