Ofe) SNAP
SIGNIFICANT NEW ALTERNATIVES POLICY
*1 PRO"*4-
REVISED:	www.epa.gov/ozone/snap
July 20, 2015
FACT SHEET
Final Rule - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Change of Listing
Status for Certain Substitutes under the Significant New
Alternatives Policy Program
Final Rule
What?
•	Changes the status of certain MFCs
now that safer alternatives are
available
Which industrial sectors are included?
•	Aerosols
•	Refrigeration & Air Conditioning
•	Foam Blowing
Who is affected?
•	Chemical producers and some
manufacturers of equipment and
products using aerosol propellants,
refrigerants, and foam blowing
agents
When?
•	Starting in January 2016; see table for
dates for all affected end-uses
EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy
Program
Under section 612 of the Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA reviews
substitutes within a comparative risk framework. More
specifically, section 612 provides that EPA must prohibit the use of
a substitute where EPA has determined that there are other
available substitutes or potentially available substitutes that pose
less overall risk to human health and the environment. Thus, EPA's
Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, which
implements section 612, does not provide a static list of
alternatives but instead evolves the list as the EPA makes
decisions informed by our overaii understanding of the
environmental and human health impacts as well as our current
knowledge about available substitutes. In the more than twenty
years since the initial SNAP rule was promulgated, EPA has
modified the SNAP lists many times, most often by expanding the
list of acceptable substitutes, but in some cases by prohibiting the
use of substitutes previously listed as acceptable.
Global warming potential (GWP) is one of several criteria EPA
considers in the overall evaluation of alternatives under the SNAP
program. During the past two decades, the general science on
climate change and the potential contributions of greenhouse
gases (GHGs) such as MFCs to climate change have become better
understood. MFCs are potent GHGs and although they represent a
small fraction of the current total volume of GHG emissions, their warming impact is very strong. HFC emissions are
projected to increase substantially and at an increasing rate over the next several decades if left unregulated. In the
United States, emissions of HFCs are increasing more quickly than those of any other GHGs, and globally they are
increasing 10-15% annually. At that rate, U.S. emissions are projected to double by 2020 and triple by 2030.
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The President's Climate Action Plan
The President's June 2013 Climate Action Plan (CAP) states that, "to reduce emissions of HFCs, the United States can and
will lead both through international diplomacy as well as domestic actions." Furthermore, the CAP states that EPA will
"use its authority through the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program to encourage private sector investment in
low-emissions technology by identifying and approving climate-friendly chemicals while prohibiting certain uses of the
most harmful chemical alternatives." In our first effort to take a broader look at the SNAP lists, we have focused on
those listed substitutes that have a high GWP relative to other alternatives in specific end-uses. In determining whether
to change the status of these substitutes for particular end-uses, we performed a full comparative risk analysis, based on
our criteria for review, with other available alternatives also listed as acceptable for these end-uses.
Today's Action
Under this final rule, various HFCs and HFC-containing blends that were previously listed as acceptable alternatives
will be listed as unacceptable in various end-uses in the aerosols, foam blowing, and refrigeration and air conditioning
sectors where other alternatives are available or potentially available that pose lower overall risk to human health
and the environment. Consistent with CAA section 612 as we have historically interpreted it under the SNAP program,
EPA is making these modifications based on evaluation of the substitutes addressed in this action using the SNAP
criteria for review and considering the current suite of other available and potentially available substitutes.
This action modifies the listings by sector and end-use, as summarized in the table below. For a more detailed table of
the status changes by sector and end-use, consult the tables in the addendum to this document.
SUMMARY OF SECTORS MODIFIED BY THE FINAL RULE
End-Uses
Final Rule Change of Status Date*
Aerosol Propellants**
HFC-125
January 1, 2016
HFC-134a
July 20, 2016 / January 1, 2018
HFC-227ea and Blends
July 20, 2016
Foams***
Rigid Polyurethane and Polyisocyanurate Laminated Boardstock
January 1, 2017
Flexible Polyurethane
January 1, 2017
Integral Skin Polyurethane
January 1, 2017
Polystyrene Extruded Sheet
January 1, 2017
Phenolic Insulation Board and Bunstock
January 1, 2017
Rigid Polyurethane Slabstock and Other
January 1, 2019
Rigid Polyurethane Appliance Foam
January 1, 2020
Rigid Polyurethane Commercial Refrigeration and Sandwich Panels
January 1, 2020
Polyolefin
January 1, 2020
Polyurethane Marine Flotation Foam
January 1, 2020
Polystyrene Extruded Boardstock and Billet (XPS)
January 1, 2021
Rigid Polyurethane Spray Foam
No status change finalized
Closed Cell Foams
Applicability to imports not finalized
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End-Uses
Final Rule Change of Status Date*
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning - Motor Vehicle Air Conditioning
HCFC & HFC Blends in New Light-Duty Systems
MY 2017
HFC-134a in New Light-Duty Systems
MY 2021****
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning - Retail Food Refrigeration
Supermarket Systems (Retrofitted)
July 20, 2016
Supermarket Systems (New)
January 1, 2017
Remote Condensing Units (Retrofitted)
July 20, 2016
Remote Condensing Units (New)
January 1, 2018
Stand-Alone Retail Food Refrigeration Equipment (Retrofitted)
July 20, 2016
Stand-Alone Retail Food Refrigeration Equipment (New)
January 1, 2019/January 1, 2020
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning -Vending Machines
Vending Machines (Retrofitted)
July 20, 2016
Vending Machines (New)
January 1, 2019
* For more detailed tables of the status changes by sector and end-use, consult the addendum to this document or the Final Rule.
** Certain technical and medical uses remain acceptable.
*** Narrowed use limits apply until January 1, 2022 for military and space uses.
**** Narrowed use limits apply for export to countries without servicing infrastructure through model year (MY) 2025.
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Addendum - Status Changes by Sectors and End-Uses
AEROSOLS - PROPELLANTS
Substitutes
Decision
Uses that Are Acceptable, Subject to Use Conditions
HFC-125
Unacceptable as of
January 1, 2016.
None.
HFC-134a
Unacceptable as of July 20,
2016 except for uses listed
as acceptable, subject to
use conditions.
From July 20, 2016 to January 1, 2018:
•	acceptable, subject to use conditions for the following specific
uses:
•	products for which new formulations require federal
governmental review, and
•	products for smoke detector functionality testing.
As of July 20, 2016:
•	acceptable, subject to use conditions for a number of additional
uses specified in the rule.
HFC-227ea and blends of
HFC-227ea and HFC-134a
Unacceptable as of July 20,
2016 except for uses listed
as acceptable, subject to
use conditions.
As of July 20, 2016:
• acceptable for FDA-approved MDIs for medical purposes.
FOAMS
End-use
Substitutes
Decision*
Rigid Polyurethane and
Polyisocyanurate Laminated
Boardstock
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc and blends thereof
Acceptable subject to narrowed
use limits for military or space- and
aeronautics-related applications*
and unacceptable for all other uses
as of January 1, 2017.
Unacceptable for all uses as of
January 1, 2022.
Flexible Polyurethane
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends thereof
Integral Skin Polyurethane
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends
thereof; Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Polystyrene Extruded Sheet
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends
thereof; Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Phenolic Insulation Board and
Bunstock
HFC-143a, HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and
blends thereof
Rigid Polyurethane Slabstock and
Other
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc and blends thereof;
Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Acceptable subject to narrowed
use limits for military or space- and
aeronautics-related applications*
and unacceptable for all other uses
as of January 1, 2019.
Unacceptable for all uses as of
January 1, 2022.
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End-use
Substitutes
Decision*
Rigid Polyurethane Appliance
Foam
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc and blends thereof;
Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Acceptable subject to narrowed
use limits for military or space- and
aeronautics-related applications*
and unacceptable for all other uses
as of January 1, 2020.
Unacceptable for all uses as of
January 1, 2022.
Rigid Polyurethane Commercial
Refrigeration and Sandwich Panels
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends
thereof; Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Polyolefin
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends
thereof; Formacel Tl, Formacel Z-6
Rigid Polyurethane Marine
Flotation Foam
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc and blends thereof;
Formacel Tl, and Formacel Z-6
Polystyrene Extruded Boardstock
and Billet (XPS)
HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, HFC-365mfc, and blends
thereof; Formacel Tl, Formacel B, and Formacel Z-6
Acceptable subject to narrowed
use limits for military or space- and
aeronautics-related applications*
and unacceptable for all other uses
as of January 1, 2021.
Unacceptable for all uses as of
January 1, 2022.
Rigid Polyurethane Spray Foam
No status change finalized.
Closed Cell Foams
Applicability to imports not finalized.
* Under the narrowed use limit, use is limited to military or space- and aeronautics-related applications where reasonable efforts have been made to
ascertain that other alternatives are not technically feasible due to performance or safety requirements.
MOTOR VEHICLE AIR CONDITIONING - NEW LIGHT-DUTY SYSTEMS
Substitutes
Decision
HFC-134a
•	Unacceptable as of Model Year (MY) 2021, except where allowed
under a narrowed use limit through MY 2025.
•	Acceptable, subject to narrowed use limits, for vehicles exported to
countries with insufficient servicing infrastructure to support other
alternatives, for MY 2021 through MY 2025.
•	Unacceptable for all newly manufactured vehicles as of MY 2026.
R-406A, R-414A (HCFC Blend Xi, GHG-X4), R-414B
(HCFC Blend Omicron), HCFC Blend Delta (Free Zone),
Freeze 12, GHG-X5, HCFC Blend Lambda (GHG-HP), R-
416A (FRIGC FR-12, HCFC Blend Beta), SP34E, R-426A
(RS-24, new formulation)
Unacceptable as of MY 2017.
RETAIL FOOD REFRIGERATION
End-use
Substitutes
Decision
Supermarket Systems (Retrofit)
R-404A, R-407B, R-421B, R-422A, R-422C, R-422D, R-
428A, R-434A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of July 20, 2016
Supermarket Systems (New)
HFC-227ea, R-404A, R-407B, R-421B, R-422A, R-422C,
R-422D, R-428A, R-434A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2017
Remote Condensing Units
(Retrofit)
R-404A, R-407B, R-421B, R-422A, R-422C, R-422D, R-
428A, R-434A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of July 20, 2016
Remote Condensing Units (New)
HFC-227ea, R-404A, R-407B, R-421B, R-422A, R-422C,
R-422D, R-428A, R-434A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2018
Stand-Alone Units (Retrofit)
R-404A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of July 20, 2016
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End-use
Substitutes
Decision
Stand-Alone Medium-Temperature
Units1 with a compressor capacity
below 2,200 Btu/hour and not
containing a flooded evaporator
(New)
FOR12A, FOR12B, HFC-134a, HFC-227ea, KDD6, R-
125/290/134a/600a (55.0/1.0/42.5/1.5), R-404A, R-
407A, R-407B, R-407C, R-407F, R-410A, R-410B, R-
417A, R-421A, R-421B, R-422A, R-422B, R-422C, R-
422D, R-424A, R-426A, R-428A, R-434A, R-437A, R-
438A, R-507A, RS-24 (2002 formulation), RS-44 (2003
formulation), SP34E, THR-03
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2019
Stand-Alone Medium-Temperature
Units with a compressor capacity
equal to or greater than 2,200
Btu/hour and Stand-Alone
Medium-Temperature Units
containing a flooded evaporator
(New)
FOR12A, FOR12B, HFC-134a, HFC-227ea, KDD6, R-
125/290/134a/600a (55.0/1.0/42.5/1.5), R-404A, R-
407A, R-407B, R-407C, R-407F, R-410A, R-410B, R-
417A, R-421A, R-421B, R-422A, R-422B, R-422C, R-
422D, R-424A, R-426A, R-428A, R-434A, R-437A, R-
438A, R-507A, RS-24 (2002 formulation), RS-44 (2003
formulation), SP34E, THR-03.
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2020
Stand-Alone Low-Temperature
Units2 (New)
HFC-227ea, KDD6, R-125/290/134a/600a
(55.0/1.0/42.5/1.5), R-404A, R-407A, R-407B, R-407C,
R-407F, R-410A, R-410B, R-417A, R-421A, R-421B, R-
422A, R-422B, R-422C, R-422D, R-424A, R-428A, R-
434A, R-437A, R-438A, R-507A, RS-44 (2003
formulation)
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2020
VENDING MACHINES
End-use
Substitutes
Decision
Retrofit
R-404A, R-507A
Unacceptable as of July 20, 2016
New
FOR12A, FOR12B, HFC-134a, KDD6, R-
125/290/134a/600a (55.0/1.0/42.5/1.5), R-404A, R-
407C, R-410A, R-410B, R-417A, R-421A, R-422B, R-
422C, R-422D, R-426A, R-437A, R-438A, R-507A, RS-24
(2002 formulation), SP34E
Unacceptable as of January 1, 2019
HYDROCHLOROFLUOROCARBONS (HCFCs)
Sector and End-use
Substitutes
Decision
Aerosols—Propellants
HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b
Unacceptable as of September 18,
2015
Aerosols—Solvents
HCFC-141b and blends thereof
Foams—All End-uses
HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, HCFC-22, and blends thereof
Fire Suppression - Total Flooding
HCFC-22
Sterilants
Blends containing HCFC-22
Adhesives, Coatings, and Inks—All
End-uses
HCFC-141b and blends thereof
1	"Medium-temperature" refers to equipment that maintains food or beverages at temperatures above 32°F (0 °C).
2	"Low-temperature" refers to equipment that maintains food or beverages at temperatures at or below 32°F (0 °C).
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