vvEPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
Fish and ShelOfish Program
NEWSLETTER
July 2019
EPA 823-N-19-006
In This Issue
Recent Advisory News	1
EPA News	3
Other News					4
Recently Awarded Research	6
Tech and Tools	9
Recent Publications	10
Upcoming Meetings
and Conferences	12
Recent Advisory News

New York State Department of Health
offers New Advice On Consumption of
Fish Caught In Some NY Waters
On March 20, 2019, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) issued new
advice about the consumption of certain fish caught in specific waters, due to elevated
levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury.
"Eating fish can be part of a healthy diet. However, some fish contain chemicals at levels
that maybe harmful to health. Our advice is intended to help people make informed
choices about eating the fish they catch, while reducing the potential for exposure," said
New York State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker.
This newsletter provides information
only. This newsletter does not
impose legally binding requirements
on the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (USEPA), states, tribes, other
regulatoiy authorities, or the
regulated community. The Office of
Science and Technology, Office of
Water, U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency has approved this newsletter
for publication. Mention of trade
names, products, or sen/ices does
not convey and should not be
interpreted as conveying official
USEPA approval, endorsement, or
recommendation for use.
https://www.epa.gov/fish-tech
The Department issues advice about eating sportfish (caught fish) because some fish
contain chemicals at levels that that could adversely affect health. Although the advisories
are not regulations, they do help people choose which fish to limit or avoid and learn how
to reduce their exposure to contaminants in the fish they eat. The health advice is based
on information from fish collected by the New York State Department of Environmental
Conservation (NYSDEC).
Women in their childbearing years who eat highly contaminated fish and become
pregnant may be at an increased risk of having children who are slower to develop and
learn. Some chemicals may be passed on in mother's milk. Chemicals may also have a
negative effect on the development of young children.
After reviewing the data, NYSDOH can make an advisory less restrictive or can issue new
or additional advice (that would be more restrictive). Based on the most recent data
collected, NYSDOH issued this advice for 2019:
This newsletter provides a monthly summary of news about fish and shellfish

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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
July 2019
Less Restrictive Advice
Waterbody (County)
Fish
Men over 15 & Women
over 50
Women under 50 &
Children under 15
Chemical
Schoharie Reservoir (Delaware, Greene,
Schoharie)
Smallmouth bass <15"
Up to 4 meals/month
Don't eat
Mercury
See httD://www.health.nv.Sov/fish/CAT for full Schoharie Reservoir advisorv.

More Restrictive Advice
Waterbody (County)
Fish
Men over 15 & Women
over 50
Women under 50 &
Children under 15
Chemical
Hoosic River (Rensselaer & Washington)
Carp
Up to 1 meal/month
Don't eat
PCBs
See http://www.health.nv.gov/fish/HV for full Hoosic River advisory.
Mohawk River/Erie Canal, between Lock
E21 at New London and Lock E20 at
Whitesboro (Oneida)
Carp
Up to 1 meal/month
Don't Eat
PCBs
All other fish
Up to 4 meals/month
Don't Eat
PCBs
See http://www.health.nv.eov/fish/LE for full Mohawk River/Erie Canal advisory.
Owasco Lake
(Cayuga)
Smallmouth bass
Walleye
Up to 1 meal/ month
Don't eat
Mercury
Mercury
Rainbow smelt
Rainbow trout < 20"
Yellow perch < 10"
Up to 4 meals/ month
Up to 4 meals/
month
Mercury
Mercury
Mercury
Rainbow trout > 20"
Yellow perch >10"
All other fish
Up to 4 meals/ month
Up to 1 meal/ month
Mercury
Mercury
Mercury
See http://www.health.ny.gov/fish/FL for other advisories in the Finger Lakes Region.
St. Lawrence River, from South Channel
Bridge (including Turtle Creek Cove)
downstream to north end of Raquette
Point (Navigation Light Number 11)
(St. Lawrence & Franklin)
All fish
Don't eat
Don't eat
PCBs
See http://www.health.nv.gov/fish/SL for full St. Lawrence River advisory.
Boundaries for advisory areas in the Mohawk and St. Lawrence rivers have been updated and extended based on
new data. Visit the Leatherstocking/Central and St. Lawrence Valley Regions on the NYSDOH website at
www.health.nv.gov/fish for the updates.
Women beyond their childbearing years and men may face fewer health risks from some chemicals. For that reason,
women over age 50 and men over age 15 are given more leeway to eat more kinds of sportfish and more often.
Advisory information is available at www.health.nv.gov/fish.
Consumers can also order publications about fish consumption online, free of charge.
Source: https://\v\v\v.health.n\ .go\ /press/releases/20io/20io-o,-20 advice on consumption of fish.htm
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EPA News
Update to Chemical Dashboard Adds Wealth of Chemical and
 |ical ' . :	;e
To ensure informed chemical safety decisions about thousands of chemicals, scientists and decision makers need a
constantly evolving set of tools to quickly and efficiently evaluate chemicals of interest. On May 7, 2019, USEPA
released an update to the online Computational Toxicology (CompTox) Chemicals Dashboard.
The CompTox Chemicals Dashboard is a one-stop-shop for chemistry, toxicity, exposure, and bioactivity data that
allows for searches based on chemical identifiers (e.g. names and CAS Registry numbers), product categories that
chemicals are found in, and assay and gene associations with the bioactivity data from EPA's Toxicity Forecaster
(ToxCast) and Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox2i) projects. The CompTox dashboard has been updated with new
data and functionality every six months for the past three years. The latest version, released in March 2019, adds
110,000 chemicals and associated data, bringing the total number of chemicals to 875,000. The dashboard release
also includes several new improvements to the user interface allowing for improved navigation for all data
associated with the chemicals' collection.
Dr. Antony Williams, a USEPA chemist and project lead for the dashboard, says that while the addition of the new
chemicals was a great enhancement to the data, the new version also incorporates bioactivity data from the
latest invitroDb release (V3.1). These data are collected as part of ToxCast's high-throughput screening program.
The latest version of the dashboard adds the ability to view concentration response plots for all ToxCast chemicals
and makes it easier for users to navigate multiple results. It also enhances the batch search mode, which allows
users to search for thousands of chemicals at one time, to include new types of data in the output.
Before the CompTox Chemicals Dashboard was developed three years ago, USEPA had a suite of web applications
(also referred to as dashboards) including the ToxCast or Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program dashboards. Dr.
Williams says that the latest dashboard release incorporates data from these dashboards and the plan is to shut
down all previous dashboards by late summer 2019. The goal is to create one dashboard as a seamless experience
for the user, allowing access to a broad spectrum of chemical and biological information. Consolidating all the data
into one dashboard also helps make sure that USEPA's scientists and programmers are able to focus on adding new
data, functionality, and improved performance that is valuable to USEPA and its stakeholders.
"We are well on the way to delivering a seamless integrated experience for examining and navigating both chemical
and biological data of interest to environmental researchers. With this release we can reduce the burden of
maintaining multiple applications and focus on enhancing one application, the underlying infrastructure, and
taking the dashboard to the next level of capability," says Dr. Williams.
Dr. Williams says that he is looking forward to making prototype developments such as structure and substructure
search, and even mass spectrum searching against predicted mass spec fragmentation spectra, available to the
community as resources allow. There will also be new chemicals, their toxicity, and physicochemical property data
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Fish ami Shellfish Program newsletter
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that will be added to the dashboard as it becomes available. Plans include rollout of an application programming
interface and web services so that stakeholders can integrate the dashboard's data into their own applications and
create customized views of the data instead of having to rely on the default interface.
"It is difficult to predict what the dashboard will morph into over the next few years, but it will continue serving its
primary role by delivering USEPA data to the community, bringing that data into a coherent application, and
integrating new data and modules in a way that had not been achieved to date," Dr. Williams says.
For more information, contact Dr. Antony Williams at william.antonv@epa.gov.
Source: https://www.epa.gov/sciencematters/update-chemical-dashboard-adds-wealth-chemical-and-biological-
data-and-improves-user
Other News
FDA Announces That It Won't Object to Certain Qualified Health
Claims for EPA and DMA Omega-3 Consumption and the Risk of
Hypertension and Coronary Heart Disease
On June 19, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it does not intend to object to the
use of certain qualified health claims stating that consuming eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic
(DHA) omega-3 fatty acids in food or dietary supplements may reduce the risk of hypertension and coronary heart
disease.
Specifically, FDA responded to a health claim petition submitted by The Global Organization for EPA and DHA
Omega-3s in a letter of enforcement discretion. Enforcement discretion means that FDA does not intend to object
to the claim if it is used consistent with the factors described in the letter of enforcement discretion. FDA
determined that the overall evidence did not meet the "significant scientific agreement" standard required for an
authorized health claim but did meet the "credible evidence" standard for a qualified health claim in the labeling of
conventional foods and dietary supplements.
The Agency found that while there is some credible evidence suggesting that combined intake of EPA and DHA
from conventional foods and dietary supplements may reduce the risk of hypertension by lowering blood pressure,
this evidence is inconclusive and highly inconsistent. EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids are found primarily in
some fatty fish, fish oils and dietary supplements.
FDA thoroughly reviewed the 717 publications cited by the petitioner. It also considered other written data and
information, including studies published after the petition was submitted and studies cited in public comments
about the petition. FDA posted the petition for comment and received 22 comments in response to the petition.
Under FDA's health claim regulations, foods and dietary supplements that bear a health claim must meet
requirements regarding levels of certain nutrients. These requirements and the enforcement discretion factors FDA
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Fish ami Shellfish Program newsletter
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intends to consider for the use of this qualified health claim are described in detail in the letter of enforcement
discretion issued to the petitioner. One of these enforcement discretion factors is that dietary supplements and
conventional foods labeled with the qualified health claim contain at least 0.8 grams EPA and DHA (combined
total) per serving. To prevent consumer deception about the strength of the science underlying the new claim, the
qualified health claim must be accompanied by a disclaimer or other qualifying language that accurately describes
the level of scientific evidence supporting the claim. FDA intends to exercise enforcement discretion for the
following qualified health claims regarding EPA and DHA when the claims are used in the labeling of conventional
foods and dietary supplements consistent with the letter of enforcement discretion:
1.	Consuming EPA and DHA combined may help lower blood pressure in the general population and reduce
the risk of hypertension. However, FDA has concluded that the evidence is inconsistent and
inconclusive. One serving of [name of the food or dietary supplement] provides [ ] gram(s) of EPA and
DHA.
2.	Consuming EPA and DHA combined may reduce blood pressure and reduce the risk of hypertension, a
risk factor for CHD (coronary heart disease). However, FDA has concluded that the evidence is inconsistent
and inconclusive. One serving of [name of the food or dietary supplement] provides [ ] gram(s) of EPA and
DHA.
3.a.	Consuming EPA and DHA combined may reduce the risk of CHD (coronary heart disease) by lowering
blood pressure. However, FDA has concluded that the evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive. One
serving of [name of the food or dietary supplement] provides [ ] gram(s) of EPA and DHA.
3-b. Consuming EPA and DHA combined may reduce the risk of CHD (coronary heart disease) by reducing
the risk of hypertension. However, FDA has concluded that the evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive.
One serving of [name of the food or dietary supplement] provides [ ] gram(s) of EPA and DHA.
4.	Research shows that consuming EPA and DHA combined may be beneficial for moderating blood
pressure, a risk factor for CHD (coronary heart disease). However, FDA has concluded that the evidence is
inconsistent and inconclusive. One serving of [name of the food or dietary supplement] provides [ ]
gram(s) of EPA and DHA.
In addition to the qualified health claims announced in the letter, since 2004 FDA has exercised enforcement
discretion for the qualified health claim "Supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA
and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease" under certain circumstances.
For More Information
	FDA Response to Petition for Qualified Health Claim that EPA and DHA Omeua-'^ Consumption Mav
Reduce Risk of Hypertension
	Qualified Health Claims
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Fish ami Shellfish Program newsletter
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For more information, contact Douglas Balentine, PhD., at douglas.balRntinR@fda.hhs.gov.
Source:
http://s2027422842.t.en2g;.com/e/es?s=2027422842&e=22628i&elqTrackId=^76c7bc788o24cdc;a7^dQc;c;f2e^dcb
dc&elq=27d4662oacao4di6b6c;c868cfo46Qd2i&elqaid=84^Q&elqat=i
CEC Continues to Develop Outreach Campaign for Subsistence Fish
Consumers
In FRbruary 2019, thR DukR UnivRrsity SupRrfund CfintRr's Community EngagRmRnt CorR (CEC) hRld a mRRting
related to a projRCt with the goal to assist subsistRncc fish consumers decrease contaminant exposures in fish. The
CEC is working with community-based organizations to implement a subsistence fisher survey. As a result of the
survey, an educational/outreach campaign was developed that intended to change people's actions so that
contaminant exposure from fish is reduced.
Source: https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/superfund/outreach-fish-campaign-progress/
Recently Awarded Research
USEPA Awards Five Pacific Northwest Tribes Neatly $500k for Water
Quality and Habitat Restoration
On February 5, 2019, USEPA awarded five Northwest tribes a total of $498,601 to boost programs that restore
habitat and protect tribal water quality across three Northwest states. Grant funds have been awarded to the
Nooksack Indian Tribe, Quinault Indian Nation, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Confederated
Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Nez Perce Tribe, through USEPA's CWA Nonpoint Source program.
Congress enacted Section 319 of the CWA in 1987, establishing a national program to control nonpoint sources of
water pollution. Through Section 319, USEPA provides states, territories, and tribes with guidance and grant
funding to implement their nonpoint source programs and to support local watershed projects to improve water
quality. Collectively this work has restored over 6,000 miles of streams and over 164,000 acres of lakes since 2006.
Hundreds of additional projects are underway across the country.
The following are specific project profiles from this round of funding:
Nooksack Indian Tribe - Project Title: Riparian Restoration along Black Slough Tributary to South
Fork Nooksack River to Address Water Temperature and Salmon Habitat Impairments.
(Contact: Oliver Grah, 360-592-5140 Ext. 3139) ($99,997)
Both the North/Middle Fork and South Fork Nooksack River early Chinook populations are considered essential for
Puget Sound Chinook salmon recovery, but current abundances of Nooksack natural-origin spawners are critically
low. While hatchery programs are in place to ensure persistence of both populations, recovery will require
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Fish ami Shellfish Program newsletter
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substantial improvement in habitat conditions. The South Fork Nooksack River (SFNR) watershed is the highest
salmon habitat restoration priority to recover the South Fork Nooksack early Chinook population. This project will
address high temperatures and low river flows that substantially limit the South Fork Nooksack early Chinook
population. Specifically, the Nooksack Tribe will:
1)	Refine riparian protection and restoration actions.
2)	Restore 10 acres of riparian buffer along Tinling Creek, a tributary to Black Slough and the SFNR.
3)	Restore 30 acres of riparian wetland associated with Tinling Creek and Black Slough.
4)	Monitor and maintain treated areas for two years.
5)	Conduct water quality monitoring above, within, and below the treated areas.
6)	Analyze data and prepare reports that discuss the effectiveness of protection and restoration actions.
Quinault Indian Nation - Project Title: Invasive plant species removal and native replanting in
riparian areas to improve water quality in the Lower Quinault River. (Contact: Greg Eide, 360-276-
8215) ($100,000)
Invasive knotweed upsets native ecosystem functions that native salmonid species depend on by excluding native
vegetation, influencing sediment transport, and impacting the food web by reducing the abundance and diversity of
insects. Native trees and shrubs that would usually grow tall and provide shade and habitat structure are prevented
from growing in areas infested with knotweed. Thousands of acres of knotweed infestations occur in the Queets-
Clearwater rivers, Quinault River, Moclips River, and Raft River basins. With this funding, the Quinault Indian
Nation will:
1)	Revisit and spot-treat remnant knotweed infestations along two river miles of the lower Quinault River.
2)	Conduct initial treatment of invasive knotweed along an additional two river miles on the lower Quinault
River.
3)	Establish native plant communities on river miles where patches treated over the past few years have left
open ground.
4)	Finalize and implement the Stewardship Plan for the Quinault Indian Reservation.
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation - Project Title: Stream crossing and road
improvements in Little Jim Creek Watershed. (Contact: Douglas Marconi, 509-634-2417) ($100,000)
The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) will implement nonpoint source water pollution best
management practices (BMPs) to improve water quality in the Little Jim Creek watershed with two new stream
crossing and critical road improvements. The project work will improve water quality by reducing sediment from
roads to streams and will improve in-stream channel hydraulics on this tributary to the Columbia River,
complementing other restoration efforts by CTCR in the watershed.

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Fish ami Shellfish Program newsletter
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Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation - Project Title: Meacham Creek Floodplain
and Riparian Restoration Project. (Contact: Rick Christian, 541-429-7283) ($98,604)
Meacham Creek was constrained years ago by the construction of an adjacent railway that included extensive levees
(to force the stream away from the tracks), channel relocation, channelization, vegetation alteration, and harvesting
of wood for fuel to power trains. Primary use of the USEPA funds will be to excavate the side channel and main
channels to reconnect the main channel to the floodplain, as well as providing erosion control best management
practices through levee removal and channel reconnection/creation.
Nez Perce Tribe - Project Title: Water quality improvement project in the headwaters of the Lower
Lapwai Creek watershed. (Contact: Ken Clark, 208-843-7368) ($100,000)
The Lapwai Creek watershed is part of the lower Clearwater River drainage. The watershed is approximately
175,000 acres and is located in both Nez Perce and Lewis counties. This project will:
1)	Create approximately 14-acres of new riparian habitat along a heavily degraded stream reach.
2)	Construct beaver dam analogues throughout the project area to promote reconnection of floodplain
surfaces and increase habitat heterogeneity and quality.
3)	Replace one dilapidated culvert.
4)	Collect data to determine the effectiveness of implemented BMPs.
5)	Present and disseminate program information at local gatherings and venues with the goals of highlighting
tribal programs, educating local community members, and promoting collaboration.
For more about USEPA's Tribal 319 program visit https://www.epa.gov/nps/tribal-^io-grant-program or contact
Mark Maclntyre at 206-553-7302 or macintvre.mark@epa.gov.
Source: https://www.epa.gov/newsreleases/epa-awards-five-pacific-northwest-tribes-nearlv-g;ook-water-qualitv-
and-habitat
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Tech and Tools
South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
Fish Advisory Map
Whether fishing to enjoy the outdoors, to
spend time with family, or to catch dinner,
always be safe about eating fish. The South
Carolina Fish Consumption Advisories provide
guidance on where fish consumption should be
limited and where it is safe to eat fish without
any restrictions through its interactive fish
advisory map.
Fish Advisory Map
Users can roll the mouse over a burgundy or
green area to identify the waterbody name. By
clicking on a waterbody, they can view the
current adv isory.
For more information:
	Download a more detailed map (pdf)
	Fish Consumption Advisory Table (pdf)
Index of All Waterbodies Where Fish Tissue is Tested in South Carolina
Below is an index of waterbodies in South Carolina where fish tissue has been tested. Not all have fish advisories.
Index of all Waterbodies Where Fish Tissue is Tested in South Carolina
Asheooo River
Cooper River
Lake Cherokee
Lake iVIurrav
Lower Wando
Salkehatchie
River
River




Ashlev River
Coosawhatchie River
Lake Conestee
Lake Oliohant
Lumber River
Saluda River
Ashlev River
(downstream of U.S.
Hwv .17)
Cuckolds Creek
Lake Coolev
Lake P rest wood
Lvnches River
Samoit River
Back River Reservoir
Dargan's Pond
Lake Cunningham
Lake Rabon
Marine Waters
Santee Coooer
Lakes





Black Creek
Diversion Canal (Santee
Cooper Lakesi
Lake Edgar Brown
Lake Russell
Middle Tvger River
Santee River
Black Mingo Creek
Durham Creek
Lake George Warren
Lake Secession
Mountain Lake 1
Savannah River
Black River
Edisto River
Lake Greenwood
Lake Thickettv
Mountain Lake 2
Sesauicentennial
State Park





Broad River
Edisto River
Lake H.B. Robinson
Lake Tugaloo
Muddv Bav
South Fork
(downstream of U.S.
Edisto River

Hwv. 17)




Broadwav Lake
Estuarine Waters
Lake Hartweli
Lake Wallace
New River
South Santee
River






Cape Romain
Fishing Creek Reservoir
Lake J. Strom Thurmond
Lake Wateree
North Fork Edisto
Star Fort Pond
(Clarks Hill Lake)
River




9
/\/ Mercury Advisory (clickable)
/\/ PCB Advisory (clickable)
Mercury/PCB Advisory (clickable)
/sy No Advisory
A/ Coastal Zone Critical Line
Estuarine I Marine Waters Advisory
County Lines
Screenshot of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
(SCDHEC) Fish Advisory Map. (Photo courtesy of SCDHEC)

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Catawba River
Four Hole SwamD
Lake J.A. Robinson
Lake Wvlie
North Santee River
Sunrise Lake
(Greenville Countvl





Cedar Creek
Reservoir
Goose Creek Reservoir
Lake Joccassee
Lake Yonah
North TvSer River
Waccamaw
River
Charleston Harbor
Great Pee Dee River
Lake John D. Long
Lancaster
Parr Reservoir
Wadboo Creek
Reservoir





Chessev Creek
Horseshoe Creek
Lake Keowee
Langlev Pond
Pennv Creek
Wadmacon
Creek
Clarks Creek


Little Pee Dee

Wambaw Creek



River


Combahee River
Lake Ashwood
Lake Monticello
Little River
Port Roval Sound
Wateree River

Combahee River
(downstream of U.S.
Hwv. 171
Lake Blalock
Lake Monticello Sub-
ImDoundment
Little
Salkehatchie
River
Rediversion Canal
Winvah Bav
Congaree River
Lake Bowen
Lake Moultrie
Louthers Lake
Russ Creek

For more information, contact Chad Altman at 803-898-4035 or Altmankc@dhec.sc.gov.
Source: https://www.dhec.sc.gov/food-safetv/food-monitoring-advisories/fish-consumption-advisories
Recent Publications
Journal Articles
~	Rounding the comer on residual risk: Implications of REDUCE-fT for omega-3 polyunsaturated fattv acids treatment in secondary prevention of
atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
Baum, S.J. and K.P. Scholz. 2019. Rounding the corner on residual risk: Implications of REDUCE-IT for omega-3 polyunsaturated
fatty acids treatment in secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Clinical Cardiology 1:10.
~	Depuration reduces microplastic content in wild and farmed mussels
Birnstiel, S., A. Soares-Gomes, and B.A.P. da Gama. 2019. Depuration reduces microplastic content in wild and farmed
mussels. Marine Pollution Bulletin 140:241-47.
~	Land use contributions to adverse biological effects in a complex agricultural and urban watershed: A case study of the Maumee River
Cipoletti, N., Z. Jorgenson, J. Banda, S. Hummel, S. Kohno, and H. Schoenfuss. 2019. Land use contributions to adverse biological
effects in a complex agricultural and urban watershed: A case study of the Maumee River. Environmental Toxicology and
Chemistry 38(5):1035-1051.
~	Nitrogen removal potential of shellfish aauaculture harvests in eastern Canada: A comparison of culture methods
Clements, J.C., and L.A. Comeau. 2019. Nitrogen removal potential of shellfish aquaculture harvests in eastern Canada: A
comparison of culture methods. Aquaculture Reports 13:100183.
~	Trace minerals in tilapia fillets: Status in the United States marketplace and selenium supplementation strategy for improving consumer's
health
Farzad, R., D.D. Kuhn, S.A. Smith, S.F. O'Keefe, N.V.C. Ralston, A.P. Neilson, and D.M. Gatlin. 2019. Trace minerals in tilapia fillets:
Status in the United States marketplace and selenium supplementation strategy for improving consumer's health. PLoS ONE
14(6):e0217043.
~	Toxic effects of a methanoliccoal dust extract on fish early life stage
Guerrero-Castilla, A., J. Olivero-Verbel, I.T. Sandoval, and D.A. Jones. 2019. Toxic effects of a methanolic coal dust extract on fish
early life stage. Chemosphere 227:100-108.
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Fish and Shellfish Program newsletter
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~	Urban recreational fisheries: Implications for public health in metro-Phoenix
Lucas, D. and B. Polidoro. 2019. Urban recreational fisheries: Implications for public health in metro-Phoenix. Chemosphere
225:451-459.
~	Legacy habitat contamination as a limiting factor for Chinook salmon recovery in the Willamette Basin. Oregon. USA
Lundin, J.I., J .A. Spromberg, J.C. Jorgensen, J.M. Myers, P.M. Chittaro, R.W. Zabel, L.L. Johnson, R.M. Neely. and N.L. Scholz. 2019.
Legacy habitat contamination as a limiting factor for Chinook salmon recovery in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, USA. PLoS ONE
14(3):e0214399.
~	Biomonitoring of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in a freshwater invertebrate to estimate toxic or effect pressure
Miller, T.H., K. Tiong Ng, S.T. Bury, S.E. Bury, N.R. Bury, LP. Barron. 2019. Biomonitoring of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and illicit
drugs in a freshwater invertebrate to estimate toxic or effect pressure. Environment International 129:595-606.
~	Applicability of a human cell co-culture model to evaluate antioxidant responses triggered bv chemical mixtures in fish and ovster homogenates
Sutherland, G.E., M.E. Franco, S.M. Willing, and R. Lavado. 2019. Applicability of a human cell co-culture model to evaluate
antioxidant responses triggered by chemical mixtures in fish and oyster homogenates. Food and Chemical Toxicology 128:154-
162.
~	Organic carbon content drives methvlmercurv levels in the water column and in estuarine food webs across latitudes in the Northeast United
States
Taylor, V.F., K.L. Buckman, E.A. Seelen, N.M. Mazrui, P.H. Balcom, R.P. Mason, and C.Y. Chen. 2019. Organic carbon content drives
methylmercury levels in the water column and in estuarine food webs across latitudes in the Northeast United States.
Environmental Pollution 246:639-649.
~	Environmental contaminants in fish species from a large dam reservoir and their potential risks to human health
Varol, M. and M.R. Sunbul. 2019. Environmental contaminants in fish species from a large dam reservoir and their potential risks
to human health. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 169:507-515.
~	Bisphenol A and 17a-ethinvlestradiol-induced transgenerational differences in expression of osmoregulatory genes in the gill of medaka
(Orvzias /atioed
Wang, X., D. Hill, D.E. Tillitt, and R.K. Bhandari. 2019. Bisphenol A and 17a-ethinylestradiol-induced transgenerational differences
in expression of osmoregulatory genes in the gill of medaka (Oryzias latipes). Aquatic Toxicology 211:227-234.
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Upcoming Meetings and Conferences
19th International Conference on Diseases of Fish and
Shellfish
September 9-12, 2019
Porto, Portugal
Atlantic International Chapter Meeting
September 22-24, 2019
Prince Edward Island, Canada
2019 Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC)
Biennial Meeting
October 5-10, 2019
San Diego, California
International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Safety
September 13, 2019
Ensenada, Baja California
American Fisheries Society & The Wildlife Society 2019
Joint Annual Conference
September 29 - October 3, 2019
Reno, Nevada
Organization of Fish and Wildlife Information Managers
Annual Conference
October 6-10, 2019
Shepherdstown, West Virginia
Additional Information
This monthly newsletter highlights current information about fish and shellfish.
For more information about specific advisories within the state, territory, or tribe, contact the appropriate
state agency listed on EPA's National Listing of Fish Advisories website at https://fishadvisorvonline.epa.gov/Contacts.aspx.
For more information about this newsletter, contact Sharon Frey (Frev.Sharon@epa.gov. 202-566-1480).
Additional information about advisories and fish and shellfish consumption can be found at https://www.eDa.gov/fish-tech.

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