United States
Environmental Protection Agency
FISCAL YEAR 2019
Justification of Appropriation
Estimates for the Committee
on Appropriations
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
February 2018
EPA- 190-R-18-001	www.epa.gov/ocfo

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Environmental Protection Agency
2019 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification
Table of Contents - Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Resource Summary Table	475
Program Projects in LUST	475
Enforcement	477
Civil Enforcement	478
Operations and Administration	480
Acquisition Management	481
Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance	482
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations	484
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST/UST)	486
LUST/UST	487
LUST Cooperative Agreements	489
LUST Prevention	491
Research: Sustainable Communities	492
Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities	493
473

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474

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Environmental Protection Agency
FY 2019 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification
APPROPRIATION: Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
Resource Summary Table

(Dollars in Thousands)




FY 2019 Pres


FY 2018

Budget v.

FY 2017
Annualized
FY 2019
FY 2018

Actuals
CR
Pres Budget
Annualized CR
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks




Budget Authority
$92,143.4
$91,317.0
$47,532.0
-$43,785.0
Total Workyears
48.5
54.1
40.7
-13.4
Bill Language: Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program
For necessary expenses to carry out leaking underground storage tank cleanup activities
authorized by subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, $47,532,000, to remain available until
expended, of which $47,532,000 shall be for carrying out leaking underground storage tank
cleanup activities authorized by section 9003(h) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act: Provided, That
the Administrator is authorized to use appropriations made available under this heading to
implement section 9013 of the Solid Waste Disposal Act to provide financial assistance to federally
recognized Indian tribes for the development and implementation of programs to manage
underground storage tanks.
Program Projects in LUST

(Dollars in Thousands)
Program Project
FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Enforcement




Civil Enforcement
$584.7
$616.0
$589.0
-$27.0
Operations and Administration




Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance
$373.2
$404.0
$420.0
$16.0
Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
$502.2
$793.0
$773.0
-$20.0
Acquisition Management
$144.7
$146.0
$138.0
-$8.0
Subtotal, Operations and Administration
$1,020.1
$1,343.0
$1,331.0
-$12.0
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST /UST)




LUST/UST
$9,554.5
$9,177.0
$6,452.0
-$2,725.0
LUST Cooperative Agreements
$55,320.2
$54,666.0
$38,840.0
-$15,826.0
LUST Prevention
$25,305.9
$25,197.0
$0.0
-$25,197.0
Subtotal, Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
$90,180.6
$89,040.0
$45,292.0
-$43,748.0
475

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Program Project
FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Research: Sustainable Communities




Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities
$358.0
$318.0
$320.0
$2.0
TOTAL LUST
$92,143.4
$91,317.0
$47,532.0
-$43,785.0
*For ease of comparison, Superfund transfer resources for the audit and research functions are shown in the Superfund
account.
476

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Enforcement
All

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Civil Enforcement
Program Area: Enforcement
Goal: Rule of Law and Process
Objective(s): Compliance with the Law

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Environmental Program & Management
$172,309.6
$170,849.0
$140,677.0
-$30,172.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$584.7
$616.0
$589.0
-$27.0
Inland Oil Spill Programs
$2,342.8
$2,397.0
$2,219.0
-$178.0
Total Budget Authority
$175,237.1
$173,862.0
$143,485.0
-$30,377.0
Total Workyears
1.061.0
1.080.4
857.1
-223.3
Program Project Description:
The Civil Enforcement program's goal is to ensure compliance with the nation's environmental
laws to protect human health and the environment. The program collaborates with the United
States Department of Justice, states, local agencies, and tribal governments to ensure consistent
and fair enforcement of environmental laws and regulations. The Civil Enforcement program
develops, litigates, and settles administrative and civil judicial cases against violators of
environmental laws.
To protect our nation's groundwater and drinking water from petroleum releases from
Underground Storage Tanks (UST), the Civil Enforcement program provides guidance, technical
assistance, and training to promote and enforce cleanups at sites with UST systems.1 The
Enforcement and Compliance Assurance program uses its Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
(LUST) resources to oversee cleanups by responsible parties.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 3/Objective 3.1, Compliance with the Law in EPA's
FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. In FY 2019, EPA will work with states and tribes on a case-by-
case basis to prioritize LUST enforcement goals for cleanup. The Agency will continue to provide
guidance, technical assistance, oversight, and training to enforce cleanups at LUST sites by
responsible parties.
Performance Measure Targets:
Work under this program supports performance results in the Civil Enforcement program under
the EPA appropriation.
1 For more information, refer to: www.epa.gov/swerust 1 /cat/index.htm.
478

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FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(+$128.0) This change to fixed and other costs is an increase due to the recalculation of
base workforce costs for existing FTE due to adjustments in salary, essential workforce
support, and benefit costs.
	(-$155.0/ -0.6 FTE) EPA will target funds to highest priority sites.
Statutory Authority:
Pollution Prevention Act; Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act; National
Environmental Policy Act; Atomic Energy Act; Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act;
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.
479

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Operations and Administration
480

-------
Acquisition Management
Program Area: Operations and Administration
Goal: Rule of Law and Process
Objective(s): Improve Efficiency and Effectiveness

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Environmental Program & Management
$31,042.0
$30,803.0
$25,438.0
-$5,365.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$144.7
$146.0
$138.0
-$8.0
Hazardous Substance Superfund
$22,103.1
$21,296.0
$21,296.0
$0.0
Total Budget Authority
$53,289.8
$52,245.0
$46,872.0
-$5,373.0
Total Workyears
277.0
304.5
259.5
-45.0
Program Project Description:
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) resources in the Acquisition Management program
support the Agency's contract activities.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 3/ Objective 3.5, Improve Efficiency and
Effectiveness in EPA's FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. Acquisition Management resources in
LUST support information technology needs and the training and development of EPA's
acquisition workforce.
Performance Measure Targets:
Currently there are no performance measures specific to this program.
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(+$1.0) This change to fixed and other costs is an increase due to an adjustment in essential
workforce support.
	(-$9.0) This program change reflect a minimal reduction in contractual resources from
more effective business practices in the Acquisition Management program.
Statutory Authority:
Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, 84 Stat. 2086, as
amended by Pub. L. 98-80, 97 Stat. 485 (codified at Title 5, App.) (EPA's organic statute).
481

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Central Planning, Budgeting, and Finance
Program Area: Operations and Administration
Goal: Rule of Law and Process
Objective(s): Improve Efficiency and Effectiveness

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Environmental Program & Management
$73,003.2
$71,493.0
$68,635.0
-$2,858.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$373.2
$404.0
$420.0
$16.0
Hazardous Substance Superfund
$22,511.4
$21,345.0
$21,152.0
-$193.0
Total Budget Authority
$95,887.8
$93,242.0
$90,207.0
-$3,035.0
Total Workyears
450.5
493.4
430.6
-62.8
Program Project Description:
EPA's financial management community maintains a strong partnership with the Leaking
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) program. Activities under the Central Planning, Budgeting
and Finance program support the management of integrated planning, budgeting, financial
management, performance and accountability processes, and systems to ensure effective
stewardship of LUST resources. This includes developing, managing, and supporting a
performance management system consistent with the Government Performance and Results
Modernization Act for the Agency that involves: strategic planning and accountability for
environmental, fiscal, and managerial results; providing policy, systems, training, reports, and
oversight essential for the financial operations of EPA; managing the agencywide Working Capital
Fund; providing financial payment and support services for EPA through three finance centers,
specialized fiscal and accounting services for the LUST programs; and managing the Agency's
annual budget process.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 3/Objective 3.5, Improve Efficiency and
Effectiveness in EPA's FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. EPA will continue to ensure sound financial
and budgetary management of the LUST program through the use of routine and ad hoc analysis,
statistical sampling, and other evaluation tools. Building on the work begun in previous years, EPA
will continue to monitor and strengthen internal controls with a focus on sensitive payments and
property. In addition, the Agency is reviewing its financial systems for efficiencies and
effectiveness, identifying gaps, and targeting legacy systems for replacement.
Performance Measure Targets:
Work under this program supports performance results in the Central Planning, Budgeting, and
Finance program under the EPM appropriation.
482

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FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(+$90.0) This change to fixed and other costs is an increase due to the recalculation of base
workforce costs due to adjustments in salary, essential workforce support and benefit costs.
	(-$74.0/ -0.7 FTE) This net program change reduces ad hoc analyses as part of the LUST
financial management efforts.
Statutory Authority:
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, 84 Stat. 2086, as amended by Pub. L. 98-80, 97 Stat. 485
(codified as Title 5, App.) (EPA's organic statute).
483

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Facilities Infrastructure and Operations
Program Area: Operations and Administration
Goal: Rule of Law and Process
Objective(s): Improve Efficiency and Effectiveness

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Environmental Program & Management
$293,997.9
$305,844.0
$300,738.0
-$5,106.0
Science & Technology
$64,642.7
$67,875.0
$68,834.0
$959.0
Building and Facilities
$26,065.5
$27,602.0
$33,377.0
$5,775.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$502.2
$793.0
$773.0
-$20.0
Inland Oil Spill Programs
$376.2
$580.0
$665.0
$85.0
Hazardous Substance Superfund
$69,651.3
$75,985.0
$74,144.0
-$1,841.0
Total Budget Authority
$455,235.8
$478,679.0
$478,531.0
-$148.0
Total Workyears
323.4
356.7
318.0
-38.7
Program Project Description:
EPA's Facilities Infrastructure and Operations program in the Leaking Underground Storage Tank
(LUST) appropriation supports the Agency's rent, transit subsidy, and facilities management
services. Funding is allocated for such services among the major appropriations for the Agency.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 3/Objective 3.5, Improve Efficiency and
Effectiveness in EPA's FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. The Agency will continue to conduct rent
reviews and verify monthly billing statements for its lease agreements with the General Services
Administration and other private landlords. For FY 2019, EPA is requesting a total of $0.60 million
for rent in the LUST appropriation.
Performance Measure Targets:
Currently there are no performance measures specific to this program.
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(-$12.0) This change to fixed and other costs is a decrease due to the recalculation of rent
and transit subsidy.
	(-$8.0) This program change is a decrease to basic operations and maintenance costs.
484

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Statutory Authority:
Federal Property and Administration Services Act; Public Building Act; Robert T. Stafford
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act; Clean Water Act; Clean Air Act; Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National
Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act
(CERFA); Energy Policy Act of 2005; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, 84 Stat. 2086, as
amended by Pub. L. 98-80, 97 Stat. 485 (codified at Title 5, App.) (EPA's organic statute).
485

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Underground Storage Tanks (LUST/UST)
486

-------
LUST / UST
Program Area: Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
Goal: Core Mission
Objective(s): Revitalize Land and Prevent Contamination

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Environmental Program & Management
$10,654.3
$11,218.0
$5,615.0
-$5,603.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$9,554.5
$9,177.0
$6,452.0
-$2,725.0
Total Budget Authority
$20,208.8
$20,395.0
$12,067.0
-$8,328.0
Total Workyears
98.8
108.1
68.8
-39.3
Program Project Description:
The Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) resources in the LUST/Underground Storage
Tank (UST) program ensures that petroleum contamination is properly assessed and cleaned up.
Under this program, EPA issues, monitors, and oversees LUST cleanup cooperative agreements
to states.2 EPA also provides technical assistance and training to states and tribes on how to
conduct cleanups and improve the efficiency of state programs. At the end of FY 2017,
approximately 68,000 LUST sites had not achieved cleanup completion.3
In addition, EPA has direct implementation authority and responsibilities in Indian country. In that
role, EPA oversees cleanups by responsible parties, conducts site assessments, remediates
contaminated water and soil, and provides alternative sources of drinking water when needed.
EPA's funding for Indian country is the primary source of money for these activities. With few
exceptions, tribes do not have independent program resources to pay for assessing and cleaning up
UST releases, and in many cases, there are no responsible parties available to pay for the cleanups
at sites in Indian country.
Cleaning up LUST sites protects people from exposure to contaminants such as benzene, a known
carcinogen, and makes land available for reuse. In 2016, EPA released a study called "Property
Value Study of High-Profile UST Release Sites." The purpose of the study was to determine the
impact of high-profile UST releases on housing prices. The study found that high profile UST
releases decrease nearby property values 3 to 6 percent. Then, once a cleanup is completed, nearby
property values rebound by a similar margin.4 In FY 2017, cleanups were completed at 8,775
LUST sites.
2	States as referenced here also include the District of Columbia and five territories as described in the definition of state in the
Solid Waste Disposal Act.
3	For more information, visit: http://www.epa.gov/ust/ust-perfonnance-measures.
4	Guignet, D., R. Jenkins, M. Ranson, and P. Walsh. Do Housing Values Respond to Underground Storage Tank Releases? Evidence
from High-Profile Cases across the United States. NCEE Working Paper No. 2016-01. March 2016. For more information, visit:
https://vosemite.epa.gov/EE/epa/eed.nsf/WPNumber/2016-017opendocument.
487

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FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 1/Objective 1.3, Revitalize Land and Prevent
Contamination in EPA's FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. In FY 2019, EPA will:
	Work with states and tribes within available resources to implement strategies to reduce
the number of sites that have not reached cleanup completion, and to address new releases
as they continue to be confirmed.
	Provide targeted training to states and tribes, such as remediation process optimization and
rapid site assessment techniques.
	Monitor the soundness of financial mechanisms, in particular insurance and state cleanup
funds that serve as financial assurance for LUST releases. EPA works with states to seek
ways to cover and control remediation costs.
	Provide support in Indian country for site assessments, investigations, and remediation of
high priority sites; enforcement against responsible parties; cleanup of soil and
groundwater; alternate water supplies; cost recovery against UST owners and operators;
oversight of responsible party lead cleanups; and technical expertise and assistance to
Tribal governments.
Performance Measure Targets:

FY 2018
FY 2019
(113) Number of LUST cleanups completed in Indian country that meet risk-based
Target
Target
standards for human exposure and groundwater migration.
16
16
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(+$439.0) This change to fixed and other costs is an increase due to the recalculation of
base workforce costs for existing FTE due to adjustments in salary, essential workforce
support, and benefit costs.
	(-$3,164.0/ -12.1 FTE) This program change reflects a focus on cleaning up the highest
priority LUST sites in Indian country and a reduction in resources that provide subject
matter and technical expertise to states and tribes.
Statutory Authority:
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act,  8001, 9001-9014.
488

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LUST Cooperative Agreements
Program Area: Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
Goal: Core Mission
Objective(s): Revitalize Land and Prevent Contamination

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$55,320.2
$54,666.0
$38,840.0
-$15,826.0
Total Budget Authority
$55,320.2
$54,666.0
$38,840.0
-$15,826.0
Program Project Description:
This funding is used to award cooperative agreements to states5 to implement the Leaking
Underground Storage Tank (LUST) program. The LUST program ensures that petroleum
contamination is properly assessed and cleaned up by providing states with funding to address
releases. LUST funding supports states in managing, overseeing, and enforcing cleanups at LUST
sites. This is achieved by focusing on increasing the efficiency of LUST cleanups nationwide,
leveraging private and state resources, and enabling community redevelopment. Cleaning up
LUST sites protects people from exposure to contaminants, and makes land available for reuse.
EPA's backlog study characterized the national inventory of sites that have not reached cleanup
completion. The study found that almost half of the releases were 15 years old or older, and that
groundwater was contaminated at 75 percent of these sites. Remediating groundwater
contamination is often more technically complex, takes longer, and is more expensive than
remediating soil contamination.6 Remediation costs average between $100,000 and $400,000 per
underground storage tank (UST) release, the cost increasing with the presence of groundwater
contamination. Potential adverse effects from chemicals such as benzene, methyl-tertiary-butyl-
ether (MTBE), alcohols, or lead scavengers in gasoline contribute to the importance of cleaning
up these contaminants and increase the cost of cleaning up these sites.7
In 2016, EPA released a study called "Property Value Study of High-Profile UST Release Sites."
The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of high-profile UST releases on housing
prices. The study found that high profile UST releases decrease nearby property values 3 to 6
percent. Once a cleanup is completed, nearby property values rebound by a similar margin.8
5 States as referenced here also include the District of Columbia and five territories as described in the definition of state in the
Solid Waste Disposal Act.
0 See The National LUST Cleanup Backlog: A Study Of Opportunities, September 2011, http://www.epa.gov/ust/national-lust-
cleanup-backlog-studv-opportunities.
7	See Technologies for Treating MtBE and Other Fuel Oxygenates, May 2004, pages 2-6 and 2-7, https://clu-
in.org/download/remed/542r04009/542r04009.pdf.
8	Guignet, D., R. Jenkins, M. Ranson, and P. Walsh. Do Housing Values Respond to Underground Storage Tank Releases?
Evidence from High-Profile Cases across the United States. NCEE Working Paper No. 2016-01. March 2016.
https://vosemite.epa. go v/EE/eDa/eed.nsf/WPNumber/2016-0 l?opendocument.
489

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FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 1/Objective 1.3, Revitalize Land and Prevent
Contamination in EPA's FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. In FY 2019, EPA will:
	Work with states to implement strategies to reduce the backlog by targeting high priority
sites, considering best practices, and increasing redevelopment efforts. Approximately,
68,000 releases remain that have not reached cleanup completion. In addition, thousands
of new releases are discovered each year.9
	Provide resources to states to perform core cleanup work. Some states also may be able to
pursue other means to maximize the effectiveness or efficiency in protectively completing
cleanups and reducing their backlogs.
	Collaborate with states to develop and implement flexible, state-driven strategies to reduce
the number of remaining LUST sites that have not reached cleanup completion, and
leverage best practices and support management, guidance, and enforcement activities.
The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005 requires that states receiving LUST Cooperative
Agreements funding meet certain release prevention requirements, such as inspecting every
facility at least once every three years. In FY 2019, EPA will factor state compliance with EPAct
requirements into LUST Cleanup Cooperative Agreement decisions.
Performance Measure Targets:

FY 2018
FY 2019
(112) Number of LUST cleanups completed that meet risk-based standards for
Target
Target
human exposure and groundwater migration.
11,200
11,200
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
 (-$15,826.0) This program change reflects a focus on cleaning up the highest priority sites.
Statutory Authority:
Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act,  9003(h)(7).
9 For more information, visit: http://www.epa.gov/ust/ust-perfonnance-measures.
490

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LUST Prevention
Program Area: Underground Storage Tanks (LUST / UST)
Goal: Core Mission
Objective(s): Revitalize Land and Prevent Contamination

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$25,305.9
$25,197.0
$0.0
-$25,197.0
Total Budget Authority
$25,305.9
$25,197.0
$0.0
-$25,197.0
Program Project Description:
The Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Prevention program works to ensure that
groundwater is protected from petroleum and associated chemicals leaking from underground
storage tanks (USTs), while the LUST Cooperative Agreement program provides funding to states
to assess and clean up LUST sites. This program has provided funding to states,10 tribes, and/or
intertribal consortia to inspect, prevent releases, ensure compliance with federal and state laws,
and enforce these laws for the 555,079 federally regulated active USTs. The Energy Policy Act
(EPAct) of 2005 requires EPA or states to inspect every UST once every three years.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Resources have been proposed for elimination for this program in FY 2019. States could elect to
maintain core program work with state resources rather than federal.
Performance Measure Targets:
Currently there are no performance measures specific to this program.
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
 (-$25,197.0) This funding change proposes to eliminate the LUST Prevention grant
program.
Statutory Authority:
Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005; Solid Waste Disposal Act of 1976, as amended by the
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986,  2007(f); Energy Policy Act,  9011.
10 States as referenced here also include the District of Columbia and five territories as described in the definition of state in the
Solid Waste Disposal Act.
491

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Research: Sustainable Communities
492

-------
Research: Sustainable and Healthy Communities
Program Area: Research: Sustainable Communities
Goal: Rule of Law and Process
Objective(s): Prioritize Robust Science

(Dollars in Thousands)

FY 2017
Actuals
FY 2018
Annualized
CR
FY 2019 Pres
Budget
FY 2019 Pres
Budget v.
FY 2018 Annualized
CR
Science & Technology
$142,429.1
$133,415.0
$52,549.0
-$80,866.0
Leaking Underground Storage Tanks
$358.0
$318.0
$320.0
$2.0
Inland Oil Spill Programs
$653.4
$659.0
$516.0
-$143.0
Hazardous Substance Superfund
$12,717.6
$11,385.0
$10,885.0
-$500.0
Total Budget Authority
$156,158.1
$145,777.0
$64,270.0
-$81,507.0
Total Workyears
459.7
476.3
294.1
-182.2
Program Project Description:
EPA's Sustainable and Healthy Communities (SHC) research program under the Leaking
Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) appropriation provides federal, regional and community
decision-makers with tools, methods, and information to prevent and control pollution at LUST
sites. Specifically, this research enables decision-makers to better:
	Assess sites and evaluate the implications of alternative remediation techniques, policies,
and management actions to assess and cleanup leaks at fueling stations;
	Identify the environmental impacts and unintended consequences of existing and new
biofuels available in the marketplace; and
	Protect America's land and groundwater resources and drinking water supplies that could
be impacted by the nation's approximately 600 thousand underground fuel storage tanks.11
Recent accomplishments in this research area include:
	Developing Field Screening Methodology to Assess Petroleum Vapor Intrusion:
SHC has developed field screening methods to assist in the implementation of EPA's
guide for petroleum vapor intrusion. The screening methodology and software tool
provides site managers with an economical and practical approach for addressing
petroleum vapor intrusion in their site cleanup plans.
	Analyzing Three National Databases to Assess Variability in Fuel Composition. In
recent years, varying fuel composition has been associated with vapor and liquid releases
from underground storage tanks and corrosion of tank components. SHC's study
increases EPA's understanding on the fate and transport of contaminants from LUST
sites and their potential impact on groundwater contamination and vapor intrusion.
11 For more information, see: https://www.epa.gov/ust.
493

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 Estimating Site Densities of Private Domestic Wells (PDWs). PDWs are not subject
to the testing requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act and are therefore more
vulnerable to contamination (e.g., susceptible sub-populations). For public health and
planning purposes, it is important to determine the locations of high density PDW use.
The SHC program's research and information on PDWs assists states in triaging their
inspections to address potential vulnerabilities to communities that are reliant on these
drinking water supplies.
FY 2019 Activities and Performance Plan:
Work in this program directly supports Goal 3/Objective 3.3, Prioritize Robust Science in EPA's
FY 2018 - 2022 Strategic Plan. Specifically, this work will aim to characterize sites and
contaminants released from leaking underground storage tanks identified under the LUST trust
fund with an emphasis on assisting the Agency and the states in addressing the backlog of sites for
remediation. This research also will help communities remediate contaminated sites at an
accelerated pace and lower costs while reducing human health and ecological impacts. Resulting
methodologies and tools will help localities and states return properties to productive use, thus
supporting the Agency mission of protecting human health and the environment in the context of
communities. Such work is integral to achieving the Administrator's priority of revitalizing land
and preventing contamination.
EPA's scientists also will continue to work with its Underground Storage Tanks program to
deliver improved characterization and remediation methods for fuels released from leaking
underground storage tanks. Research will address contaminant plume elongation and the
associated risks to communities from the many underground storage tanks at fueling stations
located near residences and residential water supplies. This research will inform tool development
to assist communities, states, and tribes to determine what remediation is needed to protect local
ground water resources and reduce the potential for vapor intrusion into buildings. These tools
will ultimately reduce costs to communities while better protecting future drinking water
resources and preventing vapor intrusion. In FY 2019, EPA scientists plan to produce software
and user's guides for evaluating transport from released gasoline. These models will provide
technical guidance for LUST remediation efforts.
Performance Measure Targets:
Work under this program supports performance results in the Sustainable and Healthy
Communities Program under the S&T appropriation. EPA has a standing subcommittee under
ORD's Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC) for the SHC program to evaluate its performance
and provide feedback to the Agency. The SHC program will meet regularly with both the BOSC
and Science Advisory Board over the next several years to seek their input on topics related to
research program design, science quality, innovation, relevance and impact. This includes
advising EPA on its strategic research direction midway through the 4-year cycle of Strategic
Research Action Plans (StRAPs).
EPA collaborates with the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Department
of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the White House's Office of Science and
Technology Policy to assess research performance. EPA's Office of Research and Development's
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(ORD's) state engagement program is designed to inform states about ORD's research programs
and role within EPA, and to enable ORD to better understand the science needs of state
environmental agencies. Key partners at the state level include the Environmental Council of the
States, with its Environmental Research Institute of the States and the Interstate Technology and
Regulatory Council, as well as state media associations such as the Association of State and
Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials. EPA supports the interagency Science and
Technology in America's Reinvestment, Measuring the Effect of Research on Innovation,
Competitiveness and Science (STAR METRICS) efforts.12
FY 2019 Change from FY 2018 Annualized Continuing Resolution (Dollars in Thousands):
	(+$7.0) This change to fixed and other costs is an increase due to the recalculation of base
workforce costs due to adjustments in salary, essential workforce support, and benefit
costs.
	(-$5.0) This program change decreases research to characterize and remediate
contaminated leaking underground storage tank sites.
Statutory Authority:
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act,  1002, 1006, 8001; Safe Drinking Water Act,
 1442.
12 STAR METRICS: https://www.starmetrics.nih.gov/.
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