vvEPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
Fish and Shellfish Program
NEWSLETTER
October 2017
EPA 823-N-17-010
In This Issue
Recent Advisory News	1
EPA News				 4
Other News 				5
Recently Awarded Research.,.. 11
Recent Publications		 11
Upcoming Meetings
and Conferences.,...			14
This newsletter provides information
only. This newsletter does not
impose legally binding requirements
on the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), states, tribes, other
regulatory authorities, or the
regulated community. The Office of
Science and Technology, Office of
Water, U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency has approved this newsletter
for publication. Mention of trade
names, products, or sen/ices does
not convey and should not be
interpreted as conveying official EPA
approval, endorsement, or
recommendation for use.
https://www.eoa.gov/fish-tech
This issue of the Fish and Shellfish Program Newsletter generally focuses on the Great
Lakes.
Recent Advisory News

Ohio Sport Fish Consumption Advisory
Highlights Improvements in Ottawa River
On April 3, 2017, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) Director Craig W.
Butler announced the state's new guidelines for eating fish caught from Ohio's lakes,
rivers, and streams, reflecting notable improvements in the waters of the state.
The table below lists state waterbodies recognized as improved as or less restrictive than
the one fish per week recommendation for certain species. Among the notable
improvements from fish data collected last summer, "do not eat" advisories were removed
for the Ottawa River (Toledo) for all species and replaced with less strict
recommendations - a sign of improved conditions.
Altered Ohio Sport Fish Consumption Advisories
WaterbodyName
Species (Advisory issue Date)
Meal Frequency
Atwood Lake
Common Carp, Largemouth Bass (April 2017)
2/week
Bluegill Sunfish, Saugeye, White Crappie (April 2017)
Unrestricted
Belmont Lake
Channel Catfish (April 2017)
2/week
Largemouth Bass, Saugeye (April 2014)
1/month
Lake Loramie
Common Carp, Largemouth Bass (April 2017)
2/week
Channel Catfish, Saugeye, White Crappie (April 2017)
Unrestricted
Huron River
Channel Catfish, Flathead Catfish, Frewshwater Drum
(April 2017)
1/month
Rock Bass, White Crappie (April 2017)
2/week
Ottawa River (Toledo)
Channel Catfish, Common Carp. Golden Shiner (April
2017)
1/month
Pumpkinseed Sunfish (April 2017)
1/week
Waldhonding River
Smallmouth Bass (April 2017)
1/month
The state was able to remove the comprehensive "do not eat fish" advisory for the Ottawa
River that was put in place in 1991. Fish can be part of a healthy diet and evaluations of
fish tissue are showing some places where anglers can eat all of certain varieties of fish
that they can legally catch. Unless otherwise notated in the new recommendations, a
general advisory is in place that recommends limiting one meal each week of Ohio-caught
fish. Some areas in this year's Ohio fish study were evaluated for the first time, and the
general advisory was applied as a baseline. Waterbodies recognized as improved or less
This newsletter provides a monthly summary of news about fish and shellfish
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October 2017
restrictive than the one fish per week recommendation for certain species include Atwood, Belmont and Loramie
lakes, as well as the Huron, Ottawa and Walhonding rivers.
Ohio EPA partners with Ohio Department of Health and Ohio Department of Natural Resources to develop the
Sport Fish Consumption Advisory. Additional information about fish consumption safety for women of child-
bearing age, pregnant and nursing mothers, and children under 15 can be found at Women, Infant and Children
(WIC) Centers, local health departments, Ohio EPA and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources regional offices.
The 2017 fish consumption advisory information is available online. Printed copies can be requested by calling 614-
644-2160.
For more information, contact Linda Amer at linda.amer@epa.ohio.gov.
Source:
http://www.epa.state.oh.us/News/OnlineNewsRoom/NewsReleases/TabId/6':;Q6/ArticleId/iii2/language/en-
US/2017-ohio-sport-fish-consumption-advisorv.aspx
f Updated Illinois Sport Fish Consumption Advisory
On February 8, 2017, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced updated consumption
advisories for fish caught in Illinois waters. Changes to the advisories for polychlorinated biphenyls
(PCBs), as shown in the table below, are the result of continued sampling by the Fish Contaminant Monitoring
Program. The advisories for some Lake Michigan fish, including lake trout, rainbow trout, Coho salmon, and carp
were relaxed, and the advisories for largemouth bass were removed for Crab Orchard Lake. A more restrictive "do
not eat" advisory was issued for Midlothian Reservoir carp, and a new advisory was established for Powerton Lake.
Updated Illinois Fish Consumption Advisories for PCBs
WaterbodyName
Species (Size)
Meal Frequency
Crab Orchard Lake
(East of Wolf Creek Road)
Carp (All sizes)
1 meal/week
Channel Catfish (All sizes)
1 meal/week
Crab Orchard Lake
(West of Wolf Creek Road)
Channel Catfish (All sizes)
1 meal/week
Lake Michigan
Carp (All sizes)
1 meal/week
Coho Salmon (<24")
1 meal/week
Coho Salmon (>24")
1 meal/month
Lake Trout (<30")
1 meal/month
Lake Trout (>30")
Do not eat
Rainbow Trout (<28")
1 meal/week
Rainbow Trout (>28")
1 meal/month
Midlothian Reservoir
Carp (<20")
1 meal/week
Carp (>20")
Do not eat
Powerton Lake
Channel Catfish (15" to 19")
1 meal/week
Channel Catfish (>19")
1 meal/month
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"The advisories are not meant to discourage people from eating fish, but should be used as a guideline to help
anglers and their families decide the types of fish to eat, how frequently, and how to prepare fish for cooking to
reduce possible contaminants," said IDPH Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D.
There is no known immediate health hazard from eating contaminated fish from any body of water in Illinois. The
main concern for regularly eating fish listed on the advisories is the effect of long-term exposure to low levels of
pesticides and chemicals, such as PCBs, dioxins, chlordane, and methylmercury.
The program is a joint effort of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), IDPH, and the Illinois
Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). The fish are collected by IDNR and tested by IEPA. The IDPH issues fish
consumption advisories based on the IEPA test results. The updated advisory and detailed information can be
found on the IDPH website: http://dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/environmental-health-
protection/toxicologvVfish-advisories.
For more information, call the IDPH at 217-782-5830.
Source: https://www.illinois.gov/IISNews/i7-OOQ6-IDPH Fish Advisorv.pdf
f Illinois Special Mercury Advisories
The IDPH has established a statewide methylmercury advisory for women who are or could someday
become pregnant, nursing mothers, and children younger than 15 years of age. The groups included in the
advisory may eat up to one meal per week of fish from any Illinois water body (in other words, up to 52 meals per
year), unless special mercury advisories have been issued. Special mercury advisories are based on site-specific
sampling data so they can be more restrictive than the statewide advisory. In some cases, special mercury advisories
also apply to men and to women beyond child bearing age.
Changes to this year's advisory are listed in the table below and
included the addition of largemouth bass to the special mercury
advisories for eight Illinois lakes, as well as a more restrictive "Do
not eat" advisory for Mill Creek Lake in Clark County. Several
other sport fish were added to the special mercury advisories for
various Illinois lakes as well. Sport fish include all species of black
bass (largemouth, smallmouth and spotted), striped bass, white
bass, hybrid striped bass, flathead catfish, muskellunge, northern
pike, saugeye, sauger, and walleye.
Largemouth bass (Micropterussalmoides) (Image
courtesy of USFWS)
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New and Updated Illinois Special Mercury Advisories
Waterbody Name
Species (Size*)
Meal Frequency for women beyond
childbearing age and males more than 15
years old
Meal Frequency for pregnant or nursing
women, women of childbearing age, and
children less than 15 years old
Anna State Pond
Largemouth Bass
1/week
1/month
Bangs Lake
Northern Pike
1/week
1/month
Black Crappie
Unlimited
1/week
Cache River Basin
Carp
1/week
1/month
Crystal Lake
Largemouth Bass
1/week
1/month
East Fork Lake
Walleye (>21")
1/week
1/month
Gillespie Old City Lake
Largemouth Bass
1/week
1/month
Kinkaid Lake
Black and White Crappie
Unlimited
1/week
Lake Michigan
Rock Bass (<8")
Unlimited
Unlimited
Rock Bass (>8")
Unlimited
1/week
Lincoln Trail Lake
Largemouth Bass
Do not eat
Do not eat
Little Grassy Lake
Black Crappie
1/week
1/month
Channel Catfish
1/week
1/month
Lusk Creek
Black Bass
1/week
1/month
Mary's River
Carp
Unlimited
1/month
Mill Creek Lake
Largemouth Bass (<19")
1/week
1/month
Largemouth Bass (>19")
Do not eat
Do not eat
Channel Catfish
1/week
1/month
Black and White Crappie
1/week
1/month
Ohio River
Sauger (<14")
1/week
1/month
Pinckneyville City Lake
Largemouth Bass (>18")
1/week
1/month
Red Hills Lake
Largemouth Bass
1/week
1/month
Siloam Springs Lake
White Crappie
1/week
1/month
Bluegill
1/week
1/month
Thompson Lake
Largemouth Bass
1/week
1/month
Carp
Unlimited
1/week
* All sizes unless noted otherwise.
For more information, contact the IDPH at 217-782-5830 or visit http://dph.illinois.gov and search for "fish
advisories." The current methylmercury advisories are available for downloading. You can also search for specific
Illinois waters with the Current Fish Advisory Map.
Sources: https://www.ifishillinois.org/regulations/special-mercurv-advisorv-2016-121216.pdf and
http://dph.illinois.gov/topics-services/environmental-health-protection/toxicologv/fish-advisories/map
EPA News
EPA Presents Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Report to Congress
and the President
On August 7, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Water announced, as leader of the of
Great Lakes Interagency Task Force, it has submitted a report to Congress and the President, which summarizes
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progress under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) during 2016. As required, the report provides detailed
information on GLRI accomplishments and funding allocations for participating federal agencies on a yearly basis.
"I'm proud that through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, we are fulfilling our mission to restore the health of
the water that so many of our communities depend on," said EPA Administrator and Great Lakes Interagency Task
Force Chair Scott Pruitt. "As we now understand more than ever, we don't have to choose between the health of our
environment and the health of our economy - we can have both."
The GLRI was launched in 2010 to accelerate efforts to protect and restore the Great Lakes. With more than $2.3
billion in GLRI investments and strong bipartisan support, 11 federal departments and partners from states, tribes,
academia, and businesses are working together to produce unprecedented results, including:
	increasing property values and property tax bases by cleaning up "Areas of Concern"(AOCs), 43 highly
contaminated sites targeted for cleanup by the United States and Canada;
	preventing the introduction of silver and bighead carp, species that threaten the region's economy and
ecology; and
	working with the agricultural community to reduce nutrient runoff to sensitive waterways.
Since 2010, the GLRI has helped fund more than 3,500 projects to improve water quality, protect and restore native
habitats and species, prevent and control invasive species, and address other Great Lakes environmental problems.
In 2014, the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force developed a five-year plan to strategically guide GLRI actions from
2015-2019 and to target resources to address the biggest threats to the Great Lakes ecosystem. More information
about the GLRI, including an interactive project map, is available at www.glri.us.
For more information, contact the EPA Press Office at press@epa.gov
Source: https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/epa-presents-great-lakes-restoration-initiative-report-congress-and-
president
Other News
Overview of the Great Lakes Consortium for Fish Consumption
Advisories
The Great Lakes Consortium for Fish Consumption Advisories (Consortium) is a
collaboration of fish advisory program managers from U.S. federal and state (Illinois,
Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin)
governmental health, water quality, and fisheries agencies bordering the Great Lakes.
The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change of Ontario, Canada,
participates as does the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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History
Goals guiding the Consortium's work:
In the early 1980s, the Consortium began as an ad hoc task
force. In 1986, as a part of the Great Lakes Toxic Substances
Control Agreement, the group was formally established as the
Council of Great Lakes Governors' Great Lakes Sport Fish
Consumption Advisory Task Force (Task Force). The Task
Force was charged by the Council of Great Lakes Governors
(Council) with developing common fish advisories for
important sport fish species that range widely in open waters of
the Great Lakes (Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and
Ontario). In response to the Council's charge, the Task Force
developed a method for assessing risks and issuing fish
consumption advice so that advice issued by each Great Lakes
state would be consistent in protecting the health of people who
consume Great Lakes fish.
 Use, share, and advance credible data and
science;
 Evaluate the risks and benefits of consuming
Great Lakes fish to develop a shared
understanding among Consortium members
and incorporate these messages into fish
consumption advice;
 Establish and utilize best practices for
communicating risks and benefits and
influencing the behavior of fish consumers; and
 Maintain a strong focus in all activities on
developing and disseminating consistent advice
for shared waters.
Protocols and Papers Issued
1993 - "Protocolfor a Uniform Great Lakes Sport Fish Consumption Advisory." (PCB Protocol)
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/fish/consortium/pastproiects/pcbprotocol.pdf
Three sets of facts were important in the development of the PCB Protocol. First, PCB concentrations found in fish
from the Great Lakes region were and remain higher than many other locations in the United States. However, PCB
contamination ranges widely and is not an issue for all fish species or locations. Second, surveys found that anglers
and many others living in the Great Lakes region eat fish at rates far greater than national averages. Third, the
Consortium recognized that anglers tend to concentrate their fishing in specific geographical locations. Based on
these facts and the health risks posed by PCBs, the Consortium concluded that the PCB Protocol should result in
adequate health protection and accommodate people's desire and the health benefits of eating fish. Note: many
Great Lakes fish species are caught, harvested, and sold in commercial fish markets (e.g. Lake Trout, Walleye,
Catfish, Smelt, Perch, Buffalo, and Common Carp).
2007 - A Protocolfor Mercury-based Fish Consumption Advice
(http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/fish/consortium/pastproiects/mercurvprot.pdf). an addendum to the PCB
Protocol.
This mercury protocol was developed to address all Great Lakes and other Great Lakes region waters. Like the PCB
Protocol, this addendum recommends a Health Protection Value and provides guidelines for deriving consumption
advice for mercury-based advisories. Merging advice for purchased fish with advice for locally caught fish on a state
or local scale is addressed in mercury-based advisories. The resulting mercury advice may differ between waters
and among states due to differences among mercury concentrations in different species, differences in mercury
concentrations among geographical areas, and other factors including implementation issues and differences in risk
evaluations.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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2015  "Discussion Paper for a Chlordane Health Protection Value (HPV)"
http://w\^v.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/fish/consortium/pastDroiects/chlordaneprot.pdf
2015 - "Potential for Human Exposure to Toxaphene through Consumption of Great Lakes Fish"
http://\M\^v.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/fish/consortium/pastDroiects/toxaphenepdf.pdf
Current Mission and Activities
The Consortium's mission is to provide the primary forum for collaboration on data and guidance for Great Lakes
fish consumption advisories. The Consortium shares and reviews data on fish contaminants, evaluates health risks
and benefits of locally caught fish consumption, shares and coordinates approaches for health education and
community engagement, and conducts evaluations of the effectiveness of fish consumption advisories that have
been issued by Consortium States.
Since 2010, the Consortium has received several GLRI grants, funded by the EPA Great Lakes National Program
Office through the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). The goals of these grants were to enhance fish
consumption advisory programs in the Great Lakes Basin, improve the public's understanding of risks and benefits
of consuming fish, improve fish monitoring programs, evaluate risks and benefits of consuming fish, and establish
health collaborations to reduce toxics exposures.
Through the GLRI, the Consortium conducts regular teleconferences to
discuss topics of interest and invite experts to present their research.
Topics have included:
	Fish sampling and analysis
	Risk assessments for contaminants in fish
	EPA Program updates
	Risk communication research
Juvenile Lake Sturgeon {Acipenser fu/vescens) (Image
	Risks and benefits analysis for fish consumption
	Microplastics in the Great Lakes
	Brominated diphenyl ether compounds (BDEs)
	Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)
	Fish consumption beneficial use impairments in the Great Lakes AOCs
The Consortium holds a face-to-face meeting, approximately annually, for members to give updates, present
research and data, discuss new and innovative fish consumption advisory communication approaches, and
maintain current scientific knowledge on new and emerging bioaccumulating contaminants in the Great Lakes
basins. Additionally, Consortium members focus on current science related to health risks, risk communication,
and interstate/interagency collaboration for developing credible fish consumption advisories for Great Lakes fish.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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For more information, contact James Stahl, Indiana Department of Environmental Management,
fistahl@idem.IN.gov) and Pat McCann, MDH, Co-Chair, Great Lakes Consortium for Fish Consumption Advisories
(patricia.mccanntf''state.miMis).
Additional information is available at http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/fish/eoiisortiurn/iridex.htrnl. which
is hosted by MDIT.
Great Lakes Health Collaboration to Reduce Toxics Exposures -
Final Report
On January 26, 2017, the MDH released the final report of the Great Lakes Health Collaboration to Reduce Toxics
Exposure, the result of a partnership with the Human Dimensions Research Unit in the Department of Natural
Resources at Cornell University; Minnesota-based healthcare systems HealthPartners Institute and Essentia
Health; the Lake County Health and Human Sendees WIC program; the MDH WIC program; and the Consortium,
to protect human health through safer fish consumption. This collaboration of state and local public health,
together with health care providers, supported increased protection for Great Lakes fish consumers from toxic
substances, such as mercury and PCBs.
The final report notes that mercury in fish is a major cause of fish consumption advisories in the Great Lakes Basin.
Although reductions in exposure to other toxic substances in fish are expected to follow, this particular study
focused on the reduction in mercury exposure in women of childbearing age.
The study had three major objectives:
1)	Develop evidence-based public health education for fish consumption that reduces exposure to toxic
substances in women of childbearing age
2)	Evaluate effects of public health education on actual behavior using a diary study
3)	Expand use of MDH Fiscal Year 2012 GLR1 Project Outputs (specifically the Lake County Mercury
Screening Project and risk benefit training for health care providers developed as part of the Fish are
Important for Superior Health (FISH) Project)
Conclusions of the study found that the development of evidence-based
education that promoted safer fish consumption and the delivery of that
education through health care systems resulted in reductions in mercury
exposure in women who are or may become pregnant. Two-thirds of the
women (all of childbearing age and anglers - who are more likely than other
women to eat fish) reported eating less than one meal of fish each week -
most of which are reportedly low in mercury. Purchased fish accounted for
more than 80% of the fish meals. Two-thirds of these purchased fish
consumed are classified as low-mercury fish by the EPA/U.S. Food and
Drug Administration. Only 3-5% of women of childbearing age exceeded federal consumption guidelines for
purchased fish. Nevertheless, one-quarter of women exceeded state and federal guidelines that include both
The final report found that increasing the
public's understanding of the risks and benefits
of eating fish help them make better choices at
the market. (Image courtesy of EPA)
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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purchased and locally caught fish. The number of women exceeding these guidelines varied considerably from state
to state. In Ohio, Illinois, and Wisconsin, 12-19% of women exceeded these guidelines. In New York and Indiana,
25-29% of women exceeded these guidelines. In Pennsylvania, Minnesota, and Michigan, 35-42% of women
exceeded these guidelines.
Additionally, the study found that using a narrative format for fish consumption guidelines was very effective.
Brochures that feature, for instance, a story about how a hypothetical woman learned about which fish she could eat
safely increased fish consumption among women who were eating the least amount of fish. Based on these results,
estimated projections show that for every 10,000 narrative brochures distributed, 2,797-3,330 women of
childbearing age would eat more fish, totaling 14,544-17,316 more fish meals each year. This increase in fish
consumption would not result in any more women exceeding fish consumption guidelines. Furthermore, for every
10,000 narrative brochures distributed, 76-90 women of childbearing age who are currently exceeding fish
consumption guidelines would eat fewer fish (totaling 1,011-1,197 fewer fish meals each year).
Results from this project, as well as other GLRI funded fish advisory related projects, were shared among members
of the Consortium through conference call and face-to-face meetings. These meetings facilitated use of project
results by Consortium states to enhance their programs to communicate the risks and benefits of fish consumption.
The final report concludes that this project resulted in reduced chemical exposure to at-risk Great Lakes fish
consumers by (1) utilizing successful public health system practices and resources, and (2) partnering with health
care and public health professionals, in accordance with the GLRI Action Plan, to "Protect Human Health through
Safer Fish Consumption."
For more information, contact Patricia McCann at patricia.mccann@state.mn.us.
Source: http://\v\v\v.health.state.imi.us/di\s/eh/fish/consortium/20i0,finalrep.pdf
State of the Great Lakes 2017
On June 19, 2017, the Governments of Canada and the United States released the 2017 State of the Great Lakes
reports. Overall, the Great Lakes are assessed as Fair and Unchanging. While progress to restore and protect the
Great Lakes has been made, including the reduction of toxic chemicals, challenges remain with issues such as
invasive species and nutrients.
The Governments reported that the assessments of the Great Lakes help them to identify current, new, and
emerging challenges to Great Lakes water quality and ecosystem health. Assessments also help the Governments
evaluate the effectiveness of programs and policies in place to address challenges, and help inform and engage
others.
The Governments of Canada and the United States, together with their many partners in protecting the Great
Lakes, have agreed on a set of nine indicators of ecosystem health. These indicators are in turn supported by 44
sub-indicators, measuring such things as concentrations of contaminants in water and fish tissue, changes in the
quality and abundance of wetland habitat, and the introduction on and spread of invasive species. To create this
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report, more than 180 government and non-government Great Lakes scientists and other experts worked to
assemble available data to populate the suite of sub-indicators and to agree on what the indicators mean. Each
indicator was assessed in relation to both status and trend. Status is defined as Poor, Fair, or Good. Trend is defined
as Deteriorating, Unchanging, or Improving.
The Fish Consumption sub-indicator reveals that in all the Great Lakes, contaminants in edible portions of fish
have declined over time. However, in Lakes Erie and Huron, recent concentrations of PCBs and mercury are stable
or slightly increasing.
Sub-Indicators Supporting the Indicator Assessment
Sub-indicator
Lake Superior
Lake Michigan
Lake Huron
Lake Erie
Lake Ontario
Contaminants in Edible Fish
Status: Fair
Trend: Unchanging
Status: Fair
Trend: Improving
Status: Fair
Trend: Unchanging
Status: Fair
Trend: Deteriorating
Status: Fair
Trend: Improving
Contaminants causing consumption restrictions of Great Lakes fish typically include PCBs, mercury, and dioxins.
PCBs drive the majority of fish consumption advice in both the United States and Canada. PCB levels in edible
portions of fish tissue have decreased by 90% in some cases, but are all above consumption benchmarks. Mercury
levels have generally declined over the last four decades and, depending on the fish species and lake, are lower than
most fish consumption advisory benchmarks.
However, in Lakes Erie and Huron, PCBs and	7000
mercury have remained stable or are slightly
increasing. Non-legacy contaminants such as
perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) continue to
be a monitoring priority and will be included in
future State of the Great Lakes reporting as
necessary.
The results for the studies pertaining to the
Toxic Chemicals sub-indicator mirror these
insights: overall status of toxic chemicals in the
Great Lakes is fair and the trend is unchanging to
improving since the last report. Some toxic
chemicals in the Great Lakes have declined
substantially over the past 40 years. While
significant progress has been made, the Great Lakes are still experiencing concentrations of some toxic chemicals,
such as PCBs, that pose a threat to human health and the environment.
For more information about the State of the Great Lakes reporting and to access the reports, visit the following
wehsites: binational.net. https://www.canada.ca/en/enyironment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-
protection/how-great-lakes-are-doing.html. and www.epa.gov/greatlakes.
Source: https://binational.net/2017/06/iQ/sogl-edgl-2017/.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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Recently Awarded Research
EPA Awards $120,000 to Illinois for Project in Waukegan Harbor
On July 26, 2017, EPA Region 5 announced a $120,000 grant to the IDNR for a project to assess the health of the
Waukegan Harbor AOC on Lake Michigan. Waukegan Harbor is one of 43 contaminated sites on the Great Lakes
designated as an AOC by the United States and Canada under the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.
IDNR will use EPA's funding to partner with the University of Illinois to assess populations of phytoplankton and
zooplankton at Waukegan Harbor and North Point Marina. Plankton communities are an indicator of water quality
and will help determine when Waukegan Harbor has recovered sufficiently to be removed from the binational list of
AOCs.
"This funding from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is critical to bringing Waukegan Harbor one step closer to
delisting as an Area of Concern," said Diane Tecic, coastal management program director at IDNR. "We hope that
the sampling and analysis of these micro-organisms will show that the cleanup has been successful, and the aquatic
community is returning to normal."
The Waukegan Harbor cleanup was completed in 2014 after more than 20 years of federal, state, and local efforts.
EPA, the State of Illinois, and parties responsible for contaminating the harbor spent $150 million to remove or cap
PCB-contaminated sediment, clean up the Outboard Marine Superfund Site, and restore habitat in the AOC. EPA
continues to monitor the recovery at this site. The work was funded by the GLRI, EPA's Superfund program, and
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The City of Waukegan also worked with federal and state agencies to
eliminate combined sewer overflows, improve beaches, and create valuable dune and swale habitat. EPA continues
to monitor the progress of the ongoing recovery at this AOC.
More information about the Waukegan Harbor AOC can be found at https: //www.epa.gov/waukegan-harbor-aoc.
For more information, contact Allison Lippert at lippert.allison@epa.gov.
Source: https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/epa-awards-120000-illin0is-pr0iect-waukegan-harb0r.
Recent Publications
Journal Articles
The list below provides a selection of research articles focusing on the Great Lakes.
~ Selective uptake and bioaccumulation of antidepressants in fish from effluent-impacted Niagara River
Arnnok, P., R.R. Singh, R. Burakham, A. Perez-Fuentetaja, and D. S. Aga. 2017. Selective Uptake and Bioaccumulation of
Antidepressants in Fish from Effluent-Impacted Niagara River. Environmental Science & Technology. 51(18): 10652-10662.
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~	Comprehensive emerging chemical discovery: Novel polvfluorinated compounds in Lake Michigan trout
Baygi, S.F., B.S. Crimmins, P.K. Hopke and T.M. Holsen. 2016. Comprehensive Emerging Chemical Discovery: Novel Polyfluorinated
Compounds in Lake Michigan Trout Environmental Science & Technology. 50(17): 946-9468.
~	Mercury levels in herring gulls and fish: 42 years of spatio-temporal trends in the Great Lakes
Blukacz-Richards, E.A., A. Visha, M.L. Graham, D.L. McGoldrick, S. R. deSolla, D. J. Moore, and G.B. Arhonditsis. 2017. Mercury
levels in herring gulls and fish: 42 years of spatio-temporal trends in the Great Lakes. Chemosphere. 172:476-487.
~	Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes from the Great Lakes Basin. USA
Braham, R.P., V.S. Blazer, C.H. Shaw, and P.M. Mazik. 2017. Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes
from the Great Lakes Basin, USA. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 58(8):570-581.
~	Consumption of Lake Ontario sport fish and the incidence of colorectal cancer in the New York State Angler Cohort Study (NYSACS)
Callahan, C.L., J.E. Vena, J. Green, M. Swanson, L. Mu, M.R. Bonner. 2017. Consumption of Lake Ontario sport fish and the
incidence of colorectal cancer in the New York State Angler Cohort Study (NYSACS). Environmental Research. 154:86-92.
~	Climate change as a long-term stressor for the fisheries of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America
Collingsworth, P.D., D.B. Bunnell, M. W. Murray, Y.-C. Kao, Z.S. Feiner, R.M. Claramunt, B.M. Lofgren, T.O. Hook, and S. A. Ludsin.
2017. Climate change as a long-term stressor for the fisheries of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. Reviews in Fish
Biology and Fisheries. 27(2):363-391.
~	Are women anglers of childbearing age in the Great Lakes region following fish consumption guidelines?
Connelly, N.A., T.B. Lauber, J. Niederdeppe, and B.A. Knuth. 2017. Are women anglers of childbearing age in the Great Lakes
region following fish consumption guidelines? Journal of Great Lakes Research. 43(3):187-191.
~	Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: I. Patterns of occurrence
Elliot, S.M., M.E. Brigham, K.E. Lee, J.A. Banda, S.J. Choy, D.J. Gefell, T.A. Minarik, J.N. Moore, and Z. G. Jorgenson. 2017.
Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: I. Patterns of occurrence. Public Library of Science
One 12(9): e0182868.
~	Spatial and temporal dynamics of nearshore fish communities in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron
Fetzer, W.W., B.M. Roth, D.M. Infante, D.F. Clapp, R.M. Claramunt D.G. Fielder, D.K. Forsyth, J.X. He, T.J. Newcomb, C.M. Riseng,
K.E.Wehrly, and T.G. Zorn. 2017. Spatial and temporal dynamics of nearshore fish communities in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.
Journal of Great Lakes Research. 43(2): 319-334.
~	Polvbrominated diphenvl ethers (PBDEs) in Great Lakes fish: Levels, patterns, trends and implications for human exposure
Gandhi, N., S.B. Gewurtz, K.G. Drouillard, T. Kolic, K. MacPherson, E.J. Reiner, and S. P. Bhavsar. 2017. Polybrominated diphenyl
ethers (PBDEs) in Great Lakes fish: Levels, patterns, trends and implications for human exposure. Science of The Total
Environment. 575:907-916.
~	Retrospective analysis of organophosphate flame retardants in herring gull eggs and relation to the aquatic food web in the Laurentian Great
Lakes of North America
Greaves, A.K., R.J. Letcher, D. Chen, D.J. McGoldrick, L.T. Gauthier, S.M. Backus. 2016. Retrospective analysis of organophosphate
flame retardants in herring gull eggs and relation to the aquatic food web in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America.
Environmental Research. 150:255-263.
~	Bioaccumulation of Dechloranes. organophosphate esters, and other flame retardants in Great Lakes fish
Guo, J., M. Venier, A. Salamova, and R.A. Hites. 2017. Bioaccumulation of Dechloranes, organophosphate esters, and other flame
retardants in Great Lakes fish. Science of The Total Environment. 583:1-9.
~	Habitat use by juvenile salmonids in Lake Ontario tributaries-species, age, diel and seasonal effects
Johnson, J.H. and J.E. McKenna Jr. 2017. Habitat use byjuvenile salmonids in Lake Ontario tributaries-species, age, diel and
seasonal effects. Journal of Great Lakes Research 43(5):963-969.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
October 2017
~	Urban anglers' adherence to fish consumption advisories in the Great Lakes region
Lauber, T.B., N.A. Connelly, J. Niederdeppe, and B.A. Knuth. 2017. Urban anglers' adherence to fish consumption advisories in the
Great Lakes region. Journal of Great lakes Research. 43(3):180-186.
~	Congener specific determination ofpolvchlorinated naphthalenes in sediment and biota by gas chromatography high resolution mass
spectrometry
Lega, R., D. Megson, C. Hartley, P. Crazier, K. MacPherson, T. Kolic, P. Helm, Paul, A. Myers, S. Bhavsar, and E. Reiner. 2016.
Congener Specific Determination of Polychlorinated Naphthalenes in Sediment and Biota by Gas Chromatography High Resolution
Mass Spectrometry. Journal of Chromatography Available online: DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2016.11.054
~	Concentration and distribution of contaminants in lake trout and walleye from the Laurentian Great Lakes (2008-2012)
McGoldrick, D.J., and E.W. Murphy 2016. Concentration and distribution of contaminants in lake trout and walleye from the
Laurentian Great Lakes (2008-2012). Environmental Pollution. 217:85-96.
~	Polychlorinated biphenvls and polychlorinated dioxins-furans in lake trout and whitefish composite samples from commercial fisheries in Lakes
Erie. Huron, and Superior
Rawn, D.R.K., M. Dowd, M.J.S. Scuby, P.P. Pantazopoulos, and M. Feeley. 2017. Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Polychlorinated
Dioxins-Furans in Lake Trout and Whitefish Composite Samples from Commercial Fisheries in Lakes Erie, Huron, and Superior.
Journal of Food Protection. 80(8): 1228-1238.
~	Lake trout spawning habitat suitability at two offshore reefs in Illinois waters of Lake Michigan
Redman, R., S. Mackey, J. Dub, and S. Czesny. 2017. Lake trout spawning habitat suitability at two offshore reefs in Illinois waters
of Lake Michigan. Journal of Great Lakes Research 43(2):335-344.
~	Vertical distribution of alewife in the Lake Ontario offshore: Implications for resource use
Riha, M., M.G. Walsh, M J. Connerton, J. Holden, B.C. Weidel, P.J. Sullivan, T.J. Holda, and L.G. Rudstam. 2017. Vertical distribution
of alewife in the Lake Ontario offshore: Implications for resource use. Journal of Great Lakes Research 43(5):823-837.
~	Estimation of omega-3 fattvacid (EPA + DHA) intake from Lake Ontario fish based on provincial consumption advisories
Strandberg U., S.P. Bhavsar, and M.T. Arts. 2017. Estimation of omega-3 fatty acid (EPA + DHA) intake from Lake Ontario fish
based on provincial consumption advisories. Journal of Great Lakes Research. In Press, Corrected Proof. Available online:
httPs://doi.org/10.1016/i.iglr.2017.08.009
~	Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure
Thomas, L.M., Z.G. Jorgenson, M.E. Brigham, S.J. Choy, J.N. Moore, J. A. Banda, D.J. Gefell, T.A. Minarik, and H.L. Schoenfuss.
2017. Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure.
Public Library of Science One. 12(9): e0184725.
~	Deepwatersculpin status and recovery in Lake Ontario
Weidel, B.C., M.G. Walsh, M.J. Connerton, B.F. Lantry, J.R. Lantry, J.P. Holden, M.J. Yuille, J.A. Hoyle. 2017. Deepwatersculpin
status and recovery in Lake Ontario. Journal of Great Lakes Research. 43(5):854-862.
~	Variation in the essential fatty acids EPA and DHA in fillets offish from the Great Lakes region
Williams, M.C.W., E.W. Murphy, H.B. McCarty, B. D. Snyder, C.S. Schrank, P. J. McCann, and B.S. Crimmins. 2017. Variation in the
essential fatty acids EPA and DHA in fillets offish from the Great Lakes region. Journal of Great Lakes Research. 43(3): 150-160.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
October 2017
Upcoming Meetings and Conferences
The Society for Integrative & Comparative Biology
Annual Meeting 2018
January 3-7, 2018
San Francisco, California
Aauaculture America 2018
February 19-22, 2018
Las Vegas, Nevada
9th International Crustacean Congress (ICC 9)
May 22-25, 2018
Washington, District of Columbia
148th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society
- Communicating the Science of Fisheries to Diverse
Audiences
August 19-23, 2018
Atlantic City, New Jersey
19th International Conference on Shellfish
Restoration & Shellfish Reef Restoration Network
Meeting
February 19-21, 2018
Adelaide, Australia
110th Annual National Shellfisheries Association
Meeting
March 18-22, 2018
Seattle, Washington
9th International Charr Symposium
June 18-21, 2018
Duluth, Minnesota
International Conference on Engineering and
Ecohvdrologyfor Fish Passage
December 10-14, 2018
New South Wales, Australia
Additional Information
This monthly newsletter highlights current information about fish and shellfish.
For more information about specific advisories within the state, territory, or tribe, contact the appropriate
state agency listed on EPA's National Listing of Fish Advisories website at https://fishadvisorvonline.epa.gov/Contacts.aspx.
For more information about this newsletter, contact Sharon Frey (Frev.Sharon@epa.gov. 202-566-1480).
Additional information about advisories and fish and shellfish consumption can be found at https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech.

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