ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Inspection Checklists for National Program Requirements
As described in the ENERGY STAR Certified Homes National Program Requirements, Version 3 (Rev. 07), one prerequisite for
certification is that a home must meet the requirements of the four attached checklists:
	Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist
	HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist
	HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist
	Water Management System Builder Checklist
To be eligible for certification, a home must also meet the other requirements listed in the National Program Requirements document,
including verification of all requirements by a Rater. 1 Note that compliance with these guidelines is not intended to imply compliance
with all local code requirements that may be applicable to the home to be built. Where requirements of the local codes, manufacturers'
installation instructions, engineering documents, or regional ENERGY STAR programs overlap with the requirements of these
guidelines, EPA offers the following guidance:
a.	In cases where the overlapping requirements exceed the ENERGY STAR guidelines, these overlapping requirements shall be
met;
b.	In cases where overlapping requirements conflict with a requirement of these ENERGY STAR guidelines (e.g., slab insulation
is prohibited to allow visual access for termite inspections), then the conflicting requirement within these guidelines shall not be
met. Certification shall only be allowed if the Rater has determined that no equivalent option is available that could meet the
intent of the conflicting requirement of these ENERGY STAR guidelines (e.g., switching from exterior to interior slab edge
insulation). Note that, under the Performance Path, a home must still meet its ENERGY STAR HERS Index Target (or
equivalent target for regional program requirements). Therefore, other efficiency measures may be needed to compensate for
the omission of the conflicting requirement.
The Rater must review all items on the Rater checklists. Raters are expected to use their experience and discretion to verify that the
overall intent of each inspection checklist item has been met (i.e., identifying major defects that undermine the intent of the checklist
item versus identifying minor defects that the Rater may deem acceptable). The column titled "N/A," which denotes items that are "not
applicable," should be used when the checklist item is not present in the home or conflicts with local requirements.
In the event that a Rater finds an item that is inconsistent with the intent of the inspection checklists, the home cannot earn the
ENERGY STAR until the item is corrected. If correction of the item is not possible, the home cannot earn the ENERGY STAR. In the
event that an item on a Rater checklist cannot be inspected by the Rater, the home also cannot earn the ENERGY STAR. The only
exceptions to this rule are in the Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist, where the builder may assume responsibility for verifying a
maximum of eight items. This option shall only be used at the discretion of the Rater. When exercised, the builder's responsibility will be
formally acknowledged by the builder signing off on the checklist for the item(s) that they verified.
In the event that a Rater is not able to determine whether an item is consistent with the intent (e.g., an alternative method of meeting a
checklist requirement has been proposed), then the Rater shall consult their Provider. If the Provider also cannot make this
determination, then the Rater or Provider shall report the issue to EPA prior to project completion at: energystarhomes@energystar.gov
and will typically receive an initial response within 5 business days. If EPA believes the current program guidelines are sufficiently clear
to determine whether the intent has been met, then this guidance will be provided to the partner and enforced beginning with the house
in question. In contrast, if EPA believes the program guidelines require revisions to make the intent clear, then this guidance will be
provided to the partner but only enforced for homes permitted after a specified transition period after the release of the revised
guidelines, typically 60 days in length.
This process will allow EPA to make formal policy decisions as partner questions arise and to disseminate these policy decisions
through the periodic release of revised program documents to ensure consistent application of the program guidelines.
The Rater is required to keep electronic or hard copies of the completed and signed checklists.
Raters who operate under a Sampling Provider are permitted to verify any item designated "Rater Verified" using the RESNET-
approved sampling protocol for homes located outside California, and the CEC-approved sampling protocol for homes located in CA.
No parties other than Raters are permitted to use sampling. All other items shall be verified for each certified home. For example, no
items on the HVAC System Ql Contractor Checklist are permitted to be verified using a sampling protocol because they may only be
designated as "Builder Verified" or "Contractor Verified". As another example, if a Rater verifies 10 items on the Water Management
System Builder Checklist and the builder verifies the remaining checklist items, then the applicable (either RESNET or CEC) sampling
protocol is permitted to be used only on the 10 Rater-verified items.
Rater Name:
Rater Company Name:
Builder Company Name:
~ Rater has verified that builder is an
ENERGY STAR partner
Effective for homes permitted 2 starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Inspection Checklist Notes

ENERGY STAR
1.	The term 'Rater' refers to the person completing the third-party inspections required for certification. This person shall: a) be a
certified Home Energy Rater, Rating Field Inspector, BOP Inspector, or an equivalent designation as determined by a Verification
Oversight Organization such as RESNET; and, b) have attended and successfully completed an EPA-recognized training class.
See www.enerqvstar.qov/newhomestraininq.
2.	The Rater may define the 'permit date' as either the date that the permit was issued or the date of the contract on the home. In
cases where permit or contract dates are not available, Providers have discretion to estimate permit dates based on other
construction schedule factors. These assumptions should be both defensible and documented.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
ENERGY STAR
Home Address: Citv: State

Zip Code


1. High-Performance Fenestration
Must
Correct
Builder
Verified1
Rater
Verified
N/A
1.1 Prescriptive Path: Fenestration shall meet or exceed ENERGY STAR requirements2
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1.2 Performance Path: Fenestration shall meet or exceed 2009 IECC requirements2
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2. Quality-Installed Insulation
2.1 Ceiling, wall, floor, and slab insulation levels shall comply with one of the following options:
2.1.1 Meet or exceed 2009 IECC levels 3A5 OR;
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2.1.2 Achieve < 133% of the total UA resulting from the U-factors in 2009 IECC Table 402.1.3,




excluding fenestration and per guidance in Footnote 3d, AND home shall achieve < 50% of the
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infiltration rate in Exhibit 1 of the National Program Requirements 4,5




2.2 All ceiling, wall, floor, and slab insulation shall achieve RESNET-defined Grade I installation or,




alternatively, Grade II for surfaces that contain a layer of continuous, air impermeable insulation > R-3
in Climate Zones 1 to 4, > R-5 in Climate Zones 5 to 8
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3. Fully-Aligned Air Barriers5
At each insulated location noted below, a complete air barrier shall be provided that is fully aligned with the insulation as follows:


 At interior or exterior surface of ceilings in Climate Zones 1-3; at interior surface of ceilings in Climate Zones 4-8.
Also, include barrier at
interior edge of attic eave in all climate zones using a wind baffle that extends to the full height of the insulation. Include a baffle in every
bay or a tabbed baffle in each bay with a soffit vent that will also prevent wind washing of insulation in adjacent bays


 At exterior surface of walls in all climate zones; and also at interior surface of walls for Climate Zones 4-?
'



 At interior surface of floors in all climate zones, including supports to ensure permanent contact and blocking at exposed edge89

3.1 Walls10
3.1.1 Walls behind showers and tubs
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3.1.2 Walls behind fireplaces
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3.1.3 Attic knee walls 11
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3.1.4 Skylight shaft walls
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3.1.5 Wall adjoining porch roof
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3.1.6 Staircase walls
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3.1.7 Double walls
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3.1.8 Garage rim / band joist adjoining conditioned space
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3.1.9 All other exterior walls
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3.2 Floors
3.2.1 Floor above garage
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3.2.2 Cantilevered floor
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3.2.3 Floor above unconditioned basement or unconditioned crawlspace
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3.3 Ceilings10
3.3.1 Dropped ceiling / soffit below unconditioned attic
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3.3.2 All other ceilings
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4. Reduced Thermal Bridging
4.1 For insulated ceilings with attic space above (i.e., non-cathedralized), Grade I insulation extends to the
inside face of the exterior wall below at these levels: CZ 1 -5: > R-21; CZ 6-8: > R-3012
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4.2 For slabs on grade in CZ 4 and higher, 100% of slab edge insulated to > R-5 at the depth specified by
the 2009 IECC and aligned with thermal boundary of the walls4,5
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4.3 Insulation beneath attic platforms (e.g., HVAC platforms, walkways) > R-21 in CZ 1-5; > R-30 in CZ 6-8
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4.4 Reduced thermal bridging at above-grade walls separating conditioned from unconditioned space (rim / band joists exempted) using one of
the following options: 13
4.4.1 Continuous rigid insulation, insulated siding, or combination of the two;
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> R-3 in Climate Zones 1 to 4, > R-5 in Climate Zones 5 to 8 14/l5/l6i OR;
4.4.2 Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs)14, OR;
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4.4.3 Insulated Concrete Forms (ICFs)14, OR;
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4.4.4 Double-wall framing 14'17, OR;
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4.4.5 Advanced framing, including all of the items below:
4.4.5a All corners insulated > R-6 to edge 18, AND;
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4.4.5b All headers above windows & doors insulated > R-3 for 2x4 framing or equivalent cavity
width, and > R-5 for all other assemblies (e.g., with 2x6 framing) 19, AND;
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4.4.5c Framing limited at all windows & doors to one pair of king studs, plus one pair of jack studs
per window opening to support the header and sill20, AND;
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4.4.5d All interior / exterior wall intersections insulated to the same R-value as the rest of the
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exterior wall21, AND;
4.4.5e Minimum stud spacing of 16 in. o.c. for 2x4 framing in all Climate Zones and, in Climate
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Zones 5 through 8, 24 in. o.c. for 2x6 framing 22
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
Page 3 of 16

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ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
ENERGY STAR
5. Air Sealing
Must
Correct
Builder
Verified1
Rater
Verified
N/A
5.1 Penetrations to unconditioned space fully sealed with solid blocking or flashing as needed and gaps sealed with caulk or foam
5.1.1 Duct / flue shaft
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5.1.2 Plumbing / piping
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5.1.3 Electrical wiring
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5.1.4 Bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans
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5.1.5 Recessed lighting fixtures adjacent to unconditioned space ICAT labeled and fully gasketed.
Also, if in insulated ceiling without attic above, exterior surface of fixture insulated to > R-10 in
CZ 4 and higher to minimize condensation potential.
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5.1.6 Light tubes adjacent to unconditioned space include lens separating unconditioned and
conditioned space and are fully gasketed 23
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5.2 Cracks in the building envelope fully sealed
5.2.1 All above-grade sill plates adjacent to conditioned space sealed to foundation or sub-floor with
caulk, foam, or equivalent material. Foam gasket also placed beneath above-grade sill plate if
resting atop concrete or masonry and adjacent to conditioned space 24 25
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5.2.2 At top of walls adjoining unconditioned spaces, continuous top plates or sealed blocking using
caulk, foam, or equivalent material
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5.2.3 Drywall sealed to top plate at all unconditioned attic / wall interfaces using caulk, foam, drywall
adhesive (but not other construction adhesives), or equivalent material. Either apply sealant
directly between drywall and top plate or to the seam between the two from the attic above.
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5.2.4 Rough opening around windows & exterior doors sealed with caulk or foam 26
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5.2.5 Marriage joints between modular home modules at all exterior boundary conditions fully sealed
with gasket and foam
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5.2.6 All seams between Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) foamed and / or taped per
manufacturer's instructions
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5.2.7 In multifamily buildings, the gap between the common wall (e.g. the drywall shaft wall) and the
structural framing between units fully sealed at all exterior boundaries
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5.3 Other openings
5.3.1 Doors adjacent to unconditioned space (e.g., attics, garages, basements) or ambient conditions
made substantially air-tight with weatherstripping or equivalent gasket
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5.3.2 Attic access panels and drop-down stairs equipped with a durable > R-10 insulated cover that is
gasketed (i.e., not caulked) to produce continuous air seal when occupant is not accessing the
attic 27
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5.3.3 Whole-house fans equipped with a durable > R-10 insulated cover that is gasketed and either
installed on the house side or mechanically operated 27
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Rater Name: Rater Pre-Drvwall Inspection Date: Rater Initials:
Rater Name: Rater Final Inspection Date: Rater Initials:
Builder Emplovee: Builder Inspection Date: Builder Initials:
Notes:
1.
2.
At the discretion of the Rater, the builder may verify up to eight items specified in this Checklist. When exercised, the builder's
responsibility will be formally acknowledged by the builder signing off on the checklist for the item(s) that they verified.
For Prescriptive Path: All windows, doors, and skylights shall meet or exceed ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Residential
Windows, Doors, and Skylights - Version 5.0 as outlined at www.eneravstar.gov/windows. For Performance Path: All windows, doors and
skylights shall meet or exceed the component U-factor and SHGC requirements specified in the 2009 IECC - Table 402.1.1. If no NFRC
rating is noted on the window or in product literature (e.g., for site-built fenestration), select the U-factor and SHGC value from Tables 4
and 14, respectively, in 2005 ASHRAE Fundamentals, Chapter 31. Select the highest U-factor and SHGC value among the values listed
for the known window characteristics (e.g., frame type, number of panes, glass color, and presence of low-e coating). Note that the U-
factor requirement applies to all fenestration while the SHGC only applies to the glazed portion. The following exceptions apply:
a.	An area-weighted average of fenestration products shall be permitted to satisfy the U-factor requirements;
b.	An area-weighted average of fenestration products > 50% glazed shall be permitted to satisfy the SHGC requirements;
c.	15 square feet of glazed fenestration per dwelling unit shall be exempt from the U-factor and SHGC requirements, and shall be
excluded from area-weighted averages calculated using a) and b), above;
d.	One side-hinged opaque door assembly up to 24 square feet in area shall be exempt from the U-factor requirements and shall be
excluded from area-weighted averages calculated using a) and b), above;
e.	Fenestration utilized as part of a passive solar design shall be exempt from the U-factor and SHGC requirements, and shall be
excluded from area-weighted averages calculated using a) and b), above. Exempt windows shall be facing within 45 degrees of
true South and directly coupled to thermal storage mass that has a heat capacity > 20 btu / ft3xF and provided in a ratio of at least
3 sq. ft. per sq. ft. of South facing fenestration. Generally, thermal mass materials will be at least 2 in. thick.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist
3.	Insulation levels in a home shall meet or exceed the component insulation requirements in the 2009 IECC - Table 402.1.1. The following
exceptions apply:
a.	Steel-frame ceilings, walls, and floors shall meet the insulation requirements of the 2009 IECC - Table 402.2.5. In CZ 1 and 2, the
continuous insulation requirements in this table shall be permitted to be reduced to R-3 for steel-frame wall assemblies with studs
spaced at 24 in. on center. This exception shall not apply if the alternative calculations in d) are used;
b.	For ceilings with attic spaces, R-30 shall satisfy the requirement for R-38 and R-38 shall satisfy the requirement for R-49 wherever
the full height of uncompressed insulation at the lower R-value extends over the wall top plate at the eaves. This exemption shall
not apply if the alternative calculations in d) are used;
c.	For ceilings without attic spaces, R-30 shall satisfy the requirement for any required value above R-30 if the design of the roof /
ceiling assembly does not provide sufficient space for the required insulation value. This exemption shall be limited to 500 sq. ft. or
20% of the total insulated ceiling area, whichever is less. This exemption shall not apply if the alternative calculations in d) are
used;
d.	An alternative equivalent U-factor or total UA calculation may also be used to demonstrate compliance, as follows:
An assembly with a U-factor equal or less than specified in 2009 IECC Table 402.1.3 complies.
A total building thermal envelope UA that is less than or equal to the total UA resulting from the U-factors in Table 402.1.3 also
complies. The insulation levels of all non-fenestration components (i.e., ceilings, walls, floors, and slabs) can be traded off using the
UA approach under both the Prescriptive and the Performance Path. Note that fenestration products (i.e., windows, skylights,
doors) shall not be included in this calculation. Also, note that while ceiling and slab insulation can be included in trade-off
calculations, Items 4.1 through 4.3 of the Checklist shall be met regardless of the UA tradeoffs calculated. The UA calculation shall
be done using a method consistent with the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals and shall include the thermal bridging effects of
framing materials. The calculation for a steel-frame envelope assembly shall use the ASHRAE zone method or a method providing
equivalent results, and not a series-parallel path calculation method.
4.	Consistent with the 2009 IECC, slab edge insulation is only required for slab-on-grade floors with a floor surface less than 12 inches below
grade. Slab insulation shall extend to the top of the slab to provide a complete thermal break. If the top edge of the insulation is installed
between the exterior wall and the edge of the interior slab, it shall be permitted to be cut at a 45-degree angle away from the exterior wall.
Alternatively, the thermal break is permitted to be created using > R-3 rigid insulation on top of an existing slab (e.g., in a home undergoing
a gut rehabilitation). In such cases, up to 10% of the slab surface is permitted to not be insulated (e.g., for sleepers, for sill plates).
Insulation installed on top of slab shall be covered by a durable floor surface (e.g., hardwood, tile, carpet).
5.	Where an insulated wall separates a garage, patio, porch, or other unconditioned space from the conditioned space of the house, slab
insulation shall also be installed at this interface to provide a thermal break between the conditioned and unconditioned slab. Where
specific details cannot meet this requirement, partners shall provide the detail to EPA to request an exemption prior to the home's
certification. EPA will compile exempted details and work with industry to develop feasible details for use in future revisions to the program.
A list of currently exempted details is available at: www.eneravstar.gov/slabedae.
6.	For purposes of this Checklist, an air barrier is defined as any durable solid material that blocks air flow between conditioned space and
unconditioned space, including necessary sealing to block excessive air flow at edges and seams and adequate support to resist positive
and negative pressures without displacement or damage. EPA recommends, but does not require, rigid air barriers.
Open-cell or closed-cell foam shall have a finished thickness > 5.5 in. or 1.5 in., respectively, to qualify as an air barrier unless the
manufacturer indicates otherwise.
If flexible air barriers such as house wrap are used, they shall be fully sealed at all seams and edges and supported using fasteners with
caps or heads > 1 in. diameter unless otherwise indicated by the manufacturer. Flexible air barriers shall not be made of kraft paper,
paper-based products, or other materials that are easily torn. If polyethylene is used, its thickness shall be > 6 mil.
7.	EPA highly recommends, but does not require, inclusion of an interior air barrier at rim / band joists in Climate Zones 4 through 8.
8.	Examples of supports necessary for permanent contact include staves for batt insulation or netting for blown-in insulation. Alternatively,
batts that completely fill floor cavities enclosed on all six sides may be used to meet Items 2.2 and 3.2, even when compression occurs
due to excess insulation, as long as the R-value of the batts has been appropriately assessed based on manufacturer guidance and the
only defect preventing the insulation from achieving the required installation grade is the compression caused by the excess insulation.
9.	Fully-aligned air barriers may be installed at the exterior surface of the floor cavity in all Climate Zones if the insulation is installed in
contact with this exterior air barrier and the perimeter rim and band joists of the floor cavity are also sealed and insulated to comply with
the fully-aligned air barrier requirements for walls.
10.	All insulated vertical surfaces are considered walls (e.g., above and below grade exterior walls, knee walls) and must meet the air barrier
requirements for walls, with the exception of adiabatic walls in multifamily dwellings. All insulated ceiling surfaces, regardless of slope (e.g.,
cathedral ceilings, tray ceilings, conditioned attic roof decks, flat ceilings, sloped ceilings), must meet the requirements for ceilings.
11.	Exterior air barriers are not required for attic knee walls that are < 24 in. in height if an interior air barrier is provided and insulation extends
in all directions from the top of this interior air barrier into unconditioned space at the following levels: CZ 1-5: > R-21; CZ 6-8: > R-30.
12.	The minimum designated R-values must be achieved regardless of the trade-offs determined using an equivalent U-factor or UA
alternative calculation, with the following exception:
For homes permitted through 12/31/2012: CZ 1-5: For spaces that provide less than 5.5 in. of clearance, R-15 Grade I insulation is
permitted. CZ 6-8: For spaces that provide less than 7.0 in. of clearance, R-21 Grade I insulation is permitted.
For homes permitted on or after 01/01/2013: Homes shall achieve Item 4.1 without exception.
Note that if the minimum designated values are used, then higher insulation values may be needed elsewhere to meet Item 2.1. Also, note
that these requirements can be met by using any available strategy, such as a raised-heel truss, alternate framing that provides adequate
space, and / or high-density insulation.
13.	Mass walls utilized as the thermal mass component of a passive solar design (e.g., a Trombe wall) are exempt from this Item. To be
eligible for this exemption, the passive solar design shall be comprised of the following five components: an aperture or collector, an
absorber, thermal mass, a distribution system, and a control system. For more information, see:
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist
http://enerqv.qov/sites/prod/files/quide to passive solar home desiqn.pdf.
Mass walls that are not part of a passive solar design (e.g., CMU block or log home enclosure) shall either utilize the strategies outlined in
Item 4.4 or the pathway in the assembly with the least thermal resistance, as determined using a method consistent with the 2009
ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, shall provide > 50% of the applicable assembly resistance, defined as the reciprocal of the mass
wall equivalent U-factor in the 2009 IECC - Table 402.1.3. Documentation identifying the pathway with the least thermal resistance and its
resistance value shall be collected by the Rater and any Builder Verified or Rater Verified box under Item 4.4 shall be checked.
14.	Up to 10% of the total exterior wall surface area is exempted from the reduced thermal bridging requirements to accommodate intentional
designed details (e.g., architectural details such as thermal fins, wing walls, or masonry fireplaces; structural details, such as steel
columns). It shall be apparent to the Rater that the exempted areas are intentional designed details or the exempted area shall be
documented in a plan provided by the builder, architect, designer, or engineer. The Rater need not evaluate the necessity of the designed
detail to certify the home.
15.	If used, insulated siding shall be attached directly over a water-resistive barrier and sheathing. In addition, it shall provide the required R-
value as demonstrated through either testing in accordance with ASTM C 1363 or by attaining the required R-value at its minimum
thickness. Insulated sheathing rated for water protection can be used as a water resistant barrier if all seams are taped and sealed. If non-
insulated structural sheathing is used at corners, advanced framing details listed under Item 4.4.5 shall be met for those wall sections.
16.	Steel framing shall meet the reduced thermal bridging requirements by complying with Item 4.4.1 of the Checklist.
17.	Double-wall framing is defined as any framing method that ensures a continuous layer of insulation covering the studs to at least the R-
value required in Item 4.4.1 of the Checklist, such as offset double-stud walls, aligned double-stud walls with continuous insulation
between the adjacent stud faces, or single-stud walls with 2x2 or 2x3 cross-framing. In all cases, insulation shall fill the entire wall cavity
from the interior to exterior sheathing except at windows, doors and other penetrations.
18.	All exterior corners shall be constructed to allow access for the installation of > R-6 insulation that extends to the exterior wall sheathing.
Examples of compliance options include standard-density insulation with alternative framing techniques, such as using three studs per
corner, or high-density insulation (e.g., spray foam) with standard framing techniques.
19.	Compliance options include continuous rigid insulation sheathing, SIP headers, other prefabricated insulated headers, single-member or
two-member headers with insulation either in between or on one side, or an equivalent assembly, except where a framing plan provided by
the builder, architect, designer, or engineer indicates that full-depth solid headers are to be used. The Rater need not evaluate the
structural necessity of the details in the framing plan to certify the home. Also, the framing plan need only encompass the details in
question and not necessarily the entire home. R-value requirement refers to manufacturer's nominal insulation value.
20.	Additional jack studs shall be used only as needed for structural support and cripple studs only as needed to maintain on-center spacing of
studs.
21.	Insulation shall run behind interior / exterior wall intersections using ladder blocking, full length 2x6 or 1x6 furring behind the first partition
stud, drywall clips, or other equivalent alternative.
22.	In Climate Zones 5 - 8, a minimum stud spacing of 16 in. o.c. is permitted to be used with 2x6 framing if > R-20.0 wall cavity insulation is
achieved. Regardless, all vertical framing members shall either be on-center or have an alternative structural purpose (e.g., framing
members at the edge of pre-fabricated panels) that is apparent to the Rater or documented in a framing plan that encompasses that
member and is provided by the builder, architect, designer, or engineer. The Rater need not evaluate the structural necessity of the
framing plan to certify the home. However, all 2x6 framing with stud spacing of 16 in. o.c. in Climate Zones 5-8 shall have > R-20.0 wall
cavity insulation installed regardless of any framing plan or alternative equivalent total UA calculation.
23.	Light tubes that do not include a gasketed lens are required to be sealed and insulated > R-6 for the length of the tube.
24.	Existing sill plates (e.g., in a home undergoing a gut rehabilitation) on the interior side of structural masonry or monolithic walls are exempt
from this Item. In addition, other existing sill plates resting atop concrete or masonry and adjacent to conditioned space are permitted, in
lieu of using a gasket, to be sealed with caulk, foam, or equivalent material at both the interior seam between the sill plate and the subfloor
and the seam between the top of the sill plate and the sheathing.
25.	In Climate Zones 1 through 3, a continuous stucco cladding system adjacent to sill and bottom plates is permitted to be used in lieu of
sealing plates to foundation or sub-floor with caulk, foam, or equivalent material.
26.	In Climate Zones 1 through 3, a continuous stucco cladding system sealed to windows and doors is permitted to be used in lieu of sealing
rough openings with caulk or foam.
27.	Examples of durable covers include, but are not limited to, pre-fabricated covers with integral insulation, rigid foam adhered to cover with
adhesive, or batt insulation mechanically fastened to the cover (e.g., using bolts, metal wire, or metal strapping).
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013	Revised 6/01/2013	Page 6 of 16

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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Home Address: Citv:
State:
Zip Code:

System Description 2 Coolina system for temporary occuDant load? 3 Yes ~ No ~
1. Whole-Building Mechanical Ventilation Design 4
Builder
Verified 5
Cont.
Verified 6
N/A
1.1 Ventilation system installed that has been designed to meet ASHRAE 62.2-2010 requirements including,
but not limited to, requirements in Items 1.2-1.5.7
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1.2 Ventilation system does not utilize an intake duct to the return side of the HVAC system unless the system
is designed to operate intermittently and automatically based on a timer and to restrict outdoor air intake
when not in use (e.g., motorized damper).
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1.3 Documentation is attached with ventilation system type, location, design rate, and frequency and duration
of each ventilation cycle.
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1.4 If present, continuously-operating vent. & exhaust fans designed to operate during all occupiable hours.
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1.5 If present, intermittently-operating whole-house ventilation system designed to automatically operate at
least once per day and at least 10% of every 24 hours.
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2. Heating & Cooling System Design 4,B - Parameters used in the design calculations shall reflect home to be built, specifically, outdoor design
temperatures, home orientation, number of bedrooms, conditioned floor area, window area, predominant window performance and insulation levels,
infiltration rate, mechanical ventilation rate, presence of MERV6 or better filter, and indoor temperature setpoints = 70F for heating; 75F for cooling.
2.1 Heat Loss / Gain Method: ~ Manual J v8 ~ 2009 ASHRAE ~ Other:
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2.2 Duct Desiqn Method: ~ Manual D ~ Other:
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2.3 Equipment Selection Method: ~ Manual S ~ OEM Rec. ~ Other:
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2.4 Outdoor Design Temperatures: 9 Location: 1%: F 99%:
F
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2.5 Orientation of Rated Home (e.q.. North, South):
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2.6 Number of Occupants Served by System: 10
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2.7 Conditioned Floor Area in Rated Home:
Sq. Ft.
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2.8 Window Area in Rated Home:
Sq. Ft.
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2.9 Predominant Window SHGC in Rated Home: 11
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2.10 Infiltration Rate in Rated Home: 12 Summer: Winter:
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2.11 Mechanical Ventilation Rate in Rated Home:
CFM
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2.12 Desiqn Latent Heat Gain:
BTUh
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2.13 Desiqn Sensible Heat Gain:
BTUh
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2.14 Desiqn Total Heat Gain:
BTUh
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2.15 Desiqn Total Heat Loss:
BTUh
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2.16 Desiqn Airflow: 13
CFM
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2.17 Desiqn Duct Static Pressure: 14
In. Water Column
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2.18 Full Load Calculations Report Attached 15
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3. Selected Cooling Equipment, If Cooling Equipment to be Installed
3.1 Condenser Manufacturer & Model:
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3.2 Evaporator / Fan Coil Manufacturer & Model:
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3.3AHRI Reference#: 16
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3.4 Listed Efficiency: EER SEER
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3.5 Meterinq Device Type: ~ TXV ~ Fixed orifice ~ Other:

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3.6 Refriqerant Type: ~ R-410a ~ Other:
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3.7 Fan Speed Type: 17 ~ Fixed ~ Variable (ECM / ICM) ~ Other:
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3.8 Listed Svs. Latent Capacity at Desiqn Cond.: 18
BTUh
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3.9 Listed Svs. Sensible Capacity at Desiqn Cond.: 18
BTUh
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3.10 Listed Svs. Total Capacity at Desiqn Cond.: 18
BTUh
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3.11 If Listed Sys. Latent Capacity (Value 3.8) < Design Latent Heat Gain (Value 2.12),
certified dehumidifier installed
ENERGY STAR
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3.12 Listed Sys. Total Capacity (Value 3.10) is 95-115% of Design Total Heat Gain (Value 2.14) or next
nominal size 8'19
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3.13 AHRI Certificate Attached 16

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4. Selected Heat Pump Equipment, If Heatpump to be Installed
4.1 AHRI Listed Efficiency: HSPF or Ground-Source: COP

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4.2 Performance at 17F: Capacity BTUh Efficiency: COP 20

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4.3 Performance at 47F: Capacity BTUh Efficiency: COP 20

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Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
Page 7 of 16

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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
5. Selected Furnace, If Furnace to be Installed
Builder
Verified 5
Cont.
Verified 6
N/A
5.1 Furnace Manufacturer & Model:
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5.2 Listed Efficiency: AFUE
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5.3 Listed Output Heatinq Capacity: BTUh
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5.4 Listed Output Heat. Cap. (Value 5.3) is 100-140% of Design Total Heat Loss (Value 2.15) or next
nominal size 8,21
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6. Refrigerant Tests - Run system for 15 minutes before testing
Note: If outdoor ambient temperature at the condenser is < 55F or, if known, below the manufacturer-recommended minimum operating temperature for
the cooling cycle, then the system shall include a TXV, and the contractor shall mark "N/A" on the Checklist for Section 6 & 7.22
6.1	Outdoor ambient temperature at condenser: F DB
6.2	Return-side air temperature inside duct near evaporator, durinq coolinq mode: F WB
6.3	Liquid line pressure: psiq
6.4	Liquid line temperature: F DB
6.5	Suction line pressure: psiq
6.6	Suction line temperature: F DB
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7. Refrigerant Calculations
For System with Thermal Expansion Valve (TXV):
7.1 Condenser saturation temperature: F DB (Usinq Value 6.3)

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7.2 Subcoolinq value: F DB (Value 7.1 - Value 6.4)
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7.3 OEM subcoolinq qoal: F DB
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7.4 Subcooling deviation: F DB (Value 7.2 - Value 7.3)
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For System with Fixed Orifice:
7.5 Evaporator saturation temperature: F DB (Usinq Value 6.5)

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7.6 Superheat value: F DB (Value 6.6 - Value 7.5)
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7.7 OEM superheat qoal: F DB (Usinq superheat tables and Values 6.1 & 6.2)
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7.8 Superheat deviation: F DB (Value 7.6 - Value 7.7)
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7.9 Value 7.4 is  3F or Value 7.8 is  5F
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7.10 An OEM test procedure (e.g., as defined for a ground-source heat pump) has been used in place of sub-cooling or
super-heat process and documentation has been attached that defines this procedure
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8. Electrical Measurements - Taken at electrical disconnect while component is in operation
8.1 Evaporator or furnace air handler fan: amperaqe linevoltaqe

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8.2 Condenser unit: amperaqe linevoltaqe
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8.3 Electrical measurements within OEM-specified tolerance of nameplate value
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9. Air Flow Tests
9.1 Air volume at evaporator: CFM

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9.2 Test performed in which mode? ~ Heating ~ Cooling
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9.3 Return duct static pressure: IWC Test Hole Location:23
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9.4 Supply duct static pressure: IWC Test Hole Location:23
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9.5	Test hole locations are well-marked and accessible 23
9.6	Airflow volume at evaporator (Value 9.1), at fan design speed and full operating load,  15% of the airflow required per
system design (Value 2.16) or within range recommended by OEM
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10. Air Balance
10.1 Balancing report prepared and attached indicating the room name and design airflow for each supply and return register. In addition, final
individual room airflows measured and documented through one of the following options:
10.1.1	Measured by contractor using ANSI / ACCA 5 QI-2007 protocol, documented by contractor on the balancing
report, & verified by contractor to be within the greater of  20% or 25 CFM of design airflow 24, OR;
10.1.2	To be measured, documented, and verified by a Rater per Item 1.4.2 of the HVAC System Ql Rater Checklist
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11. System Controls
11.1 Operating and safety controls meet OEM requirements
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12. Drain pan
12.1 Corrosion-resistant drain pan, properly sloped to drainage system, included with each HVAC component that produces
condensate 25
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HVAC Company Name: Credentialinq Orqanization: ACCA / AE / Other
HVAC Contractor Name: HVAC Contractor Siqnature: Date:
Builder Name:5 Builder Siqnature: 5 Date:
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
Page 8 of 16

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ENERGY STAR
Notes:
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist1
1.	This Checklist is designed to align with the requirements of ASHRAE 62.2-2010 and published addenda and ANSI / ACCA's 5 QI-2007
protocol, thereby improving the performance of HVAC equipment in new homes when compared to homes built to minimum code.
However, these features alone cannot prevent all ventilation, indoor air quality, and HVAC problems (e.g., those caused by a lack of
maintenance by occupants). Therefore, this Checklist is not a guarantee of proper ventilation, indoor air quality, or HVAC performance.
This Checklist applies to ventilation systems; to split air conditioners, unitary air conditioners, air-source heat pumps, and water-source (i.e.,
geothermal) heat pumps up to 65,000 Btu / h with forced-air distribution systems (i.e., ducts) and to furnaces up to 225,000 Btu / h with
forced-air distribution systems (i.e., ducts). All other permutations of equipment (e.g., boilers, mini-split / multi-split systems) and
distribution systems are exempt. If the ventilation system is the only applicable system installed in the home, then only Section 1 shall be
completed.
One Checklist shall be completed for each system and provided to the Rater.
2.	Description of HVAC system location or area served (e.g., "whole house", "upper level", "lower level").
3.	Check "Yes" if this system is to handle temporary occupant loads. Such a system may be required to accommodate a significant number of
guests on a regular or sporadic basis and shall be handled by a supplemental cooling system (e.g., a small, single-package unit or split-
coil unit) or by a system that can shift capacity from zone to zone (e.g., a variable volume system).
4.	The person responsible for the heating, cooling, & ventilation design shall be responsible for completing Sections 1 and 2 of this Checklist.
5.	For Sections 1 through 5, the 'Builder Verified' column shall be used to indicate items verified by the builder (or a firm or HERS Rater hired
by the builder). If any Items have been marked 'Builder Verified', then the builder is responsible for these Items and must sign this
Checklist. Note that builders are not permitted to verify any Items in Sections 6-12.
6.	For Sections 1 through 5, the 'Cont. Verified' column shall be used to indicate Items verified by the credentialed contractor (or a firm or
HERS Rater hired by the contractor). In contrast, for Sections 6 through 12, the 'Cont. Verified' column shall only be used to indicate Items
verified by the credentialed contractor (i.e., neither a builder, nor a firm, nor a HERS Rater are permitted to verify Sections 6 - 12). The
credentialed contractor is responsible for these Items and shall sign this Checklist.
7.	For proper procedures, exceptions, and selection methods see ASHRAE 62.2-2010 and published addenda. All components shall be
designed and installed per local codes, manufacturers' installation instructions, engineering documents, and regional ENERGY STAR
program requirements.
The system shall have at least one supply or exhaust fan with associated ducts and controls. Local exhaust fans are allowed to be part of
an exhaust ventilation system. Outdoor air ducts connected to the return side of an air handler are allowed to be part of a supply ventilation
system if manufacturer requirements for return air temperature are met.
8.	Heating and cooling loads shall be calculated, equipment shall be selected, and duct systems shall be sized according to the latest
editions of ACCA Manuals J, S, & D, respectively, 2009 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, or other methodology approved by the
Authority Having Jurisdiction. The HVAC system design shall be completed for the specific configuration (e.g., plan, elevation, option, and
orientation) of the home to be built except as permitted herein.
For each house plan with multiple configurations (e.g., orientations, elevations, options), the loads shall be calculated for each potential
configuration. If the loads across all configurations vary by < 25%, then the largest load shall be permitted to be used for equipment
selection for all configurations, subject to the over-sizing limits of ACCA Manual S. Otherwise, the contractor shall group the load for each
configuration into a set with < 25% variation and equipment selection shall be completed for each set of loads.
For each house plan with multiple configurations, the room-level design airflows shall be calculated for each potential configuration. If the
design airflows for each room vary across all configurations by < 25% or 25 CFM, then the average room-level design airflow shall be
permitted to be used when designing the duct system. Otherwise, the contractor shall group the room-level design airflow for each
configuration into a set with < 25% or 25 CFM variation and the duct design shall be completed for the average airflow of that set.
9.	If the design conditions are dictated by a code or regulation, then the requirements of the lawful or controlling authority supersedes the
Manual J or ASHRAE default design values. Otherwise, the default values shall be used. The values for the geographically closest location
shall be selected or a justification provided for the selected location.
10.	The number of occupants among all HVAC systems in the home must be equal to the number of bedrooms, as defined below, plus one.
Occupants listed for systems that are indicated in the header as a cooling system for temporary occupant loads, as described in Footnote
3, shall be permitted to exceed this limit.
A bedroom is defined by RESNET as a room or space 70 sq. ft. or greater size, with egress window and closet, used or intended to be
used for sleeping. A "den", "library", or "home office" with a closet, egress window, and 70 sq. ft. or greater size or other similar rooms shall
count as a bedroom, but living rooms and foyers shall not.
An egress window, as defined in 2009 IRC section R310, shall refer to any operable window that provides for a means of escape and
access for rescue in the event of an emergency. The egress window definition has been summarized for convenience. The egress window
shall:
have a sill height of not more than 44 inches above the floor; AND
have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 sq. ft.; AND
have a minimum net clear opening height of 24 in.; AND
have a minimum net clear opening width of 20 in.; AND
be operational from the inside of the room without the use of keys, tools or special knowledge.
11.	"Predominant" is defined as the SHGC value used in the greatest amount of window area in the home.
12.	Infiltration rate shall reflect value used in confirmed or projected HERS rating for rated home. Alternatively, use "Average" or "Semi-loose"
values for the cooling season infiltration rates and "Semi-tight" or "Average" values for the heating season infiltration rates, as defined by
ACCA Manual J, Eighth Edition, Version Two.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013	Revised 6/01/2013	Page 9 of 16

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ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist1
13.	Design airflow is the design value(s) for the blower in CFM, as determined by using the manufacturer's expanded performance data to
select equipment, per ACCA Manual S procedures.
14.	Design duct static pressure shall account for the installation of a MERV 6 or higher filter.
15.	The load calculation for the home shall be provided, documenting all design elements and all resulting loads, including but not limited to
the values listed in Items 2.1 through 2.17.
16.	All evaporators and condensing units shall be properly matched as demonstrated by an attached AHRI certificate. If an AHRI certificate is
not available, a copy of OEM-provided catalog data indicating acceptable combination selection and performance data shall be attached.
17.	If the whole-house ventilation system utilizes the HVAC air handler, then the fan speed type shall be ECM / ICM and variable speed, or
include a controller (e.g., smart cycler) that reduces the ventilation run time by accounting for hours when HVAC system is heating or
cooling the home.
18.	Listed system capacity at design conditions is to be obtained from the OEM expanded performance data.
19.	For cooling systems, the next largest nominal piece of equipment may be used that is available to satisfy the latent and sensible
requirements. Single-speed systems generally have OEM nominal size increments of 1/2 ton. Multi-speed or multi-stage equipment may
have OEM nominal size increments of one ton. Therefore, the use of these advanced system types can provide extra flexibility to meet the
equipment sizing requirements.
20.	Items 4.2 and 4.3 are not applicable to ground-source heat pumps.
21.	For warm air heating systems, the output capacity must be between 100% and 140% of calculated system load unless a larger size is
dictated by the cooling equipment selection.
22.	Either factory-installed or field-installed TXV's may be used. For field-installed TXV's, ensure that sensing bulbs are insulated and tightly
clamped to the vapor line with good linear thermal contact at the recommended orientation, usually 4 or 8 o'clock.
23.	Examples of return or supply duct static pressure measurement locations are: plenum, cabinet, trunk duct, as well as front, back, left or
right side. Test hole locations shall be well marked and accessible.
24.	Ducts shall not include coiled or looped ductwork except to the extent needed for acoustical control. Balancing dampers or proper duct
sizing shall be used instead of loops to limit flow to diffusers. When balancing dampers are used, they shall be located at the trunk to limit
noise unless the trunk will not be accessible when the balancing process is conducted. In such cases, Opposable Blade Dampers (OBD)
or dampers located in the duct boot are permitted.
25.	Condensate pan shall be made of corrosion-resistant materials, to include galvanized steel and plastic. Drain pan shall drain condensate
to a conspicuous point of disposal to alert occupants in the event of a stoppage of the primary drainage system; and shall be equipped with
a backflow prevention valve when drained to a shared drainage system, such as a storm water management system.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
Page 10 of 16

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ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
ENERGY STAR
Home Address: Citv: State: Zip Code:
1. Review of HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist2
Must
Correct
Rater
Verified
N/A
1.1 HVAC System Quality Installation Contractor Checklist completed in its entirety and collected for records, along
with documentation on ventilation system (1.3), full load calculations (2.18), and AHRI certificate (3.13).
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1.2 Review the following parameters related to system cooling design, selection, and installation from the HVAC Contractor Checklist
(Contractor Checklist Item # indicated in parenthesis):3
1.2.1 Outdoor design temperatures (2.4) are equal to the 1% and 99% ACCA Manual J design temperatures for
contractor-designated design location 4
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1.2.2 Home orientation (2.5) matches orientation of rated home
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1.2.3 Number of occupants (2.6) equals number of occupants in rated home 5
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1.2.4 Conditioned floor area (2.7) is within 10% of conditioned floor area of rated home
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1.2.5 Window area (2.8) is within 10% of calculated window area of rated home
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1.2.6 Predominant window SHGC (2.9) is within 0.1 of predominant value in rated home 6
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1.2.7 Listed latent cooling capacity (3.8) exceeds design latent heat gain (2.12)
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1.2.8 Listed sensible cooling capacity (3.9) exceeds design sensible heat gain (2.13)
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1.2.9 Listed total cooling capacity (3.10) is 95-115% (or 95-125% for Heat Pumps in Climate Zones 4-8) of design
total heat gain (2.14), or next nominal size 7
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1.2.10 HVAC manufacturer and model numbers on installed equipment, Contractor Checklist (3.1, 3.2, 5.1), and
AHRI certificate or OEM catalog data all match 8
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1.2.11 Using reported liquid line (6.3) or suction line (6.5) pressure, corresponding temperature (as determined
using pressure / temperature chart for refrigerant type) matches reported condenser (7.1) or evaporator
(7.5) saturation temperature ( 3 degrees)9
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1.2.12 Calculated subcooling (7.1 minus 6.4) value is within 3 F of the reported target temperature (7.3) or
calculated superheat (6.6 minus 7.5) value is within 5 F of the reported target temperature (7.7).9
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1.3 Rater-verified supply & return duct static pressure < 110% of contractor values (9.3, 9.4)
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1.4 Contractor-prepared balancing report indicating the room name and design airflow for each supply and return register collected by Rater
for records. In addition, final individual room airflows measured and documented on balancing report through one of the following options:
1.4.1 Measured and documented by contractor (10.1.1), OR;
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1.4.2 Measured by Rater using Section 804.2 of the Mortgage Industry National HERS Standard, documented by
Rater, & verified by Rater to be within the greater of  20% or 25 CFM of design airflow (10.1.2)
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1.5 HVAC contractor holds credentials necessary to complete the HVAC System Ql Contractor Checklist10
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2. Duct Quality Installation - Applies to All Heating, Cooling, Ventilation, Exhaust, and Pressure Balancing Ducts 11
2.1 Connections and routing of ductwork completed without kinks or sharp bends. 12
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2.2 No excessive coiled or looped flexible ductwork. 13
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2.3 Flexible ducts in unconditioned space not installed in cavities smaller than outer duct diameter; in conditioned
space not installed in cavities smaller than inner duct diameter
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2.4 Flexible ducts supported at intervals as recommended by mfr. but at a distance < 5 ft.
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2.5 Building cavities not used as supply or return ducts unless they meet Items 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, and 4.2 of this Checklist.
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2.6 HVAC ducts, cavities used as ducts, and combustion inlets and outlets may pass perpendicularly through exterior
walls but shall not be run within exterior walls unless at least R-6 continuous insulation is provided on exterior side
of the cavity, along with an interior and exterior air barrier where required by the Thermal Enclosure System Rater
Checklist.
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2.7 Quantity & location of supply and return duct terminals match contractor balancing report.11
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2.8 Bedrooms pressure-balanced using any combination of transfer grills, jump ducts, dedicated return ducts, and / or
undercut doors to either: a) provide 1 sq. in. of free area opening per 1 CFM of supply air, as reported on the
contractor-provided balancing report; or b) achieve a Rater-measured pressure differential < 3 Pa with respect to
the main body of the house when all bedroom doors are closed and all air handlers are operating.1114
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3. Duct Insulation - Applies to All Heating, Cooling, Supply Ventilation, and Pressure Balancing Ducts "
3.1 All connections to trunk ducts in unconditioned space are insulated.
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3.2 Prescriptive Path: Supply ducts in unconditioned attic have insulation > R-8.
Performance Path: Supply ducts in unconditioned attic have insulation > R-6.
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3.3 All other supply ducts and all return ducts in unconditioned space have insulation > R-6.
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Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist1
4. Duct Leakage - Applies to All Heating, Cooling, and Balanced Ventilation Ducts
Must
Correct
Rater
Verified
N/A
4.1 Total Rater-measured duct leakage meets one of the following two options: 16
4.1.1 Rough-in: < 4 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of CFA with air handler and all ductwork, building cavities used as
ductwork, & duct boots installed. In addition, aN duct boots sealed to finished surface, Rater-verified at final. 17
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4.1.2 Final: < 8 CFM25 per 100 sa. ft. of CFA with the air handler and all ductwork, buildinq cavities used as
ductwork, duct boots, & register grilles atop the finished surface (e.g., drywall, flooring) installed. 18
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4.2 Rater-measured duct leakage to outdoors < 4 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area.1619
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5. Whole-Building Delivered Ventilation
5.1 Rater-measured ventilation rate is within 100-120% of HVAC contractor design value (2.11).20
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6. Controls
6.1 Air flow is produced when central HVAC fan is energized (set thermostat to "fan").
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6.2 Cool air flow is produced when the cooling cycle is energized (set thermostat to "cool"). 21,22
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6.3 Heated air flow is produced when the heating cycle is energized (set thermostat to "heat").21
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6.4 Continuously-operating ventilation & exhaust fans include readily accessible override controls.
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6.5 Function of ventilation controls is obvious (e.g., bathroom exhaust fan) or, if not, controls have been labeled.
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7. Ventilation Air Inlets & Ventilation Source
7.1 All ventilation air inlets located >10 ft. of stretched-string distance from known contamination sources such as stack,
vent, exhaust hood, or vehicle exhaust. Exception: ventilation air inlets in the wall > 3 ft. from dryer exhausts and
contamination sources exiting through the roof. 23
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7.2 Ventilation air inlets > 2 ft. above grade or roof deck in Climate Zones 1-3 or > 4 ft. above grade or roof deck in
Climate Zones 4-8 and not obstructed by snow, plantings, condensing units or other material at time of inspection.24
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7.3 Ventilation air inlets provided with rodent / insect screen with < 0.5 inch mesh. 25
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7.4 Ventilation air comes directly from outdoors, not from adjacent dwelling units, garages, crawlspaces, or attics.
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8. Local Mechanical Exhaust
In each kitchen and bathroom, a system shall be installed that exhausts directly to the outdoors and meets one of the following Rater-
measured airflow standards:202627
Location
Continuous Rate
Intermittent Rate28
8.1 Kitchen
> 5 ACH,
based on kitchen volume 29,30
> 100 CFM and, if not integrated with range, also > 5 ACH
based on kitchen volume 29,30,31
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8.2 Bathroom
> 20 CFM
> 50 CFM
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8.3 If fans share common exhaust duct, back-draft dampers installed.
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8.4 Common exhaust duct not shared by fans in separate dwellings.32
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8.5 Clothes dryers vented directly to outdoors, except for ventless dryers equipped with a condensate drain.
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9. Ventilation & Exhaust Fan Ratings (Exemptions for Kitchen, HVAC, and Remote-Mounted Fans)
9.1 Intermittent supply and exhaust fans rated at < 3 sones by mfr. when producing no less than the minimum airflow
rate required by Section 8 of this Checklist, unless rated flow > 400 CFM.
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9.2 Continuous supply & exhaust fans rated at < 1 sone by mfr. when producing no less than the minimum airflow
required by Section 8 of this Checklist.
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9.3 Bathroom fans used as part of a whole-house mechanical ventilation system shall be ENERGY STAR certified;
unless rated flow rate > 500 CFM.
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10. Combustion Appliances
10.1 Furnaces, boilers, and water heaters located within the home's pressure boundary are mechanically drafted or
direct-vented. As an exception, naturally drafted equipment is allowed in Climate Zones 1-3. For naturally drafted
furnaces, boilers, and water heaters, the Rater has followed RESNET or BPI combustion safety test procedures
and met the selected standard's limits for depressurization, spillage, draft pressure, and CO concentration in
ambient air, as well as a CO concentration in the flue of < 25 ppm. 34'35'36
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10.2 For fireplaces that are not mechanically drafted or direct-vented to outdoors, total net rated exhaust flow of the two
largest exhaust fans (excluding summer cooling fans) is < 15 CFM per 100 sq. ft. of occupiable space when at full
capacity or the Rater has verified that the pressure differential is < -5 Pa using BPI's or RESNET's worst-case
depressurization test procedure.26'36'37'38
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10.3 If unvented combustion appliances other than cooking ranges or ovens are located inside the home's pressure
boundary, the Rater has operated the appliance for at least 10 minutes and verified that the ambient CO level
does not exceed 35 ppm.
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11. Filtration
11.1 At least one MERV 6 or higher filter installed in each ducted mechanical system.40
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11.2 All return air and mechanically supplied outdoor air pass through filter prior to conditioning.
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11.3 Filter located and installed so as to facilitate access and regular service by the owner.41
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11.4 Filter access panel includes gasket or comparable sealing mechanism and fits snugly against the exposed edge of
filter when closed to prevent bypass.42
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Rater Name: Date Checklist Inspected:
Rater Signature: Rater Companv Name:
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist1
Notes:
1.	This Checklist is designed to align with the requirements of ASHRAE 62.2-2010 and published addenda and ANSI / ACCA's 5 QI-2007
protocol, thereby improving the performance of HVAC equipment in new homes when compared to homes built to minimum code.
However, these features alone cannot prevent all ventilation, indoor air quality, and HVAC problems, (e.g., those caused by a lack of
maintenance by occupants). Therefore, this Checklist is not a guarantee of proper ventilation, indoor air quality, or HVAC performance.
2.	The Rater is only responsible for ensuring that the Contractor has completed the Contractor Checklist in its entirety and verifying the
discrete objective parameters referenced in Section 1 of this Checklist, not for assessing the accuracy of the load calculations or field
verifications included or for verifying the accuracy of every input on the Contractor Checklist.
3.	For each house plan with multiple configurations (e.g., orientations, elevations, options), the Rater shall confirm that the parameters listed
in Items 1.2.2 to 1.2.6 are aligned with either: the rated home or with the plans for the configuration used to calculate the loads, as
provided by the contractor.
4.	Item 1.2.1 shall match the 1% and 99% ACCA Manual J design temperatures for the contractor-designated design location. The Rater
shall either confirm that the contractor selected the geographically closest available location or collect from the contractor a justification for
the selected location. The Rater need not evaluate the legitimacy of the justification to certify the home.
5.	The number of occupants among all HVAC systems in the home shall be equal to the number of RESNET-defined bedrooms plus one.
Occupants listed for systems for which the header of the Contractor Checklist indicates that it is designed to handle temporary occupant
loads, as defined in Footnote 3 of the Contractor Checklist, shall be permitted to exceed this limit.
6.	"Predominant" is defined as the SHGC value used in the greatest amount of window area in the home.
7.	For cooling systems, the next largest nominal piece of equipment may be used that is available to satisfy the latent and sensible
requirements. Single-speed systems generally have OEM nominal size increments of 1/2 ton. Multi-speed or multi-stage equipment may
have OEM nominal size increments of one ton. Therefore, the use of these advanced system types can provide extra flexibility to meet the
equipment sizing requirements.
8.	In cases where the condenser unit is installed after the time of inspection by the Rater, the HVAC manufacturer and model numbers on
installed equipment can be documented through the use of photographs provided by the HVAC Contractor after installation is complete.
9.	If contractor has indicated that an OEM test procedure has been used in place of a sub-cooling or super-heat process and documentation
has been attached that defines this procedure, then the box for "N/A" shall be checked for this Item.
10.	If any Item in Sections 6 through 12 of the HVAC System Ql Contractor Checklist is applicable to the home and, therefore, completed by
an HVAC contractor, then the Rater must confirm that the contractor holds the necessary credentials. HVAC contractors must be
credentialed by an EPA-recognized HVAC Quality Installation Training and Oversight Organization (H-QUITO). An explanation of this
credentialing process and links to H-QUITOs, which maintain lists of credentialed contractors, can be found at
www.eneravstar.gov/newhomesHVAC.
11.	Items 2.7 and 2.8 do not apply to ventilation ducts.
12.	Kinks are to be avoided and are caused when ducts are bent across sharp corners such as framing members. Sharp bends are to be
avoided and occur when the radius of the turn in the duct is less than one duct diameter.
13.	Ducts shall not include coiled or looped ductwork except to the extent needed for acoustical control. Balancing dampers or proper duct
sizing shall be used instead of loops to limit flow to diffusers. When balancing dampers are used, they shall be located at the trunk to limit
noise unless the trunk will not be accessible when the balancing process is conducted. In such cases, Opposable Blade Dampers (OBD)
or dampers that are located in the duct boot are permitted.
14.	For HVAC system with multi-speed fans, the highest design fan speed shall be used when verifying this requirement.
15.	EPA recommends, but does not require, that all metal ductwork not encompassed by Section 3 (e.g., exhaust ducts, duct boots, ducts in
conditioned space) also be insulated and that insulation be sealed to duct boots to prevent condensation.
16.	Duct leakage shall be determined and documented by a Rater using a RESNET-approved testing protocol. Leakage limits shall be
assessed on a per-system, rather than per-home, basis. For balanced ventilation ducts that are not connected to space heating or cooling
systems, a Rater is permitted to visually verify, in lieu of duct leakage testing, that all seams and connections are sealed with mastic or
metal tape and all duct boots are sealed to floor, wall, or ceiling using caulk, foam, or mastic tape.
17.	Cabinets (e.g., kitchen, bath, multimedia) or ductwork that connect duct boots to toe-kick registers are not required to be in place during
the 'rough-in' test. For homes permitted through 12/31/2013: Homes are permitted to be certified if rough-in leakage is < 6 CFM25 per 100
sq. ft. of CFA with air handler and all ductwork, building cavities used as ductwork, & duct boots installed.
18.	Registers atop carpets are permitted to be removed and the face of the duct boot temporarily sealed during testing. In such cases, the
Rater shall visually verify that the boot has been durably sealed to the subfloor (e.g., using duct mastic or caulk) to prevent leakage during
normal operation.
19.	For homes that have < 1,200 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area, measured duct leakage to outdoors shall be < 5 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of
conditioned floor area. Testing of duct leakage to the outside can be waived if all ducts & air handling equipment are located within the
home's air and thermal barriers AND envelope leakage has been tested to be less than or equal to half of the Prescriptive Path infiltration
limit for the Climate Zone where the home is to be built. Alternatively, testing of duct leakage to the outside can be waived if total duct
leakage is < 4 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area, or < 5 CFM25 per 100 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area for homes that have <
1,200 sq. ft. of conditioned floor area.
20.	The whole-house ventilation air flow and local exhaust air flows shall be measured by the Rater using a flow hood, flow grid, anemometer
(in accordance with AABC, NEBB or ASHRAE procedures), or substantially equivalent method.
21.	In cases where the condenser unit is installed after the time of inspection by the Rater, the Rater is exempt from verifying Item 6.2 when
the condenser is for an AC unit and also Item 6.3 when the condenser is for a heatpump unit.
22.	To prevent potential equipment damage, the Rater shall not conduct this test if the outdoor temperature is < 55F or, if known, below the
manufacturer-recommended minimum operating temperature for the cooling cycle. When this occurs, the Rater shall mark 'N/A' on the
Checklist for this Item.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013	Revised 6/01/2013	Page 13 of 16

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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist1
23.	The outlet and inlet of balanced ventilation systems shall meet these spacing requirements unless manufacturer instructions indicate that a
smaller distance may be used. However, if this occurs the manufacturer's instructions shall be collected for documentation purposes.
24.	EPA will permit the use of reduced ventilation air inlet heights in North Carolina. The minimum required height in North Carolina for Climate
Zone 4 will be reduced from 4 feet to 2 feet and in Climate Zone 5 from 4 feet to 2.5 feet based on historical snowfall data for this state.
Note that EPA is evaluating the potential to reduce inlet heights in other regions based upon historical snowfall data.
25.	Without proper maintenance, ventilation air inlet screens often become filled with debris. Therefore, EPA recommends, but does not
require, that these ventilation air inlets be located so as to facilitate access and regular service by the owner.
26.	Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010, an exhaust system is one or more fans that remove air from the building, causing outdoor air to enter by
ventilation inlets or normal leakage paths through the building envelope (e.g., bath exhaust fans, range hoods, clothes dryers).
27.	Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010, a bathroom is any room containing a bathtub, shower, spa, or similar source of moisture.
28.	An intermittent mechanical exhaust system, where provided, shall be designed to operate as needed by the occupant. Control devices
shall not impede occupant control in intermittent systems.
29.	Kitchen volume shall be determined by drawing the smallest possible rectangle on the floor plan that encompasses all cabinets, pantries,
islands, and peninsulas and multiplying by the average ceiling height for this area. Cabinet volume shall be included in the kitchen volume
calculation.
30.	For homes permitted through 01/01/2014: Homes are permitted to be certified without enforcement of this Item to provide partners with
additional time to integrate this feature into their homes.
For homes permitted on or after 01/01/2014: Homes shall meet this Item. Alternatively, the prescriptive duct sizing requirements in Table
5.3 of ASHRAE 62.2-2010 are permitted to be used for kitchen exhaust fans based upon the rated airflow of the fan at 0.25 IWC. If the
rated airflow is unknown, > 6 in. smooth duct shall be used, with a rectangular to round duct transition as needed. Guidance to assist
partners with these alternatives is available at www.enerqvstar.gov/newhomesresources. As an alternative to Item 8.1, homes that are
PHIUS+ certified are permitted to use a continuous kitchen exhaust rate of 25 CFM per 2009 IRC Table M 1507.3.
31.	All intermittent kitchen exhaust fans must be capable of exhausting at least 100 CFM. In addition, if the fan is not part of a vented range
hood or appliance-range hood combination (i.e., if the fan is not integrated with the range), then it must also be capable of exhausting > 5
ACH, based on the kitchen volume.
32.	Exhaust outlets from more than one dwelling unit may be served by a single exhaust fan if the fan runs continuously or if each outlet has a
back-draft damper to prevent cross-contamination when the fan is not running.
33.	Fans exempted from this requirement include kitchen exhaust fans, HVAC air handler fans, and remote-mounted fans. To be considered
for this exemption, a remote-mounted fan must be mounted outside the habitable spaces, bathrooms, toilets, and hallways and there shall
be > 4 ft. ductwork between the fan and intake grill. Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010, habitable spaces are intended for continual human
occupancy; such space generally includes areas used for living, sleeping, dining, and cooking but does not generally include bathrooms,
toilets, hallways, storage areas, closets, or utility rooms.
34.	Per the 2009 International Mechanical Code, a direct-vent appliance is one that is constructed and installed so that all air for combustion is
derived from the outdoor atmosphere and all flue gases are discharged to the outside atmosphere; a mechanical draft system is a venting
system designed to remove flue or vent gases by mechanical means consisting of an induced draft portion under non-positive static
pressure or a forced draft portion under positive static pressure; and a natural draft system is a venting system designed to remove flue or
vent gases under nonpositive static vent pressure entirely by natural draft.
35.	The pressure boundary is the primary enclosure boundary separating indoor and outdoor air. For example, a volume that has more
leakage to outside than to conditioned space would be outside the pressure boundary.
36.	Raters shall use either the Building Performance Institute's (BPI's) Combustion Safety Test Procedure for Vented Appliances or RESNET's
Interim Guidelines for Combustion Appliance Testing & Writing Work Scope and be BPI-certified or RESNET-certified to follow the
protocol. If using RESNET's worst-case depressurization protocol to evaluate fireplaces, per Item 10.2, the blower door shall not be set to
exhaust 300 CFM to simulate the fireplace in operation, but the remainder of the protocol shall be followed.
37.	Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 and published addenda, the term "net-exhaust flow" is defined as flow through an exhaust system minus the
compensating outdoor airflow through any supply system that is interlocked to the exhaust system. "Net supply flow" is intended to
represent the inverse. If net exhaust flow exceeds allowable limit, it shall be reduced or compensating outdoor airflow provided.
38.	Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010, occupiable space is any enclosed space inside the pressure boundary and intended for human activities,
including, but not limited to, all habitable spaces, toilets, closets, halls, storage and utility areas, and laundry areas. See Footnote 31 for
definition of "habitable spaces".
39.	The minimum volume of combustion air required for safe operation by the manufacturer and / or code shall be met or exceeded. Also, in
accordance with the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.I / NFPA54, unvented room heaters shall not be installed in bathrooms or
bedrooms.
40.	Per ASHRAE 62.2-2010, ducted mechanical systems are those that supply air to an occupiable space through ductwork exceeding 10 ft. in
length and through a thermal conditioning component, except for evaporative coolers. Systems that do not meet this definition are exempt
from this requirement. Also, mini-split systems typically do not have MERV-rated filters available for use and are, therefore, also exempted
under this version of the guidelines.
41.	HVAC filters located in the attic shall be considered accessible to the owner if drop-down stairs provide access to attic and a permanently
installed walkway has been provided between the attic access location and the filter.
42.	The filter media box (i.e., the component in the HVAC system that houses the filter) may be either site-fabricated by the installer or pre-
fabricated by the manufacturer to meet this requirement. These requirements only apply when the filter is installed in a filter media box
located in the HVAC system, not when the filter is installed flush with the return grill.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Water Management System Builder Checklist
1,2
Home Address: Citv: State: Zip Code:
1. Water-Managed Site and Foundation
Must
Correct
Builder
Verified
Rater
Verified
N/A
1.1 Patio slabs, porch slabs, walks, and driveways sloped > 0.25 in. per ft. away from home to edge of
surface or 10 ft., whichever is less.3
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1.2 Back-fill has been tamped and final grade sloped > 0.5 in. per ft. away from home for > 10 ft. See
Footnote for alternatives. 3
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1.3 Capillary break beneath all slabs (e.g., slab on grade, basement slab) except crawlspace slabs using
either: > 6 mil polyethylene sheeting, lapped 6-12 in., or > 1 in. extruded polystyrene insulation with taped
joints.4'5'6
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1.4 Capillary break at all crawlspace floors using > 6 mil polyethylene sheeting, lapped 6-12 in., & installed using one of the following opt's:4 5 6
1.4.1 Placed beneath a concrete slab; OR,
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1.4.2 Lapped up each wall or pier and fastened with furring strips or equivalent; OR,
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1.4.3 Secured in the ground at the perimeter using stakes.
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1.5 Exterior surface of below-grade walls of basements & unvented crawlspaces finished as follows:
a)	For poured concrete, masonry, & insulated concrete forms, finish with damp-proofing coating.7
b)	For wood framed walls, finish with polyethylene and adhesive or other equivalent waterproofing.
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1.6 Class 1 vapor retarder not installed on interior side of air permeable insulation in ext. below-grade walls. 8
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1.7 Sump pump covers mechanically attached with full gasket seal or equivalent.
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1.8 Drain tile installed at the exterior side of footings of basement and crawlspace walls, with the top of the
drain tile pipe below the bottom of the concrete slab or crawlspace floor. Drain tile surrounded with > 6 in.
of 1/2 to % in. washed or clean gravel and with gravel layer fully wrapped with fabric cloth. Drain tile level
or sloped to discharge to outside grade (daylight) or to a sump pump. 9
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2. Water-Managed Wall Assembly
2.1 Flashing at bottom of exterior walls with weep holes included for masonry veneer and weep screed for
stucco cladding systems, or equivalent drainage system. 10
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2.2 Fully sealed continuous drainage plane behind exterior cladding that laps over flashing in Item 2.1 and
fully sealed at all penetrations. Additional bond-break drainage plane layer provided behind all stucco
and non-structural masonry cladding wall assemblies. 10,11
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2.3 Window and door openings fully flashed. 12
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3. Water-Managed Roof Assembly
3.1 Step and kick-out flashing at all roof-wall intersections, extending > 4" on wall surface above roof deck
and integrated shingle-style with drainage plane above; boot / collar flashing at all roof penetrations. 13
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3.2 For homes that don't have a slab-on-grade foundation and do have expansive or collapsible soils, gutters
& downspouts provided that empty to lateral piping that discharges water on sloping final grade > 5 ft.
from foundation, or to underground catchment system not connected to the foundation drain system that
discharges water > 10 ft. from foundation. See Footnote for alternatives & exemptions. 4 14
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3.3 Self-sealing bituminous membrane or equivalent at all valleys & roof deck penetrations.4
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3.4 In 2009 IECC Climate Zones 5 & higher, self-sealing bituminous membrane or equivalent over sheathing
at eaves from the edge of the roof line to > 2 ft. up roof deck from the interior plane of the exterior wall. 4
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4. Water-Managed Building Materials
4.1 Wall-to-wall carpet not installed within 2.5 ft. of toilets, tubs, and showers.
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4.2 Cement board or equivalent moisture-resistant backing material installed on all walls behind tub and
shower enclosures composed of tile or panel assemblies with caulked joints. Paper-faced backerboard
shall not be used.15
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4.3 In Warm-Humid climates, Class 1 vapor retarders not installed on the interior side of air permeable
insulation in above-grade walls, except at shower and tub walls.8
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4.4 Building materials with visible signs of water damage or mold not installed or allowed to remain. 16
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4.5 Framing members & insulation products having high moisture content not enclosed (e.g., with drywall)17
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Builder Emplovee:
Builder Siqnature: Date:
Builder has completed Builder Checklist In Its entirety, except for Items that are checked In the Rater Verified column (If any)2
Rater Signature: Date:
Notes:
1. The specifications in this Checklist are designed to help improve moisture control in new homes compared with homes built to minimum
code. However, these features alone cannot prevent all moisture problems. For example, leaky pipes or overflowing sinks or baths can
lead to moisture issues and negatively impact the performance of this Checklist's specified features.
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ENERGY STAR
ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07)
Water Management System Builder Checklist12
2.	Upon completion, the builder shall return the Checklist to the Rater for review. Alternatively, at the discretion of the builder and Rater, the
Rater may verify any item on this Checklist. When this occurs, the Rater shall check the box of the verified Items in the Rater Verified
column. The Rater is only responsible for ensuring that the builder has completed the Builder Checklist in its entirety and for verifying the
items that are checked in the Rater Verified column (if any). The Rater is not responsible for assessing the accuracy of the field
verifications for items in this Checklist that are not checked in the Rater Verified column. Instead, it is the builder's exclusive responsibility
to ensure the design and installation comply with the Checklist.
3.	Swales or drains designed to carry water from foundation are permitted to be provided as an alternative to the slope requirements for any
home, and shall be provided for a home where setbacks limit space to less than 10 ft. Also, tamping of back-fill is not required if either:
proper drainage can be achieved using non-settling compact soils, as determined by a certified hydrologist, soil scientist, or engineer; OR,
the builder has scheduled a site visit to provide in-fill and final grading after settling has occurred (e.g., after the first rainy season).
4.	Not required in Dry (B) climates as shown in 2009 IECC Figure 301.1 and Table 301.1.
5.	Not required for raised pier foundations with no walls. To earn the ENERGY STAR, EPA recommends, but does not require, that radon-
resistant features be included in homes built in EPA Radon Zones 1, 2 & 3. For more information, see www.epa.gov/indoorairplus.
6.	For an existing slab (e.g., in a home undergoing a gut rehabilitation), in lieu of a capillary break beneath the slab, a continuous and sealed
Class I or Class II Vapor Retarder (per Footnote 8) is permitted to be installed on top of the entire slab. In such cases, up to 10% of the
slab surface is permitted to be exempted from this requirement (e.g., for sill plates). In addition, for existing slabs in occupiable space, the
Vapor Retarder shall be, or shall be protected by, a durable floor surface. If Class I Vapor Retarders are installed, they shall not be
installed on the interior side of air permeable insulation or materials prone to moisture damage.
7.	Interior surface of existing below-grade wall (e.g., in a home undergoing a gut rehab.) listed in Item 1.5a is permitted to be finished by:
	Installing a continuous and sealed drainage plane, capillary break, Class I Vapor Retarder (per Footnote 8) and air barrier that
terminates into a foundation drainage system as specified in Item 1.8; OR
	If a drain tile is not required as specified in Footnote 9, adhering a capillary break and Class I Vapor Retarder (per Footnote 6) directly
to the wall with the edges taped/sealed to make it continuous.
Note that no alternative compliance option is provided for existing below-grade wood-framed walls in Item 1,5b.
8.	The 2009 IRC defines Class I vapor retarders as a material or assembly with a rating of < 0.1 perm, as defined using the desiccant method
with Procedure A of ASTM E 96. The following materials are typically rated at < 0.1 perm and therefore shall not be used on the interior
side of air permeable insulation in above-grade exterior walls in warm-humid climates or below-grade exterior walls in any climate: rubber
membranes, polyethylene film, glass, aluminum foil, sheet metal, foil-faced insulating sheathings, and foil-faced non-insulating sheathings.
These materials can be used on the interior side of walls if air permeable insulation is not present (e.g., foil-faced rigid foam board adjacent
to a below-grade concrete foundation wall is permitted).
Note that this list is not comprehensive and other materials with a perm rating < 0.1 also shall not be used. Also, if manufacturer
specifications for a specific product indicate a perm rating above 0.1, then the material may be used, even if it is in this list. Also note that
open-cell and closed-cell foam generally have perm ratings above this limit and may be used unless manufacturer specifications indicate a
perm rating <0.1. Several exemptions to these requirements apply:
	Class I vapor retarders, such as ceramic tile, may be used at shower and tub walls;
	Class I vapor retarders, such as mirrors, may be used if mounted with clips or other spacers that allow air to circulate behind them.
9.	Alternatively, either a drain tile that is pre-wrapped with a fabric filter or a Composite Foundation Drainage System (CFDS) that has been
evaluated by ICC-ES per AC 243 are permitted to be used to meet this Item. Note that the CFDS must include a soil strip drain or another
ICC-ES evaluated perimeter drainage system to be eligible for use. In an existing home (e.g, in a home undergoing a gut rehab.) a drain
tile installed only on the interior side of the footings is permitted. Additionally, a drain tile is not required when a certified hydrologist, soil
scientist, or engineer has determined that a crawlspace foundation, or an existing basement foundation (e.g., in a home undergoing a gut
rehab.), is installed in Group I Soils (i.e. well-drained ground or sand-gravel mixture soils), as defined by 2009 IRC Table R405.1.
10.	These Items not required for existing structural masonry walls (e.g., in a home undergoing a gut rehabilitation). Note this exemption does
not extend to existing wall assemblies with masonry veneers.
11.	Any of the following systems may be used: a monolithic weather-resistant barrier (i.e., house wrap) shingled at horizontal joints and sealed
or taped at all joints; weather resistant sheathings (e.g., faced rigid insulation) fully taped at all "butt" joints; lapped shingle-style building
paper or felts; or other water-resistive barrier recognized by ICC-ES or other accredited agency.
12.	Apply pan flashing over the rough sill framing, inclusive of the corners of the sill framing; side flashing that extends over pan flashing; and
top flashing that extends over side flashing or equivalent details for structural masonry walls.
13.	Intersecting wall siding shall terminate 1 in. above the roof or higher, per manufacturer's recommendations. Continuous flashing shall be
installed in place of step flashing for metal and rubber membrane roofs.
14.	The assessment of whether the soil is expansive or collapsible shall be completed by a certified hydrologist, soil scientist, or engineer. As
an alternative, a roof design is permitted to be used that deposits rainwater to a grade-level rock bed with a waterproof liner and a lateral
drain pipe that meets discharge requirements per Item 3.2. As another alternative, a rainwater harvesting system is permitted to be used
that drains overflow to meet discharge requirements per Item 3.2.
15.	In addition to cement board, materials that have been evaluated by ICC-ES per AC 115 may also be used to meet this requirement.
Monolithic tub and shower enclosures (e.g., fiberglass with no seams) are exempt from this backing material requirement unless required
by the manufacturer. Paper-faced backerboard may only be used behind monolithic enclosures or waterproof membranes that have been
evaluated by ICC-ES per AC 115, and then only if it meets ASTM mold-resistant standards ASTM D3273 or ASTM D6329.
16.	If mold is present, effort should be made to remove all visible signs of mold (e.g., by damp wipe with water and detergent). If removal
methods are not effective, then the material shall be replaced. However, stains that remain after damp wipe are acceptable. Lumber with
"sap stain fungi" is exempt from this Item as long as the lumber is structurally intact.
17.	For wet-applied insulation, follow manufacturer's drying recommendations. EPA recommends that lumber moisture content be < 18%.
Effective for homes permitted starting 8/01/2013
Revised 6/01/2013
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