OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AND
TRIBAL AFFAIRS
National Program Manager Guidance
F iscal Year 2018-2019
September 2017
NSCEP Number - 190F17002

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
CONTENTS
I.	INTRODUCTION	2
II.	KEY PROGRAMMATIC ACTIVITIES	3
TRIBAL PROGRAM - STRENGTHENING HUMAN HEALTH AND THE
ENVIRONMENT IN INDIAN COUNTRY	3
Implementation of Federal Environmental Programs	3
Tribal Capacity Building	4
Implementation of EPA's Policy on Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribes .. 5
INTERNATIONAL PRIORITIES- STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ENGAGEMENT WITH
GLOBAL PARTNERS	6
Reduce Transboundary Pollution	6
Advance U.S. Interests Abroad	6
Promote Good Environmental Governance	7
APPENDICES	8
Appendix A: FY 2018 NPM Guidance Measures	8
Appendix B: Grants Guidance—Implementation of the Indian Environmental General
Assistance Program (GAP)	8
Appendix C: Point of Contact for More Information	8

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
I. INTRODUCTION
The Office of International and Tribal Affairs (OITA)'s NPM Guidance (NPG) describes how the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will work to protect human health and the environment
by:
1.	Advancing U.S. national interests through international collaboration and,
2.	Strengthening EPA and federally recognized Indian tribe (tribe) implementation of
environmental programs in Indian country.
This Guidance addresses both the Tribal and International Programs and provides direction to the
Agency on programmatic priorities for FY 2018-2019 consistent with the FY 2018 President's
Budget. Our tribal and international partnerships extend to all aspects of the Agency's work and
involve every NPM and Region. The guidance is a guide, not a comprehensive compendium of
activities and requirements. OITA works collaboratively to identify priorities, assuring alignment
with national and international priorities. Specific expectations and deliverables will be established
through negotiations in grant agreements between EPA regions and tribes.
OITA plays a crucial role in advancing the Agency's relationship and environmental priorities
with sovereign nations outside and within the United States. Working with leaders and experts
from EPA's program and regional offices, other government agencies, tribal governments,
foreign governments, and international organizations, OITA identifies international
environmental issues that may affect the United States and helps implement technical and policy
options to address such issues. OITA also ensures that EPA protects human health and the
environment in Indian country in the United States according to principles established through
federal Indian law, as outlined in EPA's 1984 Policy for the Administration of Environmental
Programs on Indian Reservations (1984 EPA Indian Policy).1
The EPA Overview to the NPM Guidances communicates agency-wide information as well as
other applicable requirements critical to effective implementation of EPA's environmental
programs for FY 2018 and FY 2019 and should be reviewed in conjunction with this Guidance.
The Overview is available at: https://www.epa.gov/planandbudget/national-program-manager-
guidances.
1 Available at https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-04/documents/indian-policv-84.pdf.

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
II. KEY PROGRAMMATIC ACTIVITIES
TRIBAL PROGRAM - STRENGTHENING HUMAN HEALTH AND THE
ENVIRONMENT IN INDIAN COUNTRY
The 1984 EPA Indian Policy provides the framework for EPA's relationship with federally
recognized Indian tribes (tribes) and identifies the mechanisms EPA will use to implement
environmental programs in Indian country under federal environmental laws. EPA will continue
to embrace the principles found in the 1984 EPA Indian Policy and work to incorporate the
principles into the media-specific priorities, goals, and measures that EPA implements. This
approach helps EPA ensure that tribes have the opportunity to build the capacity to implement
programs on their own and/or meaningfully participate in the Agency's policy making, standard
setting, and direct implementation activities under federal environmental statutes that may affect
their tribal interests.
Under the EPA priority of promoting intergovernmental collaboration and cooperative federalism,
EPA will work with each tribe to develop and implement an EPA-Tribal Environmental Plan
(ETEP), which supports the 1984 EPA Indian Policy by setting the stage for stronger
environmental and human health protection in tribal communities. ETEPs are jointly developed
documents outlining how the EPA and each tribe will work together to protect human health and
the environment for that tribe's lands within the context of EPA programs. Understanding the
needs and priorities of each tribe allows for a focused government-to-government discussion on
actions to meet short-term and long-term tribal program development milestones. This joint
planning process also identifies areas where EPA may need to prioritize its direct implementation
responsibilities and resources for a particular tribe based upon the tribe's own priorities,
environmental protection needs, and available resources. Although often developed using funding
from the OITA-administered Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP), ETEPs
encompass the full range of EPA tribal programs and the tribe's human health and environmental
priorities, which are not limited to GAP-eligible activities. This is consistent with the description
of ETEPs in the 2013 GAP guidance, which provides, in part, "the purpose of the ETEP is to
develop the complete picture of the particular environmental issues facing the tribe, establish a
shared understanding of the issues the tribe will be working on, and a shared understanding of
those issues that EPA will address consistent with its responsibility to protect human health and
the environment." By using ETEPs to identify priorities and then map how and when the priorities
will be addressed and by whom, EPA and tribes can then work together to identify technical and
other resources that may be necessary to implement the ETEP. This assistance may be beyond
GAP funding.
Implementation of Federal Environmental Programs
EPA will continue to work directly with tribes to achieve implementation of federal environmental
programs in Indian country. This is achieved in several ways under Agency authorities:
• EPA direct implementation refers to activities performed directly by EPA to implement federal
environmental laws. In general, unless and until a tribal government has assumed full

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
responsibility for a delegable program, the applicable federal environmental regulatory
programs are directly implemented by EPA in Indian country;
•	Tribal implementation occurs when the federal program is implemented by the tribe itself This
occurs after a formal process of program delegation, approval, or authorization from EPA to
the tribe authorizing the tribe to implement the federal environmental program;
•	EPA uses Direct Implementation Tribal Cooperative Agreements (DITCAs), where
appropriate, to provide opportunities for tribes to assist in EPA direct implementation by
performing EPA program implementation activities; and
•	Tribes are encouraged to participate in policy-making and to assume, if available, appropriate
roles in the implementation of programs. For example, tribes may play a role in helping to
ensure compliance by regulated entities, including through information distribution,
identification of regulated entities, providing tips and complaints, and compliance
assistance/assurance support.
EPA works to ensure national environmental programs are as effective in Indian country as they
are throughout the rest of the Nation. A continuing emphasis on ensuring federal program
implementation in Indian country is the highest priority of the EPA tribal program and the most
proactive manner in which the Agency acts to protect human health and the environment for tribes.
OITA also administers the National Tribal Operations Committee (NTOC) consisting of the
Administrator and EPA senior leadership and 19 tribal representatives known as the National
Tribal Caucus (NTC) to improve communication and build stronger partnerships with the
tribes. The NTOC meets to discuss implementation of the environmental protection programs for
which EPA and the tribes share responsibility as co-regulators. The National Tribal Caucus advises
EPA on tribal environmental issues that are cross-media, cross-agency or that may be emerging or
urgent.
'Tribal Capacity Building
EPA provides financial and technical assistance to tribes to create and maintain effective
environmental program capacity. OITA coordinates across EPA's national programs to ensure
effective delivery of EPA tribal capacity building programs. Effective delivery includes engaging
with tribes to negotiate ETEPs that reflect short-term and long-term goals for developing,
establishing, and implementing environmental and human health protection programs in
accordance with EPA administered statutes.
Tribes receive a variety of financial and technical assistance from EPA to meet capacity building
needs including the OITA-administered Indian Environmental General Assistance Program
(GAP).2 GAP is the largest of EPA's tribal grant programs. As authorized under the Indian
Environmental General Assistance Program Act,3 EPA provides GAP grant funds to assist tribes
2	For more information, see Kttps://www.epa.gov/tribai/indian-environmentiiii-generai-assistance-program-gap
3	Indian Environmental General Assistance Program Act of 1992, as amended, 42 USC section 4368b.

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
in planning, developing, and establishing the capacity to implement federal environmental
programs administered by the EPA.
Beginning in FY 2018, OITA will work with the EPA regions to incorporate standard language
into all GAP solicitation packages to ensure national consistency in approach, communication, and
the application of the following guiding principles in awarding GAP grants:
•	Ensure tribes the opportunity to build capacity to implement federal environmental programs
through EPA delegations, authorizations, and primacy designations, and to meaningfully
participate and engage in EPA direct implementation activities;
•	Promote tribal self-governance by accomplishing mutually agreed upon environmental
program goals found in the tribe's ETEP, supporting development of tribal core
environmental program capacities for programs administered by EPA, and fostering tribal
capacity to assume the authority to implement programs administered by EPA;
•	Promote intergovernmental collaboration and cooperative federalism among EPA, tribes,
states, and other federal partners;
•	Support implementation of established solid and hazardous waste regulatory programs in
accordance with applicable provisions of law, such as the Resources Conservation and
Recovery Act; and
•	Maintain strong national program management practices to produce compelling results that
align with EPA's statutory authorities.
Regions should work with OITA to develop their GAP solicitation packages. To promote national
consistency in program implementation, regions should allow for a 30-day OITA review of any
draft solicitation, such as a Notice of Funding Availability, that includes language beyond the
standard language used by all regions.
The GAP guiding principles are intended to underscore GAP's role in fostering partnerships
between EPA and tribes through collaboration and shared accountability. OITA remains
committed to using GAP resources to assist in building tribal capacity to implement delegable
federal programs and meaningfully participate and engage in EPA direct implementation activities.
For more information about GAP, see Appendix B of this NPG.
Implementation of EPA's Policy on Consultation and Coordination with Indian 'Tribes
The EPA Policy on Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribes (Consultation Policy)4
states that EPA will "consult on a government-to-government basis with federally recognized
tribal governments when EPA actions and decisions may affect tribal interests." EPA tribal
consultation efforts include discussions of tribal treaty rights and treaty-covered resources in
accordance with the EPA Policy on Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribes: Guidance
for Discussing Tribal Treaty Rights. EPA makes consultation opportunities available on the Tribal
Consultation Opportunities Tracking System (TCOTS) available at http://tcots.epa.gov.
Available at
.epa.aov/sites/prodiK-tion/fi[es/2()13-()8/docimients/cons-and-coord-witK-mdian-tribes-

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
EPA Assistant Administrators and Regional Administrators implement EPA's Consultation Policy
and ensure it is appropriately implemented for actions in their respective offices.
INTERNATIONAL PRIORITIES- STRATEGIC APPROACH TO
ENGAGEMENT WITH GLOBAL PARTNERS
The primary purpose of EPA's international program is to protect human health and the
environment by working with other countries and international organizations to address global
environmental problems and risks. To achieve our domestic environmental and human health
objectives, work with international partners is essential to successfully address transboundary
pollution adversely impacting the United States. Strengthening environmental protection abroad
so that it is on par with practices in the United States helps build a level playing field for industry
while supporting foreign policy objectives outlined by the White House, the National Security
Council, and the Department of State. This will include working with international partners to
strengthen environmental laws and governance to more closely align with U.S. standards and
practices and to help level the playing field for U.S. industry. OITA works with NPMs and
Regional Offices to formulate U.S. international policies and to implement EPA's international
programs that provide policy and technical assistance to other countries. OITA will continue to
link anticipated and achieved outcomes to the Agency's Strategic Goals. In FY 2018-2019, OITA
will strengthen its focus on prioritizing, allocating resources, and managing assistance agreements
to advance the Agency's Strategic Goals and international priorities while maximizing limited
resources most effectively and efficiently.
Reduce Transboundary Pollution
Pollution does not stop at national borders. Transboundary flows of pollutants occur between the
United States, Mexico, and Canada. EPA works with its immediate neighbors through the North
America Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). In addition to working with key
countries bilaterally, EPA works to address global and international flows and sources of pollution
through various international forums. This work addresses atmospheric mercury, emissions from
maritime transport, persistent organic pollutants, and Arctic contaminants.
•	EPA will continue technical and policy assistance for global and regional efforts to address
international sources of harmful pollutants, such as mercury. Because 70% of the mercury
deposited in the U.S. comes from global sources, both domestic efforts and international
cooperation are important to address mercury pollution.
•	EPA will continue to engage collaboratively with Canada to advance environmental
protection, human health on issues such as oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response
coordination along our joint border.
•	The EPA will contribute to the CEC, which provides regional and international leadership
to advance environmental protection, human health and sustainable economic growth with
our closest neighbors Mexico and Canada.
Advance U.S. Interests Abroad
OITA protects human health and the environment while advancing U.S. national interests through
international environmental collaboration. Working with the experts from EPA's other programs

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
and regional offices, other government agencies, and other nations and international organizations,
OITA identifies international environmental issues that may adversely impact the United States
and helps to design and implement technical and policy options to address them. Environmental
cooperation with partner countries can advance U.S. goals on environmental challenges such as ,
air pollution, mercury, and marine pollution. This work also protects Americans as they are
exposed to toxins in food products, pesticides, and other goods that are traded globally.
•	EPA will engage with key priority countries like China to address air pollution that
contributes significant pollution to the domestic and international environment. For
example, China is implementing national air quality monitoring, planning and control
strategies with advice and lessons learned from the United States. Environmental policies
adopted and implemented in China will improve competitiveness for U.S. businesses, drive
demand for U.S. emissions control technologies, and expand exports of U.S. environmental
goods and services to China.
•	EPA will engage with Canada and Mexico to achieve a consistent North American
approach to reducing emissions of air pollutants (i.e., SOx, NOx, PM, etc.) from marine
vessels through the implementation of MARPOL Annex VI in Mexico, the adoption of a
Mexican Emissions Control Area (ECA), and building Mexico's compliance and
enforcement capacity required for MARPOL Annex VI and the ECA. This work will
achieve the desired emissions reductions that is estimated to save 20,000 lives per year in
Mexico while greatly improving air quality in U.S. airsheds.
Promote Good Environmental Governance
Countries need strong institutional structures to develop sound environmental policies and enforce
environmental protections. EPA will engage on trade policy development and with countries to
build capacity for good governance, including judicial and legal frameworks and public
participation approaches. OITA coordinates with EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance
Assurance and Office of General Council in conducting trainings, hosting study tours, and
managing bilateral programs on good governance. Governance issues span environmental media.
OITA will coordinate with NPMs and regions in promoting good environmental governance
policies internationally.
•	Through existing agreements with the China Ministry of Environmental Protection,
Indonesia Ministry of Environment, and Chile public participation to strengthen
environmental governance frameworks such as environmental impact assessments,
environmental law and enforcement; develop effective environmental information
management structures; and build regional expert networks and advance regional
knowledge.

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Office of International and Tribal Affairs FY 2018-2019 NPM Guidance
APPENDICES
Appendix A: FY 2018 NPM Guidance Measures.
OITA continues efforts to develop GAP measures that track tribes' progress in developing and
implementing environmental programs in Indian country. EPA also internally tracks tribal
consultation and EPA direct implementation activities in Indian country and will continue to
look for opportunities to track progress under the new EPA strategic plan.
Appendix B: Grants Guidance-Implementation of the Indian Environmental
General Assistance Program (GAP)
GAP is the primary resource to support the development of tribal environmental programs and
tribes' implementation of solid and hazardous waste programs in accordance with the Solid
Waste Disposal Act. Following extensive consultation and coordination with tribal governments,
OITA released the Guidance on the Award and Management of General Assistance Agreements
for Tribes and Intertribal Consortia. (GAP Guidance) in May 2013, which supersedes prior GAP
guidance. Consistent with the GAP Guidance, substantive changes to the program management
are ongoing, including the identification of short-term and long-term indicators of tribal
environmental program capacity and supporting the development of ETEPs. ETEPs support a
range of core EPA programs and tribal environmental and human health program priorities,
including aligning GAP, and other program, work plan activities with short and long-term goals
and priorities. The fundamental concept of joint planning was originally developed by the first
EPA Tribal Operations Committee (NTOC) in 1994 in coordination with the National Tribal
Caucus of the NTOC.
Appendix C: Point of Contact for More Information
Contact Name
Subject Area
Phone
Email
Janice Sims
International
(202) 566-2892
Sims.JaniceHQ@epa.gov
Rebecca Roose
Indian GAP Grants
(202) 566-1387
Roose.Rebecca@epa.gov
Mike Weckesser
OITA Planner
(202) 564-0324
Weckesser.Mike @epa.gov

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