Renewable Energy
energy team
clean energy, clean environment
Wind Power
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  April 2004
www.epa.gov/ne
Wind Power in
Connecticut
Wind resources can be used with both large wind turbines for Though sitingdecisions regarding individual wind facilities are
utility applications and with small wind turbines for on-site up to state and local officials, DOE has estimated that ap-
generation. As a renewable resource, wind is classified
accordingto wind power classes, which are based
on typical wind speeds. These classes range from
class l(the lowest) to class 7 (the highest). In
general, wind power class 3 or higher can be
useful for generatingwind powerwith large
(utility-scale) turbines, and small turbines
50m (164 ft)
WIND		
POWER	WIND POWER* SPEED
CLASS	W/m2	m/s + mph
o	o 0
LJ_ i	2Q0	5.6--12.5-
M- -f-	 300 	6.4--14.3-
m~A	 400 	7.0-- 15.7 -
_A	 500 	7.5--16.8-
H- 		 600	8.0--17.9-
 A	goo	8.8 - - 19.7 -
_ J	2000	11.9- - 26.6 -
RIDGE CREST ESTIMATES (LOCAL RELIEF > 1000 FT)
* Wind Power Density - watts per square meter
+ meters per second
can be used atany wind speed. Class 4 and above are consid-
ered good resources.
Accordingto analysis conducted by the US Department of
Energy, Connecticut has good wind resources in parts of the
state. The primary areas of good onshore wind energy
resources (class 4 through 7) are the exposed hilltops, ridge
crests, and mountain summits in the northwest part of
the state.
Onshore Potential
An extensive area of New England, including much of
Connecticut, has annual average wind power of class 3
or higher on exposed locations. Most of the hilltops and
mountain tops in Connecticut have class 3 or 4 wind power,
less than that found in the larger mountain ranges in the
northern New England states. This wind power can increase to
class 6 and 7 in the winter.
proximately 6% of Connecticut's land area may be suit-
able for wind power development. Where did these
estimates come from? First, they excluded the
land which has a wind power class of
2 or less-the nonusable resources. Then, they
excluded land with urban development or
land that is environmentally sensitive. Assum-
ingthere may be other land-use conflicts as
well, they subtracted out 50% of forest land,
30% of farmland, and 10% of rangeland, re-
sulting in about 6% of the state of Connecticut
having good winds and being available for
development.
Accordingto these estimates, if all of the wind energy
potential was developed with utility-scale wind turbines, the
power produced each yearcould equal 6,000,000 megawatt-
hours - or 22% of the entire state's electricity consumption.
Coastal and Offshore
Potential
The annual average wind power for exposed Atlantic
coastal and offshore islands of the Northeast is primarily
class 4, 5, and 6. Offshore potential tends to be higher due to
a lack of local roughness features such as vegetation and
buildings which can reduce the wind power potential atsome
land based sites. Class 4 is found immediatelyalongthe coast,
while class 6 exists alongthe outer capes and islands such as
Cape Cod and Nantucket Island. However, semi-enclosed
bodies of water, such as Long Island Sound which covers
coastal Connecticut, have a lower wind resource (class 3).
(see back for current state of wind power in New England)
f/EPA
New England
1 Congress Street
Suite 1100
Boston, MA 02114
EPA Energy Team Contact:
John Moskal
617-918-1826
moskal.john@epa.gov
 continued on back 

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